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M A R I A

B A R C Z E N T E W I C Z

NEW STORIES OF HOUSES manifest0

2016/2017


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CONTENTS

06- three stories of houses 12 - people - video 14 - the house -casa never never land 16 - autism video 18 - e-mails 20 - client 23 - understanding autism-mikroarchitecture 26 - understanding autism - mikroarchitecture - f 28 - mikroarchitecture ii - design for senses 30 - mikroarchitecture - final result 33 - redesigning the house - project 34 - individual ideas 36 - new furniture 40 - redesigning the house - the cave 42 - redesigning the house - the celling 47 - manifesto 49 - bibliography


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GROUP

irst idea


firtst phase of project


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three houses


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GROUP Villa Anbar in Dammam, by Peter Barber

A romantic novelist from Saudi Arabia approached the British architect, Peter Barber, in 1992 to design her house in the important commercial and port city, Dammam, in the Arabian Gulf. Mrs Anbar - a widow - divided her year between London and her native country, therefore her attitude towards Middle Eastern culture was characterised by cosmopolitan influences. On the other hand, as a Western architect designing in Saudi Arabia, Barber had to research the complexities of Islamic culture. The interior of Saudi domestic houses The traditional typology of interiors in Saudi houses reflects a profound sense of hierarchy between men and women. It is a rigid issue of segregation between sexes which is echoed in the two entrances to the house, and is followed up in the interior by separating men's and women's quarters. The degree of separation is further declared - between servants and members of the family, and between the family and the outside world - by a series of increasingly private spaces which gravitate towards a central courtyard.Undoubtedly, the context in which the villa Anbar was going to be built was not neutral. Political and religious leaders had far more power over architecture than even the architects themselves. Indeed, during the construction of the house, a nearby medieval settlement was razed to the ground by the government simply because its spatial complexity of tight alleyways and small squares created a problem of control for the authorities.Faced with this unfamiliar environment, the English architect acknowledged that a close reading of the books Beyond the Veil, by Fatima Mernissi, and Sexuality and Space by Beatriz Colomina was influential in approaching the programme of the house. From that moment, the programme not only became to specify the rooms required by Mrs Anbar, her children and grandchildren, but also, and above all, to understand the house as a political space.

The profundity of the gaze Peter Barber investigated the power of the gaze to determine the division of space in domestic architecture. From the most public area to the most private one, the eye was directed in very specific paths through different layers, either giving a full view or only a partial one, sometimes merely implying what could be seen. At the entrance, a gate gives a view into the courtyard, although a wall to the right prevents the gaze penetrating any further. The threshold is defined by a lintel that slips over the top of the wall. This lintel shows a dual aspect, a technical one of taking water to the swimming pool on the other side of the wall, and a metaphorical one of framing the gaze so as to give a hint of something else beyond. As one passes the entrance, tiny openings cut through the front wall of the house and signal the presence of the unseen occupants. Although internally the house follows a traditional layout of separating men and women's quarters, this structure is broken by simple acts. Thus, as a crack, a horizontal cut in a wall of the women's quarter serves as a vantage-point for surveying the unseen, that is, the male domain. As might have been expected, male members of the family demanded that a shutter would be placed over the frame. This was done but, paradoxically, it was allocated on the women's side. Opposite the pool, the driver's dwelling is placed on the first level projecting over the private garden. Looking down from his window, his gaze touches on the most private space of the family, in their time of leisure. Even if the window were to be blocked up, the presence of the servant would always be felt due to the volume of his room. However, the presence of the maid is more oblique. Her room, which is placed on the roof terrace and thus away from the family's private rooms, is connected to the central courtyard through a series of cuts. In that way, her gaze is allowed to penetrate into the symbolic heart of the house. While Barber builds according to the usual gender and class boundaries demanded by Muslim society, he subverts these boundaries with gentle questions rather than formulating them in an obvious manner. This is an architecture that goes beyond formalistic considerations, that introduces a certain ambiguity which in turns initiates questions about social conditions and changes.


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three houses


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GROUP The Naked House in Kawagoe, by Shigeru Ban

Shigeru Ban interrupted the international scene with its ingenious usage of carton tubes for rapid assembly of refugees camping places after recent earthquakes in Kobe and Turkey. This same 'paper architect' - as he was known from then on - designed a house, "naked" of any partitions, as a reply to a commission for a house that had to encourage the relationship between the members of a three generations family. Space for the family This large family had a land in Kawagoe, a small town on the outskirts of Tokyo where the accelerated speed of city life gives way to a calm landscape of greenhouses and rice fields that extended along the river Shingashi. In a Japanese context, it is a privilege to possess a land that can contain a house of more than one hundred square metres. The client having such an opportunity, decided to maximise, the significance of the communal space in the house where the different generations could communicate and relate to each other. Also, being part of the client's culture, one could argue that Shigeru Ban, took as a starting point the traditional Japanese meaning of the word "dwelling" - symbolising the roof as a gateway between heaven and earth. Consequently, the roof expresses the atmosphere of the place and it is precisely by the ceiling that people's thoughts have generous space. Even more so, the delicate floor in the traditional Japanese house is understood like a platform which forms part of the furniture. It implies a magnet state similiar to that of walls in Eurpean dwellings which we tend to sit against. In Japan the main pole of attraction is the floor and where one is seated rather than standing or walking on. The way of life in the Japanese house is motivated by movements that cherish the floor, leaning against it or even moving about it on four feet. The floor also gains attention with horizontal lines, the sliding doors and movable screens, as well the black lines that frame the places where things happen. This list of elements directs the viewers' attention to the floor as a place of communication.Between the floor and ceiling, the foundation for people's dwelling lies in the spiritual. It is the place where the soul is nourished without any distraction of ornamentation or external influences - an idea that derives from Zen Buddism and the belief that knowledge is obtained through reflection and insight.

A house naked of partitions Working within the concept of different generations fusing their lives, Shigeru Ban came up with a translucent shed-like structure containing a single common space in which private areas were reduced to a minimum. Private spaces for each member of the family are organised by four mobile, cubicle bedrooms. The three generations thereby shared a house which took reference models so opposed as the room of four and a half tatamis - the basic unit of traditional Japanese architecture and the loft - a summary of a residential ideal, occidental and metropolitan, that renounced partitions in the interests of greater spatial amplitude. The open-plan and neutral space of the shed can be organised and transformed as needed by moving the bedrooms, they even can be drawn out to the garden through the large window on the western facade. With them, and by emphasising the movement of the cubicles by making their wheels highly visible, the surface of the floor reinforces its quality as a place of communication. On the opposite end of the house, next to the porch that serves as the parking area, the bathroom, laundry and a dressing room are drawn together. All the clothes of the family members are stored together to avoid the use of wardrobes that would impede the movement of the cubicles. The kitchen is placed at one side of the shed and separated from the common living area by way of a curtain. With a similar appearance as the greenhouses nearby, a translucent enclosure was designed to protect the family's privacy and to avoid unwanted glances from the access route. The exterior of the wooden framework which forms the structure is clad with corrugated translucent plastic reinforced with fibreglass, while the interior facade is covered with cotton fabric fixed with Velcro to make it easier to clean. The problem that Shigeru Ban was faced with was to find thermal insulation, which permitted the light to filter through. Once more following his interest in introducing new materials in the building construction, and by practising with colourful materials such as wood splinters and remnants of recycled paper, he decided to fill the cavity left between the two planes with polystyrene shaving that in Japan is used to pack fruit. The only requirement to make this product suitable was to have to saturate it in a liquid that held back fire and to enclose it in transparent vinyl bags that were sealed and nailed to the wooden structure. With the exception to the cubicles, which were constructed with brown corrugated carton, the interior of the whole house enjoys the same milky white light that characterised the old houses with screens made of rice paper.In the same way as the traditional Japanese house is not thought as a permanent dwelling but a place where the inhabitants stay temporarily until their situation changes, the Naked House is designed as a one space which describes the course of time like water in the river that never stands still and takes on enumerable forms.


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three houses


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GROUP The U-House in Tokyo, by Toyo Ito

The U-House was built in 1976 in the centre of Tokyo. It was designed by the architect Toyo Ito for his older sister, who had just lost her husband to cancer. In 1997 the house was demolished before Toyo Ito's eyes. How does one explain such an ending? The Mourners' wishes The client and her family had lived in one of the city's high-rise apartment. Following her husband's death, the widow requested that the architect build a house for her and her small daughters where they could enjoy the close contact with the soil and plants that their former home had lacked. She also suggested that the house be Lshaped to enable all members of the family to have visual contact with one another. By coincidence, the site next to the architect's house was for sale - the same site on which the widow had lived before she was married. It was as if she wanted to grasp hold of her memories in order to help reunite her family during such a difficult time. In the widow's conversations with the architect, the emphasis on organising functional spaces gradually disappeared and instead turned more towards the symbolic value of the space. Thus the house changed its initial L-shape to become a concrete construction with a U-shape, a form that would create greater light effects and a stronger relationship between the inhabitants.

The life of the house The U-House consisted of two long corridors, one of which ended at the girls' rooms, the other of which led through the kitchen and bathroom and onto the mother's bedroom. Both of the corridors were dark and led into the light - a source originating from the arc of the U. This multi-use space used for playing, dining and meditating, had its walls and ceiling painted white and floor covered with a carpet, also white. In this space the light was diffused and gave a soft texture, but a cut in the ceiling directed the daylight in a straight diagonal line. The powerful light effects were reinforced by the pure whiteness of the interior, which seemed flat and without any three-dimensionality. It was like a screen where the images and floating shadows of the inhabitants were projected; a space to project the human being beyond his or her body. Twenty-one years after the completion of the house, the family was ready to re-establish its links with the outside world. The first one to move away was the older daughter. She had never thought of whether or not it was comfortable to live in the house, although she refers to the house as a coffin. This was perhaps best reflected by the behaviour of her many pets, all of whom had totally refused to be alone in the enclosed courtyard. The mother later moved to a smaller flat, but being a musicologist she had enjoyed the music echoing on the bare walls in the old house. The youngest daughter was the last to move out. She had developed certain sensitivity for aesthetics in this house that was reflected in her appreciation of Kandinsky and later, her eventual position as a museum director. The last thing we know about the story of the house is from a powerful image in a photograph that illustrates its demolition. Instead of interpreting it as a destruction of a home, it is a sign of another stage through which the family progresses. The demolition is a symbol of renewal of life and consequently, we can argue that this was a house for mourners.


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people-video

Inspired by tories of houses on the left I made a video abut this what is most important for me in architecture. It is black and white wideo with emotional music, showing many people In a crowd or in normal everyday situations. We are meeting tousands of people in our life with most of them we don't even talk. everyone has a story, story which can be a wonderful beginging for architecture. story which can change somebodys life. story which we can change if we enter into it.


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GROUP

all stories I which i have chosen have somethnig in common. That thing is focusing on a client and his indyvidual needs in very psychological way. They are changing relation between people and are working like a therapy. psychology- is what i am looking for in architecture


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HOUSETHE- CASA NEVER HOUSE - NEVER CASA LAND NEVER

NEVER LAND


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Environmental project that aims to preserve the beauty and biodiversity of the valley, creating economic security and dream-like scenarios. The building is located in a sloping terrain, in the valley of the Cala Vadella. The slope of the plot allows that each part of the house has different views of the sea without interference between. Design decisions to exploit the potential of the site to provide desirable conditions of habitability: Raise the interiors to the level that can ensure the distant views Give the interiors of a large transparent glass enclosure to allow the contribution of light on one side and on the other access to views of a landscape illuminated. Opening windows throughout the interior is a porch. Closing is a salon. Paint interior elements of blue intended to soften the visual transition between the built elements and the sky. The different buildings are connected by a network of stairs and ramps of different layout. The proposal imposes the need to preserve the natural support of the valley through a series of tactical decisions: Minimize the cutting or removal of trees and shrubs of the plot. Raise over 80 per cent of the mass built on pillars thus avoiding any kind of land transformation. Grouping all the facilities in a concrete chamber. The built complex is divided into three elements: main house, cabin 1 and cabin 2.


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autism client--video autistic person

Autism is neurological disorder which has a lot of various faces. From person to person which huge commun

In this video we wanted to focus on the way they experience world. problem with focusing on one sound and isolating it from others. They When they are in a crowded noisy space they get tired very quickly. some of them see double image.Their world is made from details, they they may have headache when they see sudden very b


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this which you can't notice if you don't have real contact to autistic nication and body movement problems.

Especially at their senses of hearing and sight. Autistic people have y hear everything louder and have unstoppable racket in their heads. When they are stressed they may have blurred picture of a world, focus on them often missing bigger view.Because of their sensitiveness bright light, or hear a lot of sounds in one moment.


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e-mails

Dear Mr. Jaque, We are architecture Erasmus students of the Univerity of Alicante and we are joining the course Projects 4. This semester, we were asked to work with a house and we have chosen “Casa en Never Never Land�, and we have to make a research about the construction. So we would like to know if you can send us some plans, sections as AutoCAD or Revit files and technical information. It would make our work much easier . Thank you in advance , Patrizia Lake, Maria Barczentewicz, Maria Verdu


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GROUP Good morning, We are Erasmus students at the University of Alicante and we are making a project about adaptation of the architecture for people with Autism. We want to understand much better this subject, in order to discover the world of autistic people and know their needs. For this reason we would like to visit your center and ask you some questions about the installations and the treatment to the people; talk to employees and patients about what makes them so special, and learn something from them. We want to understand how they see the world and design a perfect space for them. All this information will help us with our project Thank you, we look forward to hearing from you Patrizia Lake, Maria Barczentewicz, Maria Verdu


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client client - autistic person

Our client is thirty three years old. he has a two years younger wife. they both love nature, thats why they have chosen casa never never land, also called villa terramar. he works at the university as the ornitologist. it is often diffulcut for him to spend time among people he wants to rest in this house. he loves birds, as we mentioned it's his job, but he also enjojs sky at night. he used to spend a lot of time looking at the sky and recognizing constelations. when he got older and more busy he stoped doing that. the most diffult thing for him in his disoder are sounds, thats why we wanted to focus on them in this project.


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understanding autism - microarchitecture


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understanding autism - microarchitecture

very important for our client were sounds. so we decided to amplify pleasureable sounds, like birds singing, wind blowing, rain drops, cydades in the evening. so we focused on a hemlet colecting sounds.


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understanding autism - microarchitecture


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-first idea

With our model, we would like to conduct normal people into the life of an autistic person. On the one hand, we want to show how difficult it can be to live with this disorder, but on the other hand, we also want to express what advantages you get when you have this different kind of feeling. That is why our experiment deals with the special senses autistic persons have. First of all we thought about how to make these impressions as realistic as possible, and so we come up with the idea of creating a helmet and glovs. The helemt will have a geometric form and could be made out of papier mache or cardboard. The part in front of the eyes is beaked and you look throgh a loupe. This has the effect that you can not see everything around you and the things you can see are diffuse, but get really clear, when you come close to them. The same happens to the austistic people, who have often problems with their eyes, but they are focussed on details, that a lot of other people would not see. Another sense that is affected by the illness is hearing. Loud noises have a huge effect on autistic persons, because they hear these sounds louder than normally. So we thought about an appliance for the ears of the person that is wearing the helmet. This can be put on the ears and is connected with a lot of needles. In the inside of the helmet is a material like paper fixed, so that the needles always touch the paper, when the person moves. And because the needles are so close to the ear, the noises are even starched and it feels like it is directly in it . The other aspect we focussed on is that autistic people often can not recognize things by touching them. That is why we wanted to make the person loose his hands as a medium for get to know new things.Therefor, the person get something like gloves to put on his hands. It should be delicate cable on each finger, that has bubbles on it, which make the person feel like they never really touch anything. It also seems like there is something between you and all the things, so that you never know what you are touching at the moment .Our experiment target to force the person to concentrate all the time on every sense they have. It shoud show how important our senses are and that they are not self-evident. It should confuse the person that they do not see, hear and feel the things they expected and make them understand in which good way Autism can affect your life and make you see things in a different way


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microarchitecture ii - design for senses

autism is sesnsoric disorder, which means that information which autistic person gets from his senses is confusing for him and hard to understand. that was a problem on which we have focused on this stage.

we proposed to locate two cones, one on each side of a head. They were supossed to lead sound into ear, and amplyfy it.. on a picture on the left we can see zooming on some details of construction. it was very important for us to design something comfortable and stable. on the right id ilustration from the video we have showed, which is explaing how autistic person hears. a lot of bacground sounds that normal person just ignore, are disturbing autistic person


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for eyes: magnifying glass, and special shape of a helmet which force a person whose wearing it to focus. thanks to that it is possible to see more details that normally are missed

for nose: we had been thinking about placeing some nicely smelling pieces inside the helmet. when a person inside is moving his head, he also changes smells. the aim was to create mental conection between picture, sound and a smell. finally we decided to resign from that idea.


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MICROARCHITECTURE understanding autism -FINAL - microarchitectur RESULT


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e

FOR OUR MODEL WE DECIDED TO WORK WITH LIGHT WOOD FOR THE EASY HANDLING. THE FUNCTION OF A HELMET IS THE RECREATION OF A RESONANCE BOX. IT CONSISTS OF SMALL COMPOSITIONS OF TRANGLES THAT WILL BE SETTING UP THE SPACE. OUR MODEL HAS TWO PARTS. THE FIRST CORRESPONDES TO THE SENSE OD SIGHT. TO CREATE OPORTUNITY TO FOCUS WE PLACED MAGNIFYING GLASS ON THE FRONT OF THE MICROARCHITECTURE. THANKTS TO THE GLASS AND SPECIAL SHAPE OF A MODEL PERSON WHO WEARS THE HELMET WILL BE ABLE TO SEE THINGS MORE DETAILED. THE SECOND PART OF THE MODEL RESSONANCE BOX THANKS TO THE SHAPE OF A FUNNEL, IS ABLE TO PICK UP MORE AUDITORY INFORMATION. IN ADDICTION THE OUTER MEMBRANE, FORMED FROM BALOON, PRODUCES WAVE VIBRATIONS, CREATING THE EFFECT OF AMPLYFING AUDIO. T HE INTERIOR IS COATED TO THE MODE OF ISOLATION BOTH BARTS ARE UNITED WITH A HIGE.


redesigning the house - project


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individual understanding ideas autism - microarchitectur

TRANSLUCENT WINDOWS

CHANGING COLOUR OF WINDOWS DIFFUSED AND CREATE COZY SPACE INSID

USEING VAR ATMOSPHERE

ELIMINATION OF

VERY IMPORTANT ISSU IS MAKEING S IT'S NECESSARY TO FOCUS ON SOUN FOCUSING ON MUSIC OF NATURE.

`

DIFFERENT TEXTURES IN EVERY TYPE OF ROOM

BATHROOM - MARBLE

SLEEPING - FAKE FUR

LIVING AREAS


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e

S WILL MAKE LIGHT MORE

DE THE BUILDING.

COLOURFUL SIDES

RIOUS COLORS OF GLASS WILL CHANGE THE OF INNER SPACE. WE CAN USE DIFFERENT COLOR DEPENDING OF TYPE OF SPACE

F NOISES

SOUNDS MORE CLEAR AND PLEASUREABLE, TO ACHIEVE THIS GOAL D POLLUTION (SOURCES ON THE PICTURE) AND MAKE POSSIBLE

ADDING TEXTURES

M CAN HELP AN AUTISTIC PERSON TO RECOGNISE SPACE BY ENGAGEING SENSE OF TOUCH

S - COTTON

OUTSIDE - CONCRETE


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new understanding furniture autism - microarchitectur

To inform a habitant about people coming to the hause, we placed mechanism inspired by cymbals under the pavement. When a person press wooden board, little hammer hits metal plate, creating pleasureable sound. Which comes to house through metal pipe locaded below plate. We connected unpleasant and stressful situation for autistic person; meeting people, with nice sound which will help to accept and be prepared for one of many challenges in everyday life


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e

SOFT STRUCTURE OVER BED IS ACUSTIC INSULATION, WHICH HELPS AUTISTIC PERSON TO FOCUS ON TALKING WITH FRIENDS. IT IS AN ANSWER FOR PROBLEMS COUSED BY AMPLYFIED SOUNDS IN WHOLE HOUSE

Cave colecting sound which is situated on top of the roof over, autistic person bedroom. Pipe comes from the cave into bed crating amazeing experience of hrearing nature before falling asleep and after awakeing. Cave will collect sound such as rain, wind, storm, singing birds, grashoopers and many others.

Extraordinary shap of a bed helps to focus on sounds of nature and forget about everyday life problems.

LOCATION IN A HOUSE


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new understanding furniture autism - microarchitectur

c o o

skylight

d

ar i amp se sk th whe


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re we created many bubbles in different rooms: showers, bedrooms and living room. we changed the shape of a shower into a bubble and placed a chair inside to force a person to look through amplyfyi lense. in one of the bedrooms we placed another amplyfying glass bubble, over the bed, to create a possibility of watching stars at night. in second bedroom, we created a bubble which is connecting interior with a swimming pool outside. In the living room we designed one on the wall that is full of light and perfect for reading

SOFT STRUCTURE OVER BED IS ACUSTIC INSULATION, WHICH HELPS AUTISTIC PERSON TO FOCUS ON TALKING WITH FRIENDS. IT IS AN ANSWER FOR PROBLEMS COUSED BY AMPLYFIED SOUNDS IN WHOLE HOUSE

following with the idea of the architecture, we have created a skylight in the room of the autistic person. to amplify some details and make him able to see the moon and the stars by night. this skylight is not only created to amplyfy these two things. you can use the space whenever you want and be able to observe the sky.

the bubbles


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redesigning house - the cave

We redesign the house according to our client's personality. The house is located on a big hill, surrounded by a forest, which marvelous views to the sea. Thanks to the idea of a sound amplifier, we modify one of the bedrooms that face to the forest, to have the opportunity to create a new atmosphere. This new bedroom, as we said, is shape as a cone, to work as an amplifier. The bedroom is completed open to the nature, so you will be able to hear every sound from outside. Also, the cone-shape is made by glass, so it also allows you to have a perfect view from outside while you are lying in the bed.

The glass works as a progressive glass to your head is an amplifier glass; it w you can see everything closer, and have to enjoy the views from the sky befor


s. The closer part works as a loupe, e the opportunity re going to sleep.

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As we said, this bedroom will be made in glass, because of its acoustic properties. It is a good sound conductor. But not only the glass is a good conductor, the water from the pool is also a very good helper. That is the reason why we decide to place there the bedroom.


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redesigning house -

the celling

The convex shape of the ceiling helps to capture more sound.

The house is divided in two spaces, the insulated and the amplified. The amplified will be made with wood and the ceiling will go very low, over your head, to amplify the sounds closer to your ears only. The insulated spaces were made by foam, with the same shape, to follow a path. These insulated rooms will be the bedroom and the dining room, places where he needs concentration and another kind of atmosphere, to relax. The amplify space correspond to the living room, where the sofas are place. It won’t be a very loud place but it will amplify the voices or the TV, to listen better and follow the conversation.


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The other intervention we do on the house is also about noises, but this time, inside the house. We redefine the shape of the ceiling, and part of the walls, into a curvy shape. This curvy shape will help not only to amplify sounds, also to insulate them. This will be possible by using different materials with different sound properties; wood and foam.

conection between wood and foam

because threes are one of the most important aspect of a casa never never land. we cared a lot to save them. It so we decided to make higher places in a celling in locations of the tre


manifesto


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I'm trynig to think about positive things here in Alicante but the only ones I can see are the sun and the language. What have I learned here? jaja some people say enthusiastically: 'a lot!'

Not me. Not because I haven't learned anything. It's just a lack of enthusiasm. I cannot be enthusiastic about the time I've spent here, but at least I've understood some things. Lets start from the beginning! I love Spanish language. I love being abroad. I always wanted to emigrate. So I was determined to come here. Maybe Alicante wasn't my first choice but at least it lies in Spain. First two weeks I was the happiest person on earth. Everything was so different: interesting and challenging. Amazing adventure. And then it started to be too challenging. I've lost my debit card and had problems to get the new one. I had to ask other people for money and do all the transfers for more than a month. I bought a bike. Then I had a car accident. Then my bike has been stolen. And then my computer has died. At the same time I realized that most things I'm doing here are useless.

I don't dislike this subject but every day I was listening to people who did.

Everyone. And I don't dislike it because of my patience or lesser sensitivity. I just don't care so much. Because, embarrassing confession time: I don't want to be an

architect. But yes, it was frustrating sometimes.

I wish I could say everything you taught us was wrong but I can't. I see the entire path now and I know the course has sense. But I don't like the way you lead it. I felt like you tried to force me to think in one – the only way which is hard to surrender. I'm glad I was attending the course but I'm also happy I'm going home. ...

I won't feel freezing cold anymore


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http://www.peterbarberarchitects.com/villa-anbar/ http://www.archdaily.com/345857/ad-classics-white-u-toyo-ito http://www.thetreemag.com/diario/2013/12/5/naked-house-by-shigeruban http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com/works/2000_naked-house/ storiesofhouses.blogspot.com.es http://socks-studio.com/2013/12/10/sound-mirrors-and-other-sensoryexpansion-devices-from-wartime-technology-to-radical-art-practices/ http://weburbanist.com/2012/04/08/walky-talky-12-concept-mobilephone-telephone-booths/ https://microicons.wordpress.com/2010/02/15/notes-acoustics-01/ http://slowlydrifting.tumblr.com/post/28570450272/menilmontantpierre-boucher-jeanine-pr%C3%A9vert http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/09/forest-megaphones/ http://www.science-sparks.com/2013/05/07/acoustic-science-soundabsorption-and-reflection/

bibliography

http://slowlydrifting.tumblr.com/post/28570450272/menilmontantpierre-boucher-jeanine-pr%C3%A9vert


Manifesto_Maria Barczentewicz