Page 1

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 2


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane and looked thoughtful. But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance carefully in his mind. “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?” “I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow. “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang across the ditch again. Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 3


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no s near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the , “I will go into the forest and kill a for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the then my jaws would rust again.”

. “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and

But the went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the found a tree full of nuts and filled ’s with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the s. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover with dry s when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. 4


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked

despairingly.

“I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the thoughtful.

, and the

shook his shaggy mane and looked

But the said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly in his mind.

, after measuring the distance carefully

“Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the

. “Who will go first?”

“I will,” declared the , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, would be killed, or the badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The sat upon the down.

’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched

“Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the

.

“Because that isn’t the way we s do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the had got down from his back the sprang across the ditch again. 5


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no s near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the , “I will go into the forest and kill a for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the then my jaws would rust again.”

. “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and

But the went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the found a tree full of nuts and filled ’s with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the s. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover with dry s when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. 6


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked

despairingly.

“I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the thoughtful.

, and the

shook his shaggy mane and looked

But the said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly in his mind.

, after measuring the distance carefully

“Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the

. “Who will go first?”

“I will,” declared the , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, would be killed, or the badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The sat upon the down.

’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched

“Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the

.

“Because that isn’t the way we s do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the had got down from his back the sprang across the ditch again. 7


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 8


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane and looked thoughtful. But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance carefully in his mind. “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?” “I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow. “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang across the ditch again. Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 9


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 10


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane and looked thoughtful. But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance carefully in his mind. “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?” “I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow. “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang across the ditch again. Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 11


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents, have a very good breakfast.” icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents,

“Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its ob such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning.

When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some exa all started toward the Emerald City. by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 12


bjects

amples

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph it seemed that their journey must end. of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph

“What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane A statistical tabulation is an index of and looked thoughtful. A statistical tabulation is an index of But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.”

“I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance empirical observations; a population curve, carefully in his mind. empirical observations; a population curve, “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” for example, is a shape produced by the information

for example, is a shape produced by the information

“Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?”

“I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am it describes not an invented imag on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at itall.” describes not an invented image.

“I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is it is purportedly grounded by nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” As an icon, As an icon, it is purportedly grou The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow.

physical resemblance rather than cultural physical resemblance rather than cultural

“Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data. across the ditch again. convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data.

Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 13


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both

In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both

In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both

“If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will indexes. An icon is a sign icons whoseand form is analogous object it represents, have a icons very and good breakfast.” indexes. An icontoisthe a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents,

iconswhose and indexes. An icon is ato sign form is analogous the object it represents, “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a

icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents,

poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.”

such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its ob such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects

such as aorperspective drawing index is a sign linkedmap. to itsAnobjects

But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning.

When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some ex by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples

This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when

by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples

In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype are both icons indexes. An asicon is they a sign whose they saw before them a great ditch figures that crossed the road and and divided the forest far as form is analogous to either the object represents, perspective map. could see on side. Ititwas a very wide such ditch, as andawhen they creptdrawing up to theor edge and An index is a sign linked to its objects by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples of 14 indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph. A statistical tabulation is an index of empirical observations; a population curve, for example, is a shape produced by the information it describes not an invented image. As an icon, it is purportedly grounded by physical resemblance


xamples

he terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the resents, such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects by virtue of proximity or direct physica me examples of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph. A statistical tabulation is an index of empirical obs opulation curve, for example, is a shape produced by the information it describes not an invented image. As an icon, it is p unded by physical resemblance rather than cultural convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data. In the term miotics, Isotype figures are both icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents, spective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some ex exes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph. A statistical tabulation is an index of empirical observations; a p ve, for example, is a shape produced by the information it describes not an invented image. As an icon, it is purportedly gro sical resemblance rather than cultural convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data.

bjects

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph

“What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly.

A anstatistical index of tabulation is

“I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane A statistical tabulation is an index of and looked thoughtful. A statistical tabulation is an index of But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.”

empirical observations; a population curve,

“I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance empirical observations; a population curve, carefully in his mind. empirical observations; a population curve, “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, for example, is a shape produced by the information one at a time.”

for example, is a information shape produced by the “I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf,

for example, is a shape produced by the information

“Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?”

Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am it describes not an invented imag on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” it describes not an invented image.

it describes not an invented image. As an it walked is to the edge of the gulf and The Scarecrow sat uponpurportedly the Lion’s back, icon, and the big beast grounded crouched down. by “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow. physical resemblance rather than “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving cultural a great spring,

“I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is is purportedly grounded by nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.”As an icon,Asitan icon, it is purportedly grou

physical resemblance rather than cultural physical resemblance rather than cultural

he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data. across the ditch again. convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data.

convention. As an index, it is generated Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on theby Lion’s numerical data. back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were

flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 15


Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both

“If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents, have a very good breakfast.” icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents,

“Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its ob such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects

But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning.

When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some ex all started toward the Emerald City. by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 16


bjects

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph it seemed that their journey must end. of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph

“What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane A statistical tabulation is an index of and looked thoughtful. A statistical tabulation is an index of But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance empirical observations; a population curve, carefully in his mind. empirical observations; a population curve, “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” for example, is a shape produced by the information “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?”

for example, is a shape produced by the information

“I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am it describes not an invented image. on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me atit describes all.” not an invented image. “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is As an icon, it is purportedly grounded by nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.”

As an icon, it is purportedly groun

The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow.

physical resemblance rather than cultural im physical resemblance rather than cultural ted

n nve age i n “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, a n im ot to n he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased s t, a bject e n i b r i r sprang tp the o tura cLion see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the s o e o f to ndata. a byusnumerical cul s it itdis generated convention. As an index, across the ditch again. e n r a o convention. index, s a alobygnumerical atio iteisxegenerated r thdata.vation ta. Asran e a m n h d d a the Lion’s Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Totocainl her arms n iclimbed rat obser bject s on nfo and i i f i e r o e c e ynext xamples back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. th moment les ite seemed cal o its o tics form baslaifn sheiriwere um The p b n s m m p d a about flying through the air; and then, befored she e toexthink by haductime m onkthe se wasf esafe d t emio in ho it,reshe e w e e d t n sat of s o theyliall o gotothe other side. The Lion went back a third m TinsiWoodman gn sical, and prand era time exthen n t an S y n d g y e o a i . e g n h p t s n i s for a a tchance down for a few moments to igive had madeohis ac oto s g the n irest, an leaps shbeast by phisisgreat is a minol cribes tprint, t n i a c o x d i , c e s breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. i n s l h o n d ex de er ind mple, hysica xes. A groun bulatio An in the t n it de re a fo us to t n ta map. ta. In atio es a17 logo r th s a r exa ect p inde edly l A a . t c o r ion rve, f or di s and rpor atisti ng or cal da inform f index is ana rathe s t n b i t u e i n e y u onv tion c ximit th ico it is p h. A s draw umer by the ples o e form blanc irical o c l a a f pro e bo m mp to n, grap ctive by n ced exam hos ltur pul ico r ese e ed d


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

20


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

21


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

22


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

23


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

it i

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no con, i an a pho houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the s A r Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid ge. fire r, o ch a a o r r m i that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their , su n d ibread, mand s e t a t en e in resen . As a now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. inv g

an n ima it rep ntion urve, t o “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kills andeer tfor ve ion c m ct canonroast , a you. jeYou e n i b t i c b r i o it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer e andtthen ula f prox tp food, cr cooked ral youopwill s h o u t e o l f have a very good breakfast.” it d re a us to n cu s; a p tue o s are n o i at exes a alogo er tha vation by vir figure s an ta. Woodman a m r d “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin er ifjeyou cts killed al e info of ind. “I ishould rath obsweep ypea age. A or s an cecertainly c t i r o b r s e wouldhrust again.” m poor deer, and then my jaws o l um d by t mples se for mblan pirica to its tics, I ted im a mir n n y o e xa and ce the venknew eforest emsupper, ed andseno mioone inever e in prese d baway uinto But the Lion went wh found reshis oown k f g e e d l t n a n o i a a n l f oftnuts e r pr .mention sicScarecrow what it was, filledt it r ventio Som s ait.sigAndhythe y ofull dex found gn aotree edidn’t o a , aand n im i eneforhahe g n p t s n i c g p c i l a inofor a long t thought y would is basket es time. tathem, n thatd bshe annot xbeishungry s with bje al con lat Dorothy’s so inShe b t n o r i i o s a c i o r p i , m c e t x was r laughed is kind n inde, butteshe sc heartily o atothe n deof the ur popu th awkward oScarecrow e al and t o i A thoughtful dethis n l f t c d le, very i . n e u u a t i t p s a us l c i th padded xes creature gro picked an exway . Annuts. s; a vir tue am in which nHis epoor anandiothe phy the the so clumsy are were on hands abu up o I y p n i t s d l h t t g . a s t l n A d c a a o i e y t r t n. e, for rnuts r m l as r te hetisdropped tica g oalmost nal raBut damany direwere rva ects b ype fi deinx the othat the theseScarerow oasrmhef put abasket. ansod small f n p a i v r s n s o a i i c r n ofor it enabled bj , Isot im st it took ebasket, ob away puhow Along ce to akeep on mind him from cu imity didicnot wi himmto erifillythe m o l h s n r a s t i e r a s o l . l c d u get it a good it e f burn ox phfeared oth flames tics ented sand mpstraw mbhimmup. piriSo dhetokept d bintoxahis y nmight ivea spark o o e e i t on, to,gasrahe b s h c f pr are b the c c e i e e e m w cover r k leaves e she f with ldry inv e in a e near n l Dorothy came to ted pand swhen oaway efrom n o n s spetheerflames, adistance oduonlyom i a a n f h r r g e x c i a s r i o p e soundly ag pre p gThese y morning. dslept a ysand she e her very ot gu ge. A lay a s warm, ign lountil . Ssnugisand en hkept g n down toa sleep. m h p r t s n i i e a p c o s a a a ror, is a s ta con d by is an x is no cribes nt, an ct it r t n h i m i i c o r i , m i c u e d e is cagirl n rippling ri they ex daylight, de inataiolittle , s iitndwas ter tand nface ind hebrook, tpafter dessoon le, ythe a m ntsWhen obj i l ebathed . An rher u o p s s l n i e o n o i t u e f A n s e am t the ph Emerald s astarted dex City. ly g al tab map. ta. In ation are a s to th extoward n pre n. Aall d c i r e e e r t o r ic da nform exes ogou , f or di s and rpor it ntio or They sttravelers. l i e t a g v a This was to be an eventful day for the had i c r n d walking ve nal an hour when on is pu . A st rawi meri the hardly inbeen cu imity a c f i s o con ation they y ithe forest as far as they t a great before ditche that d crossed h them u the rox saw les divided d broad pand l n, i side. apIth was y n ditch, rmcrept up to the edge and botoniceither iav veryd bwide r p e t u o o g c e f f c p could see and when they r m o u e o ue o e es a As an a phot persp nerate prod e exa whos r rt i u e v m e by ype fig 24age. r, or as a it is g a shap ct. So a sign o h m t r i Iso nted a mir ts, suc ndex, le, is conta on is ic p al ve in en ni n in mage epres . As a r exam physic es. An x i r o ec t an tion e, f t it r nde


he terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the esents, such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects by virtue of proximity or direct physica e examples of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph. A statistical tabulation is an index of empirical obse pulation curve, for example, is a shape produced by the information it describes not an invented image. As an icon, it is pu nded by physical resemblance rather than cultural convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data. In the termin otics, Isotype figures are both icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents, s pective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some exa xes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph. A statistical tabulation is an index of empirical observations; a po e, for example, is a shape produced by the information it describes not an invented image. As an icon, it is purportedly gro ical resemblance rather than cultural convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end.

“What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly.

y

b “I haven’t the idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane dfaintest e d tion n a l u and looked thoughtful. . bu ro

ly g ical ta r map al d e ist Scarecrow g o said, or t But tthe eric “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this n a p i t r m s w u u a ditch. Therefore, d if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” r is p ph. Agreat e d d by n oduce v i a t r e c te e pr jumpomover g it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance era I acould oto erspe“I ethink S p n . t a p h c g s carefullys in his mind. a as a x, it is e, is a l cont icon i y e l b icaaresall swe ind xamp“Then . Anright,” edanswered y ion the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, d t h e n a p x l e u e t atnadtime.”gro u r i tab map. , fo direcone y l l d a d n r ic g or rical a or te tsaid s y o ons“Well, i t I’ll try it,” the Lion . “Who will go first?” t i m h ic urp A sta rawin nume ed p t d by oduc, “for, bo , it is“I will,” ph.declared Scarecrow if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, ive the a d t r e n c t g e o otDorothy porr theSoTin meWoodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am a killed, o rspwould c r i e e be n h e ap act. pyour genit will shnot a p son a is a for the fall would not hurt me at all.” s t i back matter son much, r a n t o i s a o o i ,r , c c , h dex cal . An i ed by ple afraid i suc “I n s i , m y am terribly of falling, s s n said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is an r exa ct ph dexe ound myself,” nt o i s t r A o nothing f eto do but try it. So get onlamy back and we will make the attempt.” on. urve, or dir and in tedly g l tabu p. An c ty Scarecrow ca Lion’s orupon maback, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and tithe ons urpsat r s c i i tion roximiThe o t p g ta oth it isdown. A s rawin . of p are bcrouched , h n rap d ico don’t veand es an“Why i g r t you run jump?” asked the Scarecrow. o u c t fig . As ho erspe p a ap ge ma ror, or“Because as that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, h r i c he m , su shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang nts ese across the ditch again.

Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 25


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

26


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

27


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both In the terminology of semiotics, Isotype figures are both

“If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents, have a very good breakfast.” icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose form is analogous to the object it represents,

“Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its ob such as a perspective drawing or map. An index is a sign linked to its objects

But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning.

When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some ex all started toward the Emerald City. by virtue of proximity or direct physical contact. Some examples This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 28


bjects

xamples

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph of indexes are a footprint, an image in a mirror, or a photograph

“What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane A statistical tabulation is an index of and looked thoughtful.

A statistical tabulation is an index of

But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance empirical observations; a population curve, carefully in his mind. empirical observations; a population curve, “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?”

for example, is a shape produced by the information for example, is a shape produced by the information

“I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” it describes not an invented image it describes not an invented image.

“I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. As an icon, it is purportedly grounded by “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow.

physical resemblance rather than cultural physical resemblance rather than cultural

“Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data. across the ditch again. convention. As an index, it is generated by numerical data.

Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 29


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journey to the Great Oz

They were obliged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no houses near. The tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the Tin Woodman chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire that warmed her and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and now she did not know what they would do for breakfast. “If you wish,” said the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast it by the fire, since your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will have a very good breakfast.” “Don’t! Please don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a poor deer, and then my jaws would rust again.” But the Lion went away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew what it was, for he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled Dorothy’s basket with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought this was very kind and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward way in which the poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the nuts were so small that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow did not mind how long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from the flames , as he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good distance away from the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she lay down to sleep. These kept her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning. When it was daylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they all started toward the Emerald City. This was to be an eventful day for the travelers. They had hardly been walking an hour when they saw before them a great ditch that crossed the road and divided the forest as far as they could see on either side. It was a very wide ditch, and when they crept up to the edge and 30


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

looked into it they could see it was also very deep, and there were many big, jagged rocks at the bottom. The sides were so steep that none of them could climb down, and for a moment it seemed that their journey must end. “What shall we do?” asked Dorothy despairingly. “I haven’t the faintest idea,” said the Tin Woodman , and the Lion shook his shaggy mane and looked thoughtful. But the Scarecrow said, “We cannot fly, that is certain. Neither can we climb down into this great ditch. Therefore, if we cannot jump over it, we must stop where we are.” “I think I could jump over it,” said the Cowardly Lion , after measuring the distance carefully in his mind. “Then we are all right,” answered the Scarecrow, “for you can carry us all over on your back, one at a time.” “Well, I’ll try it,” said the Lion . “Who will go first?” “I will,” declared the Scarecrow , “for, if you found that you could not jump over the gulf, Dorothy would be killed, or the Tin Woodman badly dented on the rocks below. But if I am on your back it will not matter so much, for the fall would not hurt me at all.” “I am terribly afraid of falling, myself,” said the Cowardly Lion , “but I suppose there is nothing to do but try it. So get on my back and we will make the attempt.” The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion’s back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down. “Why don’t you run and jump?” asked the Scarecrow. “Because that isn’t the way we lions do these things,” he replied. Then giving a great spring, he shot through the air and landed safely on the other side. They were all greatly pleased to see how easily he did it, and after the Scarecrow had got down from his back the Lion sprang across the ditch again. Dorothy thought she would go next; so she took Toto in her arms and climbed on the Lion’s back, holding tightly to his mane with one hand. The next moment it seemed as if she were flying through the air; and then, before she had time to think about it, she was safe on the other side. The Lion went back a third time and got the Tin Woodman , and then they all sat down for a few moments to give the beast a chance to rest, for his great leaps had made his breath short, and he panted like a big dog that has been running too long. 31


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

Chapter 7 | The Journe

ged to camp out that night under a large tree in the forest, for there were no he tree made a good, thick covering to protect them from the dew, and the chopped a great pile of wood with his axe and Dorothy built a splendid fire r and made her feel less lonely. She and Toto ate the last of their bread, and know what they would do for breakfast. In the

terminology of semiotics,

id the Lion , “I will go into the forest and kill a deer for you. You can roast nce your tastes are so peculiar that you prefer cooked food, and then you will d breakfast.” icons and indexes. An icon is a sign whose

don’t,” begged the Tin Woodman . “I should certainly weep if you killed a then my jaws would rust again.”such as a perspective drawing or

form is analogous to the

map. An index is a sign link

ent away into the forest and found his own supper, and no one ever knew he didn’t mention it. And the Scarecrow found a tree full of nuts and filled et with them, so that she would not be hungry for a long time. She thought nd and thoughtful of the Scarecrow , but she laughed heartily at the awkward e poor creature picked up the nuts. His padded hands were so clumsy and the all that he dropped almost as many as he put in the basket. But the Scarerow ow long it took him to fill the basket, for it enabled him to keep away from he feared a spark might get into his straw and burn him up. So he kept a good om the flames, and only came near to cover Dorothy with dry leaves when she p. These kept32her very snug and warm, and she slept soundly until morning.

ylight, the girl bathed her face in a little rippling brook, and soon after they rd the Emerald City. by virtue of proximity or direct physical

contact. Some examples


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz | L. Frank Baum

ey to the Great Oz

Isotype figures are both object it represents,

ked to its objects

33


Designed by Mary Sutton

Wizard of Oz - Experimental Typography Book  

The Wizard of Oz book is an experiment in typography and semiotics. I laid out a spread using actual text from the book and slowly began tak...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you