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FEBRUARY 2020

Disasters

AND YOUR ICE PLANT

What to do when you don’t feel VALUED AT WORK

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SWIA Meets In Galveston


2 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020


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February 2020 Vol. 203 │ No. 2 ISSN #0034-3137

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EDITORIAL STAFF Editor/Publisher Mary Y. Cronley refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Senior Staff Writer Joe Cronley cronley.joe@gmail.com (404) 295-5712 Art Direction Markurious Marketing info@markurious.com (678) 439-6534

ADVERTISING, SUBSCRIPTIONS, ACCOUNTS Mary Y. Cronley Editor/Publisher refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Established as ICE in 1906, Refrigeration Magazine™ is published thirteen times a year, including the Annual Buyer's Guide. Postmaster: Send notice by form 3579 to: Refrigeration Magazine 2930 Cedar Knoll Drive Roswell, GA 30076 Annual Subscriptions: US: $49/year or $79/two years International: $79/year Single Copies: $6/copy

Copyright © 2020 by REFRIGERATION Magazine™. All rights reserved.

FEATURES

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MANAGEMENT What To Do When You Don’t Feel Valued At Work

10 10

CONVENTIONS

14

12 12

Scenes from the 2020 SWIA Annual Convention Mo. Valley/GLIA Upcoming Meeting

On the Cover

DISASTERS

15

Top 10 Tips for Wildfire Claimants Photo from Australia

FEBRUARY 2020

Disasters

AND YOUR ICE PLANT

What to do when you don’t feel VALUED AT WORK

DEPARTMENTS

4 16 16

+

SWIA Meets In Galveston

spICE Panic Never Helped Anyone

AD INDEX A list of our advertisers

CLASSIFIED ADS Classified advertisements by region

Dave Ayres, 42, emergency goaltender and Zamboni driver gets win in NHL debut. “”It was awesome,” Ayres said after the game. “Obviously time of my life out there. I’ve been on this ice many times without fans, put fans in the mix it’s a whole different game obviously, but, hey once in a lifetime, I’ll take it.”

FIND OUT MORE AT refrigeration-magazine.com OR CONNECT WITH US AT facebook.com/refrigeration-magazine REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 3


spICE

O

Panic Never Helped Anyone Occasionally something happens in the world that has nothing to do with anything else, yet it impacts on packaged ice. Bad weather is the simplest one. July 4 on Wednesday is another. Fear has begun to creep into the everyday world about Corona virus. The disease has spread to quite a few countries, still mostly in Asia. A friend whose sister is travelling in Europe is concerned about her exposure. For the record, there are no cases in the country the sister is in. The friend is a young woman with young children and is openly discussing stockpiling food. What a great reaction. Although I hold a healthy skepticism about many governmental authorities, I do have full faith in the Centers for Disease Control. No matter what the world health issue is, CDC seems to be fully on top of it and has solutions. I spent time on the CDC website today, and as you would expect there is a full section on Corona IV virus and what you should do about it. Most of it is common sense – avoid sick people and use good basic hygiene. They suggest you don’t need a medical mask unless you have symptoms. More interesting to me were the numbers of persons infected in the U.S. As of this writing, the total number of persons infected while in the U.S. (as opposed to travelling elsewhere) is … drumroll … 14. There are an additional 39 persons who were infected in China or on the quarantined cruise ship, and are now in the U.S. I presume they are isolated if the CDC knows about them. For comparison, last year there were 45 million cases of common influenza. 38,000 died. Number of people in the U.S. confirmed dead from Corona: 0. It’s a good idea to be aware of the issue and the threat. I recommend only getting your information from credible sources such as CDC or the World Health Organization, a United Nations agency. They each have web pages devoted to the subject. Don’t believe anything you read on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or TikTok. Or anywhere else.

“Now’s the time to make sure that “last mile,” the distance from your back door to the inside of the store, is as carefully and cleanly executed as the product you make.”

I really don’t like to hear people talk about stockpiling food. Panic, whether slow or fast, will not help anyone. Nobody is helped by preparing for an imaginary crisis. I will continue to monitor reliable sources of information to learn whether there is reason for me to be concerned. I will keep myself aware of what is happening in my community. One thing I will not do is panic: stockpile food or bottled water; restrict movement of my children; buy surgical masks. Panic will really mess up your season. People won’t have picnics, cookouts, weekends on the boat, music festivals, any of the things which make your summer great. It’s in your best interest to make sure that your family, your plant staff, drivers and if necessary your customers, know that you are informed of and prepared for any eventuality. It’s in your best interest to be an agent of calm, of reason, instead of letting your or their imagination run wild. The facts don’t support the idea that anyone in the U.S. should be afraid. With spring coming, we will emerge from cold and flu season, hopefully to face a strong summer. I look forward to hearing about it.

Mary Cronley EDITOR/PUBLISHER, REFRIGERATION MAGAZINE

4 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020

Jimmie Lopez of JL Ice LLC, shares his morning coffee with Refrigeration Magazine. Cup, compliments of RouteMan/Keet Consulting.


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the name you’ve come to trust

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REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 5


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MANAGEMENT

What to Do When You Don’t Feel Valued at Work By: Rebecca Knight

It’s no fun to toil away at a job where your efforts go unnoticed. How can you highlight your achievements without bragging about your work? Who should you talk to about feeling underappreciated? And if the situation doesn’t change, how long should you stay? ►WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY “There’s nothing worse than feeling unseen and unheard in the workplace,” says Annie McKee, author of How to Be Happy at Work. “We all have a human need to be appreciated for our efforts, and so when your colleagues don’t notice [your contributions], it makes you feel as though you don’t belong.” You might also start to worry – justifiably – about your potential professional advancement. “Self-doubt starts to creep in, and you think, ‘If no one notices what I’m doing, how am I going to get ahead?’” But you are not powerless to change the situation, says Karen Dillon, author of the HBR Guide to Office Politics. “There are many ways to make sure people understand and see what you do.” The key, she says, is to find “diplomatic ways to toot your own horn.” Here are some ideas. ►BE REALISTIC Before you take any action, ask yourself whether you’re being realistic about the amount of appreciation “you expect from your boss, colleagues, peers, and clients,” says McKee. “People are very busy. The feedback might not be as much as you want,” but it might be reasonable within the context of your

organization. “You are dealing with human beings,” adds Dillon. “Even with good intentions, your colleagues and manager might overlook what you do and take you for granted.” When you’re feeling unappreciated, she recommends running a “personal litmus test” on your recent accomplishments. Ask yourself, “Was my work extraordinary? Was it over and above what my peers typically do?” And importantly, “If I had to ask for credit for it, would I sound like a jerk?” If you’re unsure, seek a second opinion from a “slightly senior colleague” or a peer you “deeply respect.”

in saying, ‘I want more appreciation.’” Instead, McKee recommends saying something along the lines of “I’d like to talk about the past three months and get a sense of where my strengths lie and where I could learn.” Come prepared with specific examples, advises Dillon. She suggests drawing up a list of your recent achievements to jog your manager’s memory of your good work. “Most managers are happy to have that list,” she says. INCREASE YOUR TEAM’S VISIBILITY If you manage a team, you also need to look for ways to explain to others what the group does and why it’s valuable, says Dillon. “In our hectic daily lives, your boss and colleagues might not be aware of ” the ins and outs of your job. She advises asking your manager for a sliver of time to “talk about what your team does, what its goals are, and ways you’re striving to do better.” McKee also suggests more subtle ways

►TALK TO YOUR BOSS If your above-par efforts are going unsung, engage your boss in a conversation, says McKee. Granted, this will be easier with some managers than others. “The MAKE SURE TO SPREAD, NOT HOARD, CREDIT average boss doesn’t pay WHEN IT’S DUE. BUT DON’T BE AFRAID TO attention to human needs,” says TOUT YOUR OWN LEADERSHIP. McKee. If yours falls into that category, keep in mind that “you’re not going to change that person, to draw attention to the group’s daybut you can signal that you’d like to-day efforts. Don’t let presentations more dialogue on your performance,” or reports go out without making she says. “And if your boss is average clear who created them. “Make sure to good, he might heed the call.” Of everyone’s name goes on the work course, you must be subtle. “Don’t go

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 7


product,” she says. You want people beyond your manager to see what your team is delivering. Make sure to spread, not hoard, credit when it’s due. But don’t be afraid to tout your own leadership. “Sometimes, in your efforts to be inclusive and not sound self-aggrandizing, you miss an opportunity,” Dillon explains. Women tend to do this more than men, she notes. It’s okay to “use the word ‘I’ as in ‘I accomplished X and Y, and I am grateful for the support that I had.’” ►RECOGNIZE OTHERS’ CONTRIBUTIONS One surefire to get your own work noticed is, “paradoxically,” to “praise and appreciate others,” says McKee. “By being the person who notices a job well done, you can be the agent of change” in your organization’s culture. Most often the “response from the other person will be to return the favor,” she adds. If your boss is not one to dispense positive feedback, talk to your team about “what you can do to shore each other up,” and generate optimism among the ranks. “Because of the pace of our organizations, what we produce becomes passé or invisible fast,” notes McKee. She recommends creating norms in your team such that when a colleague makes an important contribution or finishes a piece of work, “everyone stops for a nanosecond and says, ‘Yay.’” But don’t get carried away, cautions Dillon. “Sending extensive thankyous can diminish the message,” she says. “Use your judgment. Ask, ‘Who really deserves acknowledgement for going the extra mile?’” ►VALIDATE YOURSELF While being appreciated and valued for your work is a wonderful thing, you can’t expect all your “motivation to come from honors, accolades, and public gratitude,” says Dillon. Intrinsic motivators are much more powerful. “You need to strive to find meaning in the work itself.” McKee concurs. “Ultimately over the course of your working life, you want to move away from the need for external validation,” she says. “Real fulfillment comes from within.” She suggests making an effort to pat yourself on the back regularly. “Try to carve out time at the end of each week to reflect on what went well and what didn’t go as well.” This is a useful exercise for remembering both what you’re good at and why you do what you do. “Be 8 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020

careful not to sink into deficiency mode where you [dwell on] everything you did wrong,” she adds. “Catalog the wins.” ► CONSIDER MOVING ON If you continue to feel undervalued and unappreciated by your company, it might be a sign that it’s not the right place for you. “We all stay in jobs that aren’t perfect for a lot of reasons,” says McKee. Maybe you need the experience, or perhaps you can’t move because you need to be in a certain geographic region for your spouse or partner. But if you’ve tried to make the job more validating and fulfilling, and nothing has worked, it might be time to look for a new one.


PRINCIPLES TO REMEMBER ►DO Seek a second opinion on whether the amount of appreciation you expect from colleagues is realistic. Remember: people are busy. Praise and appreciate others’ contributions. By noticing a job well done, you help create a more positive culture. Look for ways to make your work more visible. ►DON’T Overlook the need for self-validation. Carve out time at the end of each week to reflect on what you did well. Hoard credit for your team’s accomplishments. Highlight everyone’s contributions. Stay in a job or at a company that doesn’t value you longer than you need to. ►CASE STUDY #1 Help shift your organization’s culture by praising others. Sally Srok vividly remembers feeling unappreciated at work. At the time, she was head of the hospitality department at Francis Ford Coppola Winery. Her supervisor had left the company, and Sally and her team were under new senior leadership. In addition, the firm had recently closed its home office and combined locations. “As a result, many people were telecommuting, and the culture started to feel fragmented,” she recalls. Sally liked her boss and regarded him as a “strong, caring” leader. She knew that her feeling unappreciated “was not personal” or targeted. “Rather, it was a reflection of the company going through changes. His role simply required him to prioritize other divisions.”

Still, Sally could feel her morale dipping, so she knew she needed to act. “I reminded myself that I was in a leadership position, and it was my responsibility to be of service to others,” she says. “If I was struggling with feeling unappreciated, surely others were too.” She realized that she could help shift the culture by making a special effort to notice her colleagues’ contributions and publicly thank team members when they went above and beyond expectations. “I talked about gratitude in our morning meetings, and it had an impact within the hospitality teams.” But beyond the hospitality group, nothing had changed. Sally’s colleagues in other departments felt unappreciated and taken for granted. “I realized the dilemma was systemic. I thought: ‘How could we make it easier to thank one another at work?’” Sally spoke with her boss and together they brainstormed ideas. The result was the launch of “Grazie” cards, which employees can give to one another as a way of expressing gratitude. “People were thrilled to give and receive them,” says Sally. “Once I stopped thinking about myself, and putting my efforts into changing the culture, appreciation started to flow.” Today Sally is the principal of Inner Compass Consulting and continues to emphasize the importance of thanking others for jobs well done. ►CASE STUDY #2 Find creative ways to raise your profile by showcasing your (and others’) contributions. Anna Brockway started her career as a junior account executive at a very large ad agency in San Francisco. She loved her job and her main client, Levi Strauss, and she worked incredibly hard. Still, it was difficult to stand out among her peers, and she often felt that her efforts went unnoticed. “I was spending extra hours developing new programs and ideas for [my client], but

the work was getting lost in the sea of projects already in flight,” she recalls. “I was struggling with how to get my work to be more visible so I could be more appreciated.” On reflection, Anna realizes many young women tend to wait for recognition, rather than seeking it. “I think we’re taught implicitly or explicitly to be demure,” she says. “Showcasing your work is like running an internal PR campaign. You don’t want to gloat, but you also don’t want to be invisible.” One day, Anna saw a colleague make a client presentation about a new idea and realized that transparency was the key. “It wasn’t that the client didn’t care,” she explains. “They just didn’t know what I was doing!” Anna developed a simple, 15-minute description of all the work that she’d done to help the company better showcase its newest products on the front aisle of stores. This not only highlighted her efforts but also that of the Levi Strauss’s designers, who had recently added new finishes and fits and “were seeking a way to get their work noticed too.” “I remember the head merchant saying how honored he was” to be included in the presentation and thanked for his own work. Two years later, Levi Strauss brought Anna in house, and she later became the head of its worldwide marketing group. Today she is the co-founder and CMO of Chairish, the online marketplace for vintage decor, furniture, and art. Every Monday at 2pm, she writes a personal, “good, old-fashioned” thank-you note to one of her team members. “I believe people feel most valued by recognition,” she says. “Money, promotions, and more are really nice but personal validation is the most meaningful.” RM REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 9


CONVENTIONS

THE REAL

Cool Pics

Here are scenes from the SWIA 2020 Annual Convention, held January 30th-February 1st at Moody Gardens in Galveston, Tx.

SWIA 2020 Annual Convention

The association was founded in 1891. For more information, contact Stephanie Bulak at sbulak@eami.com. RM

From the

10 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020


January 2020 11


DISASTERS

Top

a total of 36 months, should be granted if you encounter delays beyond your reasonable control.

for Wildfire Claimants

TRACK ALL OF YOUR ADDITIONAL EXPENSES THAT ARISE FROM HAVING TO LIVE IN ANOTHER LOCATION AWAY FROM YOUR HOME. Note: your ALE reimbursement may be offset by your normal cost of living before the fire (i.e., ALE does not pay for your mortgage or expenses you would normally incur) but you are entitled to the same standard of living you had before the fire. ALE will pay for temporary rent, additional mileage, etc.

10

tips

E di

t

's N ote or

In light of the Australian brushfires, we thought we’d cover some general guidance if (Heaven forbid!), something were to happen to your property because of them.

OBTAIN A COMPLETE COPY OF YOUR RESIDENTIAL HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE POLICY, INCLUDING YOUR DECLARATIONS PAGE. The law requires your insurance company to provide this to you free of charge within 30 days of your request. Ask your agent or insurer representative to explain how much coverage you have (1) to rebuild or repair your home, (2) for your personal belongings, and (3) for living expenses. This should include an explanation of Extended Replacement Cost and Building Code Upgrade coverages if applicable. Ask how to most effectively claim your coverage benefits.

1

TAKE NOTE OF YOUR ADDITIONAL LIVING EXPENSE (ALE) LIMITS AND MANAGE YOUR ALE EXPENSES IN RECOGNITION OF A LONG REBUILDING PROCESS. Your time to collect ALE after a declared catastrophe is no less than 24 months even if your policy says otherwise; however your amount of coverage is not increased. An extension of up to 12 additional months, for

2

12 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020

3

DOCUMENT ALL OF YOUR CONVERSATIONS WITH YOUR INSURER/ADJUSTER ABOUT YOUR CLAIM AND POLICY LIMITATIONS IN A DEDICATED “CLAIM DIARY.” If your adjuster says something is excluded, limited, or subject to certain conditions, ask the adjuster to point out the specific provision in your policy being cited.

4

GET AT LEAST ONE LICENSED CONTRACTOR’S ESTIMATE OR BID ON THE COST TO REBUILD YOUR HOME JUST TO GET A REASONABLE SENSE OF THE ACTUAL COST AS COMPARED TO YOUR COVERAGE LIMITS (for more considerations on contractors, view the CDI’s electronic brochure Don’t Get Burned After a Disaster and check the website for California’s Contractors State License Board.) While your insurance company may provide its own estimate, it may contain errors or fail to reflect local conditions or demand surge. Demand surge reflects price increases following a major disaster when contractors and materials are in short supply.

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CALL THE DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE HOTLINE FOR HELP AT (800) 927-4357. You can also file a complaint at: http://www.insurance.ca.gov/01consumers/101-help/. Consider insights from consumer advocates.

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UNDERSTAND YOU CAN PURCHASE OR REBUILD AT ANOTHER LOCATION, AND STILL RECEIVE FULL REPLACEMENT COST BENEFITS INCLUDING BUILDING CODE UPGRADE AND EXTENDED REPLACEMENT COST BENEFITS IF THOSE WERE INCLUDED ON YOUR POLICY AND NECESSARY TO REBUILD THE INSURED DWELLING. You also have the right to rebuild using the contractor of your choosing. In order to reduce the cost of rebuilding, you might also consider a community-wide development approach utilizing a common builder.

7

ASSESS YOUR SITUATION, DO NOT RUSH INTO ANY DECISION ABOUT CONTRACTORS, LAWYERS OR PUBLIC ADJUSTERS - consider your mortgage/ employment/financial situation, your age, children’s schools, your willingness to deal with construction issues (no matter who your contractor is). The insurance process is a series of important decisions over a long period of time, but few, if any, need to be made today. Of course, move forward if you have obtained multiple bids from reputable licensed contractors, are certain you want to rebuild, are sure of the rebuilding costs and your insurance limits and want to be sure you are a priority for your selected contractor to start the rebuild. The Contractors State License Board (CSLB) has publications that can help you identify and avoid problems before they occur. Contact CSLB at 1-800-321-2752 to obtain a free copy of their publications and/or verify the licensing status of a contractor.

8

DO NOT ASSUME YOU HAVE INADEQUATE COVERAGE BASED ON GENERAL INFORMATION YOU ARE HEARING ABOUT BUILDING COSTS OR OTHER GENERAL COMMENTS. The adequacy of your limits needs

9

to be addressed on a case specific basis to determine how much it will cost to rebuild your home and whether your limits, including extended replacement cost coverage if applicable, are adequate. But if you determine you are underinsured, gather relevant documentation and contact the Department of Insurance for help. EVALUATE WHETHER YOU WILL NEED A PUBLIC ADJUSTER OR ATTORNEY TO HELP YOU WITH YOUR CLAIM. If rebuilding will take a long time you are likely to use your entire ALE limits. If you are also reimbursed by your insurer for your entire personal property loss or your full personal property limits, you may not need a public adjuster or attorney to help you obtain full settlements for either of these coverages. Public adjusters typically require a percentage of the claim settlement for their services. Make sure you understand what they charge and the services you are paying for before you sign a public adjuster contract. Some public adjusters may insist on a contract that includes payment to the public adjuster based upon the entire amount paid to the policyholder by the insurer, including amounts paid to the policyholder before the public adjuster contract was signed. A public adjuster should not charge a fee on payments you received from your insurer before the public adjuster contract was signed. A fee should only be charged on additional monies the public adjuster gets for you. Contact the Department if this issue arises in your contract.

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In a declared-disaster, you may cancel the contract within five calendar days. Public adjusters are required to be licensed by the California Department of Insurance. To verify a public adjuster’s license, call us at 1-800-9274357 or check the status online by name or by license number. Practicing without a license is against the law. Public adjusters may not solicit in a declared-disaster area until the fire has been out for seven days. RM Please note: These tips are for general guidance only and are not a substitute for legal advice.

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 13


CONVENTIONS

Mo. Valley/GLIA Upcoming Meeting The 2020 Joint Great Lakes/MO Valley Ice Associations meeting will be held at the French Lick Resort, Casino & Spa in French Lick IN. Room rates are $149.00 per night and $189.00 on Saturday night. The room rate is extended for the three days before and after for those that would like to spend more time exploring the area. RM RESERVE TODAY! click here

ice storage & metering systems The Ultimate Babysitter When you go home for the night, the last thing you want to do is worry about what is going on at the ice plant. Used as a surge bin, the KEITH® Ice Storage & optimizing run time for the ice machine and by storing ice for processing during work hours. Bins are built to last using the best FDA approved food grade materials and are driven by reliable WALKING FLOOR® technology. Low Maintenance • Higher Quality Ice • No Ice Buildup True FIFO Rotation • Horizontal Metering • Vertical Comb Built to Last • Superior by Design ®

KEITH Mfg. Co. 1.800.547.6161

KEITH can handle it. 2016 KEITH Mfg. Co. All Rights Reserved.

14 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020


DISASTERS

A freezer stands relatively uscathed in Australia. Compliments of Scott Carson , Managing Director, Riverina Ice, 2 Mortimer Pl, Wagga Wagga NSW 2650. He also sent this link for bushfire recovery government information if your plant or company is impacted by the Australian brush fires. Thanks to Scott, Garry Wing and Darrell Mount for keeping Refrigeration Magazine in the loop. RM

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 15


CLASSIFIEDS Ad Index

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

American Ice Equipment Exchange, aieexchange.com..................................... 17 Classified Ads....................................................................................................... 16 – 19 Ice Systems & Supplies Inc. (ISSI), issionline.com....................................................... 2 Ing-Tech Corporation (ITC), itcpack.com....................................................... 11 & 16 Keet Consulting Services, LLC (RouteMan), kcsgis.com........................................... 8 KEITH Manufacturing Co., keithwalkingfloor.com................................................... 14 Matthiesen, matthiesen.com...................................................................................... 5 Modern Ice, modernice.com...................................................................................... 6 Polar Temp, polartemp.com..................................................................................... 20

Rates are $1.00 per word, with a minimum charge. Any blind ads, with an assigned box number c/o publisher, add $10.00. Deadline for upcoming issue is the 1st of the previous month. For advertising and listing information, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

Vault Ice, vaultice.com.............................................................................................. 19

NATIONWIDE/INTERNATIONAL USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 1-800-599-4744 | itcpack.com ICE MAKERS

PACKAGING

• VOGT P24A ICE MAKERS (2) • VOGT P34AL W/ HIGH SIDE

•HAMER 125 – NEW, USED AND REBUILT

REFRIGERATION

• HAMER RING CLOSER W/CONVEYOR

• 20 HP KRACK CONDENSER

• HAMER 125 W/ STAND & CONVEYOR • HAMER 310 W/ 125 CLOSER

• LIQUID OVERFEED VALVE PACKAGE

• PALLET DISPENSER

• 6.5 BOHN W/ EVAP CONDENSER W/ UNIT COOLER

• SS SHAKER W/ STAND

• MARLEY TOWER W/ PUMP

BLOCK MAKERS • LEER BL39 W/ REMOTE CONDENSER • TURBO BP-360 BLOCK PRESS

SUPPLIES • LEER ICE MERCHANDISERS IN STOCK • BAGS AND WIRE • PARTS • SPARE PARTS

16 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020

• SLIP SHEET DISPENSER

BAGGERS • VL - 510 • VLS - 510

SCREW AND BELT CONVEYORS • HYTROL BELT CONVEYORS 10’ & 12’ • PORTABLE FOLDING INCLINE CONVEYOR - MODEL R • POWER 90 BELT CONVEYOR

FOOD GRADE VOGT TUBE ICE FOR SALE 6 AND 26 POUNDS BAG We are located in Magog, Quebec, Canada 20 min from the border of Vermont. We can bag in other size for serious quantity.


CLASSIFIEDS

CANADA ICE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Magic Finger • (8) Turbo Ice Makers, 10 & 20 Ton • Cooling tower pumping station • Hamer 125 • 16 feet stainless steel auger • (3) power pack for freezer • Kamco bin • Forklift • Indoor/outdoor merchandisers



• Ice bags • Trucks • Other ice equip. and misc. items • 360 Turbo Block Press • Bagger

Contact Lino at

416-676-3429 Email:

clearicesolidblocks@ hotmail.com

SOUTHEAST USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • North Star Model 90 flake Ice • • • • • • • • • •

Makers Vogt P24 Large Tube Vogt P24FL Mid Tube and High Side Vogt 18XT Large Tube’ Vogt 118’s 5 Ton Ice Maker 7/8, W/C 2015 Tiger, turbo Ice Maker Arctic Temp 4000 Lb Ice Maker Kamco Ten Moving Floor Ice Bins Matthiesen 20 ton Moving Floor Ice Bin MGR 3000SD Stainless Bin Collapsible Blue Bins

• Matthiesen VL510, Top Load • • • • • • • • • • •

Bagger, Galv Matthiesen Heat Sealed Bagging System Matthiesen Magic Finger Bagger System Hamer 310 Form, Fill, & Seal Hamer 525 Form, Fill, & Seal Ice Max IBM300, 300lb block Baker Amcot ST-25 Cooling Tower Marley 4821 Cooling tower Ice Vending Machine Bucket Elevator Snow Crusher/blowers Perfection 25lb Ice Scorer

• 1/2HP drop In Refrigeration • Vivian Manual Block Press • 7lb Roll Stock • 22lb Roll Stock • 10LB Ice Cans (45) 4.5” x 8” x 14”T • Snow Cone Block Cans • JMC 4’ Belt conveyor 12”x10’ • • • • • •

Stainless Screw conveyor 9x24 Stainless Screw Conveyor 9x10 Galvanized Portable Screw conveyor Belt Conveyor, Hytrol BA 16’ Matthiesen 24 Ton Moving floor bin Water Softener System Blue Bins

AND MUCH MORE!

If you have discontinued ice bags or used equipment you would like to sell PLEASE CALL. SEE OUR USED EQUIPMENT WEB PAGE AT AIEEXCHANGE.COM. Call for surplus ice! Polar Temp Equipment Mike Landino - Toll free - 1-877-376-0367 E-mail (NEW ADDRESS): mlandino@polartemp.com Don’t forget to call if you have a quality piece of used equipment for sale.

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 17


CLASSIFIEDS

SOUTHEAST (continued) GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE, EVERYTHING PRICED TO MOVE!!! • 3-Phase motor starters and disconnects • 4 Embraco merchandiser compressor units • Bulk quantity 8# and 25# bags on wickets

NORTHEAST ICE CARVING TOOLS Plastic liners for clear block makers $1.24/ea Reusable drip pans from $6.50/ea Over 500 items in stock for Ice Carvers

IceSculptingTools.com

or (440) 717-1940

• 9”x14’ Incline auger • 2 Hytrol conveyors (16’x20” and 6’x12”) • Masterbilt Walk-in freezer (3-phase) 13’ wide x 15’ deep x 7’ tall

Benny and Mary Jones 1484 Topsy Rd. Randolph, MS 38864

Phone 662-419-5119

ICE FOR SALE Vogt Mini tube ice, 8, 20 & 40 lb. bags. All ice is screened, palletized & stretch wrapped. We deliver or you pick up. Our water is treated with ozone for sterilization. No chlorine added! Martin’s Ice Company

Phone (717) 733-7968 or fax (717) 733-1981 PA

FOR SALE Matthiesen Bulk Bagger, 5 years old. 8-29 lb. bag capacity.

FOR SALE Ice carving crystal clear blocks 300lb blocks

Call Kevin at Southern Connecticut Ice and Oil,

203-257-6571 or Kevinscio@yahoo.com

(518) 851-7085

YOUR AD HERE To place a classified ad, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

18 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020


CLASSIFIEDS

MIDWEST

PRIVATE LABEL COCKTAIL ICE Our ice IN the box. Your name ON the box. Large Cubes & Perfect Spheres Sealed – Boxed – Ready to Deliver

Don't waste time & money making your own. David Holland 405-279-9747 david@vaultice.com vaultice.com/privatelabel

PURE & CLEAR COCKTAIL ICE We offer The Rock (2”, 2.5”, 3”), The Cylinder, The Shard, and The Rod for purchase. Private labeling and delivery available. Contact Minnesota Ice: 612-254-8330 info@minnesota-ice.com | www.minnesota-ice.com

ICE FOR SALE A Family Owned Ice Company Tube Ice, 7, 10, 20, 22 lb Bags Over a million bags in stock. Shipped or Picked up PIQCS Plus Accredited Arctic Ice Inc. Call Steve Camenzind

(314) 989-9090

FOR SALE (3) Clinebell 10 lb. ice block makers, Model S60, 1.5HF, (3) condensing units, 3-phase, 240 volts. Will sell individually, or all three for $12,000. Call Arctic Ice at

713-269-2534

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2020 19


Polar Temp Thanks You for Your Business and Continued Support An Important announcement that we want you to know first The Industry’s engineering leader, Polar Temp, is ahead of the curve as we enter the new decade. 2020 will have its own special challenges, but also successes, with a clear vision and path forward for our customers. We all know that good ecology is good business, making some important decisions easy to make. With that in mind, and after much preparation, Polar Temp began this year manufacturing with refrigerant R448A. Simply put, but with much significance, this refrigerant reduces the potential for global warming by almost two thirds, 64.635 per cent to be exact.

Not a Special Order. No Extended Lead Time. With R448A as Polar Temp’s standard merchandiser refrigerant, we are prepared with in-stock availability, and so are our customers, as we meet all current and projected EPA rulings in all fifty states and comply with the twenty-five state (and growing) Climate Alliance States, for now and into the foreseeable future. Many times, managing change and being prepared for those changes is the most daunting part of running any business. Be assured that Polar Temp is ahead of the curve, with the most important thing to us, your business.

Call the Factory Sales Office Near You • • • • • •

Georgia: 800.554.4852 California: 866.746.0437 Colorado: 877.376.0367 North Carolina: 866.827.3232 Tennessee: 877.984.5945 Texas: 866.598.4206 Visit us online at

polartemp.com 20 REFRIGERATION Magazine February 2020

1520 Westfork Drive • Lithia Springs, GA 30122

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Refrigeration Magazine - February 2020 issue  

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