__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FEBRUARY 2019

Sapporo Snow Festival Featuring over two hundred ice sculptures, great food and a ton of activities for the family, the Festival in Japan is a fantastic way to enjoy a day in the winter. SEE MORE PHOTOS OF THIS EXTRAVAGANT YEARLY CELEBRATION, INSIDE THIS ISSUE.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE – Trends in C-Stores – Savvy Marketing – Upcoming Conventions – And more!


14

February 2019 Vol. 202 │ No. 2 ISSN #0034-3137

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor/Publisher Mary Y. Cronley refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Senior Staff Writer Joe Cronley cronley.joe@gmail.com (404) 295-5712 Art Direction Markurious Marketing info@markurious.com (678) 439-6534

ADVERTISING, SUBSCRIPTIONS, ACCOUNTS Mary Y. Cronley Editor/Publisher refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Established as ICE in 1906, Refrigeration Magazine™ is published thirteen times a year, including the Annual Buyer's Guide. Postmaster: Send notice by form 3579 to: Refrigeration Magazine 2930 Cedar Knoll Drive Roswell, GA 30076 Annual Subscriptions: US: $49/year or $79/two years International: $79/year Single Copies: $6/copy

Copyright © 2019 by REFRIGERATION Magazine™. All rights reserved.

FEATURES

6

6

10

CUSTOMER SERVICE 5 Myths of Customer Service

10

TRENDS

14

LEAD FEATURE

18

THE NEW RETAIL

20

MARKETING

21

CONVENTIONS

The Next Convenience Frontiers

The Spectacular Sapporo Snow Festival is Underway in Japan

Maine's First Marijuana C-Store Debuts

How 7-Eleven Used the Superbowl to Score an E-Commerce Play

21 The 2019 IIAR Natural Refrigeration Conference & Expo 22 Save the Date – IPIA 102nd Convention

DEPARTMENTS

4 spICE

23 AD INDEX

4 CALENDAR

23 CLASSIFIED ADS

Millennials Aren’t Slackers After All

Upcoming events

A list of our advertisers

Classified advertisements by region

FIND OUT MORE AT refrigeration-magazine.com OR CONNECT WITH US AT facebook.com/refrigeration-magazine

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 3


spICE

S

Millennials Aren’t Slackers After All Saturday Night Live recently featured a sketch poking fun at Millennials. It opens with a young woman frantically texting on her iPhone, approaching her boss and asking for a promotion. The boss asks how long she’s been with the company. She replies, “Three days.” As much as I hear folks complain about the lack of work initiative that millennials exhibit, it’s not really an accurate beef. According to an article in the Harvard Business Review, “While pithy descriptions of what makes Millennials unique are presented as self-evident and seem to have a ring of truth to them, very few are supported with solid empirical research. On the contrary, a growing body of evidence suggests that employees of all ages are much more alike than different in their attitudes and values at work. To the extent that any gaps do exist, they amount to small differences that have always existed between younger and older workers throughout history and have little to do with the millennial generation per se.” The article continued, “Even the most widely accepted stereotypes about Millennials appear to be suspect. Last year, IBM’s Institute for Business Value released a report titled “Myths, Exaggerations and Uncomfortable Truths: The Real Story Behind Millennials in the Workplace.” Based on a multigenerational study of 1,784 employees from companies across 12 countries and six industries, it found that about the same percentage of Millennials (25%) want to make a positive impact on their organization as Gen Xers (21%) and Baby Boomers (23%). Differences are uniformly minimal across nine other variables as well.” I’ve had many the conversation with ice men and women, suppliers and others in the business, who claim their children don’t want ‘the business, because they don’t want to work that hard.” An article entitled, “Millennials Are Actually Workaholics, According To Research”, by Sarah Green Carmichael, contradicts this statement. “Millennials

Upcoming Industry Events

don’t have a reputation as a hard-working generation. The caricature of the Millennial worker is more or less a cartoon of an entitled recipient of hundreds of plastic participation trophies who cares less about paying his dues at work and more about perks like flex-time, beer carts, and nap rooms. Or perhaps I should say that “we” have that reputation, since I’m technically a Millennial — most demographers put the start-date for this generation at 1981,” she said. A new survey by Project: Time Off and GfK, Millennials are actually more likely to see themselves — proudly — as “work martyrs” than older workers, and less likely to use all their vacation time. The researchers surveyed roughly 5,000 fulltime employees who receive paid time off as a benefit, and found that Millennials were much more likely to agree with four statements they used to assess work martyrdom: “No one else at my company can do the work while I’m away.” “I want to show complete dedication to my company and job.” “I don’t want others to think I am replaceable.” “I feel guilty for using my paid time off.” They sound like many of you did, once upon a time…and maybe still today. So it’s feasible it’s not that our kids who don’t want to work so hard, it’s more they don’t want to work so hard in the ice business…what you and I have done for all these many decades. But for the ice businesses who DO have their kids working under them, perchance you have passed your workaholicism on to them. They’re gonna need it!

Mary Yopp Cronley Editor, Refrigeration Magazine

Convention

Dates

Location

Details

Southern Ice Exchange 129th Annual Convention

March 10 –13, 2019

Nassau, Bahamas

sietoday.com/2011

Western Ice Association

March 31 – April 4, 2019

San Antonio, Texas

westerniceassociation.org

Northeastern Ice Annual Convention

October 13 – 16, 2019

Hershey, Pennsylvania

northeasternice.com

4 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


REFRIGERATION Magazine │ November 2018 5


CUSTOMER SERVICE

MYTHS OF

CUSTOMER

SERVICE Strong customer service helps you create loyalty, increase product awareness, and encourage future purchases. Everyone wants to create the perfect customer service experience, but many businesses are building their processes on false assumptions and insufficient metrics. If your customer service paradigm is focused on outdated ideals, you’re missing out on major opportunities to connect with your modern customer base. Today’s consumers are savvy to the traditional approach to customer service and satisfaction. They want quality service without the sense of being minimized or fed through a scripted system. Take a closer look at the truth behind today’s most popular customer service myths, and you may uncover a fresh new way to boost customer loyalty and satisfaction where it really matters. 6 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


MYTH ONE THE LOUDEST COMPLAINT DESERVES THE MOST ATTENTION While it’s important to address persistently dissatisfied customers, you don’t want to give a disproportionate amount of your time to complainers. Most companies ultimately find that just five to 10 percent of their customers are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. It’s tempting to devote a major portion of your time to the persistently dissatisfied, hoping that your endless patience and ongoing attention will win them over. Customer service professionals can sometimes slip into the mindset of the service recovery paradox. This theory states that a customer will think more highly of a company that resolved a problem or recovered from a mistake than they would if the company provided non-faulty service to begin with. While there is undeniable value in customer recovery, you don’t want to spend a disproportionate amount of time on unhappy clients. Resolving a single complaint isn’t as important as streamlining the overarching process that caused the complaint to begin with. If your unhappy customers comprise more than 10 percent of your customer base, you need to look beyond the individual to the design or performance issue behind their dissatisfaction. Provide prompt attention to the core cause of your troubles and the complaints will resolve themselves. As long as your complainers are in the lower five to 10 percent range, however, you can rest assured that they represent only the fringe of your customer base. While they deserve due attention, don’t neglect your loyal shoppers to try and appease the doggedly dissatisfied.

Instead of focusing on the individual agents, turn your attention to the training processes that give them their knowledge base, and thus their confidence and problemsolving abilities. Are they appropriately trained in your products and services, or is there something missing from their bank of expertise? Examine your response times and look at the systems behind them. Are documents arriving in the prescribed amount of time? Do agents quote realistic timeframes for repair and resolution? Make sure all your systems and processes are operating up to snuff, so customers are receiving the results that agents promise them.

MYTH THREE SOLVING THE PROBLEM RESULTS IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION There’s a prevailing belief that customers whose issues are resolved have higher satisfaction rates. While this seems like a sound assumption, resolution may not rank as high as you initially assume. While the happiest customers do have their problem resolved in their first call, less than 70 percent of customers who fall in the next satisfaction ranking achieved closure in one call. Other factors play a major role in satisfaction as well, such as listening skills and agent knowledge.

"Resolving a single complaint isn’t as important as streamlining the overarching process that caused the complaint to begin with."

MYTH TWO THE AGENT IS THE EXPERIENCE It’s a common misconception that the agent controls the customer experience. There’s no question that soft skills like diffusing anger and building rapport are important, but these typically elevate calls from good to great. They can’t pull satisfaction levels up out of the gutter. Instead of focusing on soft skills, your time is better spent addressing major performance failures, like lack of knowledge, or deeper issues such as slow systems and inefficient processes. These have a bigger overall impact on your customer service outcomes.

Coach your customer service agents in all the areas that contribute to customer satisfaction, not only problem resolution. Make sure your agents understand that there are many other factors that come into play, including empathy, understanding, and a confident, comprehensive knowledge base. Customers can hang up from a call feeling good about their experience even if the problem persists, simply because the agent they spoke with was sympathetic and offered an understandable base of background information into what the issue is. • REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 7


Just as customers can achieve high satisfaction without a resolution, so too can they experience low satisfaction even when their issue is ultimately taken care of. If it takes hours of waiting and numerous time-consuming attempts to finally reach resolution, customers will hang up feeling frustrated about their wasted time. This is where you need to reassess your processes. Could your agents improve satisfaction by referring callers to someone more efficient at resolving their issue, such as a brick-and-mortar store or service provider? Think beyond resolution and examine all the factors that impact satisfaction.

MYTH FOUR MORE TIME CREATES A BETTER EXPERIENCE Your time is valuable, so it’s easy to assume that you’re offering more value to problems that you spend more time on. However, customers are typically looking for the opposite. They want fast, efficient solutions. The key to good customer service is finding the sweet spot where you’re investing adequate time in the problem without lingering unnecessarily or using inefficient techniques. Long-tail calls can represent anywhere from a quarter to nearly a third of all time spent with callers. You could easily end up in a situation where a small proportion of your calls are taking up a significant chunk of your day, despite the fact that the added time adds little to overall satisfaction. Develop a set metric for how long each type of call should take. While certain types of issues will naturally require more time than others, you can still benchmark the appropriate investment in time and effort for common concerns such as resolving billing questions or scheduling a service call. Encourage your customer service providers to remain inside these boundaries.

8 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019

MYTH FIVE A SATISFIED CUSTOMER IS A LOYAL CUSTOMER Many managers equate a satisfied customer with a loyal one, but this isn’t always the case. Customers in the second satisfaction tier are typically more passive. Don’t settle for satisfied rankings, equating them with strong brand loyalty. It’s worth the time and effort to elevate your agents’ rankings to the top tier. Simplify your processes and help your top agents build soft skills to move from a quietly content customer to one who will truly sing your praises. Push your customer service agents to not only meet expectations, but exceed them. Pay close attention to top tier customers who achieve the highest levels of satisfaction, and identify the tipping point where service goes from good to great. Perhaps it’s when they discover an alternate billing plan or find out about a deal they didn’t specifically call to inquire about. Strive to hit that sweet spot with as many calls as possible, going a step beyond problem resolution to achieve lasting customer loyalty. Focusing on the right areas in your customer service systems will help you achieve the top-tier brand loyalty that you’re really after. Don’t settle for mediocre satisfaction ratings or a simple lack of irate outbursts. You want to achieve a high, sustainable number of customers in the very top tier of satisfaction. Abolish old-school approaches and “time-tested” techniques when the numbers don’t support their effectiveness. Keep your focus on the right metrics to get your customer satisfaction results where you really want them. RM


REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 9


THE RUNNING TRENDS NEW RETAIL HEAD

The Next Convenience

FRONTIERS The Next Convenience Frontiers By Tammy Mastroberte, Convenience Store News

By Tammy Mastroberte, Convenience Store News

10 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019

The retail industry is rapidly evolving to meet the needs of consumers, particularly around foodservice and the way food gets ordered and picked up. Carving out an increasing presence in today’s landscape are mobile ordering, delivery and drive-thru — where it’s all about convenience, a specialty of the convenience channel.


“Online and mobile ordering has become popular because of the convenience of it,” said Heidi Chapnick, founder and CEO of Channalysis and retail consultant at FreshXperts, an advisory team for growth in fresh foods. “I want to sit on the beach, order a coffee and go pick it up without waiting on line. I want to know what is on the menu before I go to a store. People are mobile today, and they are taking their mobile phones with them.” Convenience store chains including Wawa Inc., QuikTrip Corp, QuickChek Corp. and Casey’s General Stores Inc. all offer mobile ordering for their locations. Meanwhile, Casey’s, Sheetz Inc. and 7-Eleven Inc. also offer delivery options. Casey’s launched its mobile app for ordering in January 2016, and out of its 1,950 locations, 550 offer pizza delivery, according to Bill Walljasper, senior vice president and chief financial officer at Casey’s, based in Ankeny, Iowa. “…Right now, roughly 13 percent of our pizza pie orders are running through that type of service,” Walljasper said of Casey’s online and mobile ordering. “We have over 700,000 downloads of the mobile app and growing. And typically, we see an increased basket ring when someone orders that way — about 20 percent more, including more toppings or adding on complimentary items like breadsticks, wings or a soda.” Traditionally, the biggest segment for restaurant delivery has been pizza. This has been tracked by The NPD Group for years. But with third-party delivery companies cropping up, NPD began tracking other areas, too. Outside of pizza, food delivery has been growing by double-digit rates since 2012, cited

Bonnie Riggs, NPD’s restaurant industry analyst. Still, the biggest opportunity for growth is online and mobile ordering, she said. “Digital ordering is still only 3 percent of the industry, but it represents 2 billion visits and $17 billion, and the growth is coming from mobile apps,” Riggs shared. “If you are going to play in the space, you have to go there.”

Ordering from mobile apps has been growing for several years at a rate of 50 percent or more, according to Riggs. In December 2014, mobile app ordering was up 51 percent; in 2015, it rose 61 percent; and in 2016, it was up another 52 percent. Internet ordering for the same time period was up 12 percent, 10 percent and 2 percent, respectively. Additionally, internet ordering for pickup currently makes up 1 percent of the restaurant industry, and mobile app ordering for delivery accounts for another 1 percent. New Jersey-based convenience store chain QuickChek rolled out mobile ordering in March 2016, allowing customers to order breakfast items, subs and salads. It added the option as a result of consumer demand. So far this year, Oklahoma-based QuikTrip also responded to consumer demand with the addition of mobile ordering through its app in January, and Pennsylvania-based Wawa rolled out mobile ordering in February.

“Our customers were asking for mobile ordering in the app, and it helped us to speed up the customer checkout process, so it was a win-win,” said Mike Thornbrugh, spokesman for QuikTrip, based in Tulsa, Okla., and operating just under 1,000 locations. “Customers can order, pay and pickup when they arrive at the store. They can even order in the morning for an afternoon or evening pickup.” At Casey’s, the addition of mobile ordering was an opportunity to reach a broader audience. The chain already recognized that some customers like to interact face-to-face; others prefer to interact online. Mobile provides yet another type of interaction. “Mobile ordering allows us to connect with customers we didn’t reach before, and we are very vertically integrated so it was a natural extension for us,” Walljasper said.

DIVING INTO DELIVERY With the rise of third-party delivery companies like Postmates, DoorDash, Grubhub and Eat24, more restaurant and c-store chains are looking at the option of delivery. While pizza still remains the most popular delivery item, consumers today are looking for more food options to •

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 11


be delivered, according to NPD’s Riggs. “If it’s priced right, the food can travel well, and it doesn’t reflect poorly on the brand, the delivery option will continue to grow outside of major metropolitan areas,” she said. “The forecast is for delivery to grow by 20 percent between 2016 and 2020.”

a partnership with OrderUp from Groupon to deliver in two college towns where a Sheetz store is located. Items include the store’s MTO madeto-order sandwiches, breakfasts, salads, burritos and snacks, including fries, gourmet pretzels, chicken stripz, tater totz, pizza and subs.

In late 2016, Sheetz announced

7-Eleven has also been providing

delivery options in select states since 2015, working with DoorDash in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston; and with Tapingo in five states, focused on college campuses. “With c-stores, you are usually going local, so delivery options are more tailored,” said Chapnick. “You don’t have to open up everything to everybody at once because then you can’t fulfill what you promise and the customer won’t come back. It’s better to start smaller and then branch out. Start with 10 zip codes and grow from there.” Whether using a third-party service or handling delivery in-house, it is important that the food travels well, so operators must ensure good packaging, according to Riggs. Cold food must stay cold and hot food must stay hot. “There have been people who tried going with third-party companies, but then took the delivery portion in-house because of the potential loss of brand image if things are not delivered the way they are consumed in the store,” Riggs cautioned. Casey’s offers delivery through an in-house team and recently accelerated the rollout of this amenity in the last quarter, including in smaller communities than the chain originally targeted as a test, explained Walljasper. “The initial tests have gone well, and we will continue to test. We potentially have the opportunity to expand to a wider base then we initially thought when targeting only larger communities that are over 5,000 in population,” he said. Casey’s hires its own delivery drivers, with the hours of delivery fluctuating

12 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


depending on the community. At new stores, delivery hours run from 4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. or 10:30 p.m. The days of the week for delivery also fluctuate.

ran out. This location is still in a test phase, as the chain “continues to get operational learnings and customer feedback on how best to run a drivethru,” Thornbrugh reported.

Customers can place their order through the mobile app and select delivery or carryout. In addition to pizza, the c-store chain delivers complimentary items including breadsticks, chicken wings, and 2-liter sodas.

“It’s no different than taking care of the customer inside the store,” he said. “We want to offer them the quickest and easiest checkout experience possible. Since we limit our drive-thru offer to only made-toorder food from our onsite kitchen, it does not currently take care of the needs for our other convenience store customers.”

DRIVE-THRU DOLLARS In the quick-service restaurant (QSR) industry, drive-thru is an important part of the business. Tom Cook, principal at King-Casey, a retail consulting and design firm based in Westport, Conn., points to Starbucks. The coffeehouse chain added drive-thru awnings to shelter cars from the rain and sun, as well as a digital barista, where customers can see the barista on a screen and the barista can also see the customer. Drive-thru, however, is no longer the sole domain of QSRs. The option is becoming increasingly prevalent in the convenience channel, for one. In February 2016, Savannah, Ga.-based Parker’s Convenience Stores opened its first Parker’s store with drive-thru foodservice for its hot deli serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. QuikTrip also announced plans in 2016 to test its first drive-thru location for its QT Kitchens program, in Tulsa, Okla., after the store lease held by Wendy’s

Overall, drive-thru service was up 4 percent in 2016, and it accounts for 21 percent of restaurant industry visits, according to NPD tracking data. “It’s small, but that is where the opportunity and the growth is right now,” Riggs noted.

During a drive-thru experience, customers look for order accuracy and speed, Cook said, so it’s important to get the operations right — including the order, putting it together and getting it out to the customer. When first getting into the drive-thru business, it is often necessary to change the layout of the store in the backend and in the kitchen for the right process and flow, according to the King-Casey executive. This includes where the equipment will be, the employee process, and packaging.

There’s also “an art to communication” with the customer at the drive-thru, according to Cook. “It’s more than just a menuboard and a drive-up window. There is a whole art and science to menuboard optimization, and QSRs often spend an inordinate amount of time on this, from where you put the items, to how much space to give, and how many pictures relative to words,” he explained. The same is true for merchandising at the drive-thru. Cook recommends staged zone merchandising, where customers can see messages about menu items and specials from the time they enter the drive-thru area to the point where they reach the menuboard. “There should also be wayfinding in terms of aiding the customer in finding the drive-thru, and visible signage that says drive-thru,” he said. “If you didn’t have one and then you open one, nobody will know unless there is clear signage.” King-Casey worked with Starbucks on wayfinding at its drive-thrus. The partners decided to do a green stripe throughout the drive-thru that customers can see on the ground and along the curb. Not only is this helpful with navigation, but it’s also a subliminal brand message because it’s the same green used by Starbucks, Cook noted. “The overall customer experience is where the rubber meets the road,” he said. “If you have a good customer experience, you will have a satisfied, loyal customer.” RM

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 13


LEAD RUNNING FEATURE HEAD

The spectacular Sapporo Snow Festival is underway in Japan. Held annually in Sapporo, Japan, over seven days in February, the country's largest winter wonderland event on the northern island of Hokkaido is now in its 70th year, and is regularly attended by around two million people. The festival takes over the city's downtown Odori Park, Tsu Dome and Susukino district every year. The first area houses several hundred brilliantly-crafted ice statues, often of iconic characters or famous figures like baseball legend Hideki Matsui, Darth

14 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


Vader or Mickey and Minnie Mouse, all spectacularly lit up by night; the second is given over to snow slides and downhill sledging; the third to competitions. One of Susukino's centerpiece events is the International Snow Sculpture Contest, in which teams of competitors from all around the world descend to build enormous monuments. A beauty contest to crown the Susukino Queen of Ice is also staged every year. The Sapporo TV Tower at the eastern end of Odori Park is a popular attraction as it serves as an

observatory deck from which to view the landscape by night. Tickets to the top are always highly-prized. Now an established winter tradition, the event was begun on a whim by schoolchildren, who came together to build six sculptures after a heavy blizzard. Their work proved a surprise local hit, drawing a crowd of some 50,000 spectators. The city's reputation for snow sculptures really took off when members of Japan's Self-Defense Forces from the nearby Makomanai military base joined in in 1955. Four

years later, as many as 2,500 people were taking part. Sapporo hosted the 1972 Winter Olympic Games, televised around the world, and the local ice displays stole the show. The event has grown ever since, attracting tourists from across the globe. This year, the festival's most popular displays have been of US and Australian Open tennis champion Naomi Osaka and a replica of Helsinki Cathedral built by the Ground SelfDefense Force to commemorate a century of diplomatic co-operation between Japan and Finland. •

A snow sculpture of Australian Open tennis champion Naomi Osaka is displayed at the 70th annual Sapporo Snow Festival in Sapporo in Japan. REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 15


16 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 17


THE NEW RETAIL

Maine's First Marijuana C-store Debuts The Pine Tree State is introducing a new kind of convenience store.

tlantic Farms Gas N' Grass, Maine's first marijuana convenience store and one of only a handful in operation in the country, opened its doors at 10 a.m. Thursday in Portland. The c-store sells cannabis-infused gummies, tinctures and smokable marijuana to those fueling up at the former Getty Mart at 460 Warren Ave. on the first day that Maine's new medical marijuana law takes effect, Press Herald reported. Adults with a medical card and governmentissued identification will be able to buy marijuana products from a renovated walk-in cooler inside the convenience store, with different strains of cannabis selling for $5 to $15 a gram and concentrates selling for $20 to $40 a gram. Non-intoxicating hemp products, traditional c-store fare like soda and snacks, and selfserve, pay-at-the-pump gas is among Gas N' Grass' other offerings. 18 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019

Jackson McLeod of Portland, a caregiver and the public face of the four-person partnership behind Gas N' Grass, hopes to educate those who gas up at the Warren Avenue location about the therapeutic benefits of cannabis and hemp, and believes the setting will take a lot of the stigma and hassle out of buying cannabis. "We offer a rotating menu of the best cannabis products from the best caregivers in Maine with the convenience of, well, a convenience store," he told the news outlet. A former lettuce farmer, McLeod likens the business model to a farmers market for cannabis, where consumers can easily browse products from a range of local caregivers at different price ranges. He plans to make the most of the part of the new law that allows a caregiver to buy some products from other caregivers, giving customers a diversity of offerings in a one-stop shopping experience and caregivers the chance to develop a following of their own, the news outlet reported.


NEW STATE LAW The idea of the Gas N' Grass was born about six months ago as Maine lawmakers debated the merits of reforming the medical cannabis law to give caregivers like McLeod the freedom to grow their businesses. Under the new law, caregivers can do things such as hire more than one employee and open medical marijuana shops, according to the report. The new law makes changes to the state's 19-year-old medical cannabis program. It allows patients to get a medical card if a doctor deems cannabis medically beneficial instead of having to prove they have a statesanctioned qualifying condition. It will grant six new medical dispensary licenses, giving Maine a total of 14. It also gives the state new authority to inspect caregiver operations.

The law requires a caregiver to get local approval before opening a store. McLeod and his partners had their local permits in order to be approved by the state — like a renovation permit to turn a walk-in cooler into a marijuana shopping area, a foodservice license and a certificate of occupancy — to be ready as soon as the law went into effect, according to Press Herald. McLeod and his partners made these moves before Portland adopted a moratorium on new retail cannabis businesses in October. City staff asked the City Council for enough time to craft a cannabis zoning map and sort out local licensing conditions before the state medical law went into effect and the state adult-use cannabis market goes live sometime next year. McLeod and his partners were one of eight cannabis businesses to get permits before the moratorium.

SUITED FOR CANNABIS SALES Although state lawmakers have focused on the dangers of mixing cannabis and driving, banning social clubs out of fear that they could lead to a spike in impaired driving, Portland officials don't see any unique concerns with the gas and cannabis combination. Although state law doesn't require it, McLeod said he and his partners will attach a sticker with a "don't use this and drive" message to all cannabis products they sell because of their specific business model. Like any medical marijuana business, Gas N' Grass will prohibit on-site consumption of cannabis products and will have cameras monitoring the parking lot, the news outlet noted. RM

ice storage & metering systems The Ultimate Babysitter When you go home for the night, the last thing you want to do is worry about what is going on at the ice plant. Used as a surge bin, the KEITH® Ice Storage & optimizing run time for the ice machine and by storing ice for processing during work hours. Bins are built to last using the best FDA approved food grade materials and are driven by reliable WALKING FLOOR® technology. Low Maintenance • Higher Quality Ice • No Ice Buildup True FIFO Rotation • Horizontal Metering • Vertical Comb Built to Last • Superior by Design ®

KEITH Mfg. Co. 1.800.547.6161

KEITH can handle it. 2016 KEITH Mfg. Co. All Rights Reserved.

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 19


MARKETING

How 7-Eleven Used the Super Bowl to Score an E-Commerce Play The New England Patriots weren't the only winners of Super Bowl LIII. 7-Eleven Inc. leveraged the NFL's biggest game of the year to spotlight its rapidly expanding 7NOW delivery service. The convenience retailer encouraged consumers not to "miss a single moment of the big game" by offering $3 whole pizzas, originally $7.99, available through its 7NOW delivery service from Feb. 1-3, reported Convenience Store News sister publication Consumer Goods Technology. "7‑Eleven continues to redefine convenience through digital technologies and 7NOW brings it to life for our customers. For the millions of Americans who throw parties for the big game, 7NOW will bring you everything you need. From pizza, to beer and party favors, 7‑Eleven is here to deliver," said Gurmeet Singh, 7-Eleven's chief digital officer and chief information officer. "Whether your team wins or loses, 7NOW will either help you punt post-game misery with

tissues and ibuprofen or kickoff a weeklong celebration with all the treats and drinks you desire." The c-store retailer has been rapidly expanding its 7NOW delivery service, growing it from a test at 10 Dallas stores in 2017 to more than 900 stores across 277 U.S. cities as of Jan. 31. In addition to a variety of products, the service offers beer, wine and/or liquor across 18 markets, including Los Angeles, Chicago, San Antonio, New York, Phoenix and St. Louis. 7NOW orders incur a $3.99 deliver fee as well as a $1.99 "small basket fee" on orders under $15. The first three delivery fees, if within 30 days of the first, are waved through March 31. Irving-based 7-Eleven operates, franchises or licenses more than 67,000 stores in 17 countries, including 11,800 in North America. RM

On Feb. 4, the day after the Super Bowl, select "post-game" SKUS were also available for 53 cents via 7NOW, including: • • • •

Any 28-ounce Gatorade product; Any 20-ounce Coca-Cola SKU; A Hersey’s KitKat bar; A four-count packet of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare’s Advil; and • Private-label 7-Select pocket facial tissues.

20 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019


2019 IIAR

THE

CONVENTIONS CONVENTIONS

NATURAL REFRIGERATION CONFERENCE & EXPO

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE The 2019 IIAR Conference & Expo will be held at The Sheraton Grand Phoenix Hotel in Phoenix, AZ March 3 - March 6, 2019. The meeting is the largest exposition dedicated to the natural refrigeration industry. IIAR provides unrivaled opportunity for the industry's leading manufactures, contractors, trainers, and other service providers to showcase their latest innovations and products. With over 1,500 in attendance last year, this is the perfect chance to network and collaborate with some of the greatest minds in the natural refrigeration community.

SUNDAY SESSION AGENDA ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR AMMONIA REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS. Session Introduction - Eric Smith (Moderator) IIAR Overview of Energy Management in An Industrial Ammonia Refrigeration System – Doug Scott - VaCom Technologies • System-wide energy analyses • Owner project requirements • Power company plans • Continuous improvement • Managing energy programs

CLICK HERE TO ENLARGE THE MAP

Key Opportunities for Energy Savings in Natural Refrigeration Alan Moran - Cascade Energy • Low and no-cost opportunities • Keys to creating an energy program • Going after utility incentives • Rules of thumb and actual calculation tools

2019 Expo Floor Pricing

Food and Beverage

130

LU-VE Group

124

Ther mal

329

Apex FrostP Refrig oint

125

JAN X-Ray

224

Duna USA

123

NASR RETA C

Omeg a

430

Proce Safety ss Produ

428

LEWA Chapa rral

Viking Cold

118

therm MIRO ofin Indust

327

122 120

433

Frasc old

229

LU-VE Group

126

121

222 220

CoolS Centu ys ry

119

218

Cornel Kolbi l Pipe

225

Hillph oenix

324

Embr aco

426

WCR Hough Incor ton

325

424

322

323

Hillph oenix

Maye kawa

Temp rite

APSM

219

320

Maye kawa

318

431

532 530

Global Offici Cold ne

429

528

321

422

Isel

420

CCAR.E. Techn Lewis

319

418

GCAP APR , LLC Plasti

Food and Beverage

20' Danfoss

Indust rial

425

524

529

419

830

729

Airga s

SCS Trace

525

AAIM Contr

624

SCS Risk Trace Manag

20' GEA North America

832

Carno Kemp t er Carno t

526

Cal Ther

733 731

LOGIC Gartn Techn er

427

Wanxi Herme ang tic

223 221

MIRO Indust

432

Profe ssion

331

20'

128

PSRG

333

Vahter Airfoil us Oy Impell

625

724

622

623

722

Sprin gfield

Chest er-

Basse tt

Balti more

Delta Tee

519

620

Carlyl e

618

828

Draeg er,

621

Basse tt

619

720

Balti more

718

Terra Applie

831

Indust rial

829

simPR O

727

826

827

Airga s

Draeg er,

Keltec -

725

824

RefPlu Logix s, Inc.

523 521

AES NDT

STAGE

825

Tecog en,

823

20'

Tecog en,

Colmac Coil Manufacturi ng Inc.

821

719

819

Zero Zone, SGS Refrig

1017 Alfa Laval

SGS Refrig

114

1015

Interc al

Vilter Warre Manuf nder,

Food and Beverage

110

213

Vilter Proce Manuf ss &

211

MRBr az &

Vilter Manuf

108

312

209

310

Extol of

308

MRBr az & ASTI

ITW Insula

102

Ther mal

100

412

Ziehl- Parker Abeg Hannif

311

410

Inters CAMC tate O

309

408

Innov Indust ative rial

106 104

Lanier Parker Techn Hannif

313

307 Acure Climat n e By

105

North Star

103

North Star

101

204

Joe White

202

VR Food

200

406

Teikok ABE u USA Refrig

205

302

GF Stella Piping r

201

300

EVAPCO

301

713

Climat Calibr e Pros ation

411

Cool Air

407

711

DualT emp

401

ENTRANCE

709

CIMC O

Witt

506

DualT Henry emp Techn

403

502

Wagn er-

500

810

Hante H.A. mp Phillip

508

504

812

Cyrus H.A. Shank Phillip

510

Therm CIMC a-Stor O

409

405

20'

Cyrus MultiShank Wing

Book Store

512

Paul InsulMuelle Ther

304

GF Stella Piping r

203

Lanha Calibr m ation

413

707 Güntn Marki er US ng

505

604

Güntn Marki er US ng

503

602

Polyg Isothe uard rm,

501

600

Hanse VaCo n m

605

704

Hanse Bitzer n US,

603

702

Jamis Bitzer on US,

601

700

Vogt Ice

705

808

WEG Electri

806

802 800

FreijeRSC

Food and Beverage

910

1009

Dypla st

JAX Refrig

906

1007 Perm Quote aTher Soft

905

20'

Nexus Refrig InterC ool

908

Integr ated

807

1013

Operating Evaporators and Condensers for Optimal Energy Efficiency – Joseph Pillis - Johnson Controls/Frick Industrial Refrigeration • Reducing lift • Equipment considerations • Part load efficiency

1011

Summ M&M it Refrig

809

WEG Electri

Howd Sham en baugh

701

Repu blic

912

Phoen Repu ix Air blic

811

804

Leo A Azane Daly Inc.

703

Tippm ann

813

Gam ma

Frick Industrial Refrigeratio n

903

801

901

20'

Alfa Laval

112

20'

Freeman Service Center

LU-VE Group

20'

Heatcraft Worldwide Refrigeratio n

20'

DECS A

Frasc old

20'

132

Shale r

20'

Sintec o

Sum mit

1004

Analyt ical

1002

Applie d

1000

euram mon

1005

Fricon USA

1003

1 Stop Compl

1001

Panel Discussion • Low and no-cost opportunities for energy efficiency • Keys to creating an energy program • Going after utility incentives • Rules of thumb and/or actual calculation tools

ENTRANCE

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 21


SAVE THE DATE NOVEMBER 4-7, 2019

JOIN US FOR THE IPIA 102ND CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW AND EXPERIENCE A PREMIER FLORIDA GOLF RESORT & SPA

Discover the ultimate getaway at Sawgrass Mariott Golf Resort & Spa, the home of THE PLAYERS Championship and backdrop to the PGA TOUR headquarters. Located in Ponte Vedra Beach, midway between St. Augustine and Jacksonville, Florida. This resort is the perfect getaway for both business and pleasure. They offer a wide array of spacious rooms and villas with special touches and plenty of space as well as a nearby beach club, fitness center, multiple swimming pools, and (7) restaurants and lounges. We hope you will join us as we feature a top notch exhibit hall, engaging education sessions and networking opportunities during the convention. The IPIA convention is a unique opportunity to combine some business, relaxation and fun with industry colleagues. For more convention information go to www.packagedice.com

Registration to open Summer 2019


CLASSIFIEDS Ad Index

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

American Ice Equipment Exchange, aieexchange.com..................................... 24

Rates are $1.00 per word, with a minimum charge. Any blind ads, with an assigned box number c/o publisher, add $10.00. Deadline for upcoming issue is the 1st of the previous month.

Cascades, food-packaging.cascades.com.......................................................... 12 Classified Ads....................................................................................................... 23 – 26 Ice Systems & Supplies Inc. (ISSI), issionline.com.............................................. 2 & 24 Ing-Tech Corporation (ITC), itcpack.com......................................................... 9 & 23 Keet Consulting Services, LLC (RouteMan), kcsgis.com......................................... 17 KEITH Walking Floor, keithwalkingfloor.com............................................................. 19

For advertising and listing information, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

Matthiesen, matthiesenequipment.com................................................................. 28 Modern Ice, modernice.com............................................................................. 5 & 25 Polar Temp, polartemp.com..................................................................................... 27 Vogt Ice, vogtice.com................................................................................................. 9

NATIONWIDE/INTERNATIONAL

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 1-800-599-4744 | itcpack.com

ICE MAKERS

PACKAGING

• VOGT P24A ICE MAKERS (2) • VOGT P34AL W/ HIGH SIDE

•HAMER 125 – NEW, USED AND REBUILT

REFRIGERATION

• HAMER RING CLOSER W/CONVEYOR

• 20 HP KRACK CONDENSER • LIQUID OVERFEED VALVE PACKAGE • 6.5 BOHN W/ EVAP CONDENSER W/UNIT COOLER

• HAMER 125 W/ STAND & CONVEYOR • HAMER 310 W/ 125 CLOSER • PALLET DISPENSER • SLIP SHEET DISPENSER

• MARLEY TOWER W/ PUMP

• SS SHAKER W/ STAND

BLOCK MAKERS

BAGGERS

• LEER BL39 W/ REMOTE CONDENSER

• VL - 510

• TURBO BP-360 BLOCK PRESS

• VLS - 510

SUPPLIES

SCREW AND BELT CONVEYORS

• LEER ICE MERCHANDISERS IN STOCK • BAGS AND WIRE • PARTS

• HYTROL BELT CONVEYORS 10’ & 12’ • PORTABLE FOLDING INCLINE CONVEYOR - MODEL R • POWER 90 BELT CONVEYOR

• SPARE PARTS

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 23


CLASSIFIEDS



SOUTHEAST USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Vogt 118’s 5 Ton Ice Maker

7/8, W/C • Vogt 9000 7/8, W/C • Amcot ST-25 Cooling Tower • Marley 4821 Cooling tower

• 5lb Wicketed Ice Bags • 7lb Roll Stock • 22lb Roll Stock • 10LB Ice Cans (45) 4.5” x

• Arctic Temp 4000 Lb Ice Maker

• Hamer 310 Form, Fill, & Seal

• Ice Max 300, 300lb block Baker

• 1/2HP drop In Refrigeration

• Vivian Manual Block Press

• 16lb Wicketed “misprint”

Ice Bags

8” x 14”T Snow Cone Block Cans Orbital 16 ton Ice bin MGR 3000SD Stainless Bin Collapsible Blue Bins Mannhardt 2801 Ice Bin Matthiesen 10 ton moving floor bin

• Matthiesen Stainless Top Load

Magic Finger Bagging System • Matthiesen VL510, Top Load

Bagger, Galv • JMC 4’ Belt conveyor • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol TA 12’ • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol BA 16’ • 9x10 Galvanized Portable Screw

conveyor • Water Softener System

AND MUCH MORE!

If you have discontinued ice bags or used equipment you would like to sell PLEASE CALL. SEE OUR USED EQUIPMENT WEB PAGE AT AIEEXCHANGE.COM. Call for surplus ice! Polar Temp Equipment Mike Landino - Toll free - 1-877-376-0367 E-mail (NEW ADDRESS): mlandino@polartemp.com Don’t forget to call if you have a quality piece of used equipment for sale.

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Turbo Tig 33 Ice Maker, 98 model • Mycom N6WB Compressors w/125 HP motors skid mounted with oil separators (used with Vogt P34AL ice makers) • Turbo CB38 Rake • Screw Conveyor Drive Packages for 9" and 12" conveyors (great condition) • Hammer RBC with conveyor • Stainless 9" and 12" screw conveyors • 21' Hytrol belt conveyor • Turbo CB87 with plastic chain and sprockets and stainless steel flights • Morris 18 ton Tube Cube Maker, R22, 2006 model complete with evap condensor 1" ice • Vogt 218, rebuilt in 2005, complete with cooling tower

24 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019

"NEW" KAMCO PARTS Ice Systems & Supplies Rock Hill, SC Toll free (800) 662-1273 or (803) 324-8791


CLASSIFIEDS

SOUTHEAST EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Clienbell bin-holds 6 machines

10’5”x6’x4’ deep • Kamco ice transfer bid-6 ton capacity

• Incline auger conveyor 14’x9” • 2-Hytrol conveyors 16’x20”

and 6’x12”

• Hamer bag closure model 125 • Masterbilt walk-in freezer 3

phase 13’Wx15’Dx7’H

• Mathiessen bagger

Jones Refrigeration, Randolph, MS | CALL 662-419-5119

NORTHEAST VOGT ICE FOR SALE 5, 7, 16 & 40 lb. bags. Water is lab tested for purity. Delivery or pick-up. Six generations of quality.

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Suction Accumulator - Chil-Con, Model #AA24084, 24” x 7’ high, with boil out coil – Like new condition $6,000.00 Receiver 12’ x 30” with warming loop used with Vogt ice makerLike new condition - $6,000.00 Toshiba 125 HP Motor, Premium Efficiency Contact Kyle at Long Island Ice & Fuel Corp.

(631) 727-3010 or (516) 790-6842

Long Island Ice & Fuel Corp.

Call (631) 727-3010

USED ICE MAKING EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Tig 85 SC, SN 941010, Alum panels Tig 33 SC, SN 910170 Alum panels CF 40 SC, SN 8325500 SS panels

ICE CARVING TOOLS Plastic liners for clear block makers $1.24/ea Reusable drip pans from $6.50/ea Over 500 items in stock for Ice Carvers

BF 3690, SN 7801300, SS panels Morris TNT SN 785-388 Alum panel

Contact Bob Morse @ Getchell Brothers, Inc. 800-949-4423, bob.morse@getchellbrothers.com

ICE FOR SALE Vogt Mini tube ice, 8, 20 & 40 lb. bags. All ice is screened, palletized & stretch wrapped. We deliver or you pick up. Our water is treated with ozone for sterilization. No chlorine added!

IceSculptingTools.com

or (440) 717-1940

Martin's Ice Company

Phone (717) 733-7968 or fax (717) 733-1981 PA

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2019 25


CLASSIFIEDS

NORTHEAST

YOUR AD HERE To place a classified ad, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

Merchandiser Parts for all brands at competitive prices.

(877) 984-5945

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

1-800-543-1581 | modernice.com Ice Makers • Vogt Ice Maker – P24A • Morris Ice Maker • Vogt Ice Maker – P118 • Turbo Ice Maker – CAR120 • Turbo Ice Maker – CF40SCER • Vogt Ice Maker – P418 • Vogt Ice Maker – HE30 • Kold Draft Ice Maker

MIDWEST

Packaging • Matthiesen Heat Seal Bagger • Matthiesen Baler (3 Available) • Hamer Form, Fill, and Seal Machine - 310

Check our most recent inventory online at modernice.com!

Handling • Matthiesen Shaker Belt with Stand • Shaker • 12” Stainless Steel Auger (Several Lengths) • 12” Stainless Steel Shroud Trough Cover

CANADA FOR SALE

(3) Clinebell 10 lb. ice block makers, Model S60, 1.5HF, (3) condensing units, 3-phase, 240 volts. Will sell individually, or all three for $12,000. Call Arctic Ice at

713-269-2534

26 REFRIGERATION Magazine │February 2019

ICE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Magic Finger • (8) Turbo Ice Makers, 10 & 20 Ton • Cooling tower pumping station • Hamer 125 • 16 feet stainless steel auger • (3) power pack for freezer • Kamco bin • Forklift • Indoor/outdoor merchandisers • Ice bags • Trucks • Other ice equip. and misc. items • 360 Turbo Block Press • Bagger

Contact Lino at

416-676-3429 Email:

clearicesolidblocks@ hotmail.com


CLASSIFIEDS


WHAT’S IN YOUR

PLANT?

Matthiesen is a manufacturer of baggers, bucket elevators, balers, block presses, live bottom bin, belt conveyors, crushers, gravity bins, heat-sealers, rotating tables, shakers, snow reels, custom drying belts, screw conveyors and bagger takoff systems including the Magic Finger System. Contact us today to provide customized solutions for your plant through our research and development, technical service, and experienced professional staff.

the name you’ve come to trust

1-800-624-8635 MatthiesenEquipment.com

Profile for Refrigeration Magazine

Refrigeration Magazine - February 2019  

The February 2019 issue of Refrigeration Magazine features the Sapporo Snow Festival in Japan, C-Store Trends, Savvy Marketing tips and upco...

Refrigeration Magazine - February 2019  

The February 2019 issue of Refrigeration Magazine features the Sapporo Snow Festival in Japan, C-Store Trends, Savvy Marketing tips and upco...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded