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Study Reveals Long-term Health Problems Related to Vaginal Delivery

The risk of lifelong pelvic floor disorders may be high among mothers who have experienced one vaginal delivery than having one cesarean section, according to an analysis, pointing out urinary incontinence, prolapse, and fecal incontinence as possible health risks that women may develop 20 years after giving birth via the vaginal route. The 2008 Swedish pregnancy, obesity, and pelvic floor (SWEPOP) study, performed by gynecology expert Maria Gyhagen, whose work was published in a thesis at the Sahlgrenska Academy, reportedly zeroed in on the major risk factors and prevalence of urinary, fecal incontinence, and prolapse in mothers who have gone through vaginal childbirth or cesarean delivery. The study reportedly used information from the Medical Birth Registry of women who have solely given birth to a child and had no further children between 1985 through 1988. Two decades after, study cohorts were reportedly sent questionnaires pertaining to height, weight, urinary or fecal incontinence, genital prolapse, menstrual status, hysterectomy, menopause and hormone treatment. After obtaining key information, the research showed study results indicating that a 67 percent increased risk of urinary incontinence may be related to vaginal delivery and the presence of urinary incontinence more than 10 years later also increased by 275 percent as opposed to cesarean birth. The study further revealed that vaginal delivery is the strongest risk factor associated with symptomatic prolapse. Symptomatic prolapse may also be attributable to birth weight above 4500g. Symptomatic prolapse, in turn, may also be attributable to the onset of urinary incontinence. Greater prevalence of fecal incontinence was seen in women after going through vaginal childbirth than cesarean section, while women who had cesarean section, irrespective of the type (acute or elective), demonstrated no difference in prevalence of urinary, fecal incontinence, and prolapse according to the study. Pelvic organ prolapse and urinary problems such as stress urinary incontinence are some of the pelvic floor disorders commonly experienced by women due to ageing, pregnancy, and childbirth, health experts say. Mild to moderate symptoms in women may be addressed through self-care measures, pelvic floor muscle training, behaviorial techniques, or a removable vaginal pessary. Dire cases of these pelvic floor problems, on the other hand, may necessitate surgical intervention which may involve the implantation of vaginal mesh.


Although the surgical procedure is generally safe, a string of adverse effects have been linked to these medical products, reportedly leading to thousands of bladder mesh legal claims against major device makers. The Bladder Mesh Lawsuit Center at bladdermeshlawsuit.us offers comprehensive information about safety problems and related issues surrounding surgical mesh implants. Sources: sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130130082738.htm health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update0805c.shtml fda.gov/downloads/medicaldevices/safety/alertsandnotices/UCM262760.pdf

Study Reveals Long-term Health Problems Related to Vaginal Delivery  

The risk of lifelong pelvic floor disorders may be high among mothers who have experienced one vaginal delivery than having one cesarean sec...

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