Page 1

DEC. 1990/JAV.

1991 .sO.32 $4.50 ($�.95 L"O CANADA)

Yearly Index Lapels Knitting Lace •

of Mrs. William Brockman,

Gift of Mrs. William E. Frick in memory

o

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December 1990/January 1991

A

M

On the cov but See 74.

er: Czechoslovakian folk­ wear is sumptuous from head foot, the apron is the crowning glory. p.

to

Editor Betsy Levine

84

Managing Editor

86 90

Amy T. Yanagi Art Director Glee Barre

lOG

Associate Editors David Page Coffin Alice h

108 30

Korac /ProdA

Copy Julia

4 8 12 1() 20 78 80 82

uction Editor Sharpe

Associate Art Director Mary Smith Nancy Garbrecht

36

Guag

Susan liumi Lila Markrich Deborah Newton

People, organizations, knitting and sewing news, exhibits, traditions, opinion

Shnws: Designed to Wear 1990 Calendar: Exhibitions, tours, conferences, workshops, competitions, connections

Supplies:

Clothes

54

to live In

Clean finish, elegant detailing, and

A

Man

Sweaterfor the Ritz

58

Imagination meets technique lle

Marketing Manager Roy Swanson

Against the

ono

48

rma

Advertising Sales Assis

tan t

65

Gra in

Exploring couture lapels

effet·

51

Asst. Production Coordinator Margaret Capellaro Circulation Coordinator Claudia Allen

rown

byAnna

Marilyn Goachee

Why Stitches Skip and Fabric Puc ker s

byAlice S

tat-m

ore

Czechoslovakian Folk A

prons

Stitching the glories of summer by He

lene

Baine Cincebox

70 Stitching an Apron

Dia ond

by Elizabeth BO't"Ovicka Capozzi

m

Threads Illagaz Newtown.Press cr , ine Thre<!ds cr dress

Graphic Artist Judy Lind

Press 63 CopyrightPO S€co -class Dec. TlU'e(1([Newtown. cr peIm s ll13!P mark Press gran Threads n�z rates: ]JOSS€I>S tmless Subscription yr. ; possess bscri ubscri PressPress Inc NewtoNewtown. wn. cr Eas N ws Rd. 63 PO 5506, wto 06470·5506.

(lSSN 0882-7370) is published bimonthly. Oct., . Feb Apr JWle. and Aug.. by The Taunton Inc.. S. Main St.. Box 5506. 0647()'5506. Tel. (203) 426-8171. nd pos tage is paio;! at 06470. and adclitional mailing offices. 1990 by The

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Marketing Secretary Allicyn Ha rna nn

. • . • rema

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ission of the publisher. zine® is a registered trade of The Taunton Inc. Title to ine ins in the au,thors, photographers, and artists, otbelwise indicated. They have ted U.s. and ions: $22.1 yr.: $38. 2 $55. 3 yr. Canada and other countries: $27.1 yr.; $48.

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Send address changes to

74

to Fabric

Stitch a globe of thread

Judy Mierzejewski Circulation Sales Assistant

DePriest

Knitted lace is easy to design

52 Dazzling Sp heres

Circulation Assistant

erdene

by K

GI-igg Hazen 68 Charting Lace

kers

by Tafi B

Sew a pair of sturdy mittens

Improve your stitch quality

Sunprinting for Quiltma

Photographs

Fur Handwarmers

by Gale

by CwmlAdleman

ator

ane FaucIW

Techniques for knit fabric

Create unique fabrics

rdin

herrn

60 Sewing Cashmere

by Clai1"(� B. Sha

National Accounts Managers Michelle Brown Vivian Do n

by S

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by John Marshall

44

lous Welt Pockets

How to make a two-way coat pocket

55 Perfecting the Welt

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Engelhart

39 The Classic Kim

Public Relations Donna Pierpont

Postmaster:

For more information, calL..

Readers 'Shnwcase: Participate in Threads' design extravaganza Books: Fashion, machine knitting, quilting, embroidery Index: Issues 25 through 32 . Humor: Sample day Back Cover: All grown up and still having fun

ervi

istrative Secretary Nancy r

Production Coo Nancy Clark

Knit dolls, fusible interfacing, rug backing, fitting ease

Style from the East inspires

dmin Cride

E

BaNTioptessic:s:

by Eileen Summ

Publisher Jan Wahlin

N

I

Letters: Computerized sewing, knitting in the round, addicts, mail ordering, cashmere French seam, blindstitch, mitering grosgrain, grafting, slipstitch crochet, decreasing Questions: Comfortable waistbands, knitting stegosaurus spines, a fabulous apron pattern

by Jeanne

Contributing Editors Robbie Fanni'Yl!}

Judy Doty

z

sturdiness, in one flat-fell swoop

Editorial Secretary

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==Leuers

==

terized sewing

z..order debate

A quest ion of dignity

Mai

I've recently purchased "the computer

In the same issue in which you

In defense of the folks who mail order

tllat sews," and I love it. But I was also

apologized for an age-ist remark

frustrated by the small designs and am

No. 31, p. 6) you printed a Reader Reply

Compu

supplies

( Threads,

( Threads, No. 31, p. 4): Much of

North Carolina is rural and one must

in which a Ms. Kurtz was "swamped witll

drive many hours to and from a large city

calls from sweet little old ladies..." Did

like P(R?)aleigh, where shops such as

a hand embroiderer, but arthritis has

she require identification of her callers?

Jane Weir describes are located. It seems

limited that work. I've been exploring

Threads has always been a celebration of

she forgot those of us who don't have

the possibilities for texture, worldng with

what we create with our hands, not what

nice local shops to support; we have to

the programmed stitches on the Pfaff

our hands look like against the measure

mail order to keep sewing and

14 73-CD.

of our throw-away youth culture. Can we

knitting.

grateful for the tips in your article

reads

, No. 31, p. 74). I've long been

(Th

- Thelma Leonard, Espanola, NM

-Ann M. Foster, Wilmington, NC

stop the patronizing value judgments

I've been able to combine a semblance

and tend to our knitting? If women can't be

I'd like your readers to know of a mail­

of Amish beauty with the high-tech tools

sensitive to the dignity and worth of

order seIVice I offer. I buy and sell antique

available today. For an Amish Crazy­

other women, how

costumes and textiles. I have English

Patch quilt, I used my computerized

nourished-or will there even be one? I

Viking 1100 to machine-quilt the

am 65 and am doing my best work ever,

ChInese, Middle European, Japanese

decorative stitches between the patches.

slower now, but focused clearly. The

items, and so on. Prices range from

will

the future be

samplers, William Morris embroideries,

ltind of discrimination that labeling

thousands of dollars to just a few. I can

manifests, so destructive to the spirit, is

also go on a search for pieces if you send

S

an ever-ret

me a description (20 Holly Bush Lane,

I've discovered an easier way to start

and non-academic study of the origins of

circular Imitting

human knowledge. There's no time left for

England; tel: 011-44-582-460-107). I'll

name-calling. The future, more urgently

send pieces on approval, but request payment in advance. If a piece is

-Lori P. Bosinoff, San Jose, CA

tarting knitting round

(Threads, No. 31, p. 45).

I use a simple half-hitch cast-on, but

urn ing tln'ead through my long

Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 4AT,

over two needles to match my knitting

tllan at any time in history, depends on

gauge. This helps keep the stitches

the ltinds of hands portrayed so well

returned immediately,

from spiraling around the needle, malting

in

the postage.

it easier to count them. So it came

women working.

eads

, of purposeful and creative

Thr

naturally to me to pull one needle out of

J.

-Margaret

half the stitches and the other needle

Little, Morgantown,

WV

I'll

refund all but

-Meg Andrews

Breaking rules

I must communicate my surprise and

out of the second half. I fold the work in

Addicts?!

half, with the first stitch that I cast on

The last page of the last issue

right next to the last and the purls in two

No. 31, p. 114) appalled me. I have

think there is any excuse for telling knitters that all good Fair Isles exhibit

displeasure at the tone of "A Balancing Act"

(Threads,

( Threads, No. 30, p. 57). I do not

neat rows across the bottom. There

absolutely no experience with drugs. I

isn't the slightest risk of twist sneaking

deeply resent my love and passion for

a 5-to-8 ratio in two main pattern bands,

in. I begin knitting on the first stitch I

sewing compared to drug addiction. I

no round should have more than two colors, etc. I have knitted, designed,

rtrayed as an ultimate

cast on, which eliminates that dreadful

deplore drugs po

jog at the beginning of the work; knit

pleasure. I resent the language of drugs

one-third of tlle stitches; pick up another

seeping into our culture. There is no

in a dizzying array of patterns,

needle; and knit another third. I

guilt or shame attached to the pleasure I

proportions, colors, and shapes.

suggest that beginners knit onto four

take in sewing.

Korach's better self came forward when

-Mm'Y

needles in the first round, then go to

collected, and seen gorgeous Fair Isles

Oventile, Arcadia, CA

possibilities." Would that she had couched

three in the next round. By the way, a twist

she wrote, "There's no end to the

I guard each back issue of

can be fixed if you

her otherwise interesting and useful

Threads

work on the mathematics of designing

catch it while the beginning of tlle round

with my life. It's good to know, through

is still connected by a single thread­

your column on humor, that tllere are

knitting patterns in that ltind of

just transfer the twist to the thread.

other addicted nuts like me who go just as

language. I fear she may have discouraged

crazy.

some novice knitters from experiencing

-Joy Beeson, Voorheesville,

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=LeUers

==

the joy of discovering new and exciting spatial and color relationships. -Bo B1'eda Weinstock, BTooklyn,

NY

My purpose was to explain some of the mathematical principles that I had discovered to underlay all my best designs. I think the key phrase of my article is, " We'll see how to bend the rules . ... " I like only the sort of rules I can violate creatively. It's good to have a framework to reflect against and expand; it's hard to create a unique, perfect universe from scratch.

Alice KOTach Teplies:

Combining knit and

crochet

How to combine lmitting and crochet ( ThTeads, Nos. 30 and 31, Questions)? Just do it! The techniques are completely interchangeable, both being made up of loops. I crochet-knit, using a 14-in. long needle "vith a hook on each end. For a one-piece blanket, I filed a hook on the end of a rod % in. by 36 in.

-RogeT A. Hawley, RiveTside, CA

A lot of knit pieces are traditionally finished with a crocheted edge, and it is

no big leap to knit into or onto crochet either, and without finishing off, to go back into crochet. Such pieces usually end up weird and wonderful if you work "vithout a pattern. It's easier to keep the work flat if you don't use circular needles. There is no end to the techniques you can combine in this way and no guarantee of a pleasing result. -Hamet Hansen, Los Angeles, CA

Cashmere in the U.S.,

I read with dismay your reply (Threads, No. 29, p. 8) that anything other than Chinese cashmere is cashmere in name only. It is true that Chinese cashmere is the standard by which all others are compared, but cashmere is also produced in Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, Outer Mongolia, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and now the United States. Chinese cashmere is the finest, and also the weakest, due to diet and conditions. Readers might be misled into thinking that virtually no yarn is 100% cashmere. Untrue. But most does go to the machine-knitting and weaving markets. I must disagree with the statement that pure

-Ann R. Dooling, PMF CashmeTe Co., Dillon, MT

Errata

The cUlTent address for R.L. Shep (p. 37 of ThTeads No. 30) is Box 668, Mendocino, CA 95460. The price of the Badger Air Brush Co. catalog (p. 71, No. 31) is $1.

Anot

her fa

bric store

Readers have written to mention another favorite fabric store ( Threads, No. 29, p. 78): San Francisco Fabrics, at 1715 Polk St. in San Francisco. We welcome your comments, criticis1ns, advice, and ideas. Letters may be edited jor brevity and clarity. Please write to us at Box 5506, Newtown, CT 06470-5506.

� Fiber Metal Wood Clay � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � �

Knitting

too

cashmere is a weak and fragile yarn. I would stack an old cashmere sweater against an old wool one of the same age any time. The cashmere industry in the U.S. is very new. I expect we'll get to 10 tonnes by the mid-'90s.

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December 1990/January 1991

7


::Basics

==

We 've set aside this space to explain te that we assum,e are generally understood by experienced crat f speople, particularly in our sewing and knitting articl ",so If you've ever been stumped by a casual instruction to "tape a roll line" or "make a yarnover, " and so forth, this column should be a handy reference. When you see the remark "see Basics" in an article, turn to this column. You�lfind a clear explanation of the technique-how to do it and what it accomplishes.

rms

Inside the lapel facing: If you're using

form the miter by folding the ribbon over

45°

fusible interfacings, as opposed to couture

at a

hand-tailoring methods, Claire Shaeffer

the miter.

angle. Pin in place; slipstitch

recommends that you consider a light layer of fusible applied to both jacket front and facing, especially if your fashion fabric is thin; the extra layer will help prevent the seam from imprinting on the facing when the garment is cleaned and pressed. Choose knits, wovens, or weft insertions instead of a non-woven interfacing, and align the grain of both

Fold ribbon up at hemline,

Hold inside with finger; fold ribbon over at a 45° angle,

facing and interfacing. Shaeffer also recommends that you

tape both the roll line and the edge of the front, preferably with a length of

SEWING A French seam encloses the

lightweight silk selvage (it's thinner than raw edge

of a seam allowance and requires two passes of straight stitches. It's effective on transparent fablics where a raw edge would be visible, and for fabrics that ravel. It works best on straight to slightly curved seams. First stitch ,vith wrong sides together, at half the seam allowance width for medium-weight fabrics. (For thicker fabrics, stitch closer to raw edge to allow for the fabric taken up in the fold, or tUTIl, of the cloth.) Press seam open, then fold right sides together and press again. Trim raw edges if necessary,

RS�

so they fall within seamline. Stitch, right sides together, on seamline.

I

- . 711.1i

1. ,Stitchl1'S' II ., ,

"

k

with togethe

. ,

Seamline I ' 1�

twill tape), applied with a simple running stitch. The tape prevents the

KNI

T ING

Kite

hner stitch, or grafting, is used to

front edges and the roll line from

join two open rows of knit stitches with a

stretching during construction or

third row to create an invisible seam.

subsequent pressing; othenvise the

Go into each stitch twice as shown, using

fronts won't hang properly. To tape the

a tapestry needle threaded ,vith a

roll line, measure it on the pattern,

length of yarn four times the length of

then mark the length on a strip of selvage,

the seam.

and pin it in place. The larger your bust, the more you'll need to ease the roll line to the tape to keep the jacket from gaping: Pin the tape in place % in. shorter than marked and try the jacket on, adjusting if necessary. Be sure to have the collar basted in place first, so you don't stretch the neckline. The point presser, or edge board, is a multi-purpose tool. The straight, pOinted top is positioned lmderneath seams when pressing them open, so that the edges of the seam allowances don't

A yarnover (yo)

imprint on the face of the garnlent; the

stitch without knitting. Take the yarn over

is a way to make a new

pointed end is for reaching seams in

the top of the right-hand needle once

tight places, like collars, lapel points, and

before making the ne),.,'t knit st, as shown.

the points of welts and flaps. The

When you knit the yarnover on the next

will

wooden base serves as a clapper for holding

row, a lace hole

s

ne),.,'t st is to be purled, bling the yarn

team

ed and pressed edges flat while

they cool and dry after the iron is removed.

A hemming blindstitch is hidden

form under it. (If the

over the top of the needle as shown, then

c:>

under needle to the front.)

between the hem and the garment. Pick up just a few threads of the garment fabric, then a few of the hem, using a running stitch.

ws garment Grosgrain is useful for stabilizing knit fabric edges. To miter grosgrain, first fold the ribbon up so that its fold is even with the hemline and pin the lower layer in place. Hold the fold with a finger and 8

reads Magaz

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·-~

PO&.Yl!STDI -

t~~. ~

-- ·-


-Basics

==

Slipstitch crochet can be used to bind off stitches with a decorative chain edge. It also can be worked into knit fabric anywhere. Start with a slip knot on the crochet hook. From the right side, insert hook into the first knit stitch. Draw up a loop on hook, and pull it through the stitch and the loop, on the hook. Insert hook into next knit stitch; draw up a loop, and pull it through the loop on hook. Repeat until you've chained through all live stitches or completed your decorative chain.

The most usual way to decrease is to This decrease slants toward the right. Insert the right-hand needle knitwise through two stitches at once, and knit them together as if they were a single stitch. knit two stitches together (k2tog) .

A double decrease, sll-k2tog-psso, knits three stitches together into one. This decrease slants toward the center from both the right and left sides. Slip 1 stitch purlwise (as if to purl, leaving yarn in back) (drawing a), k2tog in next 2 stitches, then pass slipped stitch over (drawing b).

Work an ssk (slip, slip, knit) to decrease two knit stitches into one that slants leftward. Slip first and second sts knitwise, one at a time, then insert tip of left-hand needle into the fronts of these two sts from the left, as shown, and knit them together from this position.

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December 1990/January 1991

TV Worth Watching

11


=�t�

==

nds

Comfortable waistba

garmentiband seamline and stop 3 in.

always wishing that the waistband on the skirts and slacks that make were more cmrifortable ctnd didn't flop over when I sit down, but I don't like all the gathers on elastic waistbands. Do ymt k-now oj some pe1iect compromise? -Sarah McCormack, Warrenton, VA Dee D 0nt replies: I 've had lots of

from tlle opposite opening.

I'm

I

Ul11

Cut a length of elastic to match your waist measure, and insert it through one of the 3-in. openings; I use a latchhookstyle tube turner. Overlap the elastic and the interfacing at tlle plain end of the band, and sew through the waistband and all layers to anchor the elastic to the

Row 2 7: k7, inc in next st, kl. Row 28: kl , inc in next st, k8 (scallop with 11 sts).

Row 29: k8, k2tog, kl. Row 30: kl , k2tog, k7. Rows 31-36: Repeat rows 15-20 . Rows 37-44: Repeat rows 2 1-28. Row 45: k9, inc in next st, kI . Row 46: kl , inc in next st, klO (scallop

similar requests in my custom-sewing

band. On a zippered opening, just continue

with 13 sts).

business, and the following technique

the zipper topstitching up through tlle

has brought rave reviews. You need %-in.

band. Stitch in the ditch at that end to

no-roll waistband elastic (widely

close the opening. At the other end,

Row 47: kl0, k2tog, kI . Row 48: kl , k2tog, k9. Rows 49-56:. Repeat rows 29-36.

available, or by mail from Nancy's

repeat this procedure, after adjusting and

Repeat rows 2 1-36 once.

Notions, 333 Beichl Avenue, PO Box

trimming the elastic to feel com

683, Beaver Dam,

"VI

53916, 800-765-

0690), which creates a narrow,

fOliable.

For the flattest possible effect,

smooth out the gathers evenly on either

Repeat rows 9-20 three times. Repeat rows 1-8 once. Bind off final 3 sts.

comfortable, non-collapsible waistband. I

side of center front and push them

call it a fitted waistband because you can distribute the few gathers to those

towards the side and back. Then stitch

Cutwork supplies

vertically through the band and elastic

areas that need them , and keep

at points eqUidistant from center front,

ungathered any areas you want to be

either at the dart lines or at the side

smooth, like the center front or back,

seams. This anchors the gathers, and the

Have you got a source Jor books, andJa sJm' doi'Ylf} cutwork embroidery? -Jeane White, Cannon Beach, OR David replies: The Lacemaker,

as I 'll describe below. After altering the

stretch, away from tlle center. You can

Lace and Needle Art (7721 230th SW.,

pattern to allow for 2 in. of ease in the

experiment Witll different positions for

Edmonds, WA 98026, 206-670-1644)

waist, sew the garment as usual, putting

the fullness to find the most attractive

carries a wide selection of top-quality

in all darts, zippers, etc.

placement for your figure.

tools and supplies for lacemaking and

Cut a waistband 31/4 in. wide and 3 in. longer than the wa istline of the garment.

tools,

bric Coffin

related crafts, including cut\vork. They

How do you knit

import DMC's Caton a Broder, in sizes

a dinosaur?

16, 20, and 25, which many people use

really to make a version oj Wendy Keele's StegosaurttS Sweater, as shown in Threads #29, p. 64. How did she make those neat g ated spines ? -Sue Woodwctrd, Durham, NC Wendy Keele lies: Besides the

for cut\vork, along with linen threads

spines, the Stegosaurus Sweater has an

trove of exotic materials and tools for

because I don't like the elastic to extend

embroidered face and sewn-on "goo-

anyone who makes lace, does tatting, or

into the closure area. Cut two pieces of

goo" eyes. The spines are a single piece of

needs specialized thread.

interfacing, one 1 in. square, and the

garter stitch sewn on after knitting.

Fold it in half lengthwise and press in a crease. With right sides together, sew one edge of tlle band onto the garment with a "!a-in. seam, leaving 1/2 in. free at the plain end, and 2% in. free at the extension end. Trim and press the seam allowances towards the bancl. I interface tlle ends of the band

other 1 in.

X

3 in.; any firm fusible

I'd

lilre

radu

rep

Here's how I made them :

interfacing will do. Fuse the square piece

Stegosaurus Spines: With sport-weight

in line with the fi nished opening of the

yarn and size 6 needles, cast on 3 sts and

garment on the plain end, and the

knit one row.

rectangular piece beginning 1 in. in

Row 1: kl , inc in next st by knitting

kl.

and fabrics, all in white or ecru. They also have a new collection of reprinted antique cutwork designs, all described in their well-illustrated catalog, which is $3, or free with an order. It's a treasure

Readers want to know If you can help with write

the lease to Threads the address on p. 14 JoUowi'Ylf}, p

at

from the opening and extending 2 in. into

into front and back of st,

the extension area of the waistband.

Does anyone know of a good domestic

waistband right sides together and

Row 2: kl , inc i n next st, k2. Row 3: k3, inc in next st, kl . Row 4: kl , inc in next st, k4. (This is

stitching across the end and over to the

the peak of first scallop- 7 sts).

it's peli"ect for lingerie, baby dresses, and

opening. Finish the plain end by

sumptuous shirts and blouses.

in. to 1/2 in. Fold tlle band to the inside

Row 5: k4, li2tog, kI . Row 6: kl , k2tog, k3. Row 7: k2 , k2tog, kI. Row 8: kl , li2tog, kI . Rows 9-12: Repeat rows 1-4. Row 13: k5, inc in next st, kI . Row 14: kl, inc in next st, k6 (scallop

along the established fold line, and pin it in

with 9 sts).

place from the outside of the garment.

Row 15: k6, k2tog, kI . Row 1 6: kl , k2tog, k5. Rows 1 7-20: Repeat rows 5-8. Rows 21 -26: Repeat rows 9-14.

Finish the extension area by folding the

stitching across the band from the fold to the seam at the opening, then clip both ends and turn. Finish the inside edge of the band either by serging or by pressing under

%

The edge should overlap the seamline by % in. to

% in. Starting about 3 in. in from

either opening, stitch in the ditch of the 12

source of Sea Island cotton fabric? It's too expensive for most stores to carry, but

-Rosamund Evans, Cttba,

NM

Are there any pattern companies that specialize in Country-Western and square dance clothing patterns?

-MarlJ McClelland, Diamond Bar, CA Does anyone have directions for a Ward's Signature Sewing MachilJi model #URR-266A?

-Charlotte Dew, Baltimore, MD

'ea11S Magaz

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THE BERNINA 1 230 The Machine That Knows No Boundaries

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Select from an endless array of stitches or repeat standard and keyhole buttonholes automatically. Store your stitch patterns and functions for as long as you like, even when the power is off. Stitch a perfectly-formed alphabet at full speed. Sew hands-free with Bernina's exclusive presser foot lifter. Create flawless stitches in every fabric with Bernina's famous self-adjusting tension . You can make every sewing project a masterpiece. And now, if you visit your Bernlna dealer for a demonstration, you can receive this Vogue/Bernina pattern' absolutely

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Agnes Mercik.


=

Questim1s

Readers reply

== The

pron tern

fabulous a

pat

Several readers sent in variations on the theme of a one-piece apron that

Readers have volunteered the following information in response to queries.

The fabulous apron pattern Buttonhole

crisscrosses in the back; no doubt this is an idea that's seen many incarnations, one of which is shown at right. Joy

NY,

Gail Sundberg's request for "Weave-It

Beeson, of Voorheesville, remembers both an adult version and one for a

Squares" instructions obviously hit a

toddler, that she still had tracings of from

nerve; we've received enough copies of

1959. Jan Reinhardt, Dillsburg, PA,

"Weave-It " Sq uares unite!

the instructions to paper a small room,

sent in the pattern shown here, which

and we have sent one off to her.

she remembers malting up in

Fold line 39 in.

1

Marimekko prints in the '60s, because

Thanks!

they were "smashing," and wide enough lJutterloh located

(54 in.). Grace Kane has an old McCall's

Many people also wrote in with

pattern (#3063) that could be cut from

information about the Lutterloh

45-in. fabric. In every case, the shape is

Patternmalting material. It is available

similar, and could be redrawn easily to

gt

from The European School of Design , PO

change the len h or width. The idea is

Box 768, Estero, FL 33928, (813) 992-

that neckline strap A is attached to shoulder strap B on the opposite side,

8222. The system consists of a tool ltit and a manual describing how to make

either by sewing or with a button . If

patterns for men, women, and children;

you sew them together, you can finish the

it's sold by travelling salesmen.

entire edge "vith one continuous strip

All the materials, plus a video of a

of binding; cut it out in paper and see for

classroom demonstration , are available by

yourself. According to Joy, that's

mail; we hope to have a review in an

because this is a two-sided figure with one

upcoming issue.

knotted edge. Enjoy.

About the answer people: Dee Dumont has a custom sewing and alteration business on Bainbridge Island, WA. Wendy Keele wrote about sweaters for kids in Threads No. 29. David Coffin is an associate editor of Threads. Have a question of general interest about the fiber arts? Send it to Threads, Box 5506, Newtown, CT 06470.

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reset

15


==Tips

== (sport-weight/size 3-5; worsted­

head; then pull thread tight and tie. Sew

weight/size 6-8; bulky/size 9-1 1 ) .

back to front in two short seams to form

• Fiberfill or old stockings for stuffing. • A blunt tapestry needle.

Stuff arms and chest. Sew another short

Knitting cli1'ections:

thread around legs at top of shoes. Pull

Shoes: Cast on 32 sts, eight on each of four needles. Join round, and knit 5 rnds.

tight and tie. Weave final thread through thread tight, and tie.

intrigued by a one-piece knitted doll. My

Pants: Change color and lmit 14 rnds. Sweater or shirt: Change color and knit

eleven-year-old Swiss friend insisted that

12 rnds. Try ribbing or color variations.

even a beginner like me could make one. This project is wonderful for beginners

Face: Change color and knit 8 rnds. Hat: Change color and knit 4 rnds of

because it gives an immediate sense of

libbing or all purl. Continuing same color or

Pom-pom: Wrap yarn around fingers,

accomplishment, taking only about five

alternating colors, begin decrease rnds as foIl:

making a thick bundle of loops about 2

hours from start to finish. It is also a fun

k2tog, kl , until 4 sts remain. Cut yarn ,

threa

in. long. Tie tightly in the middle, cut

way to use scrap yarn. Once I got started,

d onto tapestry needle, pull end through

loops, and fluff into a ball. Hang from

stitches, and pull them tight. Tie off end.

doll's hat on long piece of yarn.

for creative variations. The basic pattern

Optional Turtleneck: When knitting is

Hair: The Swiss dolls had no hair, but I

is shown in the drawing below.

completed, pick up sts around neck on four

added it to some of mine. Sometimes I

needles. Work 5 rnds

knit the hat hair-colored, or I sewed

Share your hancly tips, useful tricks, goocl advice, and sources for harcl-to-fincl supplies. We'll pay $25 for each item we publish. Send cletails, photos, or sketches (we'll redraw them) to Threads, Box 5506, Newtown, CT 06470.

Kni

tted dolls

Browsing in a Swiss craft shop, I was

I became fascinated with the possibilities

Ma

teri

seam between legs, and stuff. Weave a

Bind off and fold

als:

arms, as shown in the center drawing.

kl, turtl

cast-on at bottom of shoes. Stuff shoes, pull

Embroider eyes, nose, mouth, and ears: Make ears and nose three­ dimensional by layering stitches to

kl,

pI

pI ribbing.

eneck down.

form thick lump.

hair on under the edge of the hat. You

• Scraps of yarn, all about the same weight; five or more contrasting colors. • Five short double-pointed knitting

Finishing:

hanging loops at the hat edge from the ear

Stuff and sew: Weave a thread loosely

to the center back.

needles the appropriate diameter for yarn

around neck with tapestry needle. Stuff

can make braids by sewing long,

-Amanda Smith, Mountain City, TN

needles.

Optional braids

Hat

Gather for neck.

Face

Swe

nose, mouth, and ears.

Arm seams

ater

Gather for legs.

Leg seam

Pants

Sh

Cost-on edge

oes

Seeuring

Embroider eyes,

fus ible in

le1jacing

�skid rug backing

Fitting ease

N

I often use fusible non-woven

I sew all sizes from 6 to 2 2 and have

When I was using rubber-backed

interfacing for yokes, collars, and cuffs.

found that it's easiest to fit a garment if it

draperies as drop cloths during painting, I

Since non-woven interfacings tend to

has been cut with the right amount of

discovered that the rubber side grips a

fuzz after repeated washings, I use them

ease. After taking the wearer's

wood floor effectively. The fabric side

only in enclosed areas. Fusible

measurements, I add 4 in. to the bust

engages with a rug's texture to produce

interfacing can also come loose, even after

measurement and 1 in. to 1% in. to the

a truly slip-free surface. Rubber-backed

careful fusing; so here's how I prevent

waist. For misses sizes, I add 2 in. to

draperies lie completely flat and are

that. I place a sheet of tracing paper

thin so they don't change the rug's height.

under the interfacing and use my

2 % in. to the hip; and for half-sizes, I add 3 in. I like Vogue and Butterick

tracing wheel to trace the seamline. Then

patterns that are marked with a circled

I cut the interfacing with pinking

plus sign, which indicates finished

laundering. They don't harbor pet fleas.

shears j ust outside the seamline. I fuse

And they cut easily with scissors and are

and sew as usual. The stitching j ust

garment measurements. That makes it much simpler to know how much I

catches the pinked edges.

have to add or subtract for a good

-Patricia Clements, Madison, TN 16

fit.

- Chana Bier, Monsey,

They don't require attachment to the rug or crumble with shaking or machine

very inexpensive. Recycle a drape and

NY

prevent a hip fracture.

- Carol French Bloom, Lawrence,

KS c>

hl-eadS Magaz

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ine


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=Tips

Sew a patchwork sweater

== broidery rror-i maging an

Our daughter had several cashmere

and diamond shapes, and serge or

Mi em

sweaters that had felted. So I made her a

zigzag a new patchwork sweater,

I was working on a complicated

Cut several old sweaters into strips

diamond patchwork sweater from four that were compatible in color and weight (five would have been better) . The ch<twing at right shows how I arranged the

P B

Attach

Back

pink

counted cross-stitch project recently that

wasitband

=W= blue

chart

had a double border and a floral wreath

ribbing,

with many colors. The pattern included

white

only half the border and wreath and

diamonds. I placed them on a blouse

instructed me to work the other half in

pattern to get the light shape and fit. I cut

reverse. When I tried transcribing the

a beige sweater into narrow strips and

pattern onto graph paper, I found the

used them to join all the diamonds, giving

process very tedious and frustrating.

the design conSistency. Every seam is

Since I needed a mirror image, I

serged or zigzagged. I attached the

photocopied the pattern onto a sheet of

turtleneck -from one sweater to the

tissue paper. (You could also trace it.) I

neckline and gathered the sleeves and bottom of the "new" sweater into the cuffs and bottom band of an old one. She loves it and says it is wonderfully warm because of the felting.

-Eva Braswell, Bloomington,

Attach wasitband

IL

ribbing,

could then read the pattern through

I__W ..JbL=6.Y.-_

the reversed tissue.

-Ann M. Procho

wic

z, Trempealeau,

WI

Counting stitches

When you have a lot of stitches on your knitting that you will need to count,

Speeding your quilting

want a new needle and length of thread, I

weave a contrasting yanl in every 10 stitches as you knit the row before. That

When I'm quilting or doing a lot of

unwind the thread and slide all the

way, if you have to stop, it's easier to

hand sewing, I thread several packages of

other needles down. After I rewrap the

resume counting just a few stitches (fewer

needles onto the spool of thread, wrap

thread and catch it in the notch, I cut

than

the tail a few times around the spool, and

off the already-threaded length.

catch the end in the notch. When I

10)

than to start all over.

-Josette Kilmer, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA

-Louise Owens, Old Hickory, TN

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1 487-T Parrott Drive San Mateo, CA 94402

18

hreads Magaz

T

ine


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=No�

SEWING NEWS

Sewing machine

the Viking

1100

== PEOPLE

lies with its "Sewing

Advisor," on which you push buttons to

review

tell it the stitch you want and the

eaver

weight and type of fabric. A vertical

Cambodian silk w

Recently, I had the pleasure of

display unit, the "Infodisplay," tells you

The atrocities committed by the Khmer

reviewing two new top-of-the-line sewing

what the machine recommends for foot

Rouge forced 73-year old Bun Em and her

machines, the Bernina 1230 and the

and needle. It automatically adj usts

family to flee Cambodia, walking by

Viking 1100. Stay tuned for my reviews of

stitch length, widtll, tension, and presser

night across the Thai border. They came

other top-of-the-line machines.

foot pressure, all of which can be

to the United States in 198 1 . In

overridden. This easy pre-selection makes

Cambodia, Bun E m had been a master

built in on the Cadillac of machines, the

the Viking a good choice for beginning

silk weaver for nearly 50 years , having

Bet-nina

and sporadic sewers.

Everything is elegantly tucked or

1230.

Standard features: In addition to 12

been taught by her mother in the Khmer

Standard features: With nine different

tradition, but she had had to abandon

utility stitches like blind hem, stretch

buttonholes and almost 80 stitches,

overlock, and multi-step zigzag, the 1230

including two italic alphabets (upper-

has two buttonholes: keyhole and standard.

case block and cursive) , tlle 1100 can do

adj ustment to Harrisburg, PA, two of Bun

Each can be stitched either in tll ree

everything but zip your zipper. These stitches

Em's daughters met Joanna Roe, who

steps or in conjunction witll a plism

are contained on four 2Y2 in. X 4% in.

obtained a Master-Apprenticeship Grant

buttonhole foot, which memorizes the

flat cassettes, which snap onto the

length of the buttonhole. The 1230 also has

machine. The 1100 has nine pennanent

an uppercase block alphabet, plus 20

memOlies, each of which holds 63

her art in the struggle to survive . During the family's initial

decorative stitches, which Bernina classifies

stitches, and you can choose a stitch from

as hand-look, compact, edging, pearl, and

any cassette. Your design is shown on

floral. The nine "function buttons" allow all

tlle Infodisplay panel, so you can check for

stitches to be altered-mirrored, reduced,

mistakes. Nine feet come with tlle

elongated, combined. The memory can

machine, including a buttonhole sensor

hold up to 50 symbols and remembers

foot keyed to tlle size of the button.

the last pattern when the machine is

AccessOlies and 30 additional feet are

tunled off and on.

available, including a $45 walking foot.

The Bernina won't win awards for its

For all the thought Viking has put

decorative stitch features; but on the

into the machine, it's odd that the

basics, it excels. Manuals are outstanding

markings on the needle plate are

for clarity; the 1230's satin stitch is perfect,

metric. My only other complaint is that

Witll infinite tapering; 1 1 well-designed

tapering a satin stitch is awkward, often

clip-on feet come vvith it (anotller

giving stair-step results.

40 are available, including

a walking

foot); marks on the needle plate are

% in.

apart; and dealer support is top-notch.

Unique features of now: On the 1230,

Unique features of now: Since the stitch cassettes snap on, tlle 1100 can be updated; another is e}.'Pected in 199 1 . Viking has thought of many small

ways

to

an automatic storage feature recalls the last

make sewing easier: A stop button makes

two settings and returns to them; so it's

locking off any stitch effortless; the foot

easy to alternate between tllem. The

pedal is 9 in. wide; two lights illuminate

eav

Bun Em w es Phamuong, the silk fabric used cambodia's n l me, on her cam­ bodian loom. (Photo by Janice G. Rosenthal)

for

otiona costu

presser-foot knee lifter frees both hands

the entire sewing smiace; a beep and flash

for sewing; and a clip-on sewing table

notify you when the bobbin is low; and

stores in the cover, making the machine

bobbins can be wound while you sew.

Society for the "Cambodian Woman's Silk

handy for classes, despite its 37 pOlmds.

Nineteen of the decorative stitches,

Weaving Project." She also directed the

from the Dauphin County Historical

called Pictograms, can be combined to

building of a special Cambodian loom by

bobbin, thread, make a buttonhole,

make designs and scenes, with ideas in

understand the manual.

an accompanying book.

Woodlore Builders of Harrisburg according to plans sent to them from the

Ease of use: Extremely easy to wind a

Supplementary materials: Extensive, including an advanced workbook, a biannual magaZine of

Ease of use: The easiest of all top-of­ the-line computer machines.

Supplementary materials: Two

Illiaw-i-Dang refugee camp via the Intenlational Rescue Committee. Under the grant, which enabled her business

ideas, monthly club meetings at many

videos, 3-ring binder "Owner's Manual,"

to bloom, Bun Em instructed local

dealers, idea pamphlets . No video on

project pamphlets, strong dealer

Cambodian women in silk weaving.

the 1230, but five "Footworks" videos

emphasis on consumer education.

show how to use the presser feet.

Warranty: 2 years, electrical; 5 years, printed circuit boards; 20 years, mechanical parts.

Warranty: 5 years, electrical eqUipment; 25 years , everything else.

Suggested retail: $2499. -Robbie Fanning

machine think for me, but the bea uty of 20

in. For Phamuong, above, the single­ ply warp is one color and the thicker, plied weft another, to make an iridescent fabric. This fabric is made

Suggested retail: $ 2 199. I'm not used to having a sewing

She weaves two kinds of silk fabric. Both are plain weave set at 64 ends per

Fanning is a contributing editor of

for the sampat, Cambodia's national

Threads.

costume, a loose fitting garment that

hreads Magaz

T

ine


ANDEAN FOLK KNIT ING Cynthia GraveLle LeCount

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'Being there' is one of the most powerful and exciting learning forces, and all of it can be yours through special study tours of

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For further information about

WOOL AND WONDERS OF SCOTLAND, WOOL AND WONDERS OF IRELAND GLORIOUS COLOUR TOURS OF YORKSHIRE,

please write or telephone asfollows: TREADLEART Magazine - Patterns and instruction using your sewing machine for all kinds of sewing embellishment as well as utilitarian sewing. Learn to use those wonderful stitches on your machine to their fullest. Learn machine embroidery. applique. quilting. and much more. Preview the latest in books. patterns. and gadgets for your sewing pleasure. SUBSCRIBE NOW!! Sample copy of TREADLE ART Magazine $3.00. Subscription to TREADLEART Magazine $1 8/yr. Bi-monthly. Foreign add $21yr. Sewing Supply Catalog $2.00. TREADLEART. 25834-T NARBONNE, LOMITA CA 90717 (213) 534-51 22. 800-327-4222.

December 1990/January 1991

ROWAN

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---

IHI

---

, TRAVEL COMPANY 21


Nok8

==== ==� == ORGANIZATIONS IBITIONS

wra sparound the waist and tucks

an excellent, well-attended slide lecture,

through the legs; or for a sarong-style

''The Perpetual Lure of the Bead," in the

skirt worn by women on special

intimate auditorium of the Chicago

occasions. Bun Em also weaves a

Academy of Science.

colorful, robust plaid called Sarong. She

-Gillion Skellenger

weaves a half yard of 45-in. wide fabric every day.

Skellenger is an instructor in the fashion department ofthe School ofThe Art Institute ofChicago.

In Arlington, VA, a similar project is forming, sponsored by Refugee

Women in Development, Inc. (RefWID)

EXH

of Washington D.C., the only national program representing women from diverse ethnic nationalities in the

19308 chic

United States. For information on the group, write to them at: 20 "S" St.,

"Fashion in the 1930s," a new costume

Washington, D.C. 20001.

installation at the Cincinnati

-Janice G. Rosenthal

Kimono show at the Textile Arts Centre: Works by artists who use the kimono form to ex­ plore modern materials, can be seen through

Rosenthal is chairperson ofApplied Arts and Program Advisor ofFashion Design and Fashion Merchandising at Marymount University in Arlington, VA.

oriam: 1900-1 990

Inmem

he called it-the kind of day that sends Although successful in business, after his retirement to Washington

WI,

where he and his family had

The Textile Arts Centre

summered for many years. His wife,

If you're seeking involvement in the

Sophie Sievers Schutz, was an

fiber arts community, you'll find

accomplished weaver, and over the

extraordinary resources and

years Walter had learned a lot about

stimulation at the Textile Arts Centre.

looms. So when someone asked him for

This not-for-profit organization is

plans to build one, he drew up a set. A

located at 916 West Diversey Parkway,

thriving mail-order business for loom

Chicago, IL 60614; (312) 929-5655.

and spinning wheel plans and kits

Workshops and lectures focus on such

followed. And in the summer of 1979,

topics as weaving, silk screening,

the Sievers School of Fiber Arts opened.

marbleizing, basketry, flax papermaking,

Since then, thousands of students have been

wn to Sievers to study not

receives a quarterly newsletter that lists

Walter created a refuge-a place for

classes, workshops, exhibitions (see

learning and sharing, for quiet

photo above; the next show will feature

contemplation and noisy fun, for healing,

Indonesian textiles, November 30,1990

and for love. A guardian angel in a white

to January 19, 1991), and special events.

beard and red sweatshirt, his wicked

In addition, members have access to

humor, his lively imagination, and his

TAC's library and a slide registry for fiber

creative energy inspired all who met him.

artists. Gallery hours are Tuesday to

Art

Muselun is

45202; (513) 721-5204. Visiting hours Saturday, 10-5; Wednesday, 10-9; and Sunday, noon-5.

0

Inviting accomplished artists to teach

loom, but it remains inextricably woven

xam

into the lives and memories of those he

by e

touched. Sievers School of Fiber

the TAC curriculum. A class I wanted to

Arts,

the

ple is one of the strong aspects of

thing that "wasn't supposed to happen,"

attend on ribbonwork and trims filled too

continues to grow and thrive, a living

quickly, but

22

The Cincinnati

located in Eden Park, Cincinnati, OH

Friday, 12-5; and Saturday, 10-5.

Walter's thread has been cut from the

-Judith T. Yamamoto

at

galleries. They include Parisian and American designs.

An individual pays $30 yearly and

on this island "north of the tension line,"

taught

the permanent collection costume

Various membership levels are available.

only weaving, but all the fiber arts. Here

Yamamoto has

dropping low in back. Approximately one dozen costumes are on display in

ceremonial Easter eggs, and beads.

dra

memorial.

decades in 20th century design. Bias-cut construction was in full bloom, and

are Tuesday, Thursday, Ftiday, and

Arts

Walter's greatest accomplishment came

most dramatic and sophisticated

necklines were often cut high in front,

(54

tourists in droves to realtors' offices.

January 6, 199 1 . It chronicles one of the

November 16, 1990. Yoshiko Iwamoto Wada, renowned artist and teacher, selected 20 for "The Kimono Show." Lectures by John Marshall pp. 39) were part of the festivities, along with workshops on Japanese printing, resist dyeing, and shibori. Margrit Schmidke's "Man­ tle for Mankind" in. X 62 in.) ismade of hand-dyed quilted and embroidered cloth. (Photo courtesy of Textile Centre)

(see

On a bright blue day in August 1990, Walter Schutz died. "Real estate weather,"

Island,

Art

Museum, will be on view through

1

get another chance when

it's repeated. Recently, I participated in a lively and informative workshop titled

nce 982

Sievers si

I'll

.

"Braids, Fringe, and Tassels" and attended

This 1934 wedding dress, made from seven

pieces of ivory silksatin, bears the Fashion Orig­ inators Guild label. The Guild was organized by

American designers to control design piracy. M

(Photo courtesy of Cincinnati Museum) Gift of Mrs. William E. Frick in memory of Mrs. William Brockman, Th ine Accession#:1986.1035

reads Magaz


The New Generation From £Ina. = (\ �

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Whatever you can imagine, you can create with Elna. Design a beautiful flower pattern or monogram-it's push-button simple. Select built-in stitch patterns up to wide for more creative freedom. Make instant perfect buttonholes with the exclusive One-Step Sensor� Sew with decorative threads of types. Use the free arm and large sewing table for easy sewing of fabrics and garments. Plus, Elna's one-hand threading, universal tension and drop-in bobbin get you started fast. And every Elna is unbelievably simple to use.

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�No�

== depicting

Rare quilts human figures

At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art through January 13, 1991, one can see 30 American quilts in which human figures appear in intricately detailed costume. pped in Glory: Figurative Quilts and Bedcovers 17001900" presents a unique visual record of the country's social and political history. The elegant, mannered style of the early quilts reflects America's reliance on European taste; strong national images appear in the 1830s and 1840s; and flamboyant embellishment reflects the confidence of the late 19th century. Themes span family, friendship, religion, patriotism , fashion, social issues, trade and commerce, transportation, and even sports. A fully-illustrated catalog by Sandi Fox, associate curator in charge of the museum's American Quilt Research Center (copublished by the museum and Thames and Hudson Worldwide, 1990) is available from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036; (213) 857-6146. The cost is $ 35, plus $5 S&H, hardcover edition. The Museum is opened Tuesday through Friday, 10 to 5; and Saturday and Sunday, 10 to 6.

"Wra

Lelia Buffs utter's b

lock-style Crazy Quiff. (Photo courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum ofM)

RAD

T ITIONS

The real Shaker sweater

Will the real Shaker sweater please stand up? We have all seen catalog ads for rib-Irnit cotton crew neck pullover "Shaker Sweaters." Are they genuine? The Canterbury, New Hampshire Shakers first started producing sweaters for sale in 1886 in response to the needs of the "World's" people, as they called non­ believers. Although we don't know whether the Shakers invented any of their distinctive patterns or adapted them from the World, they produced two basic styles: coat or jacket sweaters, which buttoned in front; and pullover sweaters­ all with a variety of collars. The sweaters came in 11 sizes, 30 through 50, and were made of two-ply Australian wool yarns ranging from e A"het -heavy to lightweight. Perhaps the most famous style was the heavyweight stockinette pullover with libbed turtleneck, waistband, and cuffs that the Shakers manufactured exclusively for various colleges including Dartmouth, Yale, Harvard, and Plinceton. 24

Based on sweaters in the Canterbury Shaker Village Museum's collection and conversations with Sister Ethel Hudson (1896-), the last living Shaker to have been actively involved in the industry, we

Sister Marguerite Frost didn't bother with all the buttons on her V-neck Shaker sweater coot. (Photo courtesy of Conterbury Shaker Village)

know that the bodies and sleeves of all the coat sweaters were machine knit in stockinette stitch with a 1% in. hemmed waist and ribbed cuffs. The tube forming the body of the sweater was split to form the fronts, and a placket was added by hand to conceal the slashed edges. While Shaker sweaters employed a machine knit web, the finished product involved a great deal of skilled hand labor as well. The assembly process was as follows: The underarms, pockets, and shoulders were "needled" together with a crochet hook, with practically invisible seams. The pockets were particularly difficult, and the Shakers charged extra for them. Once assembled at the Church Family, eight to ten sweaters were put in a large basket and carried to the North Family, where the buttons and buttonholes were added. Each coat sweater had six or seven "pearl" buttons purchased from Boston department stores. The finished sweaters were then carried back to the Church Family to be washed, steamed, and pressed. Shaker production was prolifiC, and surviving dialies record that during 1910, for

hl-eads

T

Magazine


The National Academy of Needlearts

announces the annual Assembly for

Embroiderers April 27-May 2, 1991 George Washington Inn, Williamsburg, Virginia Exciting classes by: Jody Adams, Sara

Ann

Cohen, Mindy English,

Jeanne Thomas Howard, Janice Love, Peg Monis, Caela Conn Tyler, Dolores Andrews, Susan Dawson, Jean Hilton, Peg Laflam,

Ann

Strite-Kruz,

Carversville Rd. Doylestown,

and conservation expert Harold Mailand

For the needle's excellence, past and present.

For your brochure, write: Barbara T. Edmonds, Registrar 10300 Cherokee Road � Richmond, Virginia 23235

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BOTH Alteration Books for $25.00 You Save $8.00! ! !

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December 1990/Jalluary 1991

G

N

Box170-280 San Francisco, CA 94117

**

Please add $ 1 .00 per book for postage

s

PO

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City St.

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==

NoW8

example, 1,489 sweaters were made. Shakers prized their sweaters, and archival photographs, like the one on p. 24, show Sisters and Brothern wearing their sweaters all year round. Ethel proudly reports that the Sisters were able to select their own style sweater, and that the standard machine patterns were often adjusted to achieve a custom fit. A collared-jacket sweater ltit with is available for instructions and wool $3 s&H. Write to: Gift Shop, $75 e, 288 Shaker Road, Canterbmy Shaker Burks -Jean 03224. Canterbm1',

yalTI

+

NH

Villag

M

Burks was Curator of Collections at Canterbury Shaker Village.

OPTh'10N Avant yarde textile art l quilters it for t rad

iona

In April 1990, the Textile Arts Festival in Bradford, England offered textile artists and craftspeople of all disciplines the opportunity to gather for an unprecedented variety of workshops, lectures, demonstrations, symposia, and exhibits. One particularly interesting feature of the festival was an exhibit of works from past years of the biennial international exhibitions of textile art in Lausanne, Switzerland. Those who are familiar with this know that the important exhibition Lausanne Biennial has become the

will

major forum for charting trends in textile art; those who are not might well ask what relevance it has to theni. A cursOl1' glance at the 1989 Biennial would probably reveal no object that quilters readily characterize as a quilt in the traditional or even in the "contemporary" sense. Even fabric was not overwhelmingly in evidence; wood, wire, and plastic were. But this does not mean that quilting was absent. Indeed, both the imagel1' and the process of quilting were vel1' much in evidence, though the makers well may not have been aware of it. Quilters are often so absorbed in the physical act of malting and the traditional language used to describe those processes that the essential nature of what they are doing is lost in the relentless pursuit of the tiniest stitch, tlle most crisply turned corner, tlle tidiest row of even quilting. These processes are really exactly the same processes used in other arts-assembly of individual elements, drawing, multiplication and jUA'iaposition of color units, amwgements of pattern, building and manipulating surfaces. Arguing over whether an object is something we can identity as "art" or not is really irrelevant to this issue. It is much more a question of the intention behind what is made. Who is its intended audience? In what context is it intended to be seen? And perhaps most important, is the work intended to honor a specific tradition by working within

Kiyomi Iwata's "Untitled" assemblage of silk organza boxes, 86 in. X 86 in. X 6 in., from the 1987 Lau­ sanne Biennial, glowed in suspension before a window at Salts Mill in Bradford, England. 26

its constraints and values; or does the work attempt to push for fresh applications of the processes of that tradition? This is not at all a matter of establishing superiority of one over the other, but rather of defining and maintaining a tradition so tllat the extent of any explora.tions within it or expansions at its edges can be judged with clarity. Often we can see more clearly what we a1-e doing by looking carefully at what we are not. I am not suggesting for a moment that everyone should rush off to make quilts of plastic or pleated wire. But look, respond, reject, learn from work like that from the Lausanne Biennial. There is nothing wrong with working within a tradition, and that should always remain a choice. But blind following of a tradition is not honoring it. On the other hand, considered use of a tradition­ aware of the similarity to its processes, pleasures, and problems-is. -Judith Duffey

Duffey, a lecturer in art history, is also 67, a textile artist. See Threads, No. 22, 92. This essay appeared in similar r 1990. form in Quilters' Review, Su

pp.

mme

�'1

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reads Magaz

Th

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December 1990/January 1991

29


Clnthes tn Live In

Clean finish! elegant detailing! and sturdiness! in one flat-fell swoop

by Jeanne Engelhart

will

t

design clothes that I hope re­ mind people that life is meant to be enjoyed and fulfilling, not over­ stuffed with struggle and discom­ fort. When you put on an interest­ ing outfit that makes you feel easy and light, you are declaring these qualities a priority in your life. They are for me, and that's why got into this business. (See "AngeUleart takes flight" on p. 32 for more about that) . I learned by the seat of my pants. After graduating from college, my twin sister and I taught ourselves how to sew because we were uninspired by available fashions. I had no formal training in clothing design or sewing and I think this was advanta­ geous. I wasn't locked into what I "could" or "shouldn't" do. explored concepts in construction and design that maybe weren't "acceptable." I didn't know any bet­ ter and it worked.

I

I

Washable, wearable fabrics For my warm weather fabric I use a washed linen. There is nothing like linen. It's cool, and the more it's washed the less wrinkles there are. It's actually the oils in linen that keep it stiff and mal{e it wrinkle. As the oils get washed out, the linen gets more relaxed and comfortable. We take it to the local laundry to be washed and put through the mangles. Then it's ready to use and it sews up beautifully. We distinguish our linens by silkscreen­ ing them right here in our barn. We print the separate pieces of the garment, after it is cut, before sewing. We aren't printing the scrap fabric and can position the de-

Comforl, fun, and ease of wear are the hall­ marks of Angelheart designs. Begin with the fabrics: washed linen and cotton double knits. Cut generously and simply. Then add function­ al detail-flat-fell seams in many guises. (Photo by William McDowell) December 1990/January 1991

sign in relation to the garment pieces. For fall and winter, I use a reversible, cotton double knit, which I'm able to de­ sign myself. I draw the pattern and choose my colors, weight, and texture. It is knit up for me by New York Fabrics (39 W. 37th St., New York, 10018) exactly to my specifi­ cations. The minimum order is 2500 yds., in two colorways. 'l'his autumn my Imit fabric was inspired by the fall foliage. I su­ perimposed an art deco motif onto the leaves, creating something very contempo­ rary and unique (photo, left) . The opposite side is a heathery solid giving a totally dif­ ferent option. For spring '91, I'm working with linens, which I get from Hamilton-Adams Imports (PO Box 2489, 101 Country Ave., Secaucas, NJ 0 7094) . They come in a wonderful range of solid colors. I chose two groups: raspberry, teal, deep periwinkle and an au­ tumn-j ungle maize, burnt orange, moroc­ can brown, khaki, lime green.

NY

gning for comfort and fun

Desi

It's quite fascinating where you can get ideas from if you keep your eyes, and, more im­ portantly, your mind, open. I'm always look­ ing for tips, be they from nature, an interest­ ing cabinet door, or an old flight suit. I watch people, how clothes fall on them, what shapes work, and which ones don't. I watch children, toddlers; what do they seem to be at ease in? I am definitely influenced by children's clothes of the '20s, '30s, and '40s; designs for kids were done with comfort and fun in mind. Details, too, were much more interesting in the past. Styles-When I start to design, I am ultimate­ ly designing for myself. I only make clothes that I love to wear. I design big. If there is a lot of fabric around you, you look smaller and feel more comfortable. I like the clothes to hang down straight, not touching the body at all, leaving room for the imagination.

will

c::>

The

coot smock It the created butto course.

Market (above) is based on the cover­ up makes a great duster, and by vary­ ing hemline and fullness at back, Engelhart has some wonderful jackets, as well. One of the first garments Engelhart made was n-up pants, with low crotch, roomy hip, and elastic back waist. The latest version (below) is in linen, of (Photos by William McDowell)


Pattern for "I can wear Angelheart to work" Jacket

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h J r 1-' ,\ � I � � f- 1-- -f - f- l--- tl 'I It'1..... 1\ �""'f..... I-..!_ .J I I '-.J..... I .. i I \ Large size I'..J.I . 1\ \I\, 0= 1 in_

f-I-I1-1-1f-I-II-f-f1-1-1f-,-!-f-

s= f-I-

1-1I-I-f-I--I-

% in_ seam allowances included.

It u ld man ufac

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Assembly:

40

,- Sew pockets to linings on sides and bottom, RSs together; turn and press, turn in top edge and topstitch. Topstitch pockets to jacket fronts. 2_ Use split flat-fell seam (see p.

center bock, splitting at dot.

3.

34)

ning

Flat-fell sleeve and side seams. Double-turn and topstitch all hems.

was

Add button closure.

work"

Craft

tayed

magina

com

The can wear Angelheort to suit is ­ fort and elegance bined. The jacket (pat­ tern above) is worn over the one-piece, d waist 'Work dress" with set-in sleeves. set of mother-of-pearl ns serve as a clasp. 32

takin

a

can't

Flat-fell sleeves to bodice.

butto

kyard

living

35).

ropped

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and lining RS together, matching notches and sewing outside edge. Turn and press. Flat-fell to jacket as for placket (see p.

com

fall

riwin

return

at

Flat-fell bodice shoulders.

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w

witi1

4. Assemble collar, lining: Join collar

5. 6. 7. 8.

with

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clothing that exp ress es lightheartedness and not create a happy work place. I cross the dri every morn ing to orchestrate the production of tho ds of a nents , to m the activities of 15 Angelbees and hun of thousands of dollars with the same question in mind: How do I make it all happen and at the day's end have love, abundance, and gratitude clearly in the lead, fear and lack high-tailing it out of town? For me this journey began in February of 1987, hen I took a break from carpentry and accompanied Jeanne to our first wholesale show. We wrote $1 7,000 worth of orders. My triumphant bliss was sooo deflated; while in the hotel pool relaxing after a day of selling, I asked my beloved how she had come up with her holesale prices. As we went ugh the breakdown of each ga ment the news was similar; our profit would be about two dollars a garment. We had gone the route of many by initially underselling ourselves. Chalk it up to advertising. That June I pushed Jeanne into going to New York to attend the Intemational Fashion and Boutique Show with a line. Knowing only linen, used it. dyed the sample e (purple, pmnpkin, evergreen, and pe kle) in the bac in our qU31t tofu pots. After g $40,000 worth of orders, we traipsed around Brooldyn looking for a dyer, who we paid $5,000 up front no idea how we coul d cover the check. On our there a notice for an ope at the Lincoln Center Fair. That weekend we sold $10,000 of retai l Angelhear and s afloat. The following January we moved into 900 square feet of renovated space in our barn, liberating our room . Next we added an inventory room , pcking room , and finally an office. I impart much more business sense upon my readers; I have none. I have never seen a cash flow chart, don't know what my overhead is or make any decisions based on the state of tile economy. I choose to that iunoceoce and i tion are more rful than n. I'm often asked why our ot es expensive ( wholesale around $170, pants around $1 l0, and coats around $200). e re by people with mo es and ents is my standard reply. -Matthew Engelhart

veway

I

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flight

wo be ludicrous to design

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AngeZheart takes

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powe reaso cl h are dresses 'Th y' sewn rtgag car paym ,"

think


The first season I made a pair of comfY, hip-hiding baggy pants, with a long crotch, elastic in the back waist, and roomy pockets. A more refined version, the "Button-up pants," (bottom photo, p. 31) is still in the line. So is the ''Market coat" (top photo, p. 31), one of my favorite pieces. I wearing one of my father's old work coats (he runs the Hunt's Point Produce Market) to protect my clothes, and caught sight of myself in the mirror. It looked great. Its loose, easy shape is also the basis of the shorter jackets we do.

was

Intuitive draping-So I get an idea and

madly sew it up, usually using parts from passe or rejected pieces that are hanging around. Perhaps I 'll make the bottom of a dress from an old skirt and the sleeves from some jacket. I do this because I 'm too impatient to sew it all up from scratch, but I 've discovered little surprises this way that I incorporate into the final garment. Let's say I am sewing up a front piece to a differ­ ent, shorter back. I add a small piece to give it the length, and 10 and behold, it's an interesting detail and so it remains. When I've come up with a very rough fin­ ished piece, I put it on and look and look and look and look and if I'm not satisfied I pull it up here, push it out there, put it on backwards, inside out, and even upside down if I can, all the time looking and look­ ing. Sometimes it works light away. Other times I play with the piece until something catches my eye. Something says yes, wheth­ er it be a neckline or the shoulder or the placement of a seam or pocket, and I go from there. What is the feeling of this component and why do I like it? How do I let it flow through the whole piece? What type of sleeves feel like that? What type of bodice? How about the skirt, shall it be pleated? Straight? I guess you'd call this draping. My patternmaker, Diana Skawold, asked me at the beginning of our relationship if I designed by draping or flat pattern method. I honestly had no idea what she was talking about. So after I'm finished "draping," Diana comes in and does her miracle work. After five seasons I am still very im­ pressed. I can hand her something partial­ ly sewn, partially pinned, basically glued together by intention. I describe the im­ pulse behind it and she creates the pattern for that dream. We fine-tune the piece by making alterations. We usually end up sewing a piece three to six times before it goes into production. We do get the occa­ sional grueller which we tinker with even after we've started manufacturing it. We've also expelienced the satisfaction in finding it just right on our first attempt. This is my designing process. Diana has certa inly helped make it smoother and more enjoy­ able, and added a professional dimension December 1990/January 1991

where it was sorely needed. You should have seen some of the patterns when it was my job. The sewers always needed to trim pieces so they would fit together, making each garment "unique. "

Construction: no fUss, no muss No, patternmaldng was not my forte. How­ ever, I have cooked up a few cockamamie ideas about sizing, cutting, sewing, and pattern shapes that we have maintained.

izing

S -I like loose, comfortable clothing and I refuse to be a size medium. So you could say the whole sizing system is based on my vanity. I am the small (I weigh be­ tween 120 and 125) and we go up and down from there, usually grading 3 in. to 4 in. per size. The chart turns out to be: 4-6 petite, 8-10 small, 12-14 medium, 16-18 large, with room to spare, of course!

Cutting

out-After grading our paper pat­ terns (which we file away) and making a sample in each size, we cut our working patterns out of heavy flannel chamois, in-

--4-----I �

cluding a %-in. seam allowance. 'fhe edges are all outlined with black marker that will be noticed if it gets trimmed off during cut­ ting. The flannel is fairly heavy and sticks to the fabric, so no pins or weights are needed. These patterns are much easier to fold up tllan paper, they last, and they store wel l . We 've recently purchased a heavy-duty rotary cutter (from Maimin Co. Inc., Kent, CT) that goes through layers of fabric like butter. like to simplity cutting as much as possible. For collars and plackets, for instance, we have one pattern for all sizes and it's long enough to accommodate a large size. We sew them on (see drawing on p. 35), positioning one edge, then sewing toward the other. When we're close to the end, we bim it to length, and finish. I nearly always use the same sleeve pat­ tern for all sizes. What!? Yes, I do and it makes cutting more efficient. If we cut too many, they'll be okay for any size. Further­ more, my sleeves are symmetrical. Sleeves can be cut on the fold if necessary, and for Pattern pieces-I

Angelheart flat-tell seam

Shift edges l st poss

3fs

in.

� RS

Back or lower portion of garment

For knits, stitch over woven tape.

Tension

II

I I

I

Open seam.

Fold raw edge in just shy of stitching line.

mach resse feed

FOld t/at and topstitch.

rrow need soon

Flat-fel/ed seams in knits with a straight-stitch ine? Yes, with the aid of na woven tope. Center the tope over the first seamline, and with p r foot and le down, pull firmly but gently on the tope as you let the knit naturally. Practice a bit; your seam will be stable, without puckers or unwonted curves.


the reversible or printed fabric it's great. You never end up with two left sleeves nor 20 for that matter. The seamstress doesn't need to take extra time figuring out which is the front. My clothes are built simply and roomy enough that this con­ cept "eases in" beautifully. The sewers like that. And without my sewers, who all do a wonderful j ob transforming my visions into reality, this business would not be. Stitchillg-While designing I think of the production and how difficult or simple a concept will be to sew. A piece isn't suc­ cessful in my mind unless it comes togeth­ er really easily for the sewer. Therefore I am constantly working on elements that look intricate but actually are sewn up quite quickly and smoothly. It's fun; it's like figuring out a puzzle. In the process I 've come up with some innovative tech­ niques in clothing construction. Take flat-felled seams, for instance. They're not so innovative in themselves, al­ though I don't know of another clothing line which is completely manufactured that way. In my flat-felled seams, rather than worrying about two different seam allowances or having to trim the allowance after the first pass, we simply shift the fab­ ric to offset the edges by in., then sew, fold (finger-pressing the linen), and top­ stitch (see drawing, p. 33) . I love the clean, finished seam you get both inside and out. In fact, I have made a reversible line based on this concept, using the double-faced cotton Imits. It was an ex­ cellent medium for the flat-fell seam ex­ cept for one major drawback. The seams stretch when you sew with knits. I don't have overlock machines. I don't even like the look of serged seams, which would put an end to the reversibility. vVe sew a nar­ row (% in.) woven cotton edge tape along the inside edge of the flat-fell seam on the first pass. It works great; it just takes a little practice. The sewers keep a slight tension on the tape while they allow the Imit to feed through naturally (photo , p . 3 3 ) . When the second pass of stitching is fin­ ished, the tape is hidden in a nice firm seam. For more on using t1at-felled seams, see the box at right. As you sew, join me in a life where we allow ourselves to laugh often, have fun, have a ball! Where we don't take ourselves so seriously. Remember, angels t1y because they take themselves lightly.

viions rtue

Making a of necessity ­ variat an a flab-fell seam One of the pieces of my construction p uzz l e has its roots as much in e fficie ncy as in style.

I

want a smoothly finished garmen t , with no raw edges, no

I

hem st i t c hing, no finicky work. So p l an each garment as an a sse m bly of variations on a flat-fell seam (drawing, p. 33). From inserting sleeves to hemming, t he finish and the detai l are one and the same.

%

0

$PUT SEAM

side one bate /eft). ffs open transffion. The 51ff with button loopis the V with the reverse side of the foce, show for

This is great sewing a seam and armhole finish in (photo. a also an effective detail for a center-front to neck ing simple same way as is deep inset (above right), except that seam acts as as n in the drawing below.

constructed the the

Split flat-fell seam

5fs in. seam

1-----1

II II

RS or WS : depending : on desired : effect

)

Backstitch at desired ope

.

IIII

Press seam open, fold, and fingerpress (or iron) at in.

318

I Ii :

V

Reverse

Jeanne Engelhart and her husband, Mat­ thew, make mm"ket functional, com­ fortable clothes uncler the name Angel­ heart Designs. For more information and a catalog, write to them at 303 Gunder­ man Rd., Spence?", 1 4883.

mul

NY

34

Threads Magaz

ine


CKETS

PLA -Here we maintain the look by attach­ ing the placket to the shirt orjacket front with a flat­ fell seam. We cut the placket extra long, then fold it lengthwise and topstitch top and visible edge. Then we "fiat-fell" placket to bodice as shown in the drawing at right.

Placket

2. Press bodice

I.

edge 3fB in. to WS.

Prepare by stitching top; trim.

3. With WSs together,

WS

WS

position placket in fold. Topstitch

v"

in. from fold.

4. % in. from

-

,II I II,II II ,Ii:

bottom, trim and clip excess placket. Either turn in raw edges, matching finished lengths, and topstitch; or wait to hem with lower edge of bodice.

--- - RS

.

Turn, topstitch top and folded edge in. from edge.

v"

5. 6.

Press placket to front. Flip bodice over; topstitch close to bodice edge.

i

"�'-III •:I

RS

I,

II.! .

.I:, I III: . :

POCKETS -The opening edges of these pockets are finished with a fo(::r stttched double tum that echoes the flat-fell seam. The remaining edges of the pockets are sewn into the flat-fell seams thatjoin the pieces.

, ,

" " -. I'

. •'" 'I. .,'/

.�.'�.·"-·- -\ .".. I•.�-· .' -:,.' ,\�, , ., .:� ,. - .

.,�\ ,/ / ,

.-

SLEEVES -This sleeve, cut with the seam at the shoulder rather than the underarm, is flat-felled to the side-seamed bodice. Then shoulder and sleeve seam are flat-felled as one.

-J.£.

December

1990/January 1991


A Swealer . for the Ritz Imagination meets knitting technique

by Eileen Sum

merville


o be able to say who I am and to show how I perceive my nature through what I create and display on my body is intoxicating. For me, knitting is e}.'j)loration, risk taking, letting go, and a celebration of the creative process. Most of the world does not see it this way. They see what I do as "knitting a sweater." I don't waste a lot of time explain­ ing to the uninitiated that what I create during my dance of love called "Color, De­ sign, Fiber, Texture, and Knitting" tells a story of myself-namely, that I exist. And that because I exist, I need to express in visual terms what I see and sense. But after the music has played, and the dance called "Process" is over, the uninitiated viewer sees only a "sweater." One morning I shall wake up with a better word for this product of self-expression.

The creative p

rocess

The process of creating is absolutely all there is for me. Sometimes I love to create so much that my creations never get further than my head. It satisfies me just to think them through. And, of course, I have thought through so many projects that one lifetime would never be long enough to do them all. But just imagining and planning, even if my ideas never become realities, is entertainment enough for me. Although I never follow p ublished sweater patterns, I often find inspiration in knitting books. I liked the graphic lines on the chart for a "Jacquard Sweater" (from Sandra, Special Issue for Men, No. 5). But my imagination added colors and luscious textures; I envisioned the rich interplay of commercial and handspun silks and wools, tweeds, and beads. So I made dozens of co­ lor/texture studies, shown at right. Some­ day there may even be a garment, but knit­ ting the studies was pleasure enough. I do make whole garments though. Let me tell you the story of the "sweater" shown at left. I needed a little number to wear to the Ritz Carlton for afternoon tea by the fire. I surveyed my closet for body coverings and was dissatisfied. Nothing dramatic enough. Now the creative imagi­ nation clicks in. It will be white, a striking color. It will announce that I am Lady As­ tor meeting Lord Astor for Tea. No prob­ lem. It will be knitted-but of course. It will be elegant and dramatic. So, now I have my initial script. Time to plan the menu. Texture? What could be more luscious than angora or silk-with a soupQon of glitz? Remember, j ust a quiet

signal of sophistication. Nothing in excess. White angora is not shiny; for shine, I 'll add a little silk bombyx. In fact, why not ply the angora with bombyx silk? It add strength and sheen and keep the ango­ ra from being too warm here in our South­ land. After all, if one is having tea with Lord Astor at the Ritz, one must not be in a sweat, so to speak. Now that I have the color and texture, is white enough? Can I add just a hint more of something that ,vill speak of class, of delicacy? Angora does look very feminine and delicate, but ... . Pink is a delicate col­ or. I search through all of my pink fibers. I have three close pinks. Again I juxtapose dull and shiny with my cotton and rayon threads. I'll use these three pinks as one thread and marry it to the white angora. Now for the shape of the garment. Dol­ man sleeves, with their wide armholes and fitted wrists, are very dramatic; I 'll go with them. In this confection, the balance and placement of the color on the shape must be perfect. I want a wonderful, dramatic white stripe to come from the neck, over the shoulder, and extend to the wrist, as shown in the schematic on p. 38. Now for the plan for actually knitting the garment. My basic technique, when all else fails, is: Guess at it. Begin at the bottom. Decide on the type of pattern stitch. I have

will

always loved "Old Shale" from the wonder­ ful shawls knitted in Scotland. So I play with fitting my color balance into this pat­ tern stitch, as shown at center on p. 38. Now it's time to pause and take stock: It will be a hand-knit sweater worked in flat pieces. It will be elegant and dramatic. The fibers will be angora, silk, cotton, and rayon. Color will be limited, white and three pinks used as one. The shape will be dolman. The pattern will be "Old Shale." The design emphasize a white stripe

• • • • • • •

will

running from neck to wrist.

Knitting decisions The technical process continues. I will knit the body pieces up, and after a certain pOint, which I shall ascertain by holding the piece up to my body, I will begin adding increments of stitches for the sleeves on each side, using cable cast-on, as shown at lower right on p. 38, until the sleeves are wide enough across the body. After the pink and white Old Shale pattern is worked up past the underarm, I will change to plain white stockinette in white angora­ with a little pink purl stripe between. This is where I 'll need to decide what type of neckline to make. A cowl sounds

com

Summerville makes a block and white chart dance into rich postels, using mercial and hand­ spun and dyed silks and wools. Thejoy ofplaying with colors and imagining their flow on her is sometimes as satisfying to her as actually knitting the sweater.

body

Eileen Summerville designed her angora and silk top, left, for teo at the Ritz. (Photo by Suson Kahn) December 1990/Jrumary 1991

37


� �� (

Eileen Summerville's tea sweater pattern

PI

rib on progressiveIY larger needles.

KI,

.".-

I

3 times neck length

arm hole

t

r

Front and back g rafted er

Y3 cast-on width

1 00"10 length

/'

Dolman sleeve, with cable cast on increases each side in stages until piece extends to mid-forearm.

q

r "I

Old Shale

Y2tobust + generous ease full pat multiple

.

--.....

- _ ::: ) 60"10 length= armhole t

cuff rib

length

Forearm picked up and knit around with several severe dec rounds to est cuff width.

Invisible cast-on with first pattern in pink

Shelded area worked back and forth

SUmmerville worked two rows of Old Shale pattem in her handspun white angora and silk yom and two in pink. Pink also highlights the transitions: to colfar and shoulder stripe. as welf as bind-offs and hem.

Old Shale

4

Multiple of 1 8 sts and rows. Row 1 (RS): Knit (white) Row 2: Purl (white) Row 3: '(k2tog )3x, (yo, k l )6x, (k2tog)3x', rep ' -' (pink). Row Knit (pink).

4:

Key

Knit (purl on WS)

p Yarnover (yo)

�� :��

- Purl (knit on WS)

A:

Knit 2 together (k2tog)

Chart (as seen from right side): Cast on any number of stitches divisible by

� � � � �� � _I� : � � �H� -t� � � � � �I� �;( � �Repea

-- ---

-----t

With MC over left thumb and a slippery waste yarn over index finger, alternately scoop MC loops in front of and behind waste yarn, twisting wrist to reverse position. Always move needles toward yourself. Remove 2nd needle to knit row

Rs

te

ta .

� MC yarn

I.

Join two open rows of knit sts with a third row. The tapestry needle enters each loop twice.

� 3 s rt

waste yarn

Invisible cast-on

Kitchner stitch (grafting)

18.

right. I guess at how to do it because none of my 150 knitting books directly explains the logistics of designing a cowl neck-sort of like a recipe book where parts of the rec­ ipe have been left out, and you think you are the problem, So I decide to bind off the middle third of the body stitches on the front of the sweater. An alternative would be to measure your neck across in inches and guess at the proportions. I shape the front neckline a little by decreasing three stitches on either side, one every other row. Now I work up to the shoulder and leave the stitches on a string. I do the back the same way, except I don't bind off for the back of the neck. When the back is done, I Kitchner stitch (graft) the corresponding front and back shoulder and arm stitches, as shown at lower left. I sew up the sides and the un­ derarms. Then I pick up the stitches around the bottom of the sleeve and work down from this point in stockinette, guess­ ing at the cuff, which I decrease sharply at the wrist and work in kl, pI rib. I slipstitch crochet a chain around the neck opening in pink (see Basics, p. 10), then pick up the stitches and work a kl, pI rib on progres­ sively larger needles for the cowl. When I try to write it all down, I realize that my methods are highly unorthodox, but truly, it is all right to punt. Sometimes I punt a lot. Go ahead, take a risk. Just plain old guess when you can't figure out what else to do. Knitting this way is a bit like being in the forest and starting out on a trail. You see another trail leading away, and you start down it, and after a while you realize you could get lost. So you backtrack and sit a spell and ponder what you want to do. Sometimes you try lots of trails that lead nowhere, so you spend all of your time backtracking. But one day, if you are per­ sistent enough, you guess right-and every­ one thinks you are a genius. When I started knitting this sweater, I used an invisible cast-on, shown at left (be­ low pattern), because I never can decide what kind of ribbing I want. When I com­ pleted the arms and had everything in place, I noticed that the pattern had a won­ derful wave along the bottom, so decided to go with the flow and forget the ribbing. I just crocheted a chain of slipstitch around the bottom. Then I decided to complement it with a pink chain over the cowl bind-off. For tea with my Lord Astor, well, it was worth the trouble. What else can I say?O

I

Cable cast-on

At beg of row, insert needle behind first st and knit up new st. Place st on LHN, and repeat from ' as desired. On purl side, insert needle from back to front.

Eileen Summerville lives in Lakemont, GA. Her work has been accepted into jur­ ied textile shows and invitationalfine art exhibits. She travels and teaches fiber art seminars on color and design. Contact her at PO Box .1 73, Lakemont, GA 30552. 38

reads Magaz

Th

ine


The

Ki

nwno

designs in the West

Style from

leaning toward nese-inspired Simplicity of design,

oefilJ IlO�es. ·.l'J

gant flow, and gra lines are the key

·

concept is the traditional (more properly, the

dard

ko8ode�);

of classic beauty. Through

the basic shape of the kimono has little. Fashion trends have been eXlIl subtly in colors and patterns, ment on the garment, and in the fibers and weaves.

J'eiI1M (>n''''I'·'.i� m

With an understanding of the cut and fit of the basic form, you can create a wide range of contemporaty jackets, shirts, and dresses, based more or less on the kimono

The cut

mon

It relies oned

of a ki o is simple; primarily on straight lengths of beautiful fabric. However, the subtle details such as softly ir seams, untrim seam allowances, and origami­ miters Introduce us to an intriguing phi­ of sewing. or John Marshall the silk shell fabric of the ki at right using a resist nique and ral . lining, of silk and purple China silk, like piping at the openings and at the . (Photo by n Kahn)

med folded losophy Auth texlured tech The texlured peeks out padded hem Susa Decem 199O/January ber

dyed

mono natu dyes sleeve

1991

39


shape, that are more suitable to wear in the West than a classic kimono. Many of the sewing techniques, such as mitering a cor­ ner or shaping sleeve corners, may be ap­ plied to any garment. I'll describe an un­ lined woman's kimono, although many kimono are lined, as is the one shown in the photo on the previous page.

rrow fabric

Few cuts and na

The kimono, having been developed by a weaving society, is designed with as few cuts as possible to avoid any waste of labor­ intensive fabric. In traditional yardage, ap­ proximately 14 in. ,vide by 12% yds. long, all cuts are made along the weft and the extra width becomes seam allowances. Nat­ urally, you can use wider fabric and nar­ rower seam allowances. A properly fit woman's kimono before being sashed should reach from fingertip to fingertip and from the top of her head to the floor, as shown in the upper left draw­ ing on the facing page. The extra length is folded over a sash at the waist until the hem falls j ust below the ankle. For pattern purposes, the distance between the two finger tips is normally divided into four, each quarter being the width of the narrow fabric. Two lengths form the sleeves, and two longer lengths-each going from the hem in back over the shoulder to the hem in front-form the main torso. Sleeve lengths vary with the style of the kimono; long sleeves are for younger women for for­ mal occasions, and shorter sleeves are for older women or for everyday use. Two more fabric lengths , called the okumi, are added to the front and overlap of the kimono. Larger or smaller seam allowances help to size the garment. The collar is considered one of the more im­ portant contributions to the overall look of the garment, and should be taken to maintain a graceful line. The collar may be designed to rest fairly close to the back of the neck, as for younger girls, or to sit back a little way to give ·a more worldly look.

great care

Fabric Most fabric is suitable for a kimono. Tradi­ tionally silk is used for most of the year and cotton for informal summer kimono, called yukata. Linen is also used commonly in spring, summer, and autumn. Wool is usual­ ly reserved for the winter, primarily for home use. Choose a fiber and weave suitable to your needs. Since people vary considerably in size, it is difficult to give accurate yardage requirements, but plan on having three to three and a half times your height if you are using 36-in. wide fabric (adjust accordingly for wider fabrics) or about seven times your height of traditional 14-in. wide weaves. 40

Kimono cut

The pattern is fairly simple. Draft your pat­ tern using dotted or gridded pattern paper or non-woven interfacing. You'll add seam allowances on the fabric once you've checked the fit with a paper pattern. Have a friend help you to measure the spread of your arms, finger tip to finger tip, and divide this measurement by four. We'll call this quarter armspan A. Measure your height, in stocking feet from the top of your head to the floor. Cut two paper body panels that are twice B in length and A in width. Next decide how much "flutter" you would like in your sleeves when they're sewn. A common sleeve length is half your body height, so the total sleeve pattern length is B. Cut two sleeve patterns. If you would like your sleeves longer or shorter adjust the

n,

measurement. For women, the sleeve is rarely less than one-third the body length. When worn, the "cuff" area of the sleeve should hit light at the wrist bone. The collar is normally at least 2% in. wide. The collar pattern, with seam allowances in­ cluded, is generally half the width of one of your panels and as long as B plus 24 in. I prefer to enclose all the extra fabric around the neck and center fronts in the collar, although I have seen lomono with the excess amounts trimmed. To mark a sewing line on the kimono body for attaching the collar and the okumi, you'll need to make a simple template. Mea­ sure around the base of your neck, divide the measurement by two, and call it C. Use C to make a template as shown in the lower left drawing on the facing page. The sides of the template extended down the front pan­ els are the sewing lines for attaching the okumi. Plot this on your pattern by aligning the shoulder and center neck lines on the body patterns. Remember, these are sewing lines, not cutting lines. The okumi is normally 5 to 6 in. shorter than the body length (B). When sewn to the front panel, the okumi seam should endjust below your collar bone. If in doubt, cut the pattern a little long and adjust it later. Once sewn, the okumi is two-thirds the width of the finished front panel (see D in the right drawing on the facing page). Also measure the distance from the top of your shoulder at the neck to the base of your sternum; you'll use this measurement, E, to determine the shoulder/sleeve seam. tape the pattern To check the kimono together with the edges of the paper butted together; removable or masking tape is rec­ ommended. Tape up the center back to the back collar curve. Tape the sleeves on and add the okumi pieces to the front, aligning the sewing lines. Then close up the side seams and try the pattern on. Overlap the left front over the right. At this point the garment should be too long for you. How is the fit around your torso? The back seam should run down your cen­ ter back, the side seams should hang straight at your sides at about the point where the side seam on slacks would hit. The center okumi seams should not quite meet in front but the lomono should be large enough so they have crossed over the center front. If the seams are not hitting at the appropriate points you will need to ad­ just your body panels by taping in more pattern paper, or by cutting some out. Be careful not to inadvertently widen or nar­ row your sleeves. If all is adjusted, untape your pattern pieces. If you are using any fabric other than the traditional 14 in. width, add % in. to % in. seam allowances to all sides of the body

(%A)

fit,

'\ � f:��?1.1�1{ " \.J1�ij>: Iv \ '::.>-",4 1 \ ' \:\

I

.It.,

II

LV

��

i)

. :'. '!' ". .

o

,

Ideally woman 's bodV Ts padded around the waist and flattened at the bust so her kimono forms a smooth column from the bust down,

Threads Magaz

ine


A woman's kimono

Pattern and beginning construction

1.

A, Armspan fingertip to fingertip

Sew center back seam. (French seam is optional.)

---1-7---­

WS

2. Stitch sleeve

1< armspan I

to body, right sides together.

B,

>1

height from top of head to floor

V4 A

Add i;2 -in. to % -in. seam allowances to pattern pieces before cutting. Blindstitch allowances after seaming back. to slee

:

Making a collar template

WS body

\

E,

length from shoulder at the neck to sternum

-41\

(-+'.-,--! k·· · · 3. WS

Stitch okumi to fronts.

,

Collar sewing line

C, base o f neck circumference

V2

Template Shoulder line

�:4L.: �.::. �.t.i1�J. I• II

Collar sewing line

French seam

_

, Extend sides of neck opening ' to hem.

• I

side seam.

D, finished front panel width

Blindstitch seam allowances to kimono.

Collar pattern

Turn seam allowance toward the okumi Blindstitch.

December

uary

1990/Jan

1991

41


panels, sleeves, and okumi; you can also add them at the layout stage. If you are using the traditional width fabric, your seam allowances will be deter­ mined by your measurements in relation to the fabric width. Do not cut off the extra seam allowance, if any. If you are a large person, make sure the traditional fabric width is wide enough before you buy it.

Construction

To shape the curve, baste several lines of stitches in the corner (left). Gather the basting and fold to the front (right), using your fingers to shape the curve. Pull the seam Slightly to the front. (Photos by John Marshall) Finishing the sleeve

RS

7.

WS of sleeve front

Iron gathers only. Blindstitch seam al!owances

4. Stitch from

in. ;�; ;: �; � i-.b::.-�..: _�+3/:i'c_nf-"�-I: Inin. c ...,=b/ .LJ,,,. �". ,,,. ,liLil'� "5.

1.

/4

2. Complete

Stitch seam with WS together

french seam with RS together.

,

Baste

6.

curve.

-

erin uv ,g h basting to offset seam Slightly toward front.

Mitered corners

Y4

WS

.,�'1.. �l - 3/4

' '''''

Draw fold lines. Mark points a, b, and miter point c.

4. Lift points

X,

WS

2. With knot on

,,

)""

, ·.11.•...•. •. "'·"". ... ..... .,·-

wrong side, gather a to b.

Y

and folding as shown.

3. Stitch from

b to c. Knot.

�5.

1

Pinch along line (RS together) and rotate clockwise Fold along line 2 with RS together

-1

c "-

----�! ;

....�.w-i H \#. H

90'

"-

"'"� "-

. .�..� . . ... ... . ...·�...·.'.." ___

:::..

8. Carefully

c

42

c

turn miter

wing

towa

will

E.

""

hand opening to curve

Body-Use your pattern pieces, with seam allowances added, to cut your fabric. Sew the center back with a French seam so the raw edges will be hidden when your kimono is complete. Sew the okumi to the front panel along the se lines and press both seam allowances rd the okumi. The front panels have larger allo wan ces than the okumi. Sew the sleeves to the body, right sides together, along a line that is equal in length to The armscye of the sleeve, and an area of the adjacent body will be left open and hemmed. To determine where to start the kimono side seam below the end of the shoulder/ sleeve seam, divide A by six. Measure %A down from the bottom of the sleeve seam and sew the side seams together from this point to the hem. Sleeves -The outside bottom corner of a ki­ mono sleeve is usually cUIVed; the extra fab­ ric in the corner is gently gathered, rather than tlimrned away. How cUIVed tlle corner will be is up to you. A standard kimono, worn on a daily basis, would have a rounded corner with a radius the size of a quarter or a half dollar. More formal, or stylish, garments may have curves comparable to bread plates or dinner plates, and some have virtually no CUIVe at all. A template made from chip­ board or cardboard is useful in marking and steaming in the sleeve curve. An unusual detail to note is that the sleeve's outer seam (right-hand photo above) is gathered and pulled gently to the front. The bottom horizontal seam up to the begin­ ning of the curve is a French seam. Mark and finish the opening for your hand: Measure the width of your hand, from your pinkie to your thumb when gen­ tly spread (most people will measure be­ tween 5 in. and 7 in.) . Mark this spread on each side of the shoulder line at the wrist. Roll the seam allowance between the two marks to the wrong side and blindstitch it in place (see Basics, p . 8) as shown in the right-hand drawing on p. 4 l. To begin the French seam , fold the sleeves in half, wrong sides together, at the shoulder line. Sew between the points, shown in the top left drawing, with a in. seam allowance. Iron the seam open only

1/4

reads Magaz

Th

ine


where it is stitched. Turn wrong sides out. With the front of the sleeve up, finish the French seam, then sew the rest of the sleeve between the French seam and the hand opening in two parts, as shown. Rein­ force the hand opening by backstitching for % in. and make sure the curved seam overlaps the ends of the straight ones. Baste a running stitch as shown to gath­ er the excess fabric of the curve. For larger curves, more than one set of stitches will be necessary, as in the top left photo on the facing page. Insert your template between the sleeve and the gathering to give the curve a well-defined shape. Pull the stitch line a bit to the inside of the curve (photo, top right, facing page); this will give the sleeve a more graceful slope when com­ plete. Flatten the gathers with a hot steam iron, being careful not to iron the corner curve itself. Remove the template. Reinfol:ce the seam ends where the sleeve joins the body and at the top of the side seams with bartacking. HeIns- Most of the hem can be turned un­ der twice and blindstitched in place, but you want to take special care with the front corners. There are several ways to miter corners without trimming any fabric away. I chose the one shown in the lower sequence of drawings on the facing page, because the fabric is evenly distributed and the corner is smooth. On the wrong side of the fabric use chalk or thread tracing to draw fold lines as shown. Iron the folds so the allowances are folded to the inside. Fold the corner diagonally through the miter point, matching points A and B . Stitch along the miter line (step 3) . Fold the point flat (step 4), then fold along lines 1 and 2 to form a corner. The l;ght side of the fabric should be facing up, with the seam allowances folded to the right side temporarily. Fold the corner flap in half. If you've been accurate, your chalk lines will form a square in the corner of the flap. Fold the seam allowances twice to the wrong side, turning the miter right side out. Then blindstitch the seam allowances in place to finish the corner.

will

Collar-The collar is the last part of the gar­ ment to be sewn in place. By this point all seams should be ironed flat and all edges finished off or tacked in place with blind­ stitching. The sewing sequence for the collar is shown in the drawing at right. Find the midpoint of the collar length. Place this at the center back seam of the neck area, matching the seam line to the curved sewing line you drew with the tem­ plate; the garment seam allowance be larger than the collar's. To locate the

will

December 1990/January 1991

stitching line for the collar to the okumi, follow your stitching line on the garment to the point where the okumi begins, j ust below your collar bone. Plot a straight line from this point to the exact middle of the garment (see right-hand drawing on p. 41) at the outer edge of the okumi. The straight-grai n collar will be stitched to the bias of the okumi; the top of the okumi is eased into the collar to make up for stretching that might occur during wear (top drawing at right) . The ease also slightly shapes the kimono over the bust. Stitch the collar to the garment and okumi. Then turn the collar away from the body, fold it so that it creases slightly away from the actual sewing line, and iron it in place. This little extra helps give a smooth­ er curve to the collar later. Divide the width between the ironed fold and the raw edge into thirds. Fold under the edge of the collar, wrong sides together, as shown. This allowance pads the collar but is just short of the final fold line. Fold the collar again, along the other line, sandwiching the body and okumi fabric in between. Excess fabric is not normally trimmed off in Japan, but if you feel the upper area of the okumi is creating too much bulk, clip off as much as is necessary to allow the collar to lie smooth. Pin and blindstitch the collar to the inside of the kimono. Then finish the collar ends as shown at right. A kimono always has a collar guard, usu­ ally made from the same fabric, which pre­ vents wear and soilage. The guard covers the collar from the back of the neck down to where the sash (obi) would cross. Cut a guard that is twice the finished width of the collar and the appropriate length and add seam allowances all around. Fold the allowances under and blindstitch the guard to the collar. Give your garment one last pressing and you are done!

%

0

John Mars hall.who studied crafts jor five years while in Japan, and one-oj-a-kind garments, us with j he dyed with dyes. He is a fre­ quent guest lecturer and instructor. His book, Make Your Own Japanese Clothes (Ko­ dansha Ltd., 1988, 130 pps., $16.95) is one oj best available in E'I'I{}lish on i'l'l{} different styles oj ki and adaptations jor contemporary wear. In­ are sewi'l'l{} tech nique.s, patterns jor tabi (Japanese socks), descriptions oj pants, a suppliers source Zist jor sewi'l'l{} and j , and a mend­ ed reading list. Copies may be ordered th h local bookstore or by contac/r i'l'l{} John Marshall at 2422 East 23rd St., O nd, CA 94601.

designs 'WJlly

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2. Iron fold

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43


Against the Grain Exploring the subtleties of couture lapels

by

Claire B.

O

Shluff er

n display in the Costume Court of the Victoria and Albert Mu­ seum in London there's an in­ tri g Ungaro outfit from the mid-'60s. The casual museum visitor might well overlook it, but I took a second look at a clever design feature of that outfit, and it set off a fascination in me that I've been pursu­ ing ever since. The ensemble, shown in the drawing on the facing page, features a short, double­ breasted jacket cut from a horizontally striped fabric. you can see, the right jack­ et front folds back to e:�.'pose the lapel, and the stripes on the lapel facing are parallel to the stripes on the jacket. But if the lapel fac­ ings had been cut traditionally, on the length\vise grain like the garment front, the stripes on the folded lapel would be vertical, interrupting the design. Obviously Ungaro broke with convention for the sake of his design and cut his facing on the crossgrain. On most ready-made garments and com­ mercial patterns, jacket facings duplicate the grainline of the garment front and are cut so the lengthwise grain is parallel to the center front. Since discovering Ungaro's outfit, I 've observed that many tailors and designers manipulate their lapel fac­ ings to achieve subtle but wonderful re­ sults that home sewers can easily dupli­ cate . T h e variations usually i nvolve shifting the grain of the facing and/or shap­ ing the straight-cut facing edge to match a curved lapel. These manipulations are possible re­ gardless of the techniques you're using to construct a jacket front. It doesn't matter whether you're pad-stitching traditional hair canvas by hand, or fusing in the latest w . eft insertion interfacing. (See Basics on p. 8 for more on fusing to grain-shifted la­ pels.) As you'll see, these ideas can be ap­ plied to any garment that has a fold-over front, not just to traditional tailored jack­ ets based on men's suits. The garments we'll be looking at are all designer gar­ ments, ranging from top-of-the-line hand­ crafted couture to high quality fused ready­ to-wear.

guin

As

44

hifting lapels

Grain-s

By merely rearranging the grain on the fac­ ings, striped garments with lapels can be made much more coherent and interesting. The following two designer jackets are not based on men's suits, and the samples were probably made by dressmakers, rather than tailors, in the couturier's workrooms.

so

Ungaro's lution - In the garment at the V and A, the center front and the garment edge are parallel and they're both on the lengthwise grain . The lower drawing on the facing page shows how Ungaro located the grainline of the facing to be at right angles to the center front. If you're laying out similar pattern pieces, arrange the front first so the color bars are positioned the way you want, then lay out the facing as shown in the g, so that the stripes match.

drawin An exam

ple from YSL -An Yves Saint Laur­ entjacket from the Fall!Winter Rive Gauche Collection 1982-83 applies this idea to a slightly more complicated pattern. It's shown in the left-hand group of photos on p. 46, called panel A. This classic Spencer jacket is made from a medium-weight navy wool ottoman. The ottoman fabric has prominent cross ribs, so the crossgrain is to identify, and it's easy to see that the edge of the lapel facing is cut on the cross­ grain. The garment center is on the length­ wise grain as usual, but the garment edge is not vertical as it was on the Ungaro e ple. To duplicate this look on a similar pattern, redraw the lapel grainline so it's perpendicu­ lar to the straight edge of the lapel. The left­ hand sample in panel A shows a facing cut this way instead of traditionally, with the grain parallel to the center front. 'fhe right­ hand sample is yet another option; it's cut with the grain parallel to the lapel edge, which positions the crossgrain stripe per­ pendicular to the stripe on the front when the lapel is folded back. The ribs on the collar, too, blend beauti­ fully with the ribs on the lapels. Tradition­ ally, jacket collars are cut so that the center back is on the straight grain, parallel to the

easy

xam

grain of the jacket's center back. This way, the stripe on a striped jacket can be made to match from collar to back. In the case of the Spencer jacket, the collar has been cut so that its center back is on the crossgrain, with the ribs running vertically, instead of horizontally, as on the jacket back. I 'd guess that the collar was cut this way so that the ribs didn't cut across the shape of the collar edges, rather than to create the smooth transition at the lapel/collar seam, but both effects are pleasing, and j ustify the opposing grains at the back of the neck.

Adding shape to sWfted lapels

The remaining garments I 'll describe are both derived from classic tailored mens­ wear, and both were no doubt made origi­ nally by tailors in the designer's work­ rooms. In each case, the tailor's technique of shaping the lapel facing with an iron to match the curve cut into the garment front has been added to a careful decision about where to place the grain on the lapel.

dayt

ture exam

A cou ple from YSL -A ime ensemble exhibited In the Metropolitan Mu­ seum of Art's exhibition of his work (New York City, catalog #203) is a good e ­ ple of Yves Saint Laurent's consistent atten­ tion to detail; it's shown in panel B on p. 46. Designed for the F inter Couture Collec­ tion 1982-83, it features a jacket made from a beige and khaki ce of Wales plaid with a skirt made from a companion hounds­ tooth check. The jacket is ed with houndstooth-check lapels which match the skirt; the check pattern is clearly parallel to the edge of the lapel, but you'll notice that the edge is not parallel to the center front. I have a duplicate of this gannent, so I able to analyze the arment front and lapel sections and make samples which show the pattern shapes and grainlines quite clearly; they're reproduced in panel B. The grainline on the jacket front is parallel to the center front, not the jacket edge, but the YSL-cut facing on the left is cut with the grainline parallel to the garment edge instead of along the lengthwise grain usual, like the right-

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Magazin e


hand sample. The photos in the lower half of panel B show the samples with the lapels folded back. The YSL-cut facing is again on the left. Notice that the garment edge isn't a perfectly straight line, but that the stripe along the edge has been curved to follow the shape. The shaping is subtle, but it keeps the seam from cutting off the stripes.

Special effect lapels This mid-60's Ungaro jacket is worth a double take. In order for the lapel stripes to match across the jacket front, the grain of the lapel facing must be arranged to parallel the seam, not the grain, of the front.

How it's done To make a facing pattern for a shaped lapel, use the original pattern as a guide. On pattern paper, or non-woven pat­ tern cloth, draw a straight line near the edge of the pattern material. Lay the facing pat­ tern on the paper so the cutting line touches this line at the widest part of the facing, shown in the g on p. 47, panel C, This is the new cutting line for the facing edge, starting at the curve of the hem. Draw a new grainline parallel to this edge. Trace the cutting lines at the neckline, shoulder, and lower edge, At the facing edge, transfer the breakpoint (the beginning of the roll line, and usually the beginning of the lapel curve) to the new line and mark it with a notch. If necessary, redraw the inner or unnotched edge so the facing is about 3 in. wide at the shoulder and 6 in. wide at the hem, unless the front edge of the hem is straight; then draw the facing 41f2 in, wide at the hem end, Lay out the new pattern so the vertical bars or stripes be positioned attractively

-

drawin

as

will

Matching stripes on crossgrain facings Notice where front stripe hits break point and arrange matching facing stripe to hit facing seamline, experim enting to adjust for the turn of the cloth.

Front

/Jan

December 1990

uary 1991

Break point

Facing

45


B. YSL's Prince of Wales jacket

the

In YSL's Prince of Wales jacket the facings are cut with grain par­ allel lapel edge , ins ofparallel garment center front. Notice that YSL lapel has been shaped follow the curve the lapel edge, so stripes 't cut across the lapel seam.

to the

the

the the

tead don

to the to

of

the

To continue horizontal rib across folded lapel at center, YSL's Spencer jacket has lapel fa like the sample on the left, with grain (this is horizontally-striped fabric) perpendicular lapel edge ; on the right is another option: grain parallel lapel edge .

its

cings cut

to

at the lapel edge. I like a dominant bar at the edge; but I've learned that if I lay out the pattern so the seamline is exactly on the edge of the color bar, I wiil lose some of the bar in the turn of the cloth. I've also found that, when cutting, it is safer to wait until after I've shaped the front edge to cut the neckline. At this stage I cut the facing straight across from the edge to the cutting line of the shoulder seam. Once you've cut out the two facings, you'll need a gUide to help you shape the facings accurately to the garment front. In Classic Tailoring Techniques: A Con­ struction Guidefor Women's Wear (by Ca­ brera and Meyers, Fairchild Publications, NY; 1984) the authors recommend that 46

to

you draw the curve from the front pattern on paper, pin the paper to your pressing board, and use it as a guide until you can trust your eye to duplicate the jacket curve. Lay the facings on the pressboard so the neckline is toward your right and the un­ notched inner edge is toward you. With your left hand, hold the edge of the facing at the breakpoint. Then, beginning at the neckline, move the iron in an arc counterclockwise with your right hand while your left hand gently pulls the facing toward you to form a convex curve at the edge, as in the top photo on the facing page. Start with large arcs at the outer edge, and as you work toward the inner edge use smaller arcs to shrink away the excess and avoid unwanted creases.

As you shape the lapel into a convex curve , ripples will form along the un­ notched inner edge of the facing. Shrink them away so the lapel will maintain its new shape. This sounds much more diffi­ cult than it is. Wool is the easiest fabric to shape; and woolens and/or loosely woven fabrics are easier to shape than worsteds and hard-finished materials, like the wool ottoman used in the Spencer jacket shown above. Perhaps this is why the facing on the Spencer jacket wasn't shaped. When I'm se the front to the facing of a -tailored ent such as this, I hand­ baste both facings and edges together, s pressjust the basted s es, then the s right side out to be sure they are perfect

man

seam

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team turn

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reads Magaz

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and identical. Finally, with the right sides to­ gether, I machine-stitch the s es.

eamlin

Yet more subtleties- The Rive Gauche plaid jacket from FalIlWinter 1984-85 in the photo at bottom right may be the most exciting garment in my collection; and I am even more impressed because it is from the ready-to-wear, not the couture, collec­ tion. The facings on this jacket are not only shaped, like the lapels described above, as you can see in the center left photo, but the plaid on the facing is moved up so it meets the corresponding color bar on the front when it is folded open, as you can see in the photo at center light. When most tailored garments are made from a plaid or horizontal stripe, the facing is applied to the front so the patterns are matched at the front/facing seamline which j oins them. When this is done, the bars on the lapel always fall below the same bars, on the front. For this design, Saint Laurent has moved the facing up so the bars are positioned more attractively when the la­ pel is rolled into place. In this case, the fac­ ing was moved up 1% in., but the exact amount will of course vary with the fabric, the garment design, and the lapel roll. To duplicate this effect, don't cut out the facings until you've first established the po­ sition of the plaid on the facing by pinning the paper pattern to a finished front. Prepare at least one garment front, either by hand­ padding the lapel, and taping the roll line and front edge; or with speed-tailoring meth­ ods, if that's the way you're constructing your garment. If you haven't already, make a new facing pattern, as shown in the drawing at right. Then, on both the facing pattern and garment front, baste the seam allowances at the lapel edge under. Match the folded edges and pin them together. Fold the lapel to its finished position, and careful­ ly mark where the horizontal bars on the front meet the facing edge. I pin a small scrap of plaid (approximate­ ly 1 in. wide X 4 in. long) in place on the facing pattern so I won't get confused when I remove the pattern from the garment; I lay it out for cutting, right side up, on a single layer of fabric. To make sure the plaids are just right and positioned identi­ cally, I cut out just one facing, and pin it to the front to check that it falls the way I want. If eve ing looks good, I turn the first facing face down on my fabric and chalk around it to cut its mate, shape them both to match the front curve, and perma­ nently join them to the garment. 0

ryth

Claire B. Shaeffer teaches couture tech­ niques at Eastern Michigan University ev­ ery summer. For more info tion, con­ tact E. Rhodes, E. Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

M u.,

December 1990/January 1991

rma

To shape the lapel facing, work towards the inside edge, and iron in decreasing orcs to curve the far edge ard. you move the iron with one hand, pull the facing into shope the other.

outw As

with

facings are again shaped to follow the curve, but the plaid matches the position of the plaid on the jacket front when of matching along the seam line as usual.

In YSL's 1985 gray plaid jacket, the also arra so that it the lapel open, i d

has

been folds

nged

nstea

Redrawing a facing paHern for a shaped lapel

1. Draw straight line on pattern paper, then line up facing so cutting line touches the line at the widest paints. Straight line is the new cutting line.

2. Transfer breakpoint to straight line.

4. Cut new facing following red outline.

�3

,.... _ _ -

_

.In .

3. Connect line to shoulder seam.

5.

After shaping front edge, recut neckline/shoulder to match front pattern.

C. YSL Rive Gauche jacket


xpos

Adle­

Sunprints con be mode by laying real objects or photographic negatives on treated fabric and e ing the setup to the sun. For "Pipes" Carol man let the sun shine through negative and positive photograph images of PVC pipe and chain link fence onto red and yellow fabric. (53 % in. X 62 in.; 1985; photo by Ch e Benkert)

ristin

48

hread

T

s

Magazine


Sunprinting for Quilt make rs Catch the sun to create unique fabrics

by Carol A

O

d1ema n

intensity vary; the blue can range from a Crush or wrinkle fabric to create subtle ne look out the window tells turquoise to a navy. This restricted color me whether or not it is a day shadows. Gather fablic by stitching a line of palette poses a challenge to the artist to to work. "Catching the light"­ basting threads and pulling to gather; re­ "push the blue" to its limit. move the stitches after plinting. specifically the sunlight- is es­ sential for blueprinting on the fabrics I use Most fabric manipulations should be pulating the cloth for my wall quilts. done after the fabric has been treated with There are many ways to manipulate fabric the chemical solution, but stitched pleats Printing my own fabric gives me an extra so that light hits some areas but not others. measure of control over my work and adds and gathering should be done beforehand Here are some suggestions. a dimension that purchased fabric cannot. to keep the fabric from being exposed to Drape fabric over cones; place rings over Blueprinting is a way to create unique fab­ light unnecessarily. the cones; drape fablic over cut-out shapes Photograms are the result of laying an rics for j ust about anything-pieced or ap­ or small boxes. Indent fabric into Styrofoam object on the treated fabric and then sun­ pliqued quilts, fabric collages, wearable art. And don't forget the borders and bind­ cups. Wrap fabric around objects such a printing. You can use flat objects, such as ball, a marble, or a tube. Pleat fabric, into lace or leaves, or three-dimensional ob­ ings of quilts or linings of garments. either stitched pleats or open folded pleats. jects, such as cut and folded paper. PTess Blueplinting is a direct process similar to the printing of a black and and dry leaves and flowers be­ white photograph. You saturate fore printing, as the moisture content in fresh ones may af­ fablic with a solution of fenic fect the print. salt, let the fabric dry, and then When printing with a flat expose it to ultraviolet light, piece such as lace, cover the which turns the fabric blue. lace and fabric with clear glass Areas that the light does not hit, because of folds in the fab­ or acrylic to ensure close con­ tact and therefore a sharp ric or objects that are placed on print. Handling a large sheet of it, remain the color of the fab­ ri c . Rinsing in clear water glass can be dangerous. Use glass in a picture frame to pro­ washes away excess chemicals; tect your hands from sharp the permanent image remains. The procedure for blueprinting edges; or tape the edges of the glass. Clear plastiC or acrylic is on fabric is explained on p. 50. safer, but unless it is thick, it Also referred to as cyanotype may warp temporarily from or sunprinting, blueprinting the heat of the sun. dates to about 1840 when it You can also print photo­ was invented by Sir John Her­ schel for producing architectlll'­ graphic negatives. Start with a good quality, high contrast al and mechanical dra�vings. Historically it has also been black and white photo. Have either a Zine negative or a half­ used to make botanical prints tone n eg a t i v e m a d e by a and for b lueprinting one's graphiCS printer. A line nega­ own photos on postcards or on tive is all black and white with household items such as pil­ no gradations of gray, unlike a low covers. regular photographic negative. Patterns can be made by manipulating fabric. The fabric for "Stripes" was Though the image produced folded before e ure. (32 in. sq.; 1988; photo by Christine Benkert] A halftone negative , which is always blue, the shade and

Mani

as

xpos

December 1990/Jalluary 1991

49


This method also gives you an idea of the quantity of fabric you'll need for a particu­ lar draping arrangement.

consists of many dots, creates the impres­ sion of grays. Halftone negatives can be made in various line screens. A I33-line screen usually works well. (For more on blueplinting photographs, see "From pho­ tographs to fabric" on the facing page.) Since cyanotype is always somewhat ex­ perimental, I often blueprint a I2-in. or I5-in . square sample before proceeding with a large project to test the fabric as well as the negative or the method of fabric ma­ nipulation. To preview where the shadows will occur in a draped fabric piece or from a three-dimensional obj ect, I arrange the untreated fab r i c a n d t h e o bj e cts as planned, then put the assemblage in the sunlight or under a lamp. Whatever is in shadow remain the color of the cloth, although the angle of the sun during print­ ing affect the shapes of the shadows.

Light SOll'CeS

The perfect day to print is a clear sunny day \vith no haze, low humidity, and little wind, but you can get good results with less than ideal conditions. If there is only par­ tial sun, lengthen the exposure time, up to half an hour. Hazy sun seems to produce a more turquoise blue. If weather conditions change suddenly you can save the already treated but not yet exposed fabric for up to a week by storing the pieces in the dark. I don't let the snow and cold of Minneso­ ta stop me from printing year round. The most difficult aspect of working outdoors in the \vinter is clearing a spot in the snow to set the printing apparatus. Winter hours

will

will

for printing are pretty much limited to peak midday hours; I usually extend expo­ sure time as well. You can use a sun lamp as an indoor light source, but I have found that it re­ quires a significantly longer exposure time (30 minutes minimum), and the image al­ ways seems to have a turquoise cast.

Fablics The more a fablic is able to absorb the chemicals, the darker the print \vill be. One hundred percent cottons are preferred but silk and linen can be used as well. Some silks seem to absorb better than others. I've had good luck with raw silk but less success with broadcloth; it's best to test the particu­ lar fablic. Unbleached muslins have been very satisfactory for me. Old linens and cot­ tons in good condition are especially absor-

Basics of blueprinting on fabric The chemicals needed to

mask when worki ng with the

potassium ferricyanide to 1

blueprint on fabric are

powdered chemicals and put

cup (250 mI.) water in another

newspaper on your work surface

brown bottle, Shake to mix,

ammonium ferricyanide,

ferric potassium

citrate, a yellow­

green powder, and

to collect any spilled powder;

1.

Mix equal amounts of the

4.

On a flat, portable surface,

layer the following items in

order: fabric; the negative or other objects; and, if

liquid solutions in a bowl just

applicable, glass or acrylic,

powder; keep the powders in

newspaper. Keep chemicals

large enough to hold the

When printing anything three­

brown bottles or the light­

away from children and pets,

saturated fabric, Start with

an orange-red

fold up and d ispose of the

Keep the equipment separate

resistant pouches they come in, You can make up stock solutions of the two chemicals and

cup of each; this will treat

%

dimensional or draped you do not need the glass,

from kitchen utensils, Garage sale

about 1 yd. of light- to medium­

bowls and spoons work nicely,

weight fabric.

the fabric and position all

first

YJ cup

Whenever possible drape

Note: Work in low light from

objects or negatives before

Store them separately in brown

(50 grams) of ferric ammonium

the time you mix the chemicals

carrying the piece outdoors.

batt1es, and label and date the

citrate with 1 cup (250 mI.)

until you are ready to bring

soon as the sun hits the fabric

batt1es, Once the two are

water (preferably distilled) in a

the fabric outdoors, I work i n a

the chemical reaction begins, A

mixed together, they remain

potent for about two hours,

brown batt1e, using a funnel. Cap

windowless laundry room with

tabletop ironing board or a

the batt1e and shake to dissolve

only the light from an open

small bulletin board makes a

the chemical. This solution tends

door. You can also use a red

good portable working

apron or a smock when working

to get moldy after abaut two

or yellow light bulb,

surface; you can pin down

with the chemicals in powder

weeks, but

or liquid form, work in a well­

you pour to use

For the

store them for up to four months,

Wear rubber gloves and an

it

solution mix

is still usable; strain

it,

it

as

For the second solution

ventilated a rea, and do not work in an eating area, Wear a

add

Ys cup (35 grams) of

Blueprinting fabric that's been draped over cones will create rough star­ burst patterns. The fabric areas e to the sun turn a gray-blue; those hidden from light keep their original color. (Photo by Carol Adleman)

xposed

2.

Saturate the prewashed

As

small objects as well as the

fabric in the mixture. Squeeze

fabric itself, Or use a washout

excess back into the bowl. Or

glue stick to hold the pieces

apply the chemicals with a 1-in, paint brush, The fabric turns

in place,

S.

Expose the assemblage in

yellow-green when treated. I

the sun for 5 to 30 minutes-5 to

continue treating fabric until

1 0 minutes on a sunny

I've used up the solution,

summer day; 20 minutes on a

3.

Dry the treated fabric

com pletely, You can iron it with a cool to warm iron to begi n d ryi ng, Put three layers of

sunny winter day, The fabric turns a gray-blue as it prints,

6.

Rinse the fabric under

running water until the water

newsprint above and below

runs clear, In these small

the fabric plus sheets of

quantities the chemical

unprinted white paper next

solutions should not harm

to the fabric if it's light colored,

septic systems, You can darken

Then let the fabric air-dry flat

the print by immersing the

in a darkroom or covered box,

fabric for a few seconds in a

You can use a hair dryer to

solution of 1 quart water and

speed the drying , Always put

1 tsp, hydrogen peroxide (the

layers of newsprint beneath

3"10 variety from the d ruggist) ,

wet or dripping fabric so as not

Rinse thoroughly in clear water

to sta in other surfaces,

and dry the fabric, - CA.


bent because they have been washed many times. Synthetic fibers won't absorb the chemicals, and only the natural fiber in a blend absorb them. Try to avoid fabrics with finishes. Always wash and dry fabrics before applying the chemicals. Fabrics that have a very fine weave with a high thread count will reproduce the most detail. Tins is impori:.:'1nt for printing a pho­ tographic negative. For a draped p1;nting, a light- to medilml-weight gauze-type fab1;c is good because it hangs with soft folds. I like to use colored fabrics as well as white; bright colors work best. The color of the fabric naturally alters the shade of blue. P1;nting on yellow fabric produces a green shade; red fabrics yield a black tone. Label or sort the fabrics in your collec­ tion as to which ones are especially good for blueprinting. Make notes of which brands work best. Test a fabric for its print­ ability before embarking on a large project. Purchase a small quantity of silk, for ex­ ample, before investing in yards of it. Blueprinted fabric can be washed in a mild soap or dry cleaned. Do not use bleach or detergents containing phosphates. The p1;nt may fade if the fabric is left in the sun for a long time, but placing it in a dark room overnight will revive it. Blueprinted fabric is sensitive to alkaline, so don't store your works in acid-free tissue.

will

D

Carol Adleman has been quilting Jor 20 years and blueprinting since 1 980. She lives in the Minneapolis area, where she active in quilt and sU11ace design groups.

is

Supplies

Blueprint-Printables

1504 Industrial Way #7 Belmont, CA 94002 (800) 356-0445; in CA (415) 594-2995 Kits of pretreated fabric, T-shirts, etc. Catalog

$2.

Donnelly Offset Negatives 269 Central Ave. Rochester, NY 14605

(716) 232-3996 Kodalith negatives. Price list. send

LSASE.

Gramma's Graphics, Inc.

20 Birling Gap, Dept. Thre-P1 Fairport, NY 14450 (716) 223-4309 Blueprinting kits and cotton fabrics. Catalog

$1 and LSASE.

Photographers' Formulary, Inc.

PO Box 5105 Missoula, MT 59806 (800) 922-5255; in MT (800) 777-7158 Chemicals for blueprinting, bulk or kits. Catalog

$1.

Testfabrics, Inc. PO Box 420 Middlesex, NJ 08846 Natural fiber fabrics. Free catalog.

December 1990/Janual'Y 1991

Fro

rap hs to fabric 1Yy Tafi Brawn

m photog

To bluep1;nt a photograph on fabric start with a sharp image free of extraneous background material. The photo should be simple and graphically strong. The most successful images are silhouettes; back-lit subjects; or simple subjects with either a lot of texture or very graphiC shapes and lines, such as a white picket fence against the sky or a New England­ style white clapboard house in early mOTIling or late afternoon light. Fill the frame with your subject and keep the background as uncluttered as possible. Photograph people on a bright, sunny day when there are distinct shadows that ,vill define the person's features. The film and emulsion of common black-and-white negatives are too thin to block out enough sunlight make a cyanotype print, so you must have a negative of your image made on graphic arts, or Kodalith, film. This high contrast film, which is used by graphic a118 printers, has a thicker base and denser emulsion, thus blocking out all sunlight in the black areas and ensuring a good, clean white in the final cyanotype print. You can often have Kodalith negatives made by a local graphics

to

printer. They will normally work from a print, but some may be able to work from a slide. A color print or slide can be converted to black and white. Ask for a line negative made the exact size you want the blueprinted image to be. If the local printer can 't make negatives, they or a graphic a118 studio or photo studio may be able to refer you to someone who can. For Kodalith negatives by mail, see "Supplies" at left. If you have a darkroom, you can make your own Kodalith negatives from slides, as I do, by putting the slide in the film carrier and the Kodalith film on the easel. You'll need box of Kodalith fil m (about $ 100 for fiffy 8 1 0 sheets) and graphic arts or lith developer. To blueprint your negative on fabric, it's critical that you create a close contact between the fabric and the negative. A contact frame (available a t photography supply stores) works well. You can also clamp the fabric and the negative between a pane of glass and a flat surface such as Masonite or another piece of glass.

a

X

TaJi Brown makes wall qu i l ts incorporc�ting cyanotype photographs.

51


Anna Diamond's Japanese-style embroidered Styrofoam balls are wonderful for holiday decorations or gifts.

think

youngest daughter. I the balls make wonderful holiday Olnaments and for Westelners too. There are an infinite number of pat­ terns, which vary according to how the ball is segmented. Having learned how to divide the ball into a given number of segments, you can then experiment, dividing balls into more and more complex shapes.

Making ito-mari

gifts

The preliminary steps are crucial if your em­ broidered pattern is to be s etrical. First you wrap a Styrofoam ball completely in d. Then you use pins and a paper strip to map the pattern grid with absolute accu­ racy. Key points in my pattern include: top, bottom, equidistant equatorial circwnfer­ ence points, and points halfway to the equa­ tor from top and bottom. Next you wrap a guide thread from point to point. Then you're ready to embroider the ball. Finally you can attach a hanging cord at the top and perhaps a tassel at the bottom.

ymm

threa

Getting sta

rted

Here's what you'll need for your first ito­ mario A Styrofoam Choose one as pelfectly shaped as possible from yoW' local craft store. Start with one 2112 in. to 3 in. in diameter. A large l of polyester sewing th To cover a 3-in. ball completely, you'll need about 300 You join threads, but the colors must identical. Gold or silver thread. Both Madeira USA Ltd., PO Box 6068, 30 Bayside Ct., Laconia, NH 03246, (800) 225-3001 ; and Kreinik Mfg. Co. , Inc., PO Box 1966, Parkersburg, WV 26102, (800) 624-1928 (except WV and 304-422-8900) , (800) 541-1601 (Can­ ada only) make several types of metallic threads suitable for hand sewing. Write or call for your local distributor. htly colored e idery A selection of brig threads. DMC Coton Perle is ideal for a 3-in. ball. For mail-order catalogs write or call The Craft Gallery, PO Box 145, Swampscott, 01907, (508) 744-2334 or The American Needlewoman, PO Box 6472, Worth, 761 1 5 , ( 8 1 7) 293-1229. Although shiny rayon threads look wonderful, they slip easi­ ly and are difficult to work with. Pins with colored such mapping pins. Use one color for the top and bottom and another for the other positions. Long, sharp crewel needles.

balL

• •

read.

spoo cotton or yards.

be

can

AR,

by Anna Dia

W

mond

hile living in Malaysia, I learned the very old Japa­ nese craft of making ito­ mari or embroi dered balls, but because of the language barrier, I inevitably have added my own interpreta­ tion to the traditional designs and tech­ niques. My directions for embroidering a square-patterned star are illustrated at light. Originally decorative balls were construct­ ed from bundles of sweet smelling herbs held together with a few threads. Gradually the amount of thread was increased until it encased the herbs; and later, the thread52

mbro

wrapped ball was decorated with silken em­ broidery. During the Edo period, 1603-1868, decorating ito-mari thread-balls was a pop­ ular activity for noble ladies. When cotton became more widely available, the craft's popularity spread �pidly. Making ito-mari is still popular in Japan. S tyro foam has become an excellent alterna­ tive, but many people still start with a care­ fully rounded bundle of rags, shaping a per­ fect sphere as they wrap the thread around it. It is traditional for a mother to start a new ball at year's end. By New Year's Eve it will be completed and placed at the pillow of the

Ft.

heads,

MA TX

as

P

lannin g your colors

I find that the most effective results come from using strong, vibrant colors and from

hreads Magaz

T

ine


The guide thread 3. Take 2-3 stitches under

1. Thread a crewel needle with go around ball at least

wrapping to bring needle out at be careful that

6 times. Knot end and

no gold thread shows.

gold thread long enough to

0;

secure thread at A.

4. Carry thread around ball 2. Carry thread to C , laying it beside bring it back

at equator, and secure with

0;

a few small stitches. Fasten

to A. passing beside H. From

Wind sewing thread onto the styrofoam ball as randomly as ible to cover it completely.

poss

Plotting the Pattern

off by taking a long stitch

A. take thread around ball,

through wrapping away from

laying it beside next group of pins. Continue, until ball is

pin. Cut thread close to ball. Do not remove pins; they

divided into

prevent guide lines from

a

segments. Make two

small stitches at A to secure thread.

distorting as you embroider.

Stitching the square star 1. Pin a 12 in. long strip of paper to the boll (A). Wrap around widest port of boll; reaching pin (A). fold end

bock to measure circumference (B).

5.

1. Using notched strip, mark pOints M, N, and

Q

halfway to

P.

such as FiI or

DMC a

equator along

broder, work 4 star motifs

4 guidelines.

centered on pins

E. G, J,

2. Thread crewel needle with

half. holding flat against boll.

broidered spaces.

E

knotted at end. Bring it out to left of

Stitch across

andjust below M. Lay it to

a star fills the area. Secure

working clockwise until

the right of guide thread up to P.

Rotate to find bottom opposite A.

and L

in the unem­

embroidery cotton. 2. Fold strip (A. B) in

Using a finer gold thread,

3. Turn ball

Insert pin C.

laO'. P.

Stitch

the spokes at the center with several small stitches.

VB -in. from right to left below going under guide thread, through wrapping.

3. Fold in half again to

Lay thread parallel

find "equator" (D).

and to right of

.:) Rotate strip around ball placing

a

P.

M.

pins

along equatm 4. Remove strip; replace pin A. Fold into

a

equal divisions. Cut

5.

4. Turn ball 18(),; take

notch at each fold.

a stitch right to left

Lay strip against equator pins.

Repeat steps 3 and 4;

Overlap

further from pin. Use 2nd

first and last notches. Place a

needle and thread to repeat on N. Continue with different colors.

pin at each notch.

Repeat steps 1 -4 on other side of ball.

combining contrasting colors. Gold or sil­ ver threads add sparkle, and two tones of a color look quite different when separated by a strand of gold or silver. Although balls with subtle color combinations may have a soft and pleasing appearance on their own, when placed with other balls that have brighter color schemes, they look dull.

Preparing the Styrofoam ball

firm,

A dense layer of wound-on thread covers the Styrofoam and provides a base for the embroidery. After choosing your embroidery colors, select a large spool of December 1990/Janual'Y 1991

just below stitch at M. make each stitch a bit

Q.

sewing thread that coordinates or contrasts with them. Wind this thread onto the ball as randomly as pOSSible, as shown in the photo at top left. No threads should be par­ allel, or the embroidery stitches will slip beneath them. When the ball is covered, cut off the spool, leaving a tail about 16 in. long. Sew it into the thread wrapping, se­ curing any loose threads as you go. Fasten it off with a few small stitches.

Securing your threads

Knot all threads when commencing. Then insert the needle into the wrapping about

To hong the completed ball, you con attach a cord at one gold star and a tassel on the star opposite it. (Photos by Susan Kahn]

1 in. from where the thread is to emerge. Bring the needle out at that pOint, and pull the knot into the wrapping. Do not pull too hard. To finish off a thread, take one or two long stitches through the wrapping so that the thread doesn't show. Cut the thread as close to the wrapping as possible. 0

Anna Diamond is the author of A Book of Baubles, which contains a selection of oth­ er patterns. It is available by airmail from her for $12 (including S&H): Anna Diamond, 1 Berkeley Place, Woodcote End, Epsom, Surrey KT18 7BA, England. 53


Fa

bulous Helt Pockets

How to make a 1wo-way coat pocket

a

by David Page Coffin mong my favorite pockets is the single-welt side pocket that I found on a London Fog raincoat, years before I even considered sewing clothes for myself. Clev­ erly concealed just inside the opening was another opening that led to the inside of the coat. It was subtle; you didn't slip into it inadvertantly. But once I noticed, it was obvious that the opening was there so that I could reach through to my pants pockets without unbuttoning the raincoat. I was delighted; surely this was one of the un­ mentioned perks of adult life, reserved for 54

those with the good judgement to wear a London Fog! Once I discovered that I was a sewer, I began to understand why I liked pockets. They're the part of a garment that I get the most use from, and their construction .is among the most satisfying steps in the making of any article of clothing. So when I finally felt the need to make my own rain­ coat (see Threads #19), I naturally under­ took to decipher that intriguing two-way welt-covered opening. What follows on pp. 56 and 57 is the step-by-step method for making your own. It's a great pocket for

any knee-length topcoat. If the pocket sounds good, but you think that perfect welts are beyond you, take a look at the techniques on the facing page; I think you'll change your mind.

c:>

David Page Coffin is an associate editor of Threads.

The perfect welt is the entrance to the perfect

pocket: a double entry trick that lets you get into your pants or skirt pocket without unbut­ toning your coot. Here's a step-by-step guide to making both the pocket and the welt. Threads Magaz ine


Perfecting the welt You could hardly ask for a more basic garment detail than a pocket welt. Welts are nothing more than faced shapes. But unless they're perfect (points sharp, edges straight, and facings neatly out of sight on every side), welts are just sore thumbs: hard-to-miss little proclamations of inadequate sewing skills. Having recently made a lot of welts in wool gabardine, like the one at left, have come up with some techniques that virtually guarantee success. They apply equally well to other similar fabrics and to any faced shape, even to collar points.

1

Cutting aut-Cut both the welt and a lining from the welt pattern, which should include %-in. seam allowances. You'll trim all the seams later, but the wide allowances make it easy to press the seams open fully, especially in a wiry fabric like gabardine. always use a natural fiber lining, usually silk crepe or broadcloth, instead of rayon, because it handles so much more easily. Cut out a fusible interfacing (I like Armo-Weft or Easy-Knit) for the gab, with the grain parallel to the welt opening edge. Trim its allowances to % in. before fusing.

1

Drawing

precise seamlines ­

Lay the lining and the fused gab pieces wrong sides together, interfacing up. Trimming with rotary cutter and straight edge will assure all edges are true. Then, with chalk and a see-through ruler, draw the seamlines of the welt shape on the interfacing. This welt is asymmetrical, with one broad point and one narrow point. Any point that's less than a right angIe has a tendency to push out too far, so correct the seamlines by moving the point % to 1f4 in. in from the actual corner, depending on the weight of the fabric, and curving the % in. of seamline on either side in to meet the new point, as shown in the drawing at top right.

1

Fa vori ng the lining -Pin the lining to the gab with a row of pins down the center of the welt, lengthwise. To make sure that the lining doesn't show on the finished welt, make the lining a little smaller by "favoring" it, which means shifting its raw edge slightly away from the gab's edge, as you can see

December 1990/January 1991

by

in the drawing at center right. With the lining side up, slide your left hand fingers under the welt and bend the edges toward your thumb, which slides the lining edge about %6 in. beyond the edge of the gab. Work along each edge, pinning the favoring in place. When the whole welt is pinned, carefully baste along the exact seamline including the corrected point. Remove the pins and machine-sew the welt just inside the basting. Sew the % in. on either side of each point with tiny stitches (about 25 per inch) and stitch across the point with two or three stitches.

S

herma ne Fouche

Correcting seamlines at a narrow point

V4 Va to

in.

Interfacing

Lining

Pressing,

trimming, and turning-Press the welt as sewn, then press the seams fully open over an edge board, or point presser (see Basics , p. 8). Now trim the seams so the lining is Va in., the gab is % in., and each point is within a few threads of the edge. The more thorough your edge pressing, the more easily the welt will turn; use an ordinary point turner for the points. Before pressing the turned welt, baste the sewn edges as you roll the facing out of Sight. Sometimes a little blister of fullness forms at the narrow pOint; with careful basting this will be held in place and won't be seen after the welt is topstitched and stitched down. Before giving the welt its final press, like to wrap a metal ruler with a single layer of muslin and lay it next to the long welt edge, pressing the welt against it to create a perfectly straight edge, as shown in the drawing at bottom right. I cover both with another press cloth and steam press, then press with a wooden clapper. repeat this for the shorter edge so the point is as straight as possible.

Favoring the lining Bend seam allowance toward gab side to offset edges. Pin along seamline.

1

1

Steaming edges straight Press welt against muslin-wrapped ruler.

1

Finishing -Even with all these

efforts, sometimes one edge is straighter than another. Try to perfect the long open edge first, and topstitch it as close to the edge as possible. You can make subtle corrections to the shorter edge as you stitch it into place.

rma

is

tom

She ne Fouche a cus designer in San Francisco who teaches classes in sewing and design at the Sewing Workshop and across the country.

Cover with press cloth. Press, steam, press with clapper.

55


Sewing the double-entry pocket 1. Mark pocket opening and welt position on coat front (RS): Draw line A equal in

length to welt, beginning approximately to in. from coot front edge and angling as desired. Draw line B, in. away and in. shorter.

7

For each pocket, you'll need: a finished, lined

7Y2

welt, approximately in. long on the row edge (see p. for step-by-step instructions); two identical rectangles of pocketing material, approximately in. long by in. wide; and on in. strip of lining selvage, in. wide.

55 14

8

8

Y2

%

12Y2

Y2

7

�/�T I B

D D D

RS Pocketing piece # 1 RS Pocketing piece #2 RS Coat front D Welt Welt lining

D

5.

D D D Ll

WS WS WS Selvage strip

3/8 in.

y"

6.

Slash pocketing: in. from welt seamline, slosh pocketing only, angling ends.

(:6

seamline in. seam allowance) on line A. Stitch, backtacking each end. Center selvage lining on line B. selvage away from welt, and stitch, bac tacking each end.

8 in.

I,A

Key

to

2. Attach welt and selvage lining strip to coat front: Position welt RS down with

V2 in.

,

Coat front edge

Turn pocket to wrong side: Push pocket

and welt seam allowance through coot slosh. On inside, turn pocketing through its own slosh.

)

7.

Topstitch welt to secure: On RS of coot front, smooth layers, press, and stitch just below welt seam, through all layers, including pocketing I .

,,/

/

I"

II : I

/ /

) 10. Attach pocketing 2: Position pocketing

i----..., .. --

u==

__ == = =

-.L1

2

under WSs together, sandwiching coot front between them. Stitch with in. seam around sides, in pocket shope. Trim.

I, = === � pocketing

y"

3

1 1. Finish pocket: Turn to

- -- - --- - - --- - - - -t\'. , \\

right side through opening; stitch around pocket only, with in. seam.

3..13

\\

\\ ,

,\

\

\\ \,

\\ l: --- - --- - - - - --- - - - - - - _... I \\

II I

/

56

Threads Magaz

ine


3. Attach pocketing 1: Position RS down, flush with coat front edge, and IV:? in. above welt. Turn coat to WS to stitch, along previous seam on line

A

backtacking ends.

4. Slash coat: Turn coat front to RS. Lift pocketing and welt seam allowance; slash exactly between lines A and

8,

angling the cut to meet endpoints top and bottom.

lY2i/n¡I

ďż˝ / ;,I

I/

I

\/ Wrong-side view of step

7

8.

Finish raw edge of coat slash: Turn lining strip to inside and topstitch (on WS of coat).

9. trod In

uce pocketing 2: With

pocketing I smooth and flat, position pocketing

2 on top, RS down and

trim both IV:? in. above slash.

12. Finish raw edge of pocketing slash: Turn coat to RS and fold out of way. Zigzag raw edge of pocketing I to pocketing or turn it

2,

under and topstitch.

13. Secure we": With coat and pocket flat and RS up, topstitch welt

December 1990/Jalluary 1991

14. Close

poc

ket:

Catch loose

edges or handstitch invisibly

edges in coat

through all layers, including pocket.

front facing seam.

D 57


Fur Handwa

rs

rme

Sew a pair of sturdy mittens Use

Robin Mayo's hands will not get cold when she wea� her fur and leather overmiffs. her pattem and techniques to make a regular­ sizedpair of mittens. (Photo by Mikki HOllinrake)

by Robin Mayo

W

hen designing and sewing clothing for my winter travels by dog team, one priority overshadows all others. When the wind starts to blow and it's a long way home, I tend to forget about inno. vative design, painstaking detail, and expen­ sive matelials. What I need is warmth. The dog musher overmitts that I'm wear­ ing in the photo above are modeled after the ones worn by early mail carriers. These mittens are designed to be worn over gloves or light mittens. But you can make a lighter and smaller pair of mittens with fur and leather using the pattern, with a differ­ ent thumb, on the facing page. The tradi­ tional materials are a pleasure and a chal­ lenge to work with. The finished product not only provides superior warmth, but is enjoyable to feel, look at, and wear. My lined mittens (top photo, facing page) have four pieces: back, palm, thumb cover, and The lining is cut from the same pattern as the shell. The backs are beaver fur, which has soft, dense underfur, wiry guard hairs, and tough, thick skin. Otter, muskrat, rabbit, or any other short, dense fur would also be a good choice. The palms and thumb covers are made of moccasin-weight elk hide. Deer, moose, or any other thick, garment-type leather could also be used. Good leather provides a solid grip at all temperatures. It resists wind and water, but breathes enough for comfort. A ruff of fur folded over the wrist makes a good seal against the parka sleeve and keeps the mittens from filling with snow. This ruff may be made of the same fur as the mitten backs or from a longer fur such as coyote, wolverine, fox, or wolf. I chose coyote because it is the least expensive of the long furs, and I like the way the color goes with beaver fur. For lining, you can use a wool flannel. Wool insulates and also absorbs moisture inside the mittens. The liner is attached to the shell at the wrist by the ruff, so it can

ruff.

58

be pulled out easily for drying. A material that wicks moisture, such as a synthetic or cotton, would cause water to condense in­ side the leather, where it would be much harder to remove. Add cords so you can wear the mittens around your neck when they are not in use .

Quali1y and layout

Every skin is unique. An animal's size, shape, texture, and coloring influence the design and construction of the· mitten. If you need more than one hide, you must carefully match them. The best furs are called "Select" and " e;" from there they are graded as 1, 2, and 3 and priced accordingly. I find it more economical to buy blemished, off-color, or odd-shaped hides. Whichever you choose, it is essential that they are sound and well­ tanned. Look for leather that is flexible and fluffy feeling, not stiff. Poke in a glover's nee­ dle (see lower photo, facing page) and pull firmly from side to side to test the strength of the leather. Tug on the hairs to see if they slip out of the skin or break mid-fiber. The pelt should smell rich and leathery, even slightiy greasy, but never at all rancid. You can apply these same tests to tile fur of an old garment to see whether it is worth taking apart and recycling. of the sources on the facing page let you examine a skin and re­ turn it, unused, for a refund. My first step is to examine a skin careful­ ly, look for blemishes, and note its impor­ tant features. I mark lightly on the skin side with a light pencil or chalk, locating the centerline, and indicating changes in fur direction and nap. It's important to re­ member you are working with an extreme nap, so be sure you mark where the hair originates, not where the tips appear. For mittens I lay the fur so it points from wrist to fing�rs. Downward pointing fur looks better, since it hangs naturally, and it sheds dirt and snow or water. However, I cut the coyote fur ruffs with the fur flowing

Prim

All

full

around the tops of the mittens, so the long fur would not gape open at the fold line. The beaver hide I had was not large enough to cut both mitten backs out of the center prime back fur. I decided to cut them from each side of the centerline, so the mit­ tens would make a symmetrical pair, and so that the toughest part of the hide would be at the thumb edge where it gets the hardest wear. There a large hole in the center of tile back, which I patched with a matching scrap. If you pay close attention to the length, color, texture, and flow of the fur, the patch will be invisible. When determining layout, I work from the skin side, frequently folding the skin along cutting lines I've traced to see exactly how the fur falls. Never cut furs with scissors, it's easy to cut the hairs as well as the hide. Instead, use a sharp knife or razor blade. Hold the pelt up off the table and slice only deep enough to sever the skin. The leather for the palms and thumbs can be cut out with scissors or against a board with a sharp knife.

was

as

Shell and lining I assemble the palm and thumb cover first, using a large, faceted glover's needle and heavyweight waxed nylon thread to straightstitch the Va-in. seam allowances together. I sew from each side of the thumb toward the . tip (see drawing at right), easing in the excess in the thumb cover. This provides the fullness needed at the end of the thumb. I turn the thumb right side out and work and roll the seam with my fingers until it is pliable. For overmitts I add a welt in between the two layers of leather. You don't need the welt for a lighter pair of mittens. I use a small square of leather to push and grip the needle, and a pair of pliers to pull the needle out. Next I match the palm to the back, with right sides together. For sewing two pieces of fur or fur and leather together, I use a

Threads Magaz

ine


Sources of fur and leather

Alaska Fur Exchange 900 W lntl. Rd. Anchorage, AK 99518 (907) 563-3877; Free price list. Furs, leather.

Airport

& Ave.

Haviland Co. 6538 42nd NE e, WA 98115 (206) 526-1066 Free list. Furs, supplies.

Seattl

price

leather,

H. E. Goldberg Co. 9050 Martin Lulher King Jr. Way S e, WA 98118 (206) 722-8200 Free price list. Furs, leather, supplies.

&

Seattl

Moscow Hide and Fur Box 8918 Mosccw, ID 83843 (208) 882-0601 Free price list, plete catalog Furs, leather, supplies.

PO

com $2.

Mayo's overmiffs, with a thumb variation from the pattern below, hove a leather palm for a sure grip. Welt strips in the seams strengthen and protect them from wear and er.

weath

small glover'S needle, lightly waxed medi­ um-weight cotton thread, and an overcast stitch. I work with small sections of the seam at a time. Comb all the hairs down away from the seam with the needle, then use a small clip, such as a clothespin, to hold the layers together (photo at lower right). Pull tlle stitches snug but not too tight. The seam will lie smooth and not cause a line in the surface of the fur. Since the palm leather tends to stretch more than the fur, I check the placement often . as I sew. Stitch from the fingertips to the cuff on each side. Assemble the lining in the same man­ ner, using cotton thread. If the lining ma­ terial ravels, cut it with a larger seam allowance and machine-stitch near the cut edges before sewing. With wrong sides together, slip the lin­ ing into the shell, and tllen attach the wrist ruff, with the right side of tlle ruff fur edge against the right side of the mitten open­ ing. The length of the ruff strip should be the circumference of the mitten opening plus a narrow seam allowance , and its width should be twice as wide as the final width. I begin overcasting the three layers together at the thumb side and then overcast the two ends of the ruff strip to­ gether. To finish, turn the whole mitten in­ side out and fold the ruff in half so it cov­ ers the seam, and then stitch it to the lining with overcasting. By the time I finish a pair of mittens, my fingers are sore and my cabin is full of stray bits of fluff. But the finished mittens are worth all the work. It's cold and windy outside, malting my dogs restless and eager to run. With my fingers kept toasty, deep in my new mittens, and the soft fur ready to warm my nose when it goes numb, I can share their joy in the winter.

ruff

M.ay

is

dog

0

and

Robin o a writer, musher, fi­ ber artist who lives in a cabin in interior of Alaska. December 1990/Jalluary 1991

the

Mitten pattern Right hand is shown; flip for the left hand.

Construction sequence

Thumb cover Cut

2 of leather

and lining. ,B

L_

_

Ruff Cut

Fur flow

I.

)

... Mitten wrist circumference

Stitch seams in direction of arrows .

. .:.

plus seam allowances

Mayo holds the seam allowances in place and the fur away from the seamline with a clothespin and uses a pair of pliers to pull the glover's needle through. (Photo by Mikki Hollinrakej

5.

With shell and lining wrong sides together. overcast ruff to edge, then stitch ruff ends

6.

Fold ruff to inside. Overcast edge over cuff seam.

together.

59


Setving Cashmere Techniques good enough for the ultimate knit fabric

by K

C

erdene DePriest

ashmere has always been con­ sidered a classic fabric, and to­ day it also connotes high fash­ ion. If you really want to wrap yourself in luxury, wearing cashmere is one way to do it. A cashmere garment is a blue chip investment well worth including in your wardrobe. It's been three years since I made my first cashmere garments; I wear them as of­ ten as possible and they still look and feel as great as the first day of wear. Cashmere knits are available in various weights, col­ ors, and patterns. They are easy to sew and the techniques I'll discuss are workable with other knit fabrics. Cashmere is visually appealing and has a distinctive "hand" which is hard to dupli­ cate. The feel of true cashmere is "downy" soft, sensuous, and seductive. It is very com­ fortable and, because it's a natural fabric, it breathes. Though soft and lightweight, its fine fibers have more insulation power than any other.

The factors behind the cost

Cashmere is hard to obtain and its produc­ tion is limited. The best cashmere comes from Himalayan goats living in the Kashmir province in the mountains of Mongolia. Us­ able fleece from goats in other regions, such as South Amelica and Australia, is not of the same quality but is available on the market. China, the main supplier of the fiber, sells it to other countries such as Scotland and Italy for processing. The goat fleece is composed of the down (a fine fur undercoat) and the hair (a coarse outercoat); either type may be used to construct the fabric. The down is re­ moved from the goat by hand combing. De­ pending upon the care taken in combing, 60

some coarse hair may be present in the fleece. The more down in the fleece, the better and more expensive the fabric. It takes 24 fleeces to make a coat and one to make a muffler. 100% cashmere knit, 54 in. to 60 in. wide, ranges in price from $98 to $170 per yard; cashmere jersey, a stretchy, fine knit, is the most expensive. Cashmere is also blended with other natural fibers; you are at hesitant to use pure cashmere, you can start with a blend and work your way up. A blend is usually less expensive and may range from $30 to $90 per yard. Alpaca, lambs­ wool, merino, or silk are blended with cash­ mere to render a high-quality fabric. The ex­ act fiber blend should be stated on the bolt label or hand tag. When nylon is blended in large amounts with a wool-type fabric, it usually means the wool has been recycled, although the fabric may not be labeled as recycled. Ni­ cole Balding, a fabric buyer at G Street Fab­ rics in Rockville, MD, notes, however, that since cashmere wool is not a strong fiber, nylon is often added in small amounts to strengthen it. As a warning to purchasers, The Wall Street Journal recently reported that im­ ported cashmere fabrics have been misla­ beled (the percentage of cashmere may be misrepresented) to increase the fabric price. The labeling laws abroad are less stringent than those in the United States, so there's not necessarily a guarantee that the imported fabric label will include the same fibers as the label states. In the U.S., however, cashmere is covered by the Wool Labeling Act which requires manufactur­ ers to state the fiber content specifically and whether the fibers are recycled. To help you through this jungle of infor-

if

all

mation, I suggest the following guidelines: Expect to pay a high price for good quality cashmere, and shop at reputable stores. Learn the feel of pure cashmere; poor qual­ ity cashmere blends feel hard and harsh because finishes have been applied, they are sometimes limp, and will wear thin and pill. Look for wrinkling; lower quality cashmere blends do not drape well and will wrinkle when you crunch them in your hand. If you are going to sew with a blend, select a natural fiber blend, which will yield a better quality garment with a hand closer to that of pure cashmere. Check for luster; pure cashmere does not shine. If there's a shine, a synthetic may have been added. Also look for knit fabric with even, tight stitches; the stitches in top-quality cashmere knits are close to­ gether and tightly knitted.

Style

talk

As with other knits, cashmere has degrees of stretch. When selecting knit cashmere fabrics look for two characteristics: the re­ covery and the amount of stretch. A quality knit should recover, or return to its origi­ nal shape, after being stretched. Knits are defined by the amount of stretch on the crosswise direction: limited or stable, moderate, and stretchy. To determine the amount of stretch, hold 4 in. of knit fabric on the crosswise grain and stretch it until just before the cut edge starts to roll. Sta­ ble knits should stretch about in.,

%

Experiment with less expensive knits, using the

techniques the author discusses, then go for the ultimate-cashmere. The home sewer can make a knitjersey dress like the one right for a half price of a ready-to-wear gar­ ment. (Photo by Yvonne Toylor)

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of

the

reads Magazine

Th


creat sea

mou

To ea m that won't pucker, build injust the right a nt of "give" as you stitch. Pull the fabric from front and back until just before the cut edge begins to curl curling (right), you've pulled too m .

(/eft). If the edge is knits 11/4 in. to I1f2

moderate i n . , and stretchy knits 2 in. or more. Knits with a limited stretch can be used with patterns made for wovens. Stretchier knits should be used only with patterns recommended for knits. The descriptions given in the pat­ tern catalogs and on the back of the pat­ tern envelopes list the type of stretch that is needed for the pattern . Most cashmere knits fall into the limited or moderate stretch category. These medi­ um-weight, stable knits that don't cling to the body are good for cardigans or button­ front sweaters, sweater coats, flared skirts, and pants. Lighter weight, stretchy knits, such as jersey, sew nicely for shells, turtle­ neck sweaters, and clingy dresses such as the one shown on the previous page. Select your pattern based on the design lines. Patterns with clean, simple lines and details tend to balance the fabric quality and allow the fabric to make the fashion state­ ment. Patterns that have classic lines will stay in style longer because they are easily updated. Over the long they will give more wear for the money invested. Gar­ ments made from patterns that can be used with woven or knitted fabrics will also add more versatility. Here is a pattern selection tip: Check cashmere ready-to-wear for fash­ ion styles; many are suitable as ideas for pat­ tern selection.

run,

Preparing

to sew

Because cashmere knit fabric is expensive, you'll want to check the yardage suggested on the pattern very carefully before purchas­ ing. A cashmere knit is usually tubular, which means that it come in double thickness on the bolt. To determine the ex­ act amount needed, take your pattern to the

will

62

uch

store and lay it out on the fabric to find the most economical cut. When laying the pattern on the fabric, always use a with-nap layout. The most subtle difference in fabric shading will show up in your finished garment whether you can see it in the store or not. If you have trouble determining the right and wrong side of the fabric, slightly stretch the crosswise edge. The fabric edge will roll toward the right side. Pure cashmere knits require no pre­ shrinking. Carefully check the content of blends to determine if shrinkage will occur and sizing has been added. If in doubt, steam-press the fabric with a good surging s iron and buy e xtra yardage to allow for shrinkage; steam will help remove the sizing. Press the fabric on a flat surface with a lifting and lowering motion of the iron while constantly shooting in steam. Use a press cloth on top of the fabric to prevent damage. Don't slide the iron across the sur­ face; that can pull the fabric out of shape and stretch it. An alternative to pressing the fabric yourself is to send the fabric to a rep­ utable dry cleaner for steam pressing only. with all fabrics, the grain of a cashmere knit should be straightened before laying out the pattern. Smooth the fabric out even­ ly, making sure it is squared off. Use a T­ square or other right angle measure and cut the crosswise edge following the straight edge and the weft of the knit. Press out lengthwise folds or re-fold the fabric to avoid placing the pattern on these areas This elimi­ nates ha permanent fold at center areas Use pattern weights to hold the pattern in place for cuttiug. the fabric is difficult to cut in two layers, cut each layer se tely for greater accuracy. An shaIp pair of

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.

lines

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para

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makers' shears is a must for cuttiug straight, clean edges. fer pattern markiugs to the fabric with a water-e rasa ble markiug pen or a small sliver of soap. the fabric is thlck, you'll need to mark one layer at a time.

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Construction Select a machine needle according to the weight of the fabric. Lighter weight cash­ meres will accept size 1 1 or 12 universal point needles. Stretch needles, which have a less sharp point than regular size nee­ dles, can also be used on knitted fabrics. Blunt or bent needles will snag the fabric or cause skipped stitches. I recommend spun polyester threads for all cashmere sewing. Molynke, Gutterman, or Metrosene are good top-quality threads suitable for sewing cashmere and other knits. A nice addition is rayon, Sulky, or Stickgam for topstitching, buttonholes, and other decorative stitching. If these threads are not available, the top thread can be dou­ bled by using two spools of thread. There are several types of machine stitch­ es that can be used to sew cashmere knits. The type of stitch, whether straight or stretch, depends on the stretchiness of the fabric. You can sew stable knits entirely with straight stitches, but stretch stitches work better for moderate or stretchy knits. Check your stitching on a scrap of fabric before be­ ginning the garment. To find just the right stitch for your particular fabric take some experimenting. For stable knits, use a straight stitch com­ bined with a short stitch length and put ten­ sion on the fabric from the front and from behind the presser foot as shown in the pho­ tos above. A short stitch length puts more thread into the seam, which allows it to

will

Threads Magaz

ine


stretch without brealting. For stretchy knits like jersey, use a long and narrow zigzag stitch, a multiple zigzag stitch like a three-stitch zigzag, or what­ ever stretch stitch your machine offers. When selecting a stretch stitch, consider the weight and the stretchiness of the fab­ ric. Check the machine tension and pres­ sure . The stitching should be flat and smooth and should not look pulled. The fabric should move through the machine at an even rate. If the presser foot and feed dog drag the fabric, tl}' putting tissue paper between the feed dog and the fabric. Test the machine stitching on a scrap piece of fabric. Adjust the stitch until you sew the fabric without the seam puckeling. The seam should be able to be p d flat without bulk from the ds. For lightweight ts, tly approximately 12-15 sWin.; for medium weight ts, use 10-12 swin. Wherever two seams meet, I trim the corner of one of the seams diagonally (left photo, above) to reduce the bulk. A % in. seam allowance can be trimmed to % in. and pressed open flat. The edges of cash­ mere knit do not ravel, so no seam finish is necessary, but I often serge the edges for a neat finish. If the fabric is thin, both seam allowances can be serged together instead of separately. In this case I finger press, then steam press them open so the seam is flat, then I press them together to one side and serge (center photo). This method gives a beautiful flat seam. the garment you go. A light press­ ing remove any slight puckering from the allowances. Since cashmere is a wool fabric, an iron that can provide bursts of s needed to give proper shaping and a good finished look. Don't slide the iron across the fabric; use an up and dmvn motion to press. Always use a press cloth so you won't polish the ere sUliace.

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threa

kni

kni

Press will

DePriest prepares a straight-stitched seam for pressing before serging the edges together. The clipped seam allowa (left) will reduce the bulk when this shoulder seam ts the sleeve. To make a nice flat seam, she first pr the allowances open with her fingers before pressing with steam through a press cloth. To finish, the seam allowances are pr to one side (right), then serged together (below).

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esses

essed

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seam

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cashm

Sewing without libbing

Sweaters, dresses, turtlenecks, and cardi­ gans are popular in cashmere ready-to­ wear, but the problem for home sewers is finding cashmere rib knit to finish the edges. A fine wool knit ribbing can be used if available. For a shell made of stretchy knit, you can use a self facing at the neck­ line. The hem edges can be turned under, pressed, and topstitched. If the knit is stretchy, woven hem tape (I prefer rayon) should be stitched into the shoulder seams to prevent stretching and to stabilize the seam. The seam can also be serged. Cardigan sweaters and simple knit tops can be seamed using an overlock stitch on the sewing machine or the serger. A one­ inch grosgrain ribbon along the neckline, hem, and buttonhole areas make a stable finish (drawing at right) . Whether you

/Jan

December 1990

uary 1991

Edge finish for a cardigan

1. Fold edge

Y4

in, to

inside,

Topstitch

2. Mark hem; trim hem allowance to

Y4

in.

grosgrain over edge; pin .

63


apply this technique to the right or wrong side of the garment depends on whether you can exactly match the grosgrain and fabric color. For a ribbon trim on the wrong side turn the raw edge

% in. to the

wrong side and press flat. Lay the ribbon

even with the folded edge, shaping around curves. Pin the ribbon in place, being care­ ful not to stretch the folded edge. Topstitch with the fashion fabric on the bottom so the feed dog eases in the fabric. The cor­ ners of the ribbon hem edge can be mi­ tered for a neat finish (see Basics, p . 8). For sleeves, apply the grosgrain before sewing the sleeve seams.

ngth

most

but

DePriest le ened her jacket pattern {white paper insert in above pattern] by al 13 in., she needed to add only 10% in. of ribbing on a stretch test. She used a modified quartering nique to add the ribbing to her 1 cashmerejacket (below). {Photo below by Yvonne Taylor]

tech

00%

based

A modification challenge

For the purple and black cocoon jacket

(photo, left) , I substituted a stable knit for the woven fabric recommended by the pat­ tern, and I lengthened it. There was no stretch guide o n the pattern to tell me whether the libbing I chose (a black 100% wool rib) had the amount of stretch the pat­ tern company had in mind. I needed to fig­ ure out how much additional ribbing would be required and to make sure that it would be distributed around the front curve of the jacket without bunching up or stretching out the lmit filblic. To check the ribbing stretch I laid it out against the lengthened pattern, grabbed the ends, and stretched it until just before the edge started to curl. Then I marked this stretched ribbing at the length of the addi­ tion, as shown in the photo at upper left. Knit ribbing usually comes in 20-in. to 24in. tubular form. It had to be pieced to fit the edge of the entire jacket. When applying ribbing to a circular area, such as a round neckline and cuffs, I divide the garment opening and the ribbing in quarters separately, then match the marks when I pin them together. For the jacket rib­ bing, I modified the quartering method, be­ cause the straighter section near the shoul­ der would need less libbing than the curved front edges. To get an approximate distribu­ tion, I quartered both the jacket front and the pieced libbing, between the shoulder seam and the side seam at the hem. After matching the marks at the shoulder and the side seam, I matched the uppermost quarter marks and pinned the jacket and ribbing to­ gether. Then I requartered the remaining lengths and pinned, matching the marks to­ gether. This distributed the libbing better arOlmd the curve. To finish the jacket, I serged the libbing to the fabIic, keeping the

D

ribbing on top.

Kerdene DePriest teaches a cashmere sewing workshop at G Street Fabrics in Rockville, , and is an educator in northern Vi?"ginia.

MD

Th1-eads Magaz

ine


Why stitches Skip and Fa bric Puc kers

How to improve stitch quality and start loving your sewing machine

m

1:JyGaleGrigg

Hazen

ost sewers, even very accomplished ones, don't really understand how sewing machines work, and it's not because our machines have become so elaborate. I 'm talking about how a stitch is formed; what hap­ pens when the needle goes up and down and the feed dogs move? In fact what hap­ pens is the same on every sort of machine, from treadles to the computer-controlled wonders. Once you have a clear idea of what's going on, I think you'll find that you can make better use of your machine, keeping ordinary tasks trouble-free and unmysterious, and even letting the ma­ chine handle much of your easing, gather­ ing, and basting.

Making a stitch UPtake

Tension plates

/

Maltin g thread loops

Although machine stitches attempt to dupli­ cate hand stitches, there's no comparison be­ tween your handmade single-thread stitch and a machine-made twod stitch. The drawings below trace the machine process.

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Threa

d movement-The first thing to real­ ize about a machine-made stitch is how much thread movement is involved. If you follow the path of the little blue dot on the thread in the drawings j ust mentioned, you'll notice how it moves from one side of the needle hole to the other and back with every stitch. In fact, depending on the length of your stitch, that marked section of thread will slide back and forth through the needle and the fabric as often as 60

times before coming to rest in a stitch. Before we examine why, I k you can see right away why you should choose your thread for smoothness and strength, and carefully match it to the size of your needle. I never skimp on quality thread; I choose all­ cotton when I want my seams to look great, or long-staple polyester when the strength of the seam is more important than its looks. Unless you're into decorative stitchery, I sug­ gest you settle on a few brands of thread that work for you and are easy to get, and stick to them. There's much more to say about thread, and I plan to devote an entire article to it in an upcoming issue.

thin

Clearing the bobbin - The reason the thread moves so much is that the top

4.

�� 1.

Blue marker

TOP

ad

on thread has moved the length of one stitch.

Bobbin thread Bobbin casing At start and end of a

As needle starts to emerge from

As thread loops around the casing,

stitch, needle and

the fabric, uptake is fully dropped,

the needle leaves the fabric and

uptake are fully raised.

slackening the thread, which forms a

feed dogs move the fabric the length

Both move down as a

loop at the needle's eye. The hook catches the loop to

of the stitch. As the loop clears the casing, the uptake takes up the slack

swing it around the bobbin casing.

thread, and the process starts over.

stitch begins.


Balanced tension, straight stitch

Balanced tension, zigzag stitch

Standard presser feet The straight stitch foot

(TOP

holds the fabric firmly and close to the needle,

(4 ' �

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for the best stitch quality.

thread

The aI/-purpose foot has a slot so the needle can make a wide stitch, but the bottom is smooth. Fabric layers

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Adjust top tension so that the Tension is balanced when the knot is not more visible from either side of the fabric.

thread must loop completely around the bobbin each time a stitch is formed, which requires about 2 in. to 4 in. of loose thread. Where does the loop come from? Let's re­ turn to the drawings on . p. 65 and look more closely. Notice how the movements of the nee­ (Ue, the uptake (the moving arm you thread through at the top of every ma­ chine), and the shuttle race (the mecha­ nism surrounding the bobbin and holding it in place) are carefully synchronized to create a thread loop and move it around the bobbin. If for any reason the little thread loop (see drawing 2) fails to form, or the hook on the shuttle race fails to catch it, you get a skipped stitch. Drawing 3 should explain why trying to remove tlle fabric before the uptake is completely raised won't work, even if the needle is all the way up: The loop is still wrapped around the bobbin casing.

Setting tensions Setting and adjusting top and bottom ten­ sions isn't hard, and when you've got the confidence to do it, you'll get much better results from your machine. Machines with "Universal" or "Automatic" tensions have su­ perb tension mechanisms that permit a wide range of valiables without adjustment, but their settings can be, and sometimes need to be, overridden. Sewers who want to be in control should feel confident to do so. Bobbin tension-The bobbin thread mere­ ly has to stay put while the top thread goes around it, so its tension mechanism is sim­ ple: a screw holding a spring-steel tension plate against the thread is all it takes. It's usually better to set this for your most usu­ al combination of thread and fabric and 66

top thread is just visible from the wrong side.

forget it, except as described below, be­ cause you can weaken the spring with too much adj usting. If you use lots of different or heavy threads in the bobbin, get another case and mark it as the looser one. When you do want or need to adj ust bob­ bin tenSion, start with cautious s of the set screw, making tiny shifts to the right to tighten, or to the left to loosen; a quarter turn is a major change, so restrain yourself. Test the results, and fine-tune with the top tension setting.

turn

Top tension - The top thread traces an elaborate path from spool to needle; it's important to realize that each step along the way contributes to the top tension, not j ust the setting on the tension dial. Ten­ sion is the total resistance against the thread as it travels through the machine from spool to needle. The dial merely fine­ tunes the resistance in order to control the top thread's longer movement, so if your tension's way off, check the whole path. Inside the tension mechanism are sepa­ rating plates between which the thread passes. Newer machines have tllree plates, so tllere's a separate space for each of two threads. Lowering the presser foot engages the top tension mechanism by pressing the plates together; tlle tension dial controls the amount of pressure that gets applied. The proper tension is whatever setting bal­ ances the bobbin tension so that the knots tllat hold top and bottom threads together in a stitch are equally spaced between the top and bottom of the fabric layers, as shown in the familiar drawing above left, and so that there's no seam puckering. For most situations, dial up a zigzag stitch and adjust it to look like the one in the drawing above center; this is the easiest way to see

the balance between the threads. The fabric you're stitching is a major con­ tributor to this happy balance. you sew, the top thread is attached to the tension path at one end, and to the just-made stitch on the other. To make the neJ..'t, stitch, the machine will pull the thread it needs from whichever end offers the least resistance. If the fabric is soft, pulling thread from the last stitch could be easier, resulting in puckers. You can shorten the stitch length, so that there's less fabric to give between each stitch, and you can loosen top and bottom tensions equally so the resistance from the spool end is less. If you loosen just the top tension, the knots fall to the bobbin side of the stitch, which looks better than puckering, but weakens the stitch. Sewing on thin, soft fabrics like charmeuse, chiffon, crepe de chine, Swiss batiste, and voile is about the only situa­ tion for which I'd recommend that you ad­ just your bobbin tensions away from your preferred "normal."

As

will

alized

Tension settings for speci stitches­ The tension dial can also be used to make some sewing activities easier. When you need to gather, but the exact amount of gathering isn't critical, try increasing the top tension and setting the stitch length to maximum. The machine will hold back the thread, so that the feed dogs pull the single layer of fabric farther than the amount of thread the machine has allowed. What's the result? Deep, regularly spaced puckers, or gathers. Experiment with different set­ tings; you won't hurt the machine. I prefer this to using a gathering foot, which can cause Skipped stitches. To baste without puckers, reduce the tension to half the normal setting. In addition to no puckers,

Threads

Magazine


the knots will all fall to the back, and you'll be able to pull the bobbin thread out easily to remove the basting. When you're satin stitching to applique or to make button­ holes, reduce the thread tension slightly so the bobbin thread isn't seen, and to lessen the puckering.

Presser

fbot ba..,ics

As needle and thread move up and down through the fabric, the fabric naturally tries to move with it, and if the presser foot doesn't hold the fabric securely, that's just what happens. If the fabric moves up with the needle, the little loop shown in draw­ ing 2 (p. 65) doesn't form, the hook misses it, and the stitch gets skipped. This is why it's hard to stitch so close to a fabric edge that the presser foot can't grab both sides; the fabric flutters up and down with the needle. Whenever pOSSible, sew at least % in. from the edge and then trim away. This is also why you need to hold fabric tightly in a hoop and press it down against the throat plate if you're sewing without a presser foot, for embroidery or darning. Most people evaluate a presser foot by looking at the top of the foot, but the part of the foot that has the most contact with the fabric is the bottom. If you compare the most-used sewing feet, the straight-stitch/ zigzag, or "all-purpose," foot and the satin­ stitch foot, you'll see that a satin-stitch foot has a grooved bottom to allow the mound of thread created by the tight zigzag to move underneath without resttiction, while the straight-stitch/zigzag foot is flat, in order to hold the material firmly and evenly across the whole width of the feed dogs. If you use the satin-stitch foot for normal sewing, you may get skipped stitches because the groove can allow fablic fluttering when there's no thread build-up. There is one instance where the satin­ stitch foot is appropriate for straight-stitch sewing. Soft, spongy fabrics like fleece get slightly spread out under the pressure of the foot, and this can cause stretched, wavy seams. If you switch to the satin-stitch foot, the groove will allow the fabric to keep its shape without stretching; the fabric is thick enough to prevent fluttering. I recommend that you add a straight­ stitch-only foot, like the one in the right­ hand drawing on the facing page, to your collection. You'll get the best possible straight seams, because the fabric will be held as securely as possible around the needle. As long as you remember not to switch to zigzag without changing feet, you'll love it. If you can't find one, or you switch to zigzag often, try adj usting your needle position all the way to the right or left so that the zigzag slot will be providing support on three sides. Remember to December 1990/January 1991

change your seam-width markings to re­ flect the new needle position.

Shifting

falnic

While the needle and thread are swinging up and down, the feed dogs are waiting for j ust the right moment to make their move. They can't move at all while the needle's in the fabric because that would pull the nee­ dle off course. Once the fabric starts mov­ ing, however, a race begins between the layers of fabric; and the bottom layer al­ ways wins. The feed dogs have a better grasp on the bottom layer, so they push it a tiny bit farther than the top layer with each stitch. At the same time the presser foot pushes against the top layer and the cumulative effect is the bottom layer com­ ing out shorter than the upper one. This movement is called shift; it's in­ creased by a number of factors . When more than two layers are being sewn, as in machine quilting, the upper and lower lay­ ers have less contact with each other and are more likely to move unequally. Any in­ crease in drag on the top layer, such as let­ ting your hands rest on the fabric, letting the fabric hang off the sewing surface, or sewing on extra-thick fabrics, will increase the shift. Soft, spongy, or stretchy fabrics, like sweater knits and hand-wovens, offer a lot of resistance against the foot. Very slick or slippery fabrics do not hold onto each other, so the bottom layer moves without taking the next layer with it. To prevent or equalize the shift, tty these techniques: Never sew more than two layers together at one time. If three or more layers are necessary, sew pairs first and then join the sets. With your fingers on both sides of the foot, stretch the fabric equally to either side and allow the fabric to feed steadily and evenly. Use a walking foot, available for most machines from local dealers; whether it's built-in or a separate attachment, this foot duplicates (over a smaller the motion of the feed dogs on the top layer. It's espe­ cially helpful on quilts. Every six inches, or more often as necessary, lift the foot and smooth back the fabric bubble that is cre­ ated by the foot, shoving the top layer for­ ward. This helps a great deal on knit fabrics. You can also hold just the bottom layer, let­ ting the top rest free as you guide them both under the needle. The increased drag on the bottom will equalize the movement of the layers. Hand basting will eliminate shift completely, but pin basting merely slow it down. If it's important to eliminate shift, take the time to baste. You can also use this shift tendency to your advantage. Whenever one side of a seam must be eased in against the other, put the longer side against the feed dogs and allow the machine to do the easing.

area)

will

Fewer and fewer pucl{el's Of all sewing machine irritations, puckered seams are the most frequent and the most likely to be fixable by the knowledgeable home sewer. In addition to what's already been described, here are the most common reasons for puckers: The "knot" where the threads cross on a machine-sewn seam be­ longs within the fabric, but if the thread is thicker than the fabric, the knot is so bulky that it displaces the remaining fab­ ric. The cumulative effect is a bumpy seam that appears puckered. Standard-weight cotton thread can cause puckers when it is initially sewn in, but the natural fiber will often press flat; a test will determine if this is the case. For very fine fabrics like crepe de chine or cotton batiste use extra-fine cotton machine-embroidery thread. The weight is similar to these fabrics and it will make smooth seams, especially when com­ bined with a short stitch length. Stitching straight seams through elastic can stretch it out of shape. The problem is those knots again; they take up more room than j ust thread would. That's why elastic is chain-stitched in ready-to-wear gar­ ments; there's no knot to displace the elas­ tic. Today there are specially-made elastics (available from Clotilde's, 1909 S.W. First Ave . , Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315-2100, 305-761-8655) with channels between the elasticized rows for machine-stitching with a traditional sewing machine without stretching. If you can't find this elastic, use a zigzag stitch to spread the knot pattern and prevent stretching. Bias or knit seams always seem to puck­ er, but the true problem is not puckering, it's stretching fabric. When the seam is sewn it's lying flat in the machine. As soon as the garment is hung, the bias or knit drapes and the seam does not. To prevent this problem use a baby zigzag stitch. This is a width 1 , length 1% (20 stitches per inch) , normal zigzag. This stitch will give and drape with the rest of the garment for a soft, smooth seam. This also works well on very long seams like princess seams on floor�length dresses. The quality of your stitching can be im­ proved by beginning your seams meticu­ lously. Hold onto the two thread ends as you begin a seam. Gentle pressure toward the back will help you start without a puck­ er. It's important to press gradually on the foot control; starting too fast is like skid­ ding tires on the pavement. The feed dogs can't get a grip on the fabric and the bot­ tom layer becomes distorted.

D

Gale Grigg Hazen runs a sewing school in Saratoga, CA. She's the author oj Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers, and Knitting Machines, Chilton, 1989. 67


When you understand how the two elements of knit lace work, yarnovers and decreases. you can chart your own form designs, as Alice starmore did in her "Flying Birds" pullover. To order the rn, p. 89. (Photo this by Yvonne Taylor; photos pp. 69-73 by n Kahn)

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patte

page

see Susa

reads Magazin

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Cha rting Lace

Work visually: knitted lace is easy to design

n

rmore

by Alice Sta

ewcomers to the art of Imit­ ted lace are amazed to dis­ cover that the techniques are remarkably few and sim­ ple, with only two basic elements: Yarnovers make the holes, but they also create new stitches; decreases compensate for those new stitches (see Bas1:cs , p. 8). (To make a yarnover, you simply bring the yarn over the right-hand needle without Imitting a stitch from the left needle. The effect is a new stitch.) The arrangement of yarnovers and decreases forms the pattern. T h e estab l i s h e d way of p rovi d i ng instructions is to write them row by row. But written instructions do not convey any sense of what the pattern looks like. The problem is compounded with lace instruc­ tions, because a pattern of anything but the simplest form is an eye-boggling chunk of repeated letters and numbers in which it is all too easy to become hopelessly lost. Sound familiar? The obvious and easy alternative is to use pictures instead of words. Charted lace patterns give a clear, visual explanation, using symbols that actually look like the stitches. They are easy to follow while working along each row, and each stitch and row can be seen and checked in rela­ tion to those above, below, and alongside. But by fa r the most exciting aspect of cha rted lace is that it makes the designing of your own original lace patterns not only possible, but easy and a lot of fun. It is with this goal in mind that have planned the following series of pattern exercises.

I

ding charts

Rea

First, it is vital to learn how to read and work from a chart. To do this, have a look at Chart l -"Eyelets," and the Imitted sam­ ple below it as I expla in how it works. The cha rt represents a swatch of knitting placed right side up, with the cast-on edge at the bottom. Each square represents a stitch and contains a symbol which con­ wys an instruction. The X in the square at each side represents a selvage stitch, which is extra to the lace pattern . It may be December 1990/Jauual'Y 1991

worked simply as a garter stitch or as a more elaborate edge such as a picot selvage (see Threads No. 23, pp. 44-45). The I sym­ bolizes a Imit stitch, which has a vertical appearance on the right side. The 0 is for the yarn over (yo) , which produces a hole. And the final symbol on this chart is the 11 for Imit 2 stitches together ( k2tog). When a k2tog is worked, the second stitch slants to the right and covers the top of the first stitch, so the symbol appears as two lines (the two stitches) with the second line slanting to the right to meet the top of the first. This gives you a clear picture of what "Eyelets" will look like-a solid fabric punc­ tuated by single holes spaced at regular in­ tervals (photo, right). We'll talk about de­ signing with both right- and left-slanting decreases shortly. Each horizontal row of sq uares represents a row of Imitting and is readjust as the knit­ ting is worked: The first row (right side) is at tlle bottom and is worked from l;ght to left. Wrong-Side rows are even numbers, and are worked from left to right. Only the right-side rows are shown on the chart because in this pattenl, as in many otller lace patterns, the wrong-Side rows are purled straight across all pattern stitches, so it is not necessary to chart tllem. Also, omitting plain wrong-Side rows actually gives a better picture of the pattern on the chart because lace Imitting does not have a square gauge. There are more rows than stitches to a given measure­ ment, and tlle holes are larger and the de­ creases more prominent than the rows of plain stitches. After working tlle last charted row at tlle top, you must work a wrong-Side row before starting again from row 1. The pattern repeat is outlined in the chart. The stitches at each side of the re­ peat center the pattenl across the row, and the minimum swatch size contain ex­ actly the number of stitches shown in one horizontal row of the chart. To make a larg­ er piece, add multiples of the stitch repeat. In other words, cast on the multiple, as many times as desired, plus the total num­ ber of stitches at each side. Now that you understand how to read and

will

Key to symbols

� Selvqge rn Knit IQI Yarnover (yo) 01 Knit 2 together (k2tog) (right-slanting) !EI Slip, slip, knit together (ssk) (left-slanting) I!tI Slip l -knit 2 tog-pass sl st over (sl l -k2tog-psso) Blue outlines indicate pattern and row repeat

1.

X X X X X X

Eyelets I I I I I I I I 11 0 I I I I I I

I

I

I I I I

..

I I I I I I

t • decr

II I

11 0 I I I I I I I I I

I

I I I

XI I

,.

I I 0 1 0 /1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I

ll 9 ? 5 3 1

.

.

toward the hole, minimiz­

/1 I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 0 I 1 0 /1 I I I I I I I I

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.,

X X X X X X

I I I I I

• •

I

I I I 0 I I

.

ease slants The ing the slant. 2. Dashes X I I I I X I I I I X I I I I X I I I I X I I 0 /1 X I 0 /1 1 I I X I I I I

I ' I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I

I I I I /1 1 I I

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,.

/1 I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I

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X X X X X X X X

15 13 ll 9 ? 5 3 1

,.

•• ,• #• ,• The decrease slants away from the hole, ac­ ,,,..#

centuating the slant.

3. Little Parallelog rams ;".._ ,.; "...:11 0 I ., 0 11 0 0 11 I I I ,. X I I I X I I I 0 11 0 11 I I I I 0 11 0 11 0 /1 I X I I 0 11 0 11 I I I I 0 X O I1 I I I 1 0 /1 0 /1 1 I I 1 0 I 0 11 X I I I I I 0 /1 0 11 I I X I I I I 0 11 0 /1 I I I I 0 11 0 X O II O II I I 1 0 /1 0 11 1 I I X I 0 /1 1 I I 1 0 /1 0 /1 1 I I I X O II I I 1 0 11 0 11 I I I I O X I 1 0 11 0 /1 1 1 1 1 0 11 0 11 1 X 1 0 11 0 /1 1 I I 1 0 11 0 11 1 I X 0 I1 0 /1 I I I 1 0 11 0 11 I I I

I � ,..-,--;--:-/1 I I I

11 I I /1 I /1 I I I1 I I I

X X X X X X X X X X X X

23 21 19 l? 15 13 ll 9 ? 5 3 1 69


work from a chart, you are ready to study charts from a design point of view. Have a look at "Eyelets" again. Already you can see how simple it would be to chart a variation of this pattern by simply moving the yo/de­ crease pairs closer together or further apart to make a larger or smaller pattern.

4a. Squares, slanting right

X X X X X X X X X X

0.0

I 0 11 0 11 I I 0 11 0. I 0 11 11 I I 0 I 0 l1 o. 11 I I I I I l i i i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

0. 11

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11 I I I

I I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I1 o. I1 o. o. I1 o. I1 I1 o. I1 o. o. I1 o. I1 11 11

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X X X X X X X X X X,

19 17 15 13 ll 9 7 5 3 1

I

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The effect of slanting dec

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4c. Squares, with a fault

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Adjacent solid sts

19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3

Adjacent holes

�l 1 I ., ••••.....#.*. � ;, ,.I.�.-.,.'"•....•;. i # ••..•-..,�•It'...f· ,".•.,�"�.." ..'.",......". ,,•. ..:.." .�,#.".:.,.'' -,�. •.•. •..•,# �·...,.' I ' .',IfJ' .,. ,. # .� ... .•' •. '• . ' :#" _..• .• • f The smart way to design 4d. Squares, slanting right and left

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Holes and decreases

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II

� Last st

I I I � I 1 1 1\ 1 9

11 I I I 1 . 1 1 I I I 1. 1 11 I I I 1 I. I I I I 1 11 I I I I I

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� Solid st between 2 holes

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.

two ements: holes and solid sfftches. The photo accentuate the righward slant of the holes.

In charting lace, learn to think in terms of just el above is "Squares" (chart 4a). The k2tog decreases 70

1 1\ 0, 1\ 0

I , I 17 ·f--11 I\1 O1\ 0� O1\ 0l\ dI ' Il II l lI I lI ,I-JI L;I\ 15 1 1 1 ' 1,, 1 1 , 1 : I I 1\ 0 r\ 0:,'1 t I 1\ 0 1\ 0 1\ : 0 1 I I I I I 1\ 11 31

reases

The appearance of the hole is affected by where you place the decrease. Looking at the k2tog decrease on Chart 1, you can see how it will look in the knitted piece: The right slant is slightly discernible, and the hole is to its right on the vertical side. You can ac­ centuate the slant if you plot the yo at the immediate left of the decrease, instead of at the immediate right (see Chart 2, p. 69). It will show up sharper because the slanted side of the stitch is followed by the hole rath­ er than by a solid stitch. Chart 2 -"Dashes," center, p. 69, is a sim­ ple pattern resulting from the idea of ac­ centuating the slant by plotting a k2tog, yo, and then another k2tog, yo, one stitch to the right on the next right-side row. Chart 3- "Little Parallelograms," at bot­ tom, p. 69, is a direct follow-through from "Dashes." It expands the k2tog, yo over four stitches and three right-side rows, arranging them with the same number of solid stitch­ es between. Although the pattern can be viewed completely after row 11, it is neces­ sary to chart the 23 rows in order to begin the row repeat at the correct position. Another important consideration is bias. If the k2tog decreases and yos cover an en­ tire pattern, the resulting fabric will bias to the right. This is even more extreme when they are placed one directly above the other. In chart 3, the areas of stockinette render any tendency for bias so slight as to be unno­ ticeable and easily co ted with blocking, Chart 4a-"Squares," at far upper left, continues the theme of simple geometric shapes with the sharp diagonals of the de­ creases adding an interesting slant. In or­ der to produce a square shape, each lace square occupies six stitches and ten rows. Chart 4b (near upper left) is the same "Squares" pattern but the decreases slant to the left and follow the yarnovers, This ac­ centuates the leftward slant. 1\ is the symbol for the slip, slip, knit decrease (ssk-slip two sts one at a time knitwise, then knit them together); it is the counterpart of k2tog, hav­ ing the same degree of slant in the opposite direction. Note that the stockinette stitch outside the repeat is on the right rather than on the left, as it is in 4a. Since the position of the decreases has been reversed, the extra stitch must also be reversed so that the holes in each band of squares are equidis­ tant from the selvages. My next idea was to make a "Squares"

rrec

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pattern with alternating bands of right­ and left-slanting decreases. You might think that the obvious thing to do is to plot a pattern repeat of rows 1 through 9 of 4a, followed by rows 11 through 19 of 4b, which I charted in 4c (center, facing page). At first glance, this looks fine, with the up­ per lace square plotted exactly in the space between the two below. But if you knit this pattern, the lace square above appears much closer to the square below right than to the square below left. This is because the corner holes are adjacent to each other on the right, but there are two solid stitch­ es between them on the left. This kind of fault arises through including the outer decreases as part of the lace squares. Although, technically, they are, the holes are the prominent feature. The de­ creases affect the pattern, but it is important to realize that solid stitches next to other sol­ id stitches are not that noticeable.

The intelligent way

to design

Another important reason why Chart 4c doesn't work is because I took the wrong approach in designing it-charting it line for line from the previous two charts. Just as it would be ridiculous to paint a picture starting at the corner and painting in hori­ zontal lines, so it is with lace patterns. The right approach is shown in Chart 4d (lower chaIt, facing page): Begin by plotting the main feature of the pattern, which is usually the holes (the yos, on the left-hand side of the chart) . Work on a large piece of graph paper plotting the yos and covering a tairly large area, especially widthways. The next step is to plot the decreases, making sure to have a decrease for each yo. Notice that between each square of holes, I have left only one vertical space for a solid stitch. On the first nine rows, a decrease precedes each hole; on rows 11-19, a decrease follows each hole. Next, plot the symbols for the sol­ id stitches. Now you can study the pattern and work out the stitch repeat. Outline the repeat and then outline any stitches to be worked at each side so tllat the pattern is centered. Before knitting, you should re­ chart tlle outlined pattern, add the selvage stitches, and nLUnber tlle rows. Looking at the outlined pattern, 4d, no­ t.ice that the two sq uares of holes now haye one solid stitch running lip between them on each side. On one side, the solid stitch has a decrease on alternate rows. It knits up as a slight ridge but does not unbalance or distract from the pattern . Chali 5a, "Diagonal Diamonds," aboye right, is a direct progression from "Squares," but it is a little more sophisticated. The lay­ out of the left- and light-slanted diamonds means that there are both k2tog and ssk de­ creases in most rows. It was yery impOliant

Dp{,PlIlbpl'

199()/JanuaJ�' 1991

Knitting from your charts is the acid test. The "Diagonal Diamonds" (chart 5b) are evenly spaced. Sa. Diagonal Diamonds The outline marks a repeat plus two sts on the left to center the pattern.

11011I 1 �11I1I O�1 0�I 0� 0�I 01 II 0 11I1 01 011011011011 111 0I �11I1 �I 0O� 0� 0101�I 0 1II 0 �011I O1 0�11I 01 0��I 00�I �I1 00II 1101I 001101111I 110�II 11 0�I 0O��I 0001�I 01O�1 00Il XX��II 00�I 0� 0I 01I1 0I 111 0I 011 011I 111 0�II 110�I �0�001I I XX XX �I 0� I 1 I 011 I 0110011 011 �11I 0� 0I XX -I--

Last 2 pattern sts

I

5b. Diagona Diamonds, recharted

19 17

15

13

Broken yoldec pairs are marked in gray.

11

9

7

5

3

Last pattern st

First 2 pattern sts Solid sts

4

1

The multiple has been moved one st to the left, and the extra, centering, pattern sts complete broken pairs. Plain sts

fill

in unbroken pairs.

71


'I,XXXIiI� II '"I I � � I II /1 � I I I (5'I-BO'�'/1I I,XXX�I I : �'O /1 � OT/1tllx' 6.

Cot's Paws

1 0 It\ 0 1 1I I 0 1 0 1 1 1 1t1 0 1 0 1 I 1 0 It\ 0 1 i l 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 /1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

/1 -+1 1ti l r f I 1 1 1 0 A\ 1 1 XJ 0 1 1 1 1 0, 1

W

9 7

5 3

Paw Above right you see the expanded "Cot's Paw Diamond" with 'Verti­

The fabric below is "Cot's ." col Cot's s" on either side.

Paw

1

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for me to rechart the outlined stitches be­ cause I had to make some changes in order to knit the pattern successfully. For one tlling, no matter where you the repeat outline, the diamonds that get split on each side of the knitted piece have either a decrease or a yo extra. In the case of 5a, tlle diamond that is split at the right of tlle out­ line has one too many decreases on every altemate row, while on the left side it has one too many yos. Chart 5b shows the pattem recharted cor­ rectly. I have moved tlle repeat to the left one stitch to split the diamond exactly in half, put stitches on each side to center and take care of the eA1;ra decs on light and extra yos on left, and added a plain stitch on tlle right to center the holes perfectly. When you have outlined the repeat and tlle stitches that center the pattern, always check that each yo has a corresponding de­ crease, and ,ice versa ; it may be necessary

draw will

72

to make adjustments like this when you rechart for knitting.

Designing with paired dec

reases

Now we're ready to explore tlle classic idea of paired decreases, the basis of innumerable patterns and the platform from which to take off on your own flights of fancy. The plinciple is simplicity itself. Have a look at Chart 6 -"Cat's Paws," above. This simple Shetland lace motif is a perfect key to under­ standing tlle essence of knitted lace design. The base, or first row, of each motif is cru­ cial. As you can see, it is composed of a cen­ tral solid stitch, on either side of which is a yarnover and a decrease. The right-slanting decrease on the right is reflected exactly by tlle left-slanting decrease on the left to pro­ duce perfect symmetry. On the next light­ side row, tlle motif is opened out with tllree central solid stitches and reflecting yo/de­ creases at each side. The motif is then closed

It\

It\

I

11

61--11 11

15 13 11

9 7

I

I

5 3

by working a central double decrease, which gathers three sts into one (sl 1k2tog-psso, see Basics, p . 10), shown on the chart by the A yamover at each side compensates symmetrically for the two stitches reduced by the double decrease. The important points to note are the sym­ metrical placing of the yarnove1'8 and de­ creases, and the typical first row, which you can use as the opening for all kinds of pattems. The degree of elaboration on this theme is entirely up to you. A fascinating part of tlle designing process is arranging motif's into a design. The next two charts, above, show the results of a small expeliment in arranging tlle Cat's Paw motif and elaborating on it. Chart 7 has the motifs arranged directly above each other in a vertical panel. There are just six rows (in­ cluding the last purl row) per repeat, al­ though I have shown more so that you can see how it looks. The effect is quite different

It\.

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from the original. In Chart 8-"Cat's Paw Diamond" (facing page), I elaborated on the original motif by continuing it into a larger diamond form. You can work the diamonds in Charts 7 and 8 side by side in a vertical panel arrangement with plain stockinette between each panel, as shown in the photograph at upper right, facing page, or with a wide variety of open or solid stitches between. When you experiment, you will find that one idea will follow an­ other and that you can create many vari­ ations on a single pattern. Designing your own lace images Up to this point I have worked with such small motifs and basic arrangements that I would be very surprised if any of the de­ signs were new inventions. But it is possi­ ble to work within a simple geometric framework and create endless new designs by elaborating on basic arrangements. You can also work with irregular shapes. For example, nature provides many beautiful forms that can inspire lace designs, such as my "Butterfly," shown at lower right. I visualized the butterfly's wings as lacy . and delicate and the body as a solid contrast. With that in mind, I plotted out the holes first and then added the decreases, as shown in Chart 9, at right. I accentuated the butter­ fly's vertical line of symmetry by using re­ flecting decreases on each side. To differenti­ ate the top and bottom pair of wings, I made the diagonals point outward on the top pair and inward on the bottom pair. The paired decreases encroach on the body space, but this is fine as they are solid stitches like the body and will be seen as part of it. On the tail end I plotted a single hole at the bottom, and the decrease is a k2togjol­ lowing the yo, thus softening the slant of the decrease and diminishing the effect of its asymmetry. I thought the tail would look further separated from the wings with double decreases in the center, rather than single ones at each side. Of course, the de­ crease where the tail meets the body had to be a double, because there was already a yarnover at each side. I used double de­ creases for the head for the same reason. The decreases at the tips of the antennae are not accentuated because I wanted them to point ahead. If I had plotted the decreases as the ones directly below, they would have pOinted outwards a little too much. Once the motif was charted to satis­ faction, the next step was to knit a swatch to see that it worked as planned. 0 Alice Starmore, who lives on the Isle oj Lewis in Scotland, is a jrequent contribu­ tor to Threads. To order the patternjor AL­ ice Sta re's "Flying Birds" pullover, see p. 89.

rmo

December 1990/Janllary 1991

9.

Butterfly

__

I! 111

The butterfly chart is the centerpiece of starmore's curtain. She used paired decreases and cot's

pow variations to design the other elements.

73


P

icture a tiny village in East­ ern Europe, surrounded by for e s ts a n d v i n eyard s . Roses and daisies riot in front of small whitewashed cottages. A tall-steepled church dominates the dusty village, and the road to the church is filled with blazing colors. It's the matrons of Ratiskovice, Czechoslovakia, on their way to church in their richly embroidered finery. Ratiskovice (ra-tish-ko-vit-seh) folk dress is renowned for its rich layers of embroidery and lace, for the beaded and sequined head­ dresses that shine in the sun, and the crisp lawn neckerchiefs alive with ancient sym­ bols. The blouses, protective motifs embroi­ dered at every opening, have huge, puffed, embroidered sleeves finished with fine bob­ bin lace. Vivid red wool skirts are embroi­ dered with roses. Vests are pieced from bits of brocade and embellished with embroi­ dery. Even the accordian-pleated "stovepipe" boots, handmade by the village bootmaker, are decorated with delicate stitchery. But in Ratiskovice, a woman's glory is her apron. It is the highest expression of her skill with the needle. According to my great-aunt Anna Zemek Husak (she's the young woman in the photo at left, born in Ratiskovice and now 85 years old), a wom­ an worked the whole winter long making an entire outfit. Village women vied to make the most elaborate. And then they vied to stuff the most petticoats under­ neath to make the apron stand out for full appreciation of their handiwork. Mrs. Husak's aprons are exquisite. The fine embroidery is almost as perfect on the reverse as on the front. See "Stitching a Czechoslovakian apron" on p. 76 for more on the techniques involved, and for an apron pattern. Every year for the past 20 years, my moth­ er, Helen Zemek BaIne, and I have traveled back to Ratiskovice. So far we've collected over 100 aprons spanning 100 years from this tiny village on the Moravian-Slovak bor­ der in central Czechoslovakia; all the aprons shown here are from the Baine-Cincebox collection. Beginning with the apron created by my great-grandmother, Rozina Barilla Ze­ mek, shown at the top of the facing page, we can trace styles from the 1800s. Her apron, probably made for her dowry, like so many pieces of folk dress, is stitched in simple three-colored motifs of red, white, and green, worked in wool on inexpensive black chintz. The ancient motifs she chose appear again and again, especially in the older aprons, we'll see on the following pages.

as

Helene Cincebox's great-aunt Anna Zemek Husak, in Ratiskovice folk dress, with her broth­ er, taken about 1920.

Threads Magaz

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Fashions in aprons Village women learned fine embroidery to please the royal and noble families who moved to Czechoslovakia during the thir­ teenth century and later, after the Black Death and the Thirty Years' War had rav­ aged the populace. Embroidery for church cloths and vestments was also of great im­ portance in this era. Until the late 1800s, village clothing was quite simple. As life became more comfortable, people had the time to create more elaborate folk dress, and what they created was modeled on im­ ages of aristocratic fashions frozen in villa­ ger's memories from far earlier times. Puffed sleeves, neckerchiefs, full pleated skirts, lace-frilled caps, and of course the endless decoration, all suggest Renais­ sance and Baroque influences. The "Golden Age" for aprons made by the Ratiskovice women is the period from 1900 to 1925. The simple band of embroi­ dery characteristic of the 1800s had grown much more complex, as in the one in the middle photo at right, and finally crept right up the apron to the waistband. As the more elaborate aprons came into fashion, two wide bands, featming an intricate nee­ dle lace joining, were embroidered up the center of the apron, as you can see in the lower apron at right. During the 1930s, bright blue aprons be­ came popular. These were decorated with wide bands of lifelike flowers that, in time, shrank again to j ust one narrow band. When I first visited Ratiskovice in 1969, the village church was filled with women in traditional dress; most were kneeling in the aisles to protect their starched petti­ coats and to spread out their treasured black aprons for the best view. Today, j ust 20 years later, you might find only one or two women wearing the glorious, heavily­ embroidered dark aprons. The other wom­ en would probably be wearing modern, simple versions of folk dress, with little or no embroidery.

Traditional motifs The most desirable aprons were called ''vy­ vazovane," those embroidered on a locally dyed dark blue fabric ,vith vertical rows of pale blue hearts, either reSist-dyed or tie­ dyed, like the apron at lower right. Tradi­ tion also decreed that a 4-in. band of coarse, cream-colored bobbin lace with red and green inserts, be added to the apron's edge. Such lace appears only in Ratiskovice and a few neighboring villages. A curious edging goes along the lower border of most of the aprons and pa y up each side. It looks like ricrac, but in fact it's a design of small triangles, meticulous­ ly embroidered. This is the "wolfs teeth" motif, an ancient warding or protective de-

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December 1990/Jalluary 1991

Cincebox's great-grandmother, Rozina Barina Zemek, stitched her initial in the corner of this exam­ ple of the simple late-1800's-style apron. From left to right the motifs on the top row are: pomegran­ ate, or "love-apple," pennyrose, tUlip, and carnation.

Another early apron from Ratiskovice (above), Cincebox's ancestral vii/age, with an entirely differ­ ent vision of the same floral motifs. the height of their glory (1900-1925) the fashion in Ratiskovice aprons (below) cal/ed for a center strip of needle lace joining two wide bands of embroidery that turned upwards at the center, aI/ stitched on a dark blue fabric tie-dyed with rows of tiny hearts.

At


A Czechoslovakian Apron (Letnice style) Half waist measure, over skirt

pron Capoz i

_-===--_

Pleats Herringbone stitch Scalloped buttonhole stitch

76

by

ka Elizabeth B oravic

My Czechoslovakian mother and grandmother gave up trying to teach me traditional embroidery when I was a child, because I'm left-handed. But I was always fascinated with the patterns, so I taught myself the techniques when I was in my early twenties. Today I start every embroidered apron project ,vith research; I'm usually looking for an inspiring design from a particular region or village to reproduce for the members of my folk-dance group. I look through my own large collection of Czechoslovakian books, or visit people I know, like Helene Cincebox, who have original garments. Once I find an authentic design I like, I make a freehand drawing that I transfer to fabric with dressmakers' transfer paper. Most aprons are stitched on either black or navy fabrics, so I use yellow transfer, or draw directly ,vith a white marking pencil. Appropriate fabrics for these aprons can include velvet and satin, but from most villages, including my ancestral village of Letnice (about 20 km from Ratiskovice), the fabric is plain or polished cotton. I needed only two pieces, the apron and a waistband, as in the drawing at left for the Letnice apron I'm wearing in the photo on the facing page. For most adults, 45-in.wide fabric will gather or pleat down perfectly to fit the waistband. The waistband is measured to fit from side to side across the front half of the waist only, and the length is measured to fit from waist to knee, plus about a 7-in. hem. This is the standard hem width on the aprons I've examined, regardless of the width of the embroidery on top of it. Before I transfer my design, I hem the fabric by hand with matching thread, but leave it unattached to the

--�."

vice that is also embroidered on the sleeves, neck, and front facings of women's blouses and men's shirts. The motifs used in the older Ratiskovice aprons show stylized hearts, pomegranates (called "love apples") , tulips, roses, carna­ tions, and a much-loved flower that the vil­ lage ladies call "penny rose," depicted as 4 or 5 hearts arranged to form a flower. Many of these motifs appear on Rozina Zemek's apron at the top of p. 75. Grapes were also a

stitching a Czec1wslovakian a

popular motif in this ancient wine-making region. Especially beautiful are the delicate traceries and leaf tendrils incorporated in the designs. In more recent times, the designs became more realistic. The grapes, daisies, roses, and forget-me-nots which grew around the sim­ ple one-story cottages in Ratiskovice also bloomed on the aprons. The embroidered designs are orderly, but without strict repeti­ tion, lending credence to my great-aunt's

contention that the artists never drew the design on the material, they just sketched on paper and then started embroidering. I 've watched another great-aunt, Julia Kral Zemek, etch similar motifs on painted eggs. She never planned the design; it just flowed according to the shape of the egg. Of the thousands she created, she never made the same design twice, except for the one motif which appeared in every dozen, a pat­ tern of twining leaves she called "eternity."

roods Magaz

Th

ine


waistband strip and unpleated. Then, starting at one end, I stretch the fabric in a wooden hoop and embroider from one end to the other with the stitches described below, stitching through two layers when I'm working over the hem area. Individual motifs must be stitched from the center outwards to prevent distortion and puckering, and it's vital to remove the fabric from the hoop whenever you're not working on it, for the same reason. Next, I finish the hem and side edges, attaching all-cotton lace to the hem edge with the finishing stitches; pleat the waist edge to fit the band; and attach the band by hand with a running stitch. The final step is attaching string or ribbon ties to each end of the band. Only two stitches are needed for the main design , the satin stitch and the stem stitch, both shown in the drawings on the facing page. I pull the needle all the way through to the back for each satin or stem stitch, instead of pushing the point out to the front to start the next stitch, as shown in most books; I think it's easier to control the tension that way. For the edge finishing I use a buttonhole stitch, changing the length of the stitch to create the j agged edge or "wolfs teeth" on the inside. About halfway up each side I switch to a scalloped buttonhole stitch, worked j ust inside the edge. The pleats (each one is about % -in. deep) are held together with a few rows of herringbone stitch. It's important that the back of the work look almost as good as the front, of course, so there are no knots; starting ends are caught by the subsequent stitches on the wrong side and finishing ends are pulled under or woven into previous stitches. Connecting threads from part to part within motifs are always hidden under previous stitches. With such simple stitches the artistry of the embroiderer is revealed primarily in the beauty of the deSign, and the embroiderer's skill, or lack of it, is impossible to hide. D

apozzi poses

Elizabeth B. Capozzi teaches folk dance and e b ro de in B ingha mpton,

Elizabeth (or "Alzbeta', Borovicka C in her "kroj, " the Czechoslovakian word for the traditional festival mode in the style of her mother's village.

Labors of love

been unlettered, but the motifs and de­ signs and the needle skills they learned from their mothers reveal technical artist­ ry of the highest order. I am sure that the treasured aprons enriched the lives of these hard-working peasant women who lived in one- or two-room houses ,vith dirt floors and, as my grandfather recalled, "ate potatoes all winter long." In addition to demonstrating their skill with the needle, the aprons of Ratiskovice brought the glory

m i ry

NY.

To choose the most beautiful apron is im­ possible since each one is a maker's mas­ terpiece. The most touching one in our col­ lection is one made during World War I . Embroidery thread and traditionally dyed material were difficult to obtain, so roses and "wolf"s teeth," and even the tie-dyed designs, were meticulously hand-painted on the fabric with oil paint. The women of Ratiskovice may have December 1990/Jalluary 1991

outfit,

of summer flowers and a glimpse of warm­ ing sunshine into the long winters, and they continue to bring beauty, joy, and in­ spiration to all who see them today. D

Helene Cincebox edits and publishes Slo­ vakia: A Slovak Heritage Newslettel� and has led craft and folk-art tours to Czecho­ slovakia. For more information, write to Slovak Heritage Society, 1 51 Colebrook Drive, Rochester, 14617.

NY

77


Desig Wear

ned to

1 990

Haute couture is generally associated with the fashion runways of Paris, not Portland. But each spring the Oregon School of & Crafts (OSAC) stages "Designed to Wear," a j uried showcase for original garments by fiber artists. According to producer/choreographer Janice Plihal, the event, which was begun as a fundraiser in 1981 by OSAC's fiber de ent, is not just a fashion show, but a break from traditional runway modeling with a ''theatrical twist." P , an haute-couture model t/designer, has coo ted the show since 1986. For 1990, contemporary music and dance were combined with elaborate stage settings in two sell-out shows sponsored by JC Penney at the Portland Center for the Performing The jurors chose 125 garments from more than 280 slides submitted by 150 artists from the U.S. and Canada. Juror Liz MapeUi, who creates large-scale artworks, said "We were looking for unique design and quality construction-things that were both art pieces and fantasy pieces, and really wearable." Entries were j udged on originality, style, and creative use of materials. Materials ranged from paper and film to hand-painted fabric. Designs included cutwork pieced jackets, oil-painted canvas vests, stenciled suede, and painted leather. Carolyn Price Dyer's "Coat of Mail" was composed of pieced and stitched bits of Asian money and newspapers, and the hemline was bordered with slides of the Republic of China. The tenth annual Designed to Wear Show will be held April 26, 1991. Fiber artists and designers wanting more information may contact the Designed-to-Wear Committee, OSAC, 8245 Barnes Road, Portland, OR 97225, (503) 297-5544. -Deborah Barry

Arts

partm

turned artis

rdina

lihal

Arts.

A A Collaboration creates on air of cosual elegance. Model, designer, and Designed-fo-Wear producer Janice Plihal hand-dyed crepe de chine to a brilliant red before constructing the jumpsuit. Plihal assembled the matching reversible silk charmeuse jacket without seams to accentuate silkpoinfer Potty Bocker's flowing composition of swirls and geometriC shapes. The design, spontaneous motifs swimming against the monochro­ matic color scheme, was inspired by the early 20th century Nol.Neau artist Gustave Klimt. (Photo by John Emmerling)

M

78

SW

Deborah Barry is an arts writer in Portland, OR.

reads Magaz

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B. Ann Williamson Hyman's shoulder-button silk-and-wooljacket creates a glowing mosaic of squares, disrupted from shoulder to waist by a diag足 onal cut. 'We're such symmetrical creatures," says Hyman, "I like to use

clashing textures and asymmetrical lines to try to offset that balance." (Photo by Anthony Rush Ledbetter) C. Genie Stewart's soft, shimmering open-weave tops are the result of her

1987 trip to the Indonesian islands of Bali and Java, where she was in足 spired by the swaying green shoots of boundless rice paddies glittering under the sun. "Perhaps," a jacket suitable for evening, captures light in parallel warps of cotton, silk, and rayon c with strong noveffy metallic threads. (Photo by Jill Connefax)

E

fine, rossed D. Bird Ross overstitches layers of cloth with dffferent colors of thread to transform the hues, patterns, and textures of fabric. For this bright blue re足 versible coot (detail shown), Ross cut and juxtaposed six fabric pattems. She washes and tumble-dries the fabric before and after construction. (Photo by Charles Frizzel) E. In "Lure A1Iure," Elaine Anne Spence transforms a simple coot pattern through embellishment. The classic, tailored wool coot in bright turquoise (detail) provides a perfect backdrop for the spray of shiny fishing lures, colored beads, and strips of rolled silk. (Photo by David Browne)

F.

rayon

Three hand-painted -and-silk blend canvases comprise the front, back, and sleeves of Sharon Coldwell's "American Time"jacket. Coldwell sometimes applies her celebrities with heat transfers, by pho g original illustrations onto transfer paper. Using an iron or heat press, she transfers the color images onto the fabric. Final touch-ups are completed a paintbrush. On the right sleeve: Ronald Reagan, William Casey, and Oliver North; on the left: Daniel Ortega, Gloria Steinem, and David Let足 terman. (Photo by Sharon Coldwell)

tocopyin

with

December 1990/Jalluary 1991

F 79


C

alendar

==

onal, or but muspeal thatternat regre lackres,s dates, add honeprimari umber contact perThesan,deador that do the deol issue 15) 10. EXHmflITONS AND LECTITIrnS the American NEW ARIZ 1991, CALCeremonial Ang.from the mmiB Glory Figumt Bed.covers 171JO.1900in (see & 'Yl1ernpo turetorical till CA Cal. Heritage QuiU Pr0- WBAI ject, 5000&MacArthur Blvd., Oaldan Listings are free t have in ti multis tate ap We rwt pub lish announcements and ending a cmnplete p n or ly with fiber. Apr./May (available Mar.

ional, na­ lj'uUy can­ beginning and a rwt line jor is Jan.

Mobilia. Woven Garments, till Dec. 7; Wearing

My Art on My Sleeve, till Dec. 29. 358 Huron Ave. , Cambridge. Museum of American Textile His . Cele­ bration and Remembrance: Com1nemorative Textiles in A'merica, till Jan. 13. 800 Mass. Ave., N. Andover.

tm·y

MISSISSIPPI:

ALABAMA:

Hun ts v i l l e Museum of Art.

Galeria Mesa. Inner Meanings, all

media, Dec. 2 hJan. 19. 155 N. Center St., Mesa.

IFORNIA:

Los

eles County Museum of

Textiles nesia, till Jan. 27; Wmp ped Quilts and

Is

Art.

oj Indo­ : ive Notes, p. 24).

Ame1';'can Museum of Quilts and Textiles.

His

Crib Quilts Co mry Miniar Quilts, Jan. 5. 766 S. 2nd St., San Jose,

Mills College A1'ts Cntr.

till Dec. 15.

d.

New Pieces Fabric

Chamber Music. Beyond

the Block: Experi1nents in Quilting, Dec. 7-Jan. 2, 1991; Point Bonita Retre(�t Quilt Show, Jan. 5-30. 1597 Solano Ave. , Berl{eley. San F'ra co C mjt Folk A1·t eum. An Okl Turkish House, till Dec. 30. Bldg. A, Fort Mason Center, San Francisco. M.H. de Young Mem l Museum. Turkish Pile Rugs, till Feb. 17; Anatolian Kilims, till Jan. 27. Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

ncis

& oria

Mus

Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Needlewm·k.

The'UXYrk,.egm Guihl Celebration Jewish Exhi Wilshire RAD ten�pora Parn

nate dle till Jan. 21. Dubin Wolf Wilshire Blvd. Temple, 3663

COLO

O:

oj Nee­ bit Center of Blvd., LA.

Gallery of Con

ry Art.

Crossovers: Contemporary Fiber Art, till Dec. 14. University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Austin Bluffs Pkwy., Colorado Springs.

NNE GUr

WQ1·

eneu

CO GrI : Wads th Ath m. The Blues, 19 indigo-dyed fabrics from 16th to 20th century, till Jan. 27. 600 Main St., Hartford. A:

Whirlwind Gallery. Contemporary

Wearables, till Jan. 1 2 . 1 1 North "J" St., Lake Worth.

The

GEORGIA: High Museum. Docu1nents oj Education: Samplers anel Silk from the Collec­ tion oj Betty R i ng, Jan. 2 4 -Mar. 2 2 . 1 2 80 Peachtree St., NE, Atlanta. HAWAII:

ions Arts

Needle Express

'90. Jan. 28-Feb.

2 2 . Hawaii Stitchery and Fibre fac Plaza, Honolulu.

LLIN Cooler INDIAN I

OIS:

Guild, Am­

ndo­M

Textile Arts Centre. Unusuol I

.from the

nesian Textiles Collection oj Richard (see Notes, p. 22).

A:

Indianapolis Museum of Art. Afri­

can Househokl Arts, till Feb. 28; Marie Webster Q u i l ts, t i l l M a r . 3 1 . 1 2 0 0 W. 3 8 t h S t . , Indianapolis.

KANSAS:

ions

I(ansas Fiber Di1'Cct

'91. Manip­

ulated fiber, Jan. 5-Feb. 3. Wichita Art Associ­ ation, 9112 E. Central, Wichita.

KENTUCKY:

Libe1·ty Gallery. Kentucky

Quilts, Dec. 3. 416 West Jefferson, Louisville.

MASS

ETT

ACHUS S: New J<Jngland Quilt Mu,­ seum. Qt�iU National, till Dec. 3 1 . 256 Market St., Lowell. 80

YORK:

,

till Jan. Laurel.

Metropolitan Museum of Art.

American Quilts and Cove1'lets, till Jan. 6 . Fifth Ave. and 82nd St., NYC. New York Guild of Handweavm·s. Fibe1' Arts Jan. 8-2 5. Craft Students League Gal­ lery at the YWCA, 610 Lexington Ave. at 53rd St., NYC. Museum of Am n Folk Art. Five-StaT Folk Art, till Dec. 2; The Work oj Taiji Harada: Folk Art and Life in Japan, till Jan. 4; The Cutting Edge: Contempm'ary A1nerican Folk Art, till Mar. 6. Two Lincoln Square, NYC. 19th Annual HolWay Cmlts Fair. Dec. 7-9 and 1 4 - 1 6 . Columbia University's Feris Booth Hall, 1 15th St. Broadway, NYC. Hud � River eum. A Certain Style, '50s handbags, till Dec. 2 . 5 1 1 Warburton Ave . , Yonkers. Holthaus Fibm' Art. TTeasures and Trifles, Dec. 1-15. 7 Irma Ave. , Port Washington. Schweinfurth A1·t Cenw·. Quilts Art Quilts, till Jan. 1 . 105 Genesee St., Auburn.

(see Notes, p. 22).

weaver Sakiestewa, till Jan. 6. 2 100 Smallman St., Pittsburgh.

ienc

lphia College of Textiles and Sc

200

e.

American Made : Years oj Textile Manujac­ turing, till Jan. 5. Goldie Paley Design Center, 4200 Henry Ave ., Philadelphia.

LAND

RJw

RHODE IS

: Museum of Art, de Is­ land School of Design. Indonesian Textiles II,

EXAS

T

: North Texas Quilt Artists. Material Connections, Dec. 4-29. Trammel Crow Center, West Pavillion, 2100 Ross Ave. , Dallas.

rafts ups,Pibm' Dec Dec llections, St., The

Potomac C

t Festival, till n Rug Co 18, 105 North Union

.

men

Gallery.

2; Wmp 4Jan. 2; Jan. 4-Feb. 3. Studio Alexandria.

.

WASHINGTON, D.C.: Textile Museum. Art .from the Navajo Loom: The Hearst Collection, till Dec. 30; Visions oj Infinity: Design and Pattern in Oriental Carpets, till Feb. 24; Trail­ ing the TigeT- To Goklen Cloths oj SU1Tw,tm's Minangkabau, till June 9; New Quilts: Inter­ pretations and Innovations, Jan. 26-Apr. 28. 2320 's' St., N .W. Tactile Architectw'C 1991. Modern art quilts with an architectural theme, Jan. 26-Feb. 10. Decatur House, 748 Jackson PI., N.W. American His eum. Men and W01nen: A History of Costume, Gender and Power, till Apr. 30. Between 12th St. and Constitution Ave. 1990 Washingt011 Cmlts Expo. Dec. 7-9. Sher­ aton Washington Hotel, Woodley N.W. at Connecticut Ave.

tmy Mus

Rd.,

CAN

ADA:

A1'Ca.

Pibm'

The hnag

tlantic Quilt Festival II. Hilton National Conference Center, Williamsburg, VA, Feb. 2124. LSASE Quilt Show Coordinator, 6075 Rt. 202 Upper Mt. Rd., New Hope, PA 18938; (215) 794-0858.

ite National Park. Registration dates, till Feb. 1 . Contact Registrar CNCH 9 1 , P O Box 25786, Fresno, CA 93729.

Porc

Secmu! Annual Yvonne ella Quilt Sym­ posium. April 19-21, 1991. Regis trati on Feb. 1.

till LSAS CA CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS /fm'd cmJ't

E Porcella Studios, Dept. S91, 3619 Shoe­ maim Ave., Modesto, 95351; (209) 524-1134.

Gui

The Society for A1·t in . A one-person show of the work of Hopi

VIRGINIA: Harves Handwove

London Rd.,

Conjm'ence of Nm·thm"n California Hanel­ weavm·s. Web of the Earth, Mar. 15-17, Yosem­

PENNSYLVANIA:

Phi

Textiles in the

Mus &

Cincinnati A1·t Museum. Fashion in

1930s Cmlts lade the

miclm'Cd

Embroidery in London. Jan. 1991. Contact Liz Jackson, Rowan Travel, 2 Old Lyme Pitts­ ford, NY 14523; (800) 447-6926. Festivals of the New Year in China. Feb. 1 1Mar. 5. Contact Gail Rossi , PO Box 1026, Blue Lake, CA 95525; (707) 668-5006. Artists Tou 1' the USSR May 30-June 16. Moscow, Leningrad, Odessa, Tblisi. Contact Winged Lion Creative Expeditions, 2 48 1 7 Southeast 165th St., Issaquah, WA 98027; or call Phyllis Grimes at (206) 624-7289.

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Micl-A &

==

OHIO:

TOURS Emb

m'ica

till Dec. 30. 224 Benefit St., Providence.

RID

FLO

Needle Exp1'Css

4. Lauren Rogers Museum of

Amish Quilts . from Museum oj Folk A11; till Jan. 1 . 700 Monroe St., Huntsville.

ONA:

1790-1990, ions '90. Art

nad C1-ajt

The Ca ian Museum. Made by Hand: Felt and Paper, till Jan. 1. 1411 Cartwright St., Vancouver, B.C.; (604) 684-7174.

Museum fm' Textiles. Picto1-ial

Space: New Textile es, till Dec. 2. Contem­ porary Gallery, 55 Centre Ave. , Toronto, Ont.; (416) 599-5321 .

Hand Center. Weaving, basket­ ry, etc., till Dec. 15. 411 Church St., Guilford, CT 06437; (203) 453-5947. John C. Ca mp bell Folk School. Quilting, spin­ ning, weaving, Dec. 2-8. Brasstown , NC 28902; (704) 837-2775.

MPETflITONS JW' tural Anni Barbara, 3.CA Grea Cam CO

Natural Imp1'ession

ieel Quilt Exhibit.

Santa Barbara Na History Museum, May 3-5, in conjunction with the Museum's 75th ver­ sary. Slide deadline Dec. 1 . SASE Sandy Globus, 1067 bridge Dr., Santa 93111. t Ammwan Quilt Festival Four con­ tests. Winners to be shown at festival in April 1991 at the Pier, NYC. Entry deadline Jan. 2 . Contact Cathy Rasmussen, 6 1 West 62nd St., New York, NY 10023; (212) 977-7170. Sout Fibers. A jmied exhibit, Mar. 2-29, at North Georgia College, Dahlonega, GA. Deadline J a n . 4 . C H G , PO Box 5 2 9 5 4 , A t l a n t a , GA 30355. Artwear in Motion. Runway show of wearables by U.S. artists, Mar. 2. Entry deadline Jan. 8. LSASE Su Butler, AIM, 5118 Pepin PI., Madi­ son, 53705-4723; (608) 231-1704.

hern

WI to

String Slingm'

1991

Design Competition.

Open all machine lmitters. Deadline Jan. 1 1 . String Slinger, P O Box 23272, Chattanooga, TN 37422; (615) 843-0272.

lJion

Lafayette Art Association Annual Na al JU Competition. Apr. 1-30. Deadline Jan.

1'ied

Art

15. SASE Marta Fieldldng, Lafayette Gallery, 700 Lee, Lafayette, 70501. Paper/Fiber April. Open to all artists in U.s. Slide deadline Jan. 18. SASE to PaperlFiber XIV, The Arts Center, 129 E. Washington, Iowa City, 52240.

XIV. LA

IA CONNECTIONS furtharts, CT

Handweavers Guild of Amm'ica Scholarships.

To er education in field of handweaving and related including training for research, teAlile history, and conservation. Deadline Mar. 15. Con­ tact HGA, 120 Mountain Ave., B-101, Bloomfield, 06002; (203) 242-3577.

hreads Magazllle

T


� W

9{'X!dfetJ.&atwtionalWQrorl((

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&tP1)l�s

==

ore inJormatinn, call

For m

..

By David Page Coffin

This time we're devoting the Supplies column to materials you'll need for techniques described in this issue. In most cases, pertinent supplies are referenced right in the article as usual, but for those topics that are without sources, here's where to start looking. Lively linens The soul of almost every Angelheart creation is a beautiful, washable linen, in an inspiring color. Most stores bring out their best linens in the spring, but here are a few sources that have noteworthy collections all year. The Mill End Stare cauies suit and blouse weights in the basic naturals, pastels , and a few bright colors, ranging in price from $8 to $25 a yard; they'll send you swatches on request. For off­ cuts from the workrooms of major New York designers, try Fabric Place. They have solids, stripes, and plaids in more striking, and more subtle, colors from $ 10 to $25 a yard. Again, swatches are available for the asking. At Vogue Fa s, you'll find 25 colors of 45-in. blouse-weight linen for $9 a yard, plus an ever-changing collection of two to three dozen exotic Italian suiting solids and stripes, in combinations like honey/mauve, and coral/olive, all for less than $ 10 a yard.

bric

Mill End Store 8300 S. E. Mcloughlin Blvd. Portland, OR 97202 (503) 236-1234 Fabric Place 136 Howard St. Framingham, 01701 (508) 872-4888 Ask jor the Fabric Offic e.

MA

Vogue Fabrics 718 Main St. Evanston, IL 60202 (708) 864-9600 Ask jor Liz in the silk room.

kim

Authentic ono fubri('S John Marshall's directions for kimono­ making assume that you'll be using fabrics other than the traditional Japanese 14in. fabrics that authentic kimono are made from, and with good reason. He feels that non-Asians are almost always too big, and definitely have inappropriate body proportions, to wear kimono made from such narrow fabrics. He's a typical 5-ft. 82

8-in. Westerner and barely fits into an authentic-fabric kimono, so he makes his out of standard-width silks and cottons. The ideal fabrics for the traditional effect are flat, firm weaves, a little on the stiff side, like tafetta, pongee, shantung, and lined tussah, in silk, and medium-weight cottons, like Guatemalan ikats. Anything that really drapes is too fluid, but could be very comfortable, if authenticity isn't your first concern. If you still hunger for the real thing, it's definitely available. sells hundreds of different cottons, wools, and silks woven at 14 in., ranging in price from $8 to $60 per yard, including about 40 different shibOli patterns, 250 ikats, and 500 paste-resist patterns. Their catalog comes on video tapes, and to watch all seven categories end-to-end takes about six homos! Write for details on the video tapes; each category costs $7.50; periodic updates, $3.50. There's no minimum order.

Kasuri Dyewarks

Kasuri Dyeworks 1959 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 94704 (415) 841-4509

hm

Do you carry cas ere? The cashmere market has changed for the worse lately; it's hard to find even the most basic sweater for less than $200. 100% cashmere yardage is no exception. At G Street Fabrics , jersey knits come in two quality categories, "wonderful," and "incredible." ''Wonderful'' starts at $90 and goes up to $ 120 per yard; there are cuuently about 25 colors in stock, from the standard naturals and grays, to black, white, and charcoal, and on to more exciting teals, roses, greens, blues, and some great yellows. There are only three "incredible" colors, a black and two grays, but one touch will explain why these range from $150 to $ 170 per yard. At least they're all 60 in. wide! G Street Fabrics 11854 Rockville Pike Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 231-8998

fan

Yarn cies Alice Starmore's "Flying Birds" Lace pullover is made from Rowan's "Edina Ronay Wool and Silk," a luxurious 50/50 blend of botany wool and mulberry silk; it comes in 18 colors. A 20g ball 82 yds., and sells for $8.15 each; you'll need about 20 to make the sweater. An alternate yarn is Rowan's "Cabled Mercerized

=

Cotton," 32 colors, 50g ball 201 yds., for $7.70; you'll need nine balls. To find a nearby supplier, contact Westminster ing Carp. , 5 Northern Blvd., erst, NH 03031. T to Fac is a mail-order source for all Rowan yarns. In the British Isles, lace is traditionally knit from Shetland wool. The Tomato Factory is a source for the McCoy: Jamieson Smith's 2-ply Laceweight 100% Shetland Wool (1 oz. hank = 252 yds., $3.60 each) comes in 70 COlOl"S, for #0 to #3 needles. To really duplicate Eileen Summerville's handspun yarns, you'd have to spin them yourself. If you'd rather j ust knit, try an all-angora yarn. Two that will come close to Eileen's 4 % stitches­ per-inch gauge are Bru k's Brigitta (lOg 30 yds., $8.35), and Plymauth's Pure Angora (lOg 33 yds., $8.50). From sic Elite, try Fame, a silk/rayon blend (50g 116 yds., $5.95) that is similar to Eileen's cotton and rayon mix.

=

Trad

The ama

tmy

Amh

real

&

=Clas = nswic =

Tomato Factory Yarn Co. 8 Church St. Lambertville, NJ 08530 (609) 397-3475 Plymouth Yarns, Inc. PO Box 28 Bristol, PA 19007 Brunswick Yarns Pickens, SC 29671 Classic Elite Yarns, Inc. 12 Perkins St. Lowell, 01854

MA

Apron accessories Appropriate laces for the hem of a Czechoslovakian apron are all cotton, about 2 in. wide, and not too delicate. Heirlo by Emily canies a good selection of suitable lace from England; their catalog is $2.50. Liz Capozzi does all her embroidery with widely available DMC #8 Perle Cotton, on 90-yd. balls; a mail-order source for anything by DMC is Craft Gallery.

oms

Heirlooms by Emily RD 1, Box 190 Myers Road Glen Rock, PA 17327 (717) 235-0466 Craft Gallery PO Box 145 Swampscott, 01907 (508) 744-2334

MA

David Page Coffin is an associate editor of Threads.

hreads Magazine

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� '

==

Shmv�

We've gotten a good deal of feedback from you on the question of a Threads design contest. And we've thought hard about your comments, reservations, and your mostly overwhelming enthusiasm. We want to provide a showcase for your work. We'd like to publish what you're most proud of, what you'd like to share with your fellow readers. And we want to bring you plenty of inspiration and the best ideas about garmentmaking to be found. So, here's what we're going to do. To celebrate our 5th anniversary, we invite you each to submit ne garment that you have made for possible inclusion in Thr . We also invite you to submit the design (if it is original) for possible publication as a Threads pattern. We must receive your entry no later than February 1 , 1991 .

o

eads

I end

Wha t kind of entry can s ? We're looking for any sort of garment­ from lingerie to outerwear or accessories. It may fashioned from any rial using any sort of entm g technique or techniques, but it must be w eara ble. Your garment may be a completely

be

garm

akin

mate

original design; it may be made in collaboration with another designer or maker; it may be your adaptation of a commercial pattern or design; or it may be made following a commercial pattern, as long as you've added something extra, to make it your own: you've woven, dyed, spun, printed, embroidered, or otherwise created the fabric or you've added your own finishing details. Your garment must have been made in the last two years and must have never before been published. How do

I

enter?

Please fill in the form below. Tell us what, specifically, makes your garment satisfying to you. Describe any original details and/or fabric characteristics you deem noteworthy. Include the source of your design inspiration, the materials incorporated (type, fiber content, etc.), and the techniques employed (sewing, knitting, knotting, dyeing, etc.). If you worked from a commercial pattern , tell us which one. Attach additional pages and sketches if you wish. If you are submitting the garment for pattern consideration, include a schematic

drawing of the pattern pieces. Send us three color photos of your garment. Well want to see the front, the back, and a detail. One of the photos should show your garment on a person­ choose someone who wears it well. Print your name and ad in pencil on the back of every photo. Please rwt send the garment at this time. Be sure to sign the publication release form. We will not re your pictures unless you send a stamped, self-addressed padded envelope.

dress

do

turn

you

teria

Wha t will do with the ma l? We cannot present everyone's work, but we'll do our best to present the variety, the depth, the quality, and the vision of your work in Threads magazine. If we need to borrow your garment to rephotograph in our studio, we'll do so at our expense. But please don't send the garment unless we ask for it. If we publish a pattern from your original design, we will need from you at that time a full-size pattern, the loan of the garment, and construction information. So please, fill out the form, send it in, and good luck. This is going to be fun.

Make a copy of this page and mail your entry blank and three photos to: R ERS' SHOWCASE . PO Box Ne , C

Threads EAD

5506 . wtown T 06470

Threads

M A G A Z I N F. Name

Readers' Showcase Marenrus

___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________

Address

Phone

Techniques

Description of garment

oThreads

(Attach additional pages if necessary)

Check here if you have an onginal design that you want considered as a

Design source

___________________________________________ #, ________________________________

Patrern co. and

84

if applicable

_

patrern. (Please include schematic drawing.)

Publication release form: By sending in this marenal, I am granting to the Tatlnton Press first time nghts to use this marenal in

Threads

magazine; the nghts to repnnt the marenal in an

anthology; and the nght to use the marenal in promotional marenals. All other nghts are reserved by me.

Your signature

Dare

____ __ __ __ __ _ Threads Magazin e


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==

�Boo�

Here are some of the more interesting books to come our way. You can usually order books through your local bookstore without having to pay a service fee. Addresses are provided if you would like to order a book directly from the publisher.

publications in the Collezioni series

1989; hardcover, $34.95; 158 pp.) is an

include issues on ready-to-wear,

excellent book entirely devoted to an

accessories, fabrics, children's wear,

often neglected stitch category. Musk

and menswear.

- Claire B. Shaeffer

covers the slipstitch much more thoroughly, and with far more creative

hoes

S

examples, than any compendium. This

Books on shoes are rare, but during the

book should be of interest to both the

past year two shoe books were published.

novice and advanced knitter. The

Couture for seamstresses

Colin McDowell's Shoes (Rizzoli

explanations are suitable for any Japanese

It seems like only yesterday that

International Pub . , Inc. , 300 Park Ave .

punchcard or electronic machine, as

pessimists were predicting the demise of

South, New York,

well as Passap .

haute couture. Couture is not only alive

hardcover, $50; 224 pp.), covers the

and well, but continues to influence the

broadest span of time, from Roman

instructions for

wardrobes of ordinary mortals like us,

mythology to the present, and is the

and mosaic designs; and braids,

richest for general readership. The

ruffles. Heavily te

via dressmakers and designers who

turn

to

NY

10010; 1989;

Single-bed techniques include

Fair xtured

Isle; multicolored maze

trims,

and

fabrics made with

high fashion magazines for ideas. Two of

plentiful illustrations (drawn from prints,

bubble, ripple, blister, or ruched stitches

these magazines, Haute Couture

posters, sculpture, paintings) and

are covered,

Collections and Collezioni Donna­ Haute Couture, are ideal references

photos offer us a wealth of information on

fabrics. Bac

because of their superb sharp, no­

people's lives. Citing examples from

nonsense color photography and little or

folktales, literature, music, art, and

excellent chapter discusses slip combined

no advertising. Both pUblications, which

history, McDowell touches upon the

with other stitches.

could be considered books, focus on the

connection between shoes and the

couture collections shown each January

human psyche . The book contains

the roles footwear has played in

as well as double-bed jacquard

kings, using a color changer, and preparing a punch card are all discussed

uard

along with jacq

variations. Another

The last section includes automatic shaping, sideways knitting, and

and July. Their photos, shot at the runway

excellent chapters on show business

instructions for knitting projects shown

shows, are large; and most garment

and recreational footwear, and on

throughout the book.

details are

designers and the development of style.

easy

to see, even when the fabric

is black. In fact, you see more in the photos than you would at the shows.

Haute Couture Collections (GAP JAPAN Co. Ltd., distributed by North Light Books, 1507 Dana Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45207; 800-289-0963; 1990; softcover, $59.95; 292 pp.) is a new, large-format publication (10 in. X 14 in.) that features in-depth coverage of couturiers who show in Paris. The premiere Spring'Summer '90 issue, with shots from 21 French couture houses, included designs from Per Spook, Torrente, Lecoanet Hemant, and Serge Lepage ­ houses that are usually ignored by the fashion press. It has no advertisements. GAP also publishes other "books" that cover the ready-to-wear collections in Tokyo, New York, Paris, and London.

Collezioni Donna-Haute Couture is an Italian publication (Zanfi Editori, distributed by Overseas Publishers Representatives, 1328 Broadway, New York, 10001; U.S. number for orders 800-666-MAGS; softcover, $50) . The Spring'Summer '90 issue (352 pp.) covered 12 Italian and 19 French couture houses. I particularly enjoyed the section on Italian couture houses such as Lancetti, Mila Schon, and Andre Laug. Collezioni does have some advertising, but it is concentrated at the front and back of the book. Other semi-annual

NY

86

- Carolyn Dadisman

The main value of Mary Trasko's

Quilting tips and samp

Heavenly Soles (Cross River Press, distributed by Abbeville Press, 488 Madison Ave . , New York, 10022; 1989; hardcover, $29.95; 131 pp.) is its photo collection of extraordinary shoes from the 20th century; as an added bonus, she identifies where each of the shoes can be located. The book's main weakness is its unbalanced presentation of the period covered and its lack of accuracy. Roger Vivier's designs, for example, are represented by more than twice as many photos as the runner-up, Salvatore Ferragamo. Some important deSigners are relegated to half a sentence in passing. The shoes of the Victorian Era can hardly be described as "unisex," and to state that "the maj ority of shoes in the Western world were not differentiated left from right" until the second half of the 19th century ignores most shoes of the Western world made before 1600 A.D. Trasko does, however, offer us a glimpse into the lives of some designers, a bibliography, and some useful references. - Gaza Bowen

I have always been a fan of household

NY

Slipstitch

lers

gadgets and tricks, so it was with both awe and apprehension that I approached Ami Simm's new book, Every Trick

in

the Book (Mallery Press, 4206 Sheraton Drive , Flint, MI 48532; 1990; softcover, $7.95; 149 pp.): awe , that I might find solutions to the quilting hazards so near and dear to me; and apprehension that having found a great tip, I would be unable to find it again. I need not have feared. Even the most disorganized quilter will find a tip easy to locate because Simms organized her material using the order of the quilting process itself, and backed it up with a comprehensive index. This book contains a wealth of ideas gleaned from quilters across the country. The ideas are presented concisely, with diagrams as required to ensure complete understanding. It is a welcome addition to the quilting library, and will augment the collection of other needleworkers as well. The

Sam

pler Quilt Wo

rkboo

k by

machine knitting

English quilter Dinah Travis (St. Martin's

tting

10010; 1990; softcover, $ 15.95; 96 pp.) is

The first of its kind to my knowledge , Machine Kni : The Technique of Slipstitch by Denise Musk (B. T. Batsford, Ltd., distributed by David Charles, Inc. , North Pomfret, 05053;

VT

&

Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York,

NY

a drafting workbook for quilters at all levels of experience. As the title suggests, the series of 24

Throods Magaz

ine


FREE SAM PLE COpy Send today for a free sample copy of 'TEXTILE FIBRE FORUM' magazine, published for ten years, and giving quality coverage to textiles in Australia/New Zealand and the Pacific Subscribe today! - $20.95 $39.95 (2 $ 26 $49.50 (2

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We offer the Romney fleece in a number of natural shades, ranging from dark brown through to white. The Coopworth and Perendale fleeces are avoilable in white only, Packed in Ib lots our beautiful white or naturally shaded wool costs the same per pound as follows: per Ib for Ibs or more per Ib for 1 2-48 1bs per Ib for Ibs

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magazine appears three times a year; each issue is 60 pages long_ Glossy and colourful. this is a beautiful publication with contemporary works, some instruction, historical articles, regular columns; covers all the textile arts Uor example, basketry, papermaking, lace, weaving, surface design, and much more).

Join the once-in-a-lifetime

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Bound in dark green and embossed gold, each case holds at least six issues of (a year's worth), and costs $7.95 ($2 1 .95 for 3, $39.95 for 6)Add $1.00 per case for postage and handling. Outside the U.S., add $2.50 each (U.S. funds only). PA residents add 6% sales

Threads

tax.

Send your order and payment to the address below, or toll-free, 1-800-972-5858, and use your credit ( um $15).

call

card

minim

Jesse Jones Industries Dept. THD 499 E. Erie Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19134.

STITCHED TEXTILES TOUR TO ENGLAND

Explore the world 's most breathtaking embroidery in the company of leading designers, collectors, and teachers on this 13-day tour based in London Highlights include_'

Studying with world-famous artists and collectors including Kaffe Fassett, Richard Box, Jan Beaney, Jean Littlejohn, Diana Springall

• • •

Meeting the distinguished Constance Howard at her special retrospective exhibition VLSiting the Royal School of Needlework, the London College of Fashion, and the Victoria and Albert Museum Dining with members of the renowned 62 Group

Depart January 3, 1991, for the embroidery tour of your dreams. (Limited to 25 guests)

For full details and a brochure, call Liz Jackson/Rowan Iravel, 2 Old Lyme Road, Pittsford, 14534,- 1-800/447-6926 (toll-free in the US. and Canada)

NY

THE ROWAN TRAVEL COMPANY

December 1990/January 1991

87


==

Boo�

Textile dyeing

blocks presented, including the Friendship Knot, Rose of Sharon, and Mariner's Compass, can be combined to make a sampler quilt. Excellent graphics demystify block drafting, and are complemented by piecing instructions. Full-page color studies expand the quilter's exploration of each pattern family. Actual patternmaking is left to the reader, but following the instructions will result in accurate templates.

- Constance Rathfon

Jane Aus

ten quilt pattern

Many of you wrote to us requesting the pattern for Jane Austen's quilt (see Threads, No. 20, p. 18). We are happy to say that one has been published in Lynette-Merlin Syrne's book, LeaITl Patchwork (Sterling Publishing Co. , Inc., 387 Park Ave. South, New York, 10016; 1990; softcover, $ 7.95; 64 pp.). Those who buy this book for the pattern (pages 36 and 37) will also enjoy the other quilting projects­ manipulations of hexagons, squares, rectangles, and non-geometric shapes. -Amy T. Yanagi

NY

Sas hilw pa

ttern drafting

Quil

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IRONS

VISA

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Shaeffer'S article on lapels starts on page 44; shoe artist Bowen lives in Santa Cruz, CA; Dadisman is a partner in Seadad Studios in NYC; Rathfon is a quilter and a chemical engineer in Astoria, OR; and Yanagi is managing editor of Threads.

The title of Japanese Country ting: Sashiko Patterns and Projects for Be ers (by Karen Kim Matsunaga; Kodansha International, 114

I l 9140 · 14 Ililch, I Ilep Button Hole While 8910 Computer lome �king 990 VX910/940/950 30 Ihleh, II"honic Rood OUI Il 803 Sergemole 3003·Threod Serger

SINGER MACHINES/ SERGERS

Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011; 1990; softcover, $ 14.95; 95 pp.) could have stopped after the word "patterns." This book's value lies in its instructions for drafting 52 sashilw patterns. The presentation of the stitching instructions and selection of projects-wrapping cloth, door curtains, floor cushions­ assume prior appreciation of Japanese sewing aesthetics and household furnishings, and are more appropriate for the embroiderer who has already taken a class in the Japanese -A. T. Y. embroidery technique.

It's hard to imagine what David and Paula Cohen might have possibly left out of their warm and friendly guide, Marb ling on Fabric (Interweave Press, 306 N. Washington Ave . , Loveland, CO 80537; 1990; softcover, $12.95; 94 pp.). Within an hour, the Cohens have the novice marbler ready to construct a frame from readily available materials; to order a non-toxic carrageenan medium; and to select paints and fabric. Color photographs of eleven basic marbling patterns, each with a thoughtful process drawing, serve as quick and efficient starting points for your own designs. The instructions for marbling different surfaces-pillow covers, tennis shoes, sweatshirts, note cards, kimono yardage-are thorough, as are the short sections on tips, teaching, -A. T.Y and suppliers.

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Two knitted lace projects from

new

Patterns ...

Alice Korach's intricate lace shawl 771reads

(shown at right) was featured on the cover of # 1 1 . Worked in the traditional Shetland manner, it is a generous 60 in. square. offer this

pattern in response to many reader requests.

A

scoop-neck sweater

We

(below left) with a new and unique pattern motif created by especially for Knit this allover lace design in silk and wool, or cotton. One size fits sizes 34 to 38.

Alice Starmore

Threads.

Pattern stitches for both projects are charted for ease of reading. Stitch techniques are explained in drawings. Recommended for intermediate to advanced knitters. Each $4.25.

Also

Available:

Susan Guagliumi's Woven Cable Cardigan for hand or maehine lmitters (from Threads #29) $4.25 Deborah Newton's Sleigh-Ride Gloves (from Threads #14) $4.50

Jean Baker "Vhite's Aran Sweater (from Threads #23) $3.75

Laee Shawl

Name

#031008

Scoop-Neck Sweater

Address

#031007

Woven Cable Cardigan (Hand¡knit)

City State

Zip

Please make checks payable to: December 1990/January 1991

cr

#031006 #031005

$4.25 $4.25

Woven Cable Cardigan (Machine¡knit)

$4.2 5

Aran Sweater

$3.75

#031003 #031002

Sleigh-Ride Gloves

The Taunton Press

63 S. Main St. , Box 5506 Newtown, 06470-5506

$4.2 5

(U.S. funds, please)

$4.5 0

,, - - -_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.J, 89


=Index,

Threaffi 253 2 A 46-4 teclll1i rdigaI tting

heil'loom-sewing 27:

Abbott, Deborah, on Imit-and­ woven galments, 26:64-67

31:26

Boots, Inuit, 27:58,60,62-63

from Ille North Pacific, 26:22 paclting for tr'ansit, 31:14

on ca

cling

Bryant, Narley, on gra

Amat�ti, 27:58-63

se\ving pattenl8, 29:58-63

Animals:

urda lnaga m'ks

B

Applique: finis

of, by machine, 26:32

in

25:80

B

on se\ving-machine

on se\ving notions, 25:6 , 30:10

27:72-73

B

Banes, Helen, fiber jewehy of, 27:30-34,100

, for, 29:100; 31:72-73

books, 30:16

_

, Deborah, on Designed to Wear

1990, 32:78-79 books on, 26:86

tringi twes

valti aIl apron, 32:76-77

rlting

Card

25:4,9; 30:41

.;;cal e mannequins, 31:78-81

, 26:68-71; 28:6 t,

Bel'SOn, RullI, on Amish quilt show, 30:72-73

dings Do see dging

Bin

,

E

g, 28:86

lmet, Valerie, on North

Cheny, Julie, on combining wovens and lmits, 26:66,67

king

custom )Xltterruna

d, 30:10

Cotmte'l)ane squares, 25:8 co

, bincling of, 31:14

CTOchet:

buttons, 27:39 hruuor, 32:106 and knitting, neeclJe for, 31:10 \villI mbberbands, 25:100

m

, full-size, 30:36;

one-third scale, 31:82-84

Drower,

on mail order from

Britain, 30:78-80

Clark, uree exhiures

n , Imit suit by, 27:72-73

Clos

:

button-fly, 28:62 for necklaces, 27:33

as

art

D

Daclisman, Carolyn, on BTOther CK-35 lmitting machine, 30:20 Danielson, Eslller, on weaving, 28:84,86 Darts: in Al1uani jackets, 30:29 elimiuating, on sleeves,

to wear, 25:50-51; 32:78-79

ted fabrics and yanl8,

to match swatch, 27:6; 28:10 see Slllface design. Lincla, on knitting book,

29:86

E

Edgings:

of bias tape, 26:32,33; 27:66,67

Hong Kong finish, 26:32 lace, 27:46-49 leall�er, 31:37 for plackets, 29:43

Edra

os, Patricia Tongue,

on Greek knitting, 30:51

Elliott, Mary C.: on Bonnie Cashin, 31:32-37 on N0111lan NOl-ell, 25:27-31 Ellman, Nonua, on knit hats, 25:32-35 EmbroidelY Guild of Amelica, 25:14,16 Embroidery: applique, 28:56-57

Czechoslovaltian aproll8, 32:74-77

Czechoslovakian aprons, 32:74-77

books on, 28:84; 32:86

book on sashilw, 32:86

hot lmife, 25:52-53,55

Ci1lcebox, Helene, on

Festival, 32:26

Cutting tools: rotaly cutters, 25:6,42

25:56-57

le, 31:79

ng, h

Cuffs, on Dior jacket, 27:26,27

Clille, embroidery workshops in, 25:58-61

Clothing: for, 25:62-67

tln-ea er'ecl rding

Cllouinald, Yvon, Patagonia founder,

for outdoor wear, 25:56,57

for Imitting, 30:30-33 Blouses:

inni1l

, I{aren, on Sp

for cardigall8, 27:39

s

rolllY, on combining colors

source for str-etch fablic, 30:10

books on, 26:84, 86

bition, 31:26

on vests, 29:50-53 Bias strips for quilts, 27:52,53

malting, 26:4

for pillows, 28:27-30

aids for counting, 26:12

Clausen, Valerie, on shoemaking

pants video, 26:24,26

CostInue Society of America,

Cov

for, 29:8

, humor, 27:98

Ma

Betzina, Sandra:

books on, 27:78,80

source for

Pacific clollling, 26:22

Bero, Mary, small-scale te Jl.1;iJ e 26:26

t, pattem for, 31:insert

Ul"Ces

C

quilting, 30:68-71

29:16,18

Cotton:

se\ving, 32:60-64

Cha

Berli11 embroidery c

'88,

design techniques for, 30:34-37

coa

ni1lg haseUSSO

sh Nine Patch

Convergence Costunle:

from GIlizhou, Cllina, 29:74-75

Cashill, Bomue:

ca

Ami haris artis

programs for, 29:8; 31:24 for quilts, 29:54-57

meeting on, 28:22

slipcovers for, maldng, 25:22-26

fiber necklaces, 27:30-34 Bender, Sue, on

Computer design:

convention on, 27:14

Cllail'S:

of, 30:39

lTI1S :

26:24

Can', Roberta:

yarn SO

Beau clry , Susan Pence, on

Dress fo

coo

collections of, 25:10

Noh

\villl,

scale, 31:78-81

Duffey, JudillI, on Textile AIis

Carow, Barbara, on dyeillg, 28:84

CasIDuere:

ng, 26:49

s

Color:

Th1'l,ads, 31:86; 32:84

fablic som'Ces for, 32:82

supplies for wo

half-

rclina Dyett, also

videos by, 25:12,14

needleweaving \villI, 27:32-33

ani jacket, 30:27

on, 28:66-67

a Czechoslo

ClOtl1i1lg willI, 30:38-42

on

on full-scale, 30:34-37

in quilting, 27:50-53

designs of, 31:32-37

hilIg

Aml

Competitions:

Capozzi, ElizabellI Borovicka, on stitcl1i11g

from Britain, mail-order, 30:80

pleater, 26:50-55 Draping:

Dyeing:

Caplinger, Mary Anne, on

sources for, 26:57; 27:4; 28:6

knit, 32:16 Douglas, Sarah, on Ille smoclting

in lmittiug, 28:36-39; 30:30-33

on half

using, 26:59; 27:67

for, 31:24 collectiOll8 of, 25:10,12; 29:100

from staghom, making, 26:8

c

Batting:

bool, and pattems on clollIes

in strip piecing, using, 25:41

on pillOWS, 28:27-30 , 26:6

video on, 29:84

Dolls:

restoling, 27:12

prehistoriC, 26:20

rratum

Slut by, 27:24-29

for, 29:8

llal'S :

on kimono, 32:41,43

coiled, 25:36-38

embellis

on yam eqluvalences, 26:8

museum collection of, 26:100

weaving, see Weaving

Baskets:

videos, 25:74 Dior, Cluistian:

mo

on

air-blushing fablic, 31:67-71

Bany

Dielinger, Beverly, on neeclJepoint

cliJYing alf-sca odifyi SOUl"Ces Sam,

Co

Campbell, Sophie, quilting teacher, 27:16

Bames, MalY Galpin, on alteration

a , on

32:52-53

on spling 1990 fablics,

matchilrg to fabric, 27:10 parts for making, 28:8

ia, on Failfield

Fashion Show, 25:50-51

Diamond,

half-scale, 31:78-81

on welt pockets, 32:54-56

crocheted, 27:38,39

tral ia, fashion exhibition in,

ese symbolS for

sewn garments, 30:62-63

on se\ving videos, 25:12,14 28:80-82

from Blitain, mail-order, 30:80

by, 25:6

source for malting, e

embroidery, 31:74-77

Buttoll8:

Atwater, Mary Meigs, weaving book

Beads:

attachments, 26:8 on sewing-machine

ures

America program, 26:26

show on, 30:16

on se\ving book, 25:12

by machine, 26:60-63

Protis, about, 29:16

Bird,

on rotaly cuttel'S, 25:6

zine, 25:14

, Jean M., on Shaker sweatel'S,

loop enclos

A1pille1"O,s, Chilean, 25:60-61

ll1i11g

on quilting fabrics, 26:24

knit, 27:38,39

i , Giorgio,jacket by, 30:24

Barbie doll, clo

on No-Ft'aY, 26:24

25:30,31

one-piece, pattem for, 32:14

e, 27:18

Cllin Ann ito-rnm'i,

Deval, Jean, on

on neckties,,27:40-43

handworked, of Nomlan Norell,

Annan Art Arts

27:84

on Mini BlUte

32:22

, 31:14

31:66

on mail-order

Buttonholes:

Czechoslovakian, 32:74-77

, quilt by, 25:12

:

on KOO8 van den Akker, 26:28-33

Business, books on, 26:86

Apron:

exhibit, 27:72-73

on custom-<:\yeillg, 27:6

25:10,12

on Imit sweaters, 29:64-68

de Teliga, Jane, on AustI'alian fashion

Jackets

Coffin, David

g

slipcovel'S, 25:22-26

rt

Coclu'a also Pageurcl1 fur, SOlll'Ces , sewilrg maclIin

Buck, Diane D., on doll museum,

embroidered, 25:61

90

ting techniques, 30:48-54

knit

bordel'S, 27:35-39

9

Siberian, 26:22

see

mvin

de Soto, Donna, on maldng

inse44-4

quilted, 25:50-51

on fake

Brown-Reinsel, BellI, on etlInic

Allen, Pam, on knitting cardigan

irgin

on blueplinting a photo

onto fabric, 32:51

patchwork quilts, 26:39-43

AvelY, V

Tafi,

America, 27:20

DePriest, Kerclene, on s

on buttonholes, 26:63

by machine, 29:37-39 Brown,

31:62-66

n, JaIle B

Brock, Charlotte, on intarsia knittilIg

and libbon dress, 29:20

flU',

knit, clrop-shouider, 25:

trali an

convention, 31:22,24

techniques, 30:34-37

e collector, 25:10

Allen, Nomla Braclley, on pioneer

Aus

fal,e

Davis, Virginia, on Te Jl.1;iJ e Society of

casllinel-e, 32:60-64

Noh, pattem for, 31:

Brennan, Naney, on costume design

eiteA1;iJ

eans

for rugs and quilts, 27:10

kilrg

Allen, Kendra, on paperclip, tape,

j

Coats:

Braclley, Charmaine, on tapestry

smoc

AlclIich, Luey TrtU11an,

hing eclges A1pille 1"O,s,

, 27:35-39

l8, kni

Brandau, JuclillI, on Aus

fabric for quilting, 32:48-51 Airbrushing, see Surface design

for tee-shilis, 25:64

construction, exhibit on,28:74-75

collages, 28:56-57

Aclleman, Carol, on blueplinting

costmn

collagecl, 26:28-33

ques for,

9

Border'S:

Adams, Monni, on Afiican weaving, 27:80 Aclams, Renie Breskin, embroidery by,

==

25:28,29

books on, 26:4 chalis for, 26:68-71; 28:6 Chilean, 25:58-61 C7�hoslovaltian, on aprons, 32:74-77 exhibition of Saucli Arabian, 28:18 guild for, 25:14,16 of

ito"Yltm'i,

32:52-53

on knitting, 27:69-70 by machine, 29:46-49; 31:74-77 Needle

EJI.,])ress ions '90,

31:26 shadow, 25:6

hreads Magazine

T


eaJl1l

Englehart, J

e, on Angell1eart

designs, 32:30-35 Englehart, Matthew, on Angelheart designs, 32:32 28:68-73

yarns,'TIleI'eSa, rfinkl

Gaffey,

on Fall 1989 knitting

26:80,82

iling

Ericson, Diane, on stenc

G

Galloway, Steven and

,

27:72-73

Evans, Keny, on Silk for Life project,

Lee, dr'ess

e, Stanley, on Le Theatre de

Ga

Gathers:

Exercise wear, 29:26-29

in heil'loom-sewn gamlents,

F

27:49 by ma

e, 32:66

Gelfand, Verena F.:

antique, source lor, 32:6

on In Stitches show, 30:14,16

for cold-weather gear,

on prehistoric textiles, 26:20 Gienger, Ellen, on exercise wear,

25:52,56-57; 27:4,59,61 collages, 26:28-33 designing with more 26:12

tban

29:26-29 one,

25:16

25:6

quilted collection of, 26:24

Greenbawn, Frances, on weaving, humor, 28:98

rubber-stamped, 27:64-67

Guagliumi, Susan:

29:78,80

Fran

cisco,

on bead stringing, 26:49

tting-

on kni

25:74

for Spring 1990, 28:80-82 testing for fiber content, 26:8

machine videos,

on macJline knitting cabled

testing for washability of, 25:8

bands and cords, 27:44-45

used by Norman Nor'ell, 25:29

on R. Brown Tex1iles, 26:24

see also specific fabrics Faiola, Linda, on skirt pleats, 30:43-47 Failfield Fashion Show, 25:50-51 Fanning, Robbie: on buttonholes, 26:60-63 on computer sewing machines, 32:20

wing

32:20 on sergers'

machines,

diff erential feed,

on sewing notions, 28:18,20 Fashion Before the Deluge: Parisi Vienna 1900-1914, exhibit,

Hamilton, Virginia, on competing, Harper, Rochelle, on fleece-lil1ed Hats: books on making, 29:84 lmit, 25:32-35

72-73 show on Le Theatre de Mode, 31:82-84

1.1

shows, Fairfield Fashion, 25:50-51 'TIlirties, show on, 32:22 Felting, for chilcu'en's jackets,

27:24-29

Fiol, Magcla, embroideroo work by, 25:59 Fischer, Josef,

dr'eSS l'ugh

by, 25:69

Fisher, Rosie, quiltmaker, 26:40-41

Fitz, Comlie, on

ooking, 31:28

Rebecca Speakes, 27:50-53 Fogel, Susan Iilindienst, se,ving,

25:27-31

see

Seams

van den Akker, K OO8 , designs and techniques of 26:28-33 videos on, 25:12; 29:84

usan

Hay, S

Anderson, on RISD

costmnes and textiles, 25:10 machine technique, 32:65-67

dr'eSSes Lyrm

tting

, 27:10

Hendry, Diane, design assistant to KOO8 van den Akker, 26:31,33;

Hoffinann, Josef, Vienna WorllShop founder, 25:69 Home

sources for, 31:66

Fouche, Shennane, on pocket welts, 32:55

funli

shings:

books on, 30:82; 31:6 chairs,

can ed, humor, 27:98

pillows, 28:27-30; 30:4

Freimark, Bob, tapestry by, 29:16

slipcovers, 25:22-26

Frommer, D. W., II, boot by, 31:26

valances, 28:12

Fuku,

Norum, on

baskets, 30:16

Ed

Rossbach

Futons, makllg, 26:56-59

December 1990/Jauumy 1991

26:64-67

rlJ3ll

counte

27:58-63

decreases, better SSK, 28:12

knitting, 28:63-65

rm13 lto�ari,

Hong Kong finish, 26:32 Horton, Roberta, designer of quilt fabrics, 26:24

e squares, making

items \vith, 25:8 decreases lor cuffs, 26:14

thillg

n, Betty, on Arctic clo

27:58-63

,

32:52-53

on double-pointed needles, 31:45 duplicate stitch, 29:68 ethnic styles of, 30:48-51 gadget organizer for, 27 :12 garment sections, 25:32-35,46-48

fti11g

gra

, 25:48; 31:44; 32:38

hexagonal shapes, 25:32-35 humor, 29:98

Jackets:

I-cord, 25:47,48

by Annani, 30:24-29

Impr'eSSionistic, 28:36-39

bolero, 25:30

intarsia, 29:68; 31:56-61 invisible cast-on, 25:33-34 garo , 32:44

joining to fabric edges, 26:12; 29:35

by Yves Saint Laurent, 32:44-46

knitting-in ends, 3:60

hand-felted, for kids, 30:52-56

Kitchner stitch, 25:48; 32:38

Inuit, 27:58-63

lace, Catalan, 29:31-35

pattem for

see

Ange

llieart, 32:32

also Coats

lace, charting, 32:68-73 left-handed, 28:63-65

James, Kathy, on handweaving neckties, 27:43

mail-order SO

LU'C es for, 27:84

for Navy Relief Auxiliary,

Jasper, Jann:

28:20

on hat book, 29:84 , 25:76,78

from needlework gmphs, 26:72-75 Norwegian style, 25:44-49

on pants, 26:34-38

picking up stitches, 27:37

on pleating, 27:6; 31:47-51

plaited ribbing, 28:38

on sleeves, 28:52-55

proportion in patterns for, 30:57-61

cardwoven, 31:52-55

socks, 31:42-46

necklaces, woven, 27:30-34,100

stitch markers for, 27:12

embroidered tapestry, 29:46-49

supplies for, 25:4; 28:39; 31:61 teaching children, 32:26 t\vo-stitch cables, 28:45-47;

K

30:4 t\vo-strand Swedish, 26:44-48; 27:68-71

I{ane, Marie Louise, on sewing video, 28:84

Turkish patterns, 25:44-49 unmveling, 26:98

Kelly, Mary B., on R

Knitting, machine: Brother Knit\vear Competition, 30:18

sweaters, 29:64-68 uss ian batik

artists, 31:22

bool{S and magazines on, 26:84,86; 31:10; 32:84

Kennedy, Alan, on Intenmtional Conference on Oriental Carpets, 30:14 Kennedy, Sandrn, on making a Nine Patch Quilt, 30:71

Hillestad, Carol, on cJlair caning, Hofer, Anton, cape by, 25:69

with, 31:62-66

combined with woven fabric,

securmg fusible, 32:16

Keele, Wendy, on knitting childr'en's

se\ving \vith, 32:58-59 fake:

starting, 32:6

e, on computer design

on pants, fi

31:17

on Dior suit, 27:25

Heller,

se'ving caribou, 27:58-63

Fur,smving

prevention of t\visting,

I{arge, Lucia, hwnor, 32:106

with ruftles, 27:12

26:46; 27:12; 32:38 choosing colors for, 30:30-33

ds, 30:64-67

, prehistoric, 26:20

for quilts, 29:54-57

castron methods, 25:33-34;

tban

for couttU'e wais

, 27:35-39

weet en, 26:22,24

cil'Cular:

Head

humor, 27:98

sources for, 62:59

g fabric, 31:38-41

Interracing:

Johanson, Rosita, on machine­

27:6

humor, 31:114 French seams,

Fur:

Norell, Nonnan, techniques of,

Hems:

Fitzgerald, Diane, on puzzle quilts of

25:62-87

,

Jewehy:

Hazen, Gale Gligg, on se\ving­

30:52-56

nnnaking

, Rosemary, on patte

Ul"Ces

exhibit on, 31:82-84

exhibitions, 25:68-69; 27:18,

Inghanl Inlayin

resO

ani, Giorgio, jacket

gans

camp for, in S

on New York City culttrral

HauteAnncoutUt'e:

books on, 26:84; 28:84; 29:84; 30:82; 32:86

Ingall, Annabel, dr'eSS and hat by,

fleece-lil1ed, 25:52-57

Dior, Christian, techniques of,

Fashion:

30:82; 31:45; 31:96

by Emanuel Un

techniques of, 30:24-29

25:68-69

sweaters, 29:64-68

borders for cardi

Gustafson, Paula, on knitting, 28:86

jacket, making, 25:52-55

27:8

animals for childr'en's

books on, 26:84; 28:86; 29:86;

by Dial', 27:24-29

28:66

review of se

I J

Gussets, in pants, 27:56,57

H

et, needle for, 31:10

bind-off methods, 29:35

Isse

reference book for, 25:12 sources for in San

ni jackets,

Ireland, Robin, on left-handed

26:74; 31:61

French, 28:18

30:24,29

Inuit, sewing techniques of,

Graph paper, SOUl'Ces for kn itting,

for Fall, 1990, 31:90,92

Anna

and se\ving, show on, 31:24

25:36-38

]X>C kets, 25:49

rocl1

on sheer fabrics, 26:14

Golson, Julia, on shadow embroidery,

26:12 exhibition of 18th century

and c

for neckties, 27:41,42

Gilun, Maria Maza, Mayan weaver, Gloves, see Mittens,

device for marking on,

on basket coiling,

Lissa,

27:72-73

cllin

in sleeves, 25:67

Fabric:

adding

Hunter,

Hyde, Ann, on by,

la Mode, 31:84

28:20,22

Houston Quilt Festival, 25:50-51

Kesting, Piney:

cabled bands and cords on, 27:44-45 intarsia, 29:36-39 isolation lace on, 26:14 mail-order source for, 27:84

on costtune book, 27:78

patterns for, dr'a\ving, 27:10

on Saudi Arabian embroidery

punch cards for, fixing enors

exhibit, 28:18 Kimono: book on, 30:82

w'ces

fabric so

for, 32:82

making, 32:39-43 KIupfell, Molly, on antique purse

ecting

coll

, 29:20,22

KetchaI11 , Jennifer, costtune-award winner, 27:14 Knit fabrics, seams in, 32:60-64

tting

Kni

in, 25:8 videos on, 25:74; 31:10

, hand:

,vaste

yam

from, using, 27:12

Komch, Alice:

lIS,

on fiber-arts boo

26:84,86; 30:82-84 on fitting socks, 31:46 on knitting book, 28:86 on knitting on double-pointed needles, 31:45 on left-handed knitting, 28:65

91


=Index,

Threads 25-32 Mayo, Robin, on se\ving fur and

on propOItion in Imitting

leather mittens, 32:58-59

patterns, 30:57-61

McFadden, Dolly, on Le TheatJ'C de la

on stranded lmitting, 30:33

molus

of, 26:76-77

Anlish Nine Patch, 30:68-71 books on, 26:86; 30:84; 32:86,88

Textile

bomers for, 27:10

Arts Arts

Centre, 32:22

Age ncy's

McMahan, Gl'Cg, on patiern book,

26:26

31:96

L

Labels, technique for, 30:10

Meza Gil'lJll, Maria, Mayan weaver, 25:16

Lace:

Mintzer, Arlene, iInp

mgra

America p

on clothing, 25:50-51 m,

conferences on, 25:12 exhibits, 25:12; 30:16; 31:26; 32:24

McPhelson, Kate, shoes by, 27:72-73 Meeko, Lucy, Inuit

seamstress,

27:62-63

Mexico, weaving co-op in, 25:16

to

adding

Mittens:

beyri

e. Jacqueline, quilt by, 27:16

Scott,

on jaclmt by Patagonia,

fiLl' and leather, 32:58-59

Motas,Swedi

on

Musker, Mameen, on knitting,

Alt

Quilt exhibit in West

Leather: for, 31:37; 32:59

ll, Jmnne, on beading,

Le

Lchmatm, Levy ingeJi inings

e, smllop edges

L

:

fo

ngin beads

stJi

g

for, 26:49

can:1s, wea'�ng ,vith, 31:52-55 inlde, book about, 25:6 27:31-32

books on, 31:96

for

rwea

calendar

Belfast cord for, 30:8

Newnann, Caml, on heirloom

boolffi on, 28:8

sewing,

Malan, Linda, on card

wea ving,

Nelini, Joan, doll costume by, 31:24 New York City, cultural

31:52-55

Alts

America program, 26:26

28:16,18 Mangan, Kathleen Nugent, on Lenore ey's tapestJy, 28:16

Malmequins, sec Dress

forms

Marcharlt, Nancy, on repeating-motif

of, 25:27-31

Marcus, Ruth Claire, on fashion boolffi, 28:84 Marcus, Sharon, on tapestry symposiwn, 27:14,16 Marklich, Lilo: on Chilean embroideIY, 25:58-61 on embroidelY pattern charts, 26:68-71 on exhibitions, 31:26

teacher, 25:58-61 Alnerican Sewing Guild, 31:26

Purse

Califo

rnia

Weaving Pmject, 32:20,22 CostLmle

Soc iety of AllleJica, 28:22

Custom Clothing Guild, 29:18 EmbmidelY Guild of America, 25:14,16 4-H, 30:18 Navy Relief A

adapting shiIt pattern, 30:12 books on clothing for, 29:84

Collectors' Club, 29:20

Cambodian Woman's Sill,

on te:>.:tile reference, 27:78,80 Matemity:

ewco

N

Kha,

Pa

tago nia patie

25:56-57

Piping: seamless, 31:16

HistOIical

Society,

RefiJgee Women in Development, Inc., 32:22

for smockiIlg, 26:50-55 working \vitlI, 31:47-51 Pockets: double entry, 32:56-57 for knit galments, 25:49 single-welt, 32:54-57 single-welt, of Nonnan Nomll, 25:31 Polyester, for outerw&'lr, 25:56-57

Press Pmses,

ing seanls, quilted, 25:9 antique, 29:20

,

h,

Rowe,

show on

P., on

Q

Quilt National '87, 25:12 Quilting:

baske

tJy, 30:16

nw lus exhibit, 26:76-77

Rowe, Mary:

on computer lrnitting design, 31:24 on klIitting !iBm n

eecll ework

graphs, 26:72-75 Rowley,

Kathl

een, on papennalting

confel'Cnce, 31:24 Rubberbands, vest from, 25:100 Rubber"stamping on fablic, 27:64-67 Rugs: borders for, 27:10 hoolting in Vennont, 31:28 Inte rna tional Confel'Cnce on Oriental Carpets, 30:14 rags for malting, 26:12 Tibetan factory, 31:28

yam baW, SOW'Ces

Russian

for needlepoint, 25:4

artists, 31:22

s

Salyers, Donna, on sewing \vith fake

fur, !imn Samp Sa"ye Art, shibori, 31:62-66

lers,

Folk

MuselUn of

26:22

AlllCliCaJl

r, Susan, small patchwork by,

28:40-44

Scarves,

LL'illi my, 28:20

mb Looms

30:8

foml for, 27:6

in cold-weather jackets, 25:53

Organizations:

on neecllepoint book, 31:96 Marshall, Jolm, on lumono, 32:39-43

magaziIles, 29:10 Pham,

commercial, 31:50

l1'llg o-Salas, Calmen, embmideIY

order fi'Om Britain, 30:78-80

!iBlll

Pleating:

fablic, 31:38-41

on competitions, 28:67

28:8

for slipcovers, 25:23

Oppenheimer, Ellen, on inlaying O

sill, weaver, 32:20,22

ossbacAImEel,

R

Pitcaim Island quilt, 26:26

o

sweaters, 31 :56-61

mail

in,

NOl'Cll, Norman, coutW'e teclmiques

on Chinese embroidelY exhibit,

Tawn

resom'Ces

25:76,78

Malarcher, PatJicia:

fabric, 28:48-51

supplies for, 25:66; 31:10

27:46-49

Maison Beer, 25:68

by, 30:100

Rosenthal, Janice G., on Cambodian

ill'CSSes, rking lmnaimr

for square-dance

tracing and ma

31:42-45

da, ta

Roberts, Truclie, on weaving

r, 25:55

Stoling, 28:14

Isle

Richanlson,

sow'Ces for costLmIe, 30:37

mail-order sources for, 27:84

roses, 27:10

Peg, on

pmseIVing, 26:12; 27:12

show on, 31:26

ques of, 29:

for ma

period and ethnic, 31:4

SaJ1 1pler, 26:22

Rhodes, Elizabeth, on Dior video, 29:84

as knitting stitch holders, 25:8

kin1 ono, 32:41

for oute

e collections,

25:10

Ribbons:

multisize, 25:8

for, 25:4

eJtextil Zandra, techni 40-45 Richarcl, ltingAlnanFair pestry soc\ffi, ,vitil (RISD), CosQml

Rhodes,

for Noh coat, 31:inselt

boolffi on, 26:84; 30:82,84

Macrame:

cutting weights for, 26:14

instJllction in, 25:66

Needlework:

M

custom, malting, 25:62-67; 26:34-38

basketweave stitch for, 26:4

yanl SOUl'Ces

Rhode Island School of Design

g for, 29:58-63; 30:6

videos on, 25:74

,

R. Brown Textiles, 26:24,66

for exercise W&'lr, 29:29,30

chmts for, 26:68-71

king

for weaving necldaces, ma

25:100

ing, 30:12

illemtjacket, 32:32

g, for sarongs, 28:31-35

SOUl'Ces for, 28:8

Looms:

Rand, Carolee L., rubber-band vest,

:

g, for jeans, 28:60-61

Neecllepoint:

on sewing with lace, 29:69-73

R

5,46

25:46-49

draftin draftin gradin

of the Quilt show,

31:116

boo lffi on, 25:66; 26:4; 29:84; 31:96

makiIlg, 27:40-43

Long, Connie:

27:70; 31:

Art

boolffi on, 26:86; 29:86; 30:71, 31:96

for apmn, one-piece, 32:14

Neckties:

handmade felt, 30:55-56

on

for

woven, 27:30-34,100; 32:52-55

for neckties, 27:42-43 Livingstone, Karen, on dyeing

h: the

30:72-73

ns, 26:64-66

adapting for

Necklaces:

forjaclmts, 25:52,54; 27:27-29

Amis art,

eecll eworl< graphs,

1&\vove socIffi , coot, 43-4 Tmitish wing)nurs Ange

Pattelns (se

klliLting of, on sweaters, 27:38

for Imi1/crochet camisoles, 26:12

on

for

high, for blouse, 25:67

r, 29:10

Quilts:

:

for mitiens, 26:48 for

bias-boLIDd, 29:44

Linen, soW'ces for, 32:82

weights for, 27:12

Quilting

for lace, 29:34-35; 32:68-73

:

Necklines:

hwnor, 30:98

L

becca

on se\ving boolffi, 29:84

, Geralcline, on tailors in India,

28:43-47

weather gear, 25:56-57

for kni

on pants, 27:54-57

Anne, on quilt show, 25:98

trick for, 32:18 using strip-piecing for, 25:39-43;

r of cold­

adapted from n

ress iIIg, 25:9

string, 25:14

book of nostalgic, 29:86

Nebesar, Re

30:38-42

seams in, p

26:72-75

N

bindings with, 31:37

27:16,50-53; 28:6; 30:71

muactLtre seetting)

tago nia, ma

Patchwork,

for, 27:84

of rubber-stamped fablic, 27:67

tJ'Ousers, makiI1g, 27:54-57

Patterns (lmi

hWllor, 29:98

Berlin, 29:22

SOlU'ces ftb�ve

tilffi by, 31:22

SOW'Ces

mail-order

patchwork, 25:39-43; 26:39-43;

video on, 25:12,14; 26:24,26

book, 27:80 Muradova, Natasha, ba

inlay technique for, 31:38-41

hems on, fitting, 27:10

Pa

ns for, 28:15

Japanese, 26:56-59

weaving

copying, 26:34-38

Moser, Koloman, Vienna Workshop

art quilt by, 31:116

ayml

L., on M

eces for, 27:50-53

xago

he

malung blue jeans, 28:58-62

Moss, Gillian, on I\ashmir shawl

L1l"zelere, Judith:

Sm3h

co-op, 25:16

fOUllder, 25:69

25:56-57

Lapels, coutlU'e, 32:44-47

geometJic puzzle pi

Pants:

exhibit of, 26:76-77

27:72-73 Landis,

Virginia AvelY, 25:50-51

Pattee,

sh, 26:48; 27:69-70

Lambelt, Jane, dress arId hat by,

Fairfield Fashion Show, coat by

on, 31:24

origami-style, for lumono, 32:42

garments using, 29:69-73

p

Papel1llakiI1g, international conference

in grosgrain, 32:8

knit, 32:68-73

fabric for, 26:24

Paletti, Rosella, knit outiit by, 27:72-73

Mitering:

creating/embellishing

La

l'CSS ionistic

knitting, 28:36-39

garments, 27:46-49

Catalan Imit, 29:31-35

92

Silk for Life, 28:20 Talentshare, 32:26 United States Infonnation

Mode, 31:82-83

on weaving book, 25:6 KLma Indians,

==

31:69

Schevill, Margot Blmn, on weaviIlg books, 27:78

Schutz, Walter, obitLtalY of, 32:22 Schick, Tamar, archaeologiml textile fillds of, 26:20

read

Th

s

Magazine


Seam

binding,

see

two-p OIman pcoveI'S Carte

Norell, 25:28

iece, of N

Sli

device for flattening, 26:14

Slopers, 25:62-67

flat-felled, 25:54; 32:30-35

Smith,

French, 32:8

Smith, Ethel, on costume

r, tie dyeing, 28:100

convention, 27:14

furrier's, 31:65 in lmits, 32:60-64

vinin

g book,

Smith, Joyce, on weft U

lippled, 25:51

Sua

Jolobil,

Mayan

Socl>s:

Sewing

, hand:

and knitting, show on, 31:24 ks on, 25:12; 26:86; 30:16,82,84 boo

lUll

0r, 31:114

Swedish-lmit, 27:70-71

Th

Swedi 44-4becca

wedi tting

sh kni

Speakes, Re

Titcomb, M

lace, 29:31-35

artin tting

g lmittecl

Staml01'e, Alice, on ch lace, 32:68-73

for buttonhole malting, 26:60-63 controWng fablic on, 26:12

Steinhagen, Janice, on fashion

28:67

slipping of, 27:10

Stephenson, CatheIine, on Cnstom Stinchecmn, Amanda, on quilt book, Straney, Cecilia, on Convergence '88,

pincushion for, 26:14

29:16,18

preventing catching sweater

rogrammin Vilting

sharp points, 25:9

on couture lapels, 32:44-47 on coutme waistbands, 30:64-67

lU.I1l11

design, 32:36-38

Ulfac

e design:

fabriC book by, 25:12

blueplinting, 32:48-51

on fashion exhibit, 27:20

convention on lUbber

Shib01-i,

see

ping,

27:64-67; 28:4

bition on, 31:26 e:'{hi

shibori:

, 31:69

Shore, Lys Ann, on French

,vith tie dyeing, 28:100 stenciling, 28:68-73

Sider, Jeny, on blue j

s, 28:58-62 ean

Silk for Life project, 28:20-22

eaving Ul'Ces

thread, SO

for, 25:6

Cambodian, 32:20

w

Skellenger, Gillion, on Textile Centre, 32:22

kirts

S

tie dyeing, 28:100 Swansen, Meg, on

OIwegi

Arts

:

Sweatel'S:

Aran,

tting kni

Turki

sh

borders on, 27:35-39

for

frum rubber bands, cmcheted,

handsplm, fl

Fall uffin urcesR

1990, 31:92 g, 31:16

for needlepoint rugs, 25:4

mbber-stamped, 27:64-67

AIm

e Einset, on felting kids'

fium

Brown Textiles, 26:24

so

for, 26:80,82; 31:92; 32:82

tenSion lings for, 26:8

Vienna workshop, 25:69

'vinding metilod for, 26:12

Voulkos, Caml, on mbber-stanIping on

wool, Icelandic, for kni

tting

25:44,46

,

patchwork, 25:39-43

wam

tional oto, on Inte rna

e Design Contest, 29:18 ex:til

Zippel'S: double, of Nonnan Nomll, 25:30,31

with elastic, 32:12

forjackets, 25:52-55

drop shoulder, 25:44-49

44-4

and cords for, 27:

5

repeating motifs for, 31:56-61 sewing a patchwork, 32:18 Shaker, 32:22

gings lUll'aveling, Laura, , Wallins Wals

for s

, embroidered, 25:60

Wall han

on

kirtspm18

repair

for, 25:6

with vents, 30:47

for slipcovers, 25:23

26:98

h, Julia, on student machine

knitting competition, 30:18,20

WarendOIfer, FIitz, Vienna Workshop founder, 25:69

T

Warnick, Kathleen, on knitting, 28:45-47 Warth.er,

galhered, 25:67

Talentshare, 32:26

set-in, 27:12; 26-27; 29:12; 30:12

Tapestries: A1-pille

Walker, Barbara G., on lmitting for Barbie, 29:100; 31:72-73

sarong, 28:31-35

December 1990/January 1991

equivalence guides for, 26:8

making and decorating, 29:50-53

designing, 32:36-38

pleats for, 30:43-47

shoulder pads for, 28:54

cone holder for, 26:14

by Dior, 27:27

coutUI-e, faced, 30:64-67

machine-knit cabled bands

drop-shoulder, 28:14

frum Britain, mail-Drder, 30:78-80

Vests:

Waistbands:

couture waistbands for, 30:64-67

dolman, 25:29

mnount needed for row, 27:12

designed for children, 29:64-68

pleated, by Dior, 27:29

Chanel, 25:4

Yarn:

e for, 29:8 cashmere, so urc

T

Fair Isle, 30:59

arnlholes and sleeve caps, 28:52-55

, 28:31-35

on sewing activeweaJ', 29:29

Vessels, see Baskets

Wada, Yoshiko I

30:60-61

circle, in half-scale, 31:81

Sleeves:

Diego, 30:16

YlUld, Ginny, on Seminole

an-style, 25:44-49

pattems N

Silk:

, on

fabric, 27:64-67

of ZanID'a Rhodes, 29:40-45

25:56,57

, 27:62-63

Sankirts

on samng s

jackets, 30:52-56

hing

\vith airbrus

Siberell, Richard, Patagonia designer,

wing

on Japanese quilts, 26:56-59 on pants video, 26:24,26

VickI-ey,

Shoes, books on, 32:86 patchwork quilting, 27:16

28:22

on Inuit se

25:100

rubber-stamping techniques,

SlUface design

Shirts, reeycling of, 25:4; 27:4 Shoemaking,

stam

29:4

on Zandra Rhodes, 29:40-45

uv w z Pitcairn bicentem1ial quilt, 26:26

erville, Eileen, on sweater

S

magaZine, 25:14

on CostUIne Society of America, on fashion book, 29:84

van del' HOI'St, Rozem

air brushing, 31:67-71

on Dior suit, 27:24-29

; 27:68-71

myn

Indian, humor, 30:98

S

Shaeffer, Claire B.:

mda

on B

44-48

tickning, 26:

teclmiques of, 26:28-33; 27:6

by Dior, 27:24-29

1100, review of, 32:20

Yamamoto, Judith T., on Walter Schutz, 32:22

van den i\kker, Koos, designs and

Suits:

for strip piecing, 25:40

on quilt

y

on Quilt

Stubchen-KiI'Chner, coat by, 25:69

g, 31:77

AIthtn',

heirlooms, 26:42

on quilt book, 29:86

Strip piecing, 25:39-43; 28:40-43

yarn in, 26:14

stIing quilts, 25:14

Yanagi, Amy:

Utter, Lelia Butts, quilt by, 32:24

31:96

pin-tuclting 'vith, 28:12

Twining, Tvaa:ndss

quilter,

on 4-H sewing, 30:18

Clothing Guild, 29:18,20

inlPIUving technique on, 32:65-67 Pfaff 1473, 31:74-77

in heirloom sewing, 27:46-49

Till11er, Ellen, doll by, 25:10

Donalene S. Poduslrn, on competition,

for heavy-duty smving, 27:18

Mariann, on needlework

organization, 31:26,28

weft, book on, 31:96

Stephens, Janet Jolmson, and

foot controls, preventing

a, hooked rug by, 31:28 arth

for pillows, 28:27-30

exhibit, 25:68-69

tIing

Woodblll11,

Tiims:

Stauber, Evelyn, on lmi

for embroidelY, 31:74-77

Tiiece,

book, 31:96

cleaning of, 25:8; 27:4 cord guide for, 27:12

es in, 26:14

TJi-Cord Iillotter, 26:49

Stanley, Montse, on Catalan Imit

Wink, Emla, quiltmaker, 26:41-42

Winningllam, Nmley, on Appalachian

tangl

silk, SOlU'Ces for, 25:6

spindle for, 30:4

n, Rob, on COpyIigllt

infringement, 30:20

25:14

organizer for, 25:9

videos on, 25:12,14; 28:84

Wilso

Wim1ingl1am, Castro, s

nylon, for gathers, 31:17 preventing

bool>s on, 28:86

Bernina 1230, review of, 32:20

Guild of Amelica, 25:14,16

for machine buttonhole making,

, puzzle quilts of,

Awdliary, 28:20 Wilson, Marie, on Embroiderer's

for fleece-lined jacket, 25:52

Spinning:

atiachments for, 26:8

n, Kurt, on Tibetan carpet OI'SO

cones of, tip for using, 27:10 camp, 26:22,24

Musewn, 25:10,12

Wilkel'SOn, Jeanne C., on Navy Relief

26:61

tools for, 28:8 Sewing machines:

We

Thread:

sh

27:50-53

mail-Drder SOlU'Ces for, 27:84

\varping, 31:17

factory, 31:28

8

26:

notions for, 25:52-53; 28:18-20

ding for, 25:9

prehistoriC, 26:20

on Swedish two-strand knitting,

Inuit, 27:58-63

Tawney, 28:16

till'ea nham

frum R. Brown, 26:24,66

on

In Stitches show on, 30:14

neclrties, 27:43 sculpture exhibit by Lenore

organization for, 27:20

knitting, 27:68-71

heirloom 27:46-49

necklaces, 27:30-34,100

hanging, 26:4,6

Thimbles, 25:6

on multicolor S

combined ,vith Imitting, 26:64-67

ces Greenbamn,

exhibitions of, 26:26; 28:16; 32:26

Fair Isle, 31:42-46 Sokalski, Linda D.Y.:

Fran

28:98

museUln for, 25:10

techniques of, 25:39-43

fablic, 28:48-51

hwnor, by

Textiles:

p, 25:16 CO-Q

weaving

Snaps, sewing on, method for, 26:14

SergeI'S, differential feed on, 27:8

,vitil

books on, 27:78, 80

books on, 25:43

p

Festival, 32:26

tecl1niques for, 26:50-55

topstitched, 25:54; 26:14 Seminole patchwork:

h

Textile

tional conference on, 31:22 inte rna

shoulder, 25:28

ks on, 25:6; 26:86; 28:84,86; 30:84 boo cO-Qp, 25:16

Centre, 32:22

Smocking:

1

card, 31:52-55

Blouses

,

Textile

31:96

mitered, 26:57-59

Weaving:

Tawnhirts see Temm-i,AI18see lto-mari AI1:s Tee-S

AvelY, quilted, 25:

of Vi

porphYIY, 30:100

ey, Lenore, ''woven fonns" by, 28:16

, malting, 25:22-26

appliqued in lace, 29:72

50-5

rginia

conferences on, 27:14,16

sloper for, 25:63

Edgings

Seams:

Wearable , 25:60-61 ra.8

FIieda, AIt:

button assemblages

of, 26:100

necklaces, woven, 27:30-34,100

93


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Send S2.P.O00. Boxfor 1201, catalogBurlingame. with fabric CAsam940 ples11·1201 to:

Printables.

for

�ililil iliiljl :.

1\-1ort l:-.1\\' Xth !he P'1-10' a1nd .

-

a

S2

our �l·pp color catalog.

, Fresh Ink Press

wefeature top quality mohair, wool, and cotton yarns for hand and machine knitting and weaving at discountprices. Send/or our 1990 sample package -$5.00

12 WE MA 01854 D-106T (508) 937-0320 PERKINS STREET, LO

LL,

Box 1469 Taos, 87571 505·586·1607

• J

NM

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· Over 1 00 Quality Books • Individually Reviewed F A S T S E$2.00 R V I: C E I ' PFL 231 94028 I

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97


�arketp�e Qu i l1/??f PRESENTED BY1HE PALM BEACH COUNTY aUILTERS GUILD

MARCH 22, 23 & 24, 1 991 The NEW Educational Center

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(407)798-0049 IACEMAKIN G KITS FOR BEGINNERS Bobbin Lace: Self-teaching instructions . . $36.00 Battenberg Snowflakes (3) 8.50 arrickmacross ( Irish applique) 8.50 CTatting 8.50 Right and left-handed directions . .. .. . .. . . ... . . .... 8.50 Needlelace Tambour 8 . 50 1 . 00 SNOWGOSO E Catalog . .. ... .. � P.O. Box 927-T6 Conifer, CO 80433 (303) 838·2276 OR CALL SARA AT

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Treat yourself to a bead shopping experience. More than 3000 types of beads and findings gathered worldwide. Visit our shop or send for 48-page color catalog, Send $ 1 0 . 00 (deductible from first mail order - minimum $50, 00) to:

BonniE TRIOLR

- Cone & Skein Yarn -

• WHOLESALE • RETAIL

BEADWORKS, CAT/TSTREET WASHI N GTON SOUTH NORWALK, CT FAX 1 39

Stock Ya rns : Cotto ns, Angoras,

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also New York Designer Closeouts

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Catalog $8.00

W W RAI S HE D F R I E � T r E RN S W W 5 0 J (0. :':�: �: �\\ - 0 W W --' -��� � T� � P�4,i5�� Q.6 6x: ti}1��..rrf'\.t�;;!";Ij:':

THE SCOTTISH COLLECTION Designer Knitting Kits Alice Starmore, Nicky Epstein Nadia Severns, & David Codling create 1 1 original designs featuring Jamieson & Smith Shetland wools. Send 53 (refundable) for color poster.

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==

8 Church Street, Lambertvil l e .

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AURA Box 602-TH Derby Line, 05830

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IHE fA6RIC5 101 OUTDOOR 97330' C.5011 7.51·8900

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Wa t e r p r o o f / B reathables, P o l a r f l e e c e , Polarplus, C o r d ura, P a c k c l o t h , S u p p l e x , N y l o n s, H a r d w a r e .

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For sample materials, wholesale order information and retail sources, please send $5.00 to:

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1 55 OXFORD ST. Dept. THPC PATERSON, N.J. 07522 (201) 942- 1 1 00

98

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_ ��, . �

Full� .. .... .. ..�".. � I "� Ll'" ' J & '-''' '''' !): . ��.. ;� . .)�. �"'''';"1990-91 $2:00� . /// , '. . � Ontario Residents add 8% PST) '0' 270

� <AI

range of complete sewing

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-

To receive your new

Catalogue send

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to:

685 Danforth Ave ., P.O. Box

Stn 'J', Dept. TC3, Toronto, Ont., Canada M4J 4Yl

Threads Magaz

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== �flU�lDU.M cS23mClonhckt:it:ntg �pin ing �p£cial .' t* U.'f�WCaQum�ilatinog! mQl' &piultl'rs ifil �rt?QOlP X§epsa/q Qy ft linf ,]I K. ON rHE INCA TRAIL

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New 24-page color catalog $3 . 00 3-volume set $10.00

Louet S p i n n i n g Wheels

515 . . . . . . 155 5511 . . . 195 shipping included S10 ............. $195 .... . . .. . . $21 0 . . . . . .... . 1 80 S70 .......... 275 S7 . . ........ 295 S 1 5 kit... 575 ... . . . . 540 ............. 265 The Ulti mate 590 ................... $379

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:�����t tBge.�:k�l�d NY r3733 B(6a07)i bri967-8325

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to :

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� - - - - - - - - - - - ."

..

NATURAL FIBERS

Mail Order Yarn.s .& E quipment for Weaving Knlttmg, Spmnmg Cottons, Silks, Wools, Mohairs Send for over 60 yarn samples·$3.00 Sp inning Fibers-$3.00 Cata/og-$ 1 . 00 Close-Out and Regular Yarns THE FIBER STUDIO Foster Hill Rd./Box 637 He n iker, NH 03242 603-428-7830 (Open Tues-Sat. 1 0-4)

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handspun plant dyed yarns send SASE for orderi g informacion 136 Paseo Norte · Taos NM 87571 505-758-9631

of wool . silk . mohair/carded blends for spinners n

SUPER FOR BLOCKING KNIT AND WOVEN FIBERS

Tile Original

First andin U.stilS.lAthsie nficenest1940 Made

Made in t h e U . S . A the Steamer will gi ve you years of dependable performance.

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For additional information write for brochure

Crafts Unlim ited 4986 Warwick Memphis, 381 1 7 (901) 682-2358

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Samplers

Materials for 18 th century Needlework All Sorts of the very best GOODS for traditional

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New Catalog $3. or $12.wlsamples

KA 48

THLEEN B. SMITH

Handwcavcr and Wool Dyer

Box

West Chesterfield, Mass.

01084

December 1990/January 1991

Counted t h read sam p l e r kits. Authentic reproductions from private and muse u m collections. A l l kits are worked on natural o r d y e d l inens. For color catalogue send to

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The Essamplaire 4 1 26 - 44 Street Red Deer, Alta. Canada T4N 1 H 2 (403) 347-3574

NEW ENGLAND'S NEW OLD-FASHIONED YARN Send $2 for color card and yam sample PONEMAH YARN - 100% VtrginVV",nul -

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522 KNOTS & TREADLES * * * on & nn n * &

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1 01 E. Pittsburgh Street Delmont. PA 1 5626 (412) 468-4265 CATALOG 3-Stamps DYES SHEEP Everything! SHOELACES. BALLOONS. SOCKS. . . ! SHEEP PRINT FABRICS (Swatches $5) Weaving Spi i g Supplies Equipment VHS Video Rental Library via UPS! TAHKI'S YARNS CLOSEOUT COLORS

*

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99


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Gloriou�

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Rowan Designer Kn itting Kits

WOOL J A C KET

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to

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Fine fibers from ilnd other /"lice places TeXo'ls

KID MOHAIR FINE WOOL SILK-ALPACA CAMEL DOWN

SPINNING WHEELS

AnN

Kaffe Fassett, Annabel Fox, Sasha Kagan, The Seatons, & others.

samples $2.00

Send

$3.00

for photos and price list.

The Best Of Britain brother@ KNRIETPAOINuRtGleCtMAEfNorCTHERINE i'Gualamala! dl1M}j 1!.uer� KNITGTIN WORLD <�.::.� :�.�:.: .�.�1!l!.,;:;�' .::� .�: .� �.: �:?::�.::.� L2�_u�ndCAir'·g"Iren Rya, Inc. SJ�.�'1IfW111 �,"..�. fiber

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lake Dr. Weatherford. 6086

Most Rowan Yarns, Kils, and Books are in-!Jlock.

TX 7

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NATIONALLY AUTHORIZED

Exotic and SpeciallY Yarns WelchCA 94304 Nd. I'alo7001' (415)1\110,327·5683

Our hand loomed Ikats from Mayan weavers are some of the world's most exciting fabrics! Vibrant exotic designs in machine washable colors 1 00% cotton, they're perfect for fashion sewing interior design. We offer the finest quality, widest variety lowest prices and full money back guarantee. For generous swatch pack info., send $3.50, applicable to first order. (Foreign; $5. US funds)

• Refurbished & used Brother

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T

101 W. Broadway, StPeter, MN. 56082 507-931-3702

Custom Quilting Frames

H4"

Gold , optical qual ity magnifying glass pendant on a tubu lar link chain.

&

,

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. • ,. ' '

. ".�."

#140·TH

1 1 01

OR 97205·2313

Well written instructions for brimmed wool hats wi h 6 band designs · puffins, sheep, o h ers $6.00 for booklet, postage included. Write:

FREE CATALOG! $25.00 $3.00 Shipping

+

MAIL MONEYCHECK ORDERORTO:

PS UNIQUES Dept. THDS 3330 S. Columbine Cir. Englewood , CO 801 1 0

We are the Rug Weaving special ists . Our large volume means lower. discount prices. We carry

a large selection of beautiful cotton rags on

coi l s .

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rug filler. loopers, braid­

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For catalog and samples send

$ 1 .00

handling

to: GREAT NORTHERN WEAVING, P O . Box

3611

Augusta,

MI 49012.

1.•• NEW MORE

YARN WITHKNITT LEFTOVER YARN:•• 20 $ 7. 9 5 2. 40 AIN WITH LEF&TOVER YARN: $ 10.95 YARN: 3.60 WITH LEFTOVER $2.14.95 dling $ $ 1. tax. Canadians, 6% KNITTIN $TTE .50, TTIN 30036, 95213·0036 LEFTOVER

KNITIER'S SWEATSHIRT

with Don' og t Just Sit, Knit! our

'll

�\ .�

l o ! In pink or light blue, sizes are medium, large and extra large. Great gift for knitters! sure to state color size desired when ordering.

Be & Send $16.&50 $2.00 (wi$1.th00 ooluFree e) incatal cludedog HAZELCRAFTS -Box 175·T - Woburn, MA 01801

plus for ship. handling for each shirt. every order!

Wholesale Inquiries Imited

(508) 356·1314

KN ITTING AG

holidayitems.

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Quick, easy,

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Original patterns using leftover yarn in different Sweaters for babies to adults, cute kids

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for each additional book. CA residents add

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G PA

RN and catalog of y

FREE

arns , kits,

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or free with any order.

FRUGAL

G HAUS, Dept. T, PO Box

KNI

Stockton, CA

Yam

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patterns, plus bonus patterns. Price

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ING BOOKS

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100

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Patterns fo r h i storical c l ot h i n g , chain· mail t-shirts, almost reproductions of a u t h e n t i c j ewe l ry from the M i d d l e Ages Renaissance, a n d more. Catalog dealer inquiries welcome.

&

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Also available COMPLETE

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-

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r brochure

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15% to 23% Discount Knitking Knitting Machines & Accessories Send SASE Far Price List:

Scot! St.

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Fiber Products Your SourceNorskforKllliNordic andtsvevgam yams. & 50 FLEECE & ROVINGS $5, $1. SAMPLES: CATALOG lTING&:RUGYARNS$5 TAP YUEYARNSS3,KNl P.O. BOXN=O271�T, =R=S=K=LEXIF=JO=N=RGTON, D F[=B=E=GAR 30648 �

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AUDITORE PATTERN DESIGN AZ 85032 1 2629 N .

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Also Fine French Laces, Swiss E mbroideries, i y buttons. silk ribbons, old

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kids and adults TO SEW!

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Route 1. Box 145 Monroe. VA. 24574 EXCITING FABRICS SELECT FROM OVER 500 SILKS, COTTONS AND WOOLENS

Natural Yarns For Knitting Weaving

TRAINING PACKET to teach

ram

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y�" of our cCllll1r

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6508 Main ' P.O. Box 1 553 ' Caseville, MI 48725 Phone : ( 5 1 7 ) 856�3449

78N 7'1" Whtt. w/llue . Gold 24" 5/8"

(Any

word

ing)

MAil ORDER YARNS

NATFOUSIPBEECRUISARLATLY •

alpaca Send

wools

$3.50

cottons

& 500

for over

lOOK

GoadGold 600D g. for $7.00 •forhandl$5.i0n0.40 US. 12Addfor50¢$3.postage 5.20 2 $24.0sMa.0.500 $14.00.250namefor-one 100(PriCefosrbosed DosnOt'"forsplit$37.order0)0 CharmDept.WovenPortLabel land. OR y 1 1/4" White wi Gle y 11K 7/8" Whltew/ Gfe

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on

mohairs

colors

&

rayons

Box30027

one• • T

97230

textures

first-quality mill ends of name brands machines for knitters, weavers,

& es (approx. ber samplcashmere, Exotic firibbon, etc: $2.150)75 samples of silks, angora, 01451 327, FiberMALoft) (P.O. Studios (Retail: 111 Hill Periodic Updates

Quantity Discounts

Also Available:

Bare Rt.

Bldg) Box

Harvard

December 1990/Jauuary 1991

101


�arketp�

== � ��Creat y?UI 'Year bleArt. Wl'th � YaV'VlSo �----�8�e�:.IN�OVATIVE . .:,�--. A u s t r a li a n N e d l e p o i n t � J � 4< � \ ir. � , ----�����--- Industries ���* 7..a1S 111i1l. . -.., . � YOLO KRUH man-os by. ma. il KNITS � " SILK SCARF BLANKS & SILK GARMENT BLANKS

"CHARITY HILL FARM"

in yarn, thread, and sliver form. Coloured by

nature within the cotton boll itself, these fibres have a presence all their own.

Natural White Silk . Top Quality .

For samples send

Introductory 4 ScarfAssortment...$14. 95 LSASEfor Free Catalog

Q UALIN INTE.NATIONAl

THE NEW ENGlAND YARN

The natural colours of cotton are now available

P.O. Box 3 1 1 45-T San Francisco, CA 94 1 3 PhoneiFax (4 1 5 )

647-1329J

$3 CA 93280

100% wool grown and spun in New England

to:

NATURAL COTTON COLOURS, INC. P.O. Box

791,

Wasco,

r.�'�"'�"""""""'''''''''�'#('��� own �. NInn . . �� ov�tlve Apphque • : : . siml1-Inieclandildeseasa.y . . � � rileewbookcovers thcidsf Machinethelates!, Applique. $7.95 + $1.50 S & H . . . . �� APPLIQUENY,. NY 1 001 2 . � ��,;. ,77 ,;,;,Bleecker ,,,,,,,,,S1.,,,#1,,2,,1,, ,,,,,;,;,;,,,,,,,,,,1

;

� ..

or � chaptenin creatin2 yoilr own applique sweaters an<fpattern stoo!r

Great colors, great Southwest

and traditional sweater designs Available i n kits or open stock

FREE SAMPLES

P.O. Box 434 (Dept. T ) Uxbridge, MA 0 1 569

00

I (6 1 7) 278-7733

Oa.m, to 4p,m. Tues.-Sat.

HELENE RUSH DESIGNS

MAINE SAMPLER SWEATER KITS, AND OTHER

100%

COLORFUL ORIGINAL SWEATER KITS IN WORSTED WEIGHT WOOL FROM NEW ENGLAND. BOOKS AND BUTTONS TOO! SEND $1 .75 FOR COLOR BROC H U R E ON KITS( R E F U N DABLE WITH 1 ST ORDER), SASE FOR LIST OF BOOKS AND BUTTONS TO: 3 RIDGE DRIVE, WINDHAM, MAINE 04062 WHOLESALE INQUIRIES WELCOME.

MOHAIR BOUCLE YARN We are very pleased to introduce our beautiful new bulky weight pure mohair boucle yarn"Encantado." Avai lable in 1 enchanting variegated colorations.

0

I D IVIDUALLY HAND PRI NTED DESIGNS ON BELG I U M WOVEN) , . CAN VAS ES. CA 2.00

�t�£� � b

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Luxurious Garment Leathers

Send SASE: D'Anton Rt. 2 Box 159 West Branch,

Phone:

C rafts

(319) 643-2568 Wholesale accounts welcomed

Sewing Needlework

155 OXFORD ST. Dept. THMB PATERSON, N.J. 07522

easons

221 7

Iowa 52358

. ... . • . . Snowflake Designs Needlework Shop : ".

Los Altos - Dept. T

Clovis, CA

�:�

Ouran P.O. Box 241 02 Apple Valley MN . 551 24-01 02

HOLIDAY CREATIONS FOR YOU WINTER CATALOG $2

For sample materials, wholesale order information and retail sources, please send $5.00 to: Silk City Fibers

>"'

••

9361 2

The Needlework Store that comes to your Door Catalog Subscription $3.50

Handpainted Needlepoint, Fibers, Fibers, Fibers, canvas, evenweave fabrics, linens, counted cross stitch supplies, hardanger books, charts, Natural Fiber Knitting yarns, North Island Rowan kits. And much much more Suite 208 (Dept. T ) 1 1 4 N. San Francisco St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001

+

A c ompr e h e n s ive workbook r e l a t ed s t ep b y s tart SASE

Experience the pleasure o fknitting with hand spun

&

kettle dyed yarn from the Manos del Uruguay collective.

. .. . . . $7.$5.0000 70 I . 3. . . . . . . . . . $7.7%$11. 00 00

New Fashion Pattern Book 4 Color wheel of over shades

. .. . .... . .. . . . . Book Wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. Pattern Books still available . ...

&

(NJ residents add

VIDA EVELYN fine yarns

800-654-4341

Tues. - Sat. 1 0-5

102

SAMPLES ,

A/M

C

at your

f i n i sh .

x

and

to

For

plus

advance

own pac e ,

you

f r om

det a i l s ,

s end

t o Dept .

T-Ki t .

Prompt. Personalized Service Natural Fiber 't.lms

Send S5.00

for Samples

Irefundable with purchase)

CRANBROOK

VIS

manual

a nd c o s t

(4 1/8 9 1/2) AyoTTES" DESIGCH,NERY CENTER03221 SANDWI N.H.

to

ppd. ea. ppd. sales tax)

20 1 -625-935 1

STUDY

WEAVING PROJECTS

n e eds

a s s ignme n t s

s t ep ,

ppd. ppd.

Dept TM 1 , 26 Diamond Spring Rd. Denville, NJ 07834

HOME

o f beaut i fu l

w i t h YARN

NORWOOD . SCHACHT . LOUET

P.O505-265-6333 . x 36030 • 1-800-345-927687176 Bo

Albuquerque. NM

Merchants to the Machine Knitter ®

The only complete source for machine knitters under one cover!

To receive your 1 37 page catalogue, send $ 4 . 00 to KR U H KN ITS, PO BOX 1 587T,

1991

AVON , CT 0600 1

reads Magaz

Th

ine


�arketp�e

==

WEAR THE KNITTER'S APRON

,-----------1

CHINA: TEXTILE AND EMBROIDERY TOURS THAI WEAVING (For the adventurous)

NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW!

also

\-��-- '�\'�t.:J;""?�j7i, S�ewing Pr�1PIOlllaojectsOrgan -tL'Jtl:J�rJK rq � � � 2. . THREADS Threadne dFleibers MOVING ? s���htaLnpoeosmtcRskY I� ;

17

With Knitting Sheep design "up front". Three pockets for yarn, needles, etc. Light Blue with dark blue design. One size fits all. $ 1 6.00 p.p.

Dorothy298-7757 Grubbs NH

10

THE SEWING SAM PL E R - B U S I N ESS E DITION

Write: Occidor, Broomcroft Road Bognor Regis, Sussex, 7 NJ , U . K.

P022

information on marketing and promoting your requirements, tax i nformation, financing, and more!

03784

the woo/room

jacob fleece from landmark flock . curry great

&

saxony wheel.

"sweatermaker" from bond. schacht

$1 +

louet "ultima " . ashford . exotic fibers mc/visa n catalogue:

Laurelton Road Dep. T

Isase

(914) 241-1910 800)473-1910

orders only:

MI. Kisco, NY 10549

Subscriber List Senice

We occasionally make our subcriber list available to companies whose products we think may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive the mail, just send your mailing label (or an exact copy) to the address below. We'll take care of the rest.

Written by women with experience i n the industry.

Everything at Your Fingertips " �, � Sewing Machine & Serger Data and Maintenance Record

. Personal & Household Measuremenls Patterns. Supplies & BooklVideo Lisls Average Garment Yardages

6' by)' C v r n . Goes � Adhesive 'trip seCU/8S fabrlc 10 Swr.:rtchcard 6 50Swol+cnel 53.75 $.50 S+H PocR5tSwatcfr. ealrIM Rt:llICAlSS OfI1t:lPOCksl S lOanls· Iocol soles lax TOke j u sl a l e w cor d s o ng Includes 10 SwotchCords SwolchCOrd on e sio Chorts Fabric Widths. English/ Melric & Needle Sizes

COfe COdes Chart

Information Paoes Refill Refill

Australian Wool and Mohair

fleeces in 2500 bei g e, Coniedale, Choose your IIeeceforby$3.feel00. fromown samples Price: Alsou.s.whil$4.e00 Top quality, skirted, clean grey s, moorit,

black, white, brown, all

fawn and silver. From

Merino,

Boreler Leicester, Bond and Tukicl-tle sheep.

&

Send Name Address with Check or Money Order To:

COTTON is fun and easy to SPIN

with our complete "Cotton Starter Box" Fiber-Spindle!BowI-Instructions

Send $ 17.50 to:

Spin 'n Weave

3054 N. I st Ave., Tucson, AZ 857 1 9 (602) 623·9787

December 1990/Jalluary 1991

t

For samples send $2.00 to: P. o. Box 129, Dept. T Pasadena, MD 21122

,

- : �

The Tatlllton Press,

Address Change, P.O. Box 5506,

Newtown, CT 06470-5506

and sight

From

accepted.

lb., inc/licks postage. Pelsonal checks

and colored mohair and tanned sheepskins.

Prompt, friendly, personalized senAceflum:

P.o.

John Perkins Industries P.O. Box 8372 Greenville, SC 29605

cl;J'" .6J

Anny Blatt feathered yarns and Irish fleck yarns

.-J

Please include this form in an envelope with old label and new address and send to:

High tension, heavy duty, professional tapestry looms with roller beams and Call (206) 573·7264 other weaving accessories.

10 lbs, Assorted Coned Yarns $22.00 delivered US only.

unique yarns

:

D

PRE-CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

/

�L

$ 1 2.00

BUSINESS EDITION ,SEWING SAMPLER PRODUC­ TIONS, PO Box 39, Dept. TH, Springfield, MN 56087. I SA MASTERCAR rderS I I 7 '723.501

Christmas Special Free PocketSwatcher

i)

.

Sample issue · $2.00

Or send $ 1 .00 for catalog of newsletters, books, patterns, sewing supplies and fabric.

.

Press

or write to: 1 0402 N.W. 1 1 th Ave., Vancouver, WA USA 98685

One year (four issues)

!!

•• •p{us:• 24 3"6y 5"Swatch.Caras Also Available: Odd 5250 +S+H II fr=

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CT

Quarterly newsletter includes designer profiles, wholesale sources, cost analysis, pricing, and product. Plus crucial non-sewing information: legal

(603)

Dana, West Lebanon,

The Newsletter for Small Manufaclurers'/Designers

Box Cyril 9, Henty,Lieschke N.S.W. 2658, Australia

(\ (\

& We serviceneed the kniletterssons.who does not write u m t and yarn. Hatfi eRebecca ld, PA Accessories

DISCOUNTED

Call or

for prices on eq i p

en

Yarn-It·AII

2223

Old Address: Nanle

BROTH ER

Knitting Machi nes

or c a l l 2 0 3 - 4 2 6 - 8 1 7 1 . ( Pl e a s e allow 6 weeks advance notice.)

Dr. 19440 (215) 822·2989

___ ________________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ___ _______ __ ____ ___________ ______________________ ____

Address City

State

Zip

State

Zip

New Address: Address City

103


�((AGI�-CS-�INGEr:=. R® �R��1M SEAWTIANGDIMSACOHUINTES Sewhoibn'iynisVte.rmo. nt STEAM RESS MSP7

---..

usr S2W*

"

SUSSMAN

PM

SUSSMAN

PM

RONENTA

DA-82

YARN STORE FOR SALE. Established seven years. Great location San Francisco Bay area. Please inquire: (415) 327-5683. BEVY OF EMBELLISHMENTS by Beth Kmj ala. A sl,etch­ book of handwoven belts, etc. Ideas and techniques for weaving beads, buttons, feathers, recycled items into fablics to create dramatic aCces801ies. $8.95 plus $1.50 plb. Dos Tejedoras, 757 ?tul, MN 55114.

Raym

ond Ave., #300 E-T, St.

ketweave" by Davie Hyman. $12.95 plus $2.50 handling. Davie Hyman Designs-T, 12908 Westchest Trail, Chester­ land, OH 44026. 'Wholesale inquilies welcome.

eving

awilaraftSilayo Call

TALL TABLES for c kinds

ut. Low plioes! Dillerent back­

ble.

for brochures. 800-745-5739.

05819

"'Ac( .

ANGER BOOK by well-known teacher/design­

er Connie Includes patten1S, helpful how-tos. Avail­ able exclusively: Sand Dollar Designs, P.O. Box 1994, Dept. T-1, 98281-1994. Wlite for details.

free

READ

TINE CROCHET AND TATTING TH

S. SASE $2 for

samples and plice list. Yam Peddler, Ave., Upland, CA 91786.

263 N. Second

KNITT Call HINE ING MAC

supply cataiog.

Passa

p , Singer,

now lor FREE catalog. 800-745-5739.

BEADS evelY description, amazing embellishments. Eu­ ropean silk corsages, beaded appliques. Freeds, 415 Cen­ tral, NW., Albuquerque, 87103.

NM

LEATHERCRAFT CATALOG. 100 pages. Largest selec­ tion ,mlik'lble of genuine leathers, tools, lots, supplies. Includes to garment leathers, suedes and exotics. Kits for belts, handbags, moccasins and more! New patten!s, books, instructional videos. Low plices, quantity dis­ counts. Send $2 pst glh dIg to: Tandy Leather Company, Dept. TH1290C, Box 2934, Fotth Worth, 76113.

TX

LYCRA. You won't be disappointed wi!b LGF's valiety, prices and prompt service! Send $2.25 for nylon/lycra OR $2 for cotton/lycra OR $4 for both sets., 70 plus swatches! LGF, Box 58394 (T), Renton,

98058.

Park,

FL

34666.

VIDEO (Textiles are oW' specialty). FREE VIDEO CATA­ LOG-50 titles, how-to workshops, plus documentaly and inspirational titles on: Fablic painting, Bobbinlace, Weaving, Spinning, Card weaving, Stenciling, QUilted painting, Applique, Knitting, Rug malong, Tapestly, Tat­

Even if you've never hooked a rug or wall hanging before, Rumpelstiltskin's exclusive Electric Tuft Hook Needle can help make you an expert in hours . . . in fact, you can complete a beautiful rug in a single weekend!

ting, Basl,etiy, Needlelace, etc. We make leaming easy and successful. VIGI'O VIDEO PRODUGI'IONS,

Complete, easy-to-follow instructions, and a free catalog of 46 different designs included with every needle.

dating, basic conselvation: Cooperstown Textile School, P.O. Box 455, Cooperstown, 13326. (607) 264-8400.

Name

_

______________ _____________ _ ____

Address C i ty

State

Zip,

Mail to: Rumpelstiltskin's Rt. 1 , Box 915, Hillsboro, OR

97124

THIMBLES FROM AROUND THE WORLD. Send $2, for catalog. $5. off first order over $25. Collectable Trea­ sm-e8, Box 279, Lambeth, Ontmio, Canada NOL

ISO.

expe dt-ess direc

thlns NY & JEWE VT RINT darlrro usttial o FULL trimslfin Free

nsive

fill!,

RIAN

1304 Scott St., Petaluma, CA 94954. 800- 289-9276 .

RKS

UNUSUAL 4 DAY WO

ISCO

D

HOPS: Textile identification,

NY in sewing, sergiI,g ARN

UNT BOOKS!! the best

chine knitting.

CALL

and ma­

now for FREE booldist. 800-745-5739.

IMPORTER OF ANGORA TIBER AND Y

; manufac­

turer of sterling silverlbrass buttons seek Rep. PreSident, 935 Rodeo Queen, Fallbrook, CA 92028. COLLEGI'ORS ITEMS. Unusnal

eslboo

lrni tting'needlework sup­

pli ks. Catalog, $ l!LS ASE (45¢). Studio 35, Box 021177T, Brooklyn, 11202-0026. NATIONAL

NY JURl EXH AESTHET ED

slide deadline. Details, son, KS 67460.

IDITION, Apli!.

All

05401 (802) 658-0013.

BLUEP SENSITIZED FABRICS. Rea dy to ptint, no chemicals to mix, no m n eed ed. Send E: Blue­ prints, 1504 No. 7 Ind Way, Belmont, CA 94002.

LSAS

-GATHERED LACES, dings, craft pattel11S. cat. CoI Ull1 bia Oalment Co., P.O. Box 349, CoI Ull1 bia, PA 17512.

KNITT innin RD NY pOlt, crFree RAM

USED ELECl'RONIC Sp

CHINE

ING MA

: $865 postpaid.

g, weaving, knitting supplies: catalog $2. WoolelY, 1, Genoa, 13071. (315) 497-1542.

BELTS-BUTTONS custom covered professionally. Your fablies.

catalog. Fashion Touches, Box 1541, Blidge­

06601.

HANDMADE CE IC BUTTONS. Unique designs, shapes and colors. SASE for brochure. L.B. Buttons, 2323 F St., Bellingham , WA 98225.

V<lShaCIm'HES Box I<:its to knit.FIL, EAD

BABY \

- Delighful designs, na

ble. Complete

Oat Couture, B

799, Dept.

\vi!bfibers, machin

tura l

Catalogue

e

samples: $2.

Talent, OR 97540.

S! JEWELRY SUPPLIES! Semi-precious, pearls,

Austrian crystal, findings. Samples, $5. Necklace kit, $15. Wholesale catalog, $2(refundable). Rebshan's, P.O. Box 7808, Dept. T, NOIthlidge, CA 91327. MUSK OX QIVIUT Homegrown handcombed fiber \vi !b minimal gnardhair. Sold raw, dehaired o r SpUl1 2 ply 150 ydsloz. Send $3 and legal SASE for samples and bro­

DERY supplies brochure. 330 page complete catalog. Save 30-75%! Suncoast, Dept. T, 9015-US19N, Pinellas

SEND FOR FREE INFORIATION - NO OBLIGATIONI

104

WA

FREE- SEWING- KNITTING - QUILTING-EMBROI­

Reward yourself, personally or financially. Write for details of Rumpelstiltskin's exclusive Electric Tuft Hook Needle today.

EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! Assemble products at home. Call for in/ormation. (504) 641-8003. Ext. 4046.

Bmlington,

HARDWillIS. PT. Roberts, WA

VE IN GREECE: Residential courses, May-October.

"Fml

449-8600. (LB9)

Greel, techniques, Oliental cmpets. Katerina Kalamitsi, 22300(A) Leonidlon, GREECE.

FRE{OETAILS . . . . � ; ' MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

Tat" for

,vith Tatting" for advanced tatters. Mak­

ing crazy quilts and !be hand embroidelY stitches that go on them. Also with Paper" leam Scherensch­ nitte and making paper beads. 2 hoW' videos show all. $32 ppd each. Calpenters Crafts, P.O. Box 1283T, Alton,

BEADS LRY-MAKING SUPPLIES. Send for fTee catalog. Optional E,xtras, 150A Church St., Dept. 103,

WEA

t'. I

to

THE ART OF TATTING LACE. "How

begiImers.

LET THE GOVE ENT FINANCE your small business. Grants'loans to $500,000. Free recorded message: (707)

FREE

NEW ELECTRIC TUFT HOOK NEEDLE WILL SPEED YOUR WORK GIVE YOU PROFESSIONAL LOOKING RESULTS

ytim

EARN "Fun

L

form, any size, shape. Easy, illustrated tions, $8.95. Sewing, 121 5th St., Wa Glen, 14891.

Studlo products.

rug

Wlite An­

Textile Exchange, a quarterly newsletter, $24/yr. Box 1065, Lafayette, CA 94549. ple $3.

NEW

VT CALL TOLL FREE 1 (800) 451-5124 SINGER �

(TM),

$8-check&'credit cards by mail, phone or

gus Inte rna tional 6 Fok Loh Tsnn Kowloon City, HONG KONG. Tel 011 -852-718-2748. Fax 011-852-7184565 an e. Personal callels welcome!

DESIGNER'S METHOD. Make yoW' own in

RNM

' PLUS SHIPPING

nan:ls Thais, Rd., fax.

DESIGN TEXTILES ON YOUR COMPUTER! Computer

Sam

4% sales tax for Vermont residents ONLY

P SILKS airmailed world\vide by retum! Cre pes , char­ meuses, dupiOl1S, noils, jacq , etc. WeU even dye for you! Swatches of over 150 silks sent for just US

IL 62002. (618) 462-1768.

A NEEDLEPOINT NECESSITY-"The Diagonal Bas­

reli

OLDE COUNTRY COSTUMES. Sew Scandinavian cos­ tumes \\1th our illustrated, multi-sized pattems, import­ ed pewter and braid. Brochlll'e $l(refundable), Doeling Designs, Rt. 2, Dassel, MN 55325.

URE

8SVS inghamrefunNY

Brand New Machines . Most Orders Shipped Within 48 Hours

Vermont ResIdents Call 1 -748-3803

Newtown, CT

BI BS?tttems, lots, completed. SASE, $1. dable. Arn e­ Ie's, Dept. BBT, P.O. Box 21 , B ton, 13903.

E L ECTRONIC SEWING MACHINES $459 -

St Johnsbury.

5506,

is Novembe1'

$41 9-

Concord Avenue

ad

mp a ny 01-de1'. Send to

Deadline f01' the Febn,my/Mm'ch issue

5 THREAD SERGERS

84

=======

per W01-d, minimum

Threads, Adve1tising Dept., Box

Major Brands at Minor Prices

Irom from

$3

w01-ds. Payment must acco

S19!JOD* $21200" $21200" $54110* SfigDO*

LITE

100 [)A.33

RONENTA

The CLASSIFIED 1'ate is

15 06470-5506. 10.

r-. -�

PRO LITE

SUSSMAN

C�sifWd

media. Feb.

ICS 91, Box 252, McPher­

chure to The Musl, OX Company, Dept. T, 633 Fish HatchelY

Rd., THREADS Call FREE Deco WALL Hamilton, MT 59840.

DISCOUNT ALL COLORS!

!! Wooly nylon, r 6, suThy etoetera. now for samples. 800-741>-5739.

NINJA TURTLE POCKET PATTERN. Cash in on this super popular item for gifts or bazaars! Quick and

to

easy make! $3. Sarah Doyle, 6713 Olde Mill Ct., #NT104 Roc l<vill e, MD 20855.

Tlu'eads & HWE EWIN FUN.

LOOKING FOR

back issue ApliVMay 1986, No.

6. Please contact M.J. Smith, (215) 688-7943. SPINNING WHEEIB

LOOMS. Quality products and

prompt, personal selvice. Catalog, $ 1 . Spling Creek Farm, Box 466-T, Mound, MN 55364. 15 NEW SOUT

STERN PATTERNS! Send $1 for cata­

log to: The Cedar Chest, P.O. Box 140, Sedalia, CO 80135. NEWSLETTER FOR S G Each issue contait1S three or more "How-to" projects. Six issues 13.50. Betty Chalker's Se'ving Carousel, 143 Power's Ferry ietta, GA 30067.

RAFT

C

Rd.,

Mar­

NTRY

FAIR CALL FOR E

. The Worcester Center

for Crafts invites craftpersol1S to apply for jUlied admis­ sion to its May 17, 18, 19 Fair. Applicaton deadline Feb­ ruary 1 4 , 1 9 9 1 . For SLIDEMAILER/APPLICATION PACKET contact Worcester Center for C , 25 Saga­ more

Rd.,

rafts

Worcester, MA 01605. (508) 753-8183.

hreads Magaz

T

ine


Index

to

Beads

9694 969496

Garden of Beadin' Kuma Promenade Shenvood Designs Shipwreck Beads BookslVideos, Etc. Amelican Quilters Society Auditore Pattem Design Bizarre Butteltly Publishing Black Sheep Propductions Body Blueplints C T Publishing Caning Shop Cochenille Computer Knit Products Cindv's Stitches Dos Tejedoras Fabricon Fresh Ink Press Frugal Knitting Haus Tnno\'atiw Jesse Jones Knitting Machine Cenh-e Lacis Lois Elicson �la(Ulatter PI-ess Marlene's Videos Bool<s Mary Roeh Custom Ta ilOling Mav Wales Loomis Master Designer PFL Patiernworl{S Quilting Bool<s Unlimited Rizzoli Intel11ational PubliCc:'1tiol1 Softworl<s Speed Sewing String Slinger Wooden Porch Bool<s

&:

I' &:

1018197 101957 101 961821 9797 100 10287 10021 27 979525 281897 9576 10394 9629

Buttons

296

Bauer Castings Dogwood La ne ClasseslTouTs Ann Hyde Institute of Design John C. Campbell Folk School Connoissew' Tours Craft World ToW's New England Weawrs Occidor Rh"t'l' Farm Rowan 'l'ran't C0l11pany Sie\'ers School of Fiber Arts Textile Detective

Cal Feather Pillow Products Eatth Guild FaiI1ieid PlDcessing GH PlDductions Knots 'li-eadles Plymouth Reed Cane R{.,mpelstiltskin's Seasons Tand)' Leather Company

&:

Alia

MI�. Co. Dharma Trading PID Chemical Dye Rupelt. Gibbon Spidel' Sillqxtint COlvoration

&: &:

&

Fiber Bal-e Hill Studios Black Sheep Knitting CaIDI and Malcolm Dewe c\�il Lieschl,e T e Fiber Studio Non,k fjord Fiber Texas Fibel'S The Wool Room

h

Looms Beau Monde CaIfer's Counh}' Rose Workshop Crafts Unlimited Hallandall Para Tech Sew·Knit Disnibutor Shannock Tapeshy Looms Spinners Hill Shop

10198 1038799 101 100 103

Kits

9714 288527

vVoo

Downie Ente'l"ises Gadolina Jasmille Heirlooms Kathleen B. Smilli Magic Needle Oman Industries Snowflake Designs Needleworl{ Shop

Alpha Impressions Atllelican Eflid Brittanv Charnl·Woven Labels Clotilde Cottage Cl-eations Claft Gallety Domthy S. Grubbs Jdent-ify Label Corp. MalY Lolish Jahn Nancy's Notions Uniques Sterling Name Tape Company

&

Patterns

Fabric

14

December 1990/January 1991

Alts

&

PI-eSS

Periodicals Alnerican Quilter's Society The Machine Knittels Source Needlework Networl, Sewing Sampler So Letter TaLUlton Te:\.1:ile Fibre Forum TI-eadle3lt Magazine

urce PI-eSS

878119 10398 10787 21

Bufialo Batt '" Felt Keepsalle Quilting Mil{e BiUelt NOlth Camlina Public Tele\'ision Rucller Racl'

15 1009911 28

Campbell's Domthy S. Grubbs Fa irwinds Patte111 Co, FoU"vear Pattems Ftiends Patterns Green Pepper

23135 1042788 28

Sew-Knit Dishibutols Sewin' in Vermont Suburban Sew N' Sweep R DishibutOiS

Convergence The Knitting Guild of Amelica The National Academy of Needlemis Ol-egon School of Alts Cmfts Palm Beach Quilt-Fest Shing SliIlger

&

966 257 9883

Weaving Supplies Good Wood GI-ea! NOlthern Weaving Kimberley Marketing Real RIve Spin N' Sew Wem'els' Store

1009625 101 10396

Yarns

2894 9499 10294 102 8317 1012785 18 1039611 9910 10085

Aurora Sill, Bonnie Tliola CottDn Clouds Crystal Palace Yarns Dmp SpinellI" Exquisicat Imports The Fiber of Eden Hemy's Attic Hub Mills Jamie Harmon Jesse's Spling John Perkins Industries La h�na Wools LLUldgren Rp, Inc. .Man' Haven Natuml Cotton Colours No eld Meadow On The Inca Tmil Pendleton Shop Ponemah Yam Silk City Fibers ThreacLileedle Fibels Tonlato FactolY Yarn Vida RI'el)�l Wem'els W31-ehouse WEBS Wilde Yarns R'lrn Yam Basket Yam Galore Ymlls Yolo Wool Pmducts Zandy's Yam

rthfi

1009618 Yal1] 2998 94

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back. Caress, touch, yank over 450 samples of the world's

finest, most beautiful yarns

right in the comfort of your own home. If you aren't convinced you love them, send them back and we'll If you love them you'll still get your money back because

$9 to your first $50 or more. Over 10,000 satisfied Cotton we credit the order for

Clouds customers can attest to the beauty and work­ ability of these yarns­ many available only from Cotton Clouds. As you page through our catalog you'll find yarns, looms, needles,

SbowslExhibits

102 100 2 27 101 103

OBRCIOYLVAEOIRARN4NES5TD0LY ForJust$9

refund your money.

Quilting Supplies

Bemina Elna

Notions

991115 PS 9915 99 85 10399

1009495 10297 8195 1019889

Magic Garden Designs Mediae\'el Miscellanea Nordic Fiber Past Pattems Patience Purity Pattem Penelope Cmft Pl'Ogmllls Pingouin Pattems Pitter PattenlS Pmilie Clothing Taunton

1029895 PiaIf 999781 94 'I' & 100 100 10225 9596 9597 98 101 100

Needlework

9595 95999 94 104 10215

===

Sewing Machines

Aura Ayottes' DesignelY Beggars' h�ce Daisy Kingdom Essanlplaire For Generations nDstiine Kits Gossamer Web Hazelcrafts Helene Rush Designs Michele Woodford Design Nanc\" s Too Paix Farm lies Peace Wem-ers Plintables 811owgoose Stontellers 'Yan By Mills

l Knits Marl' Lue's Ii.ntting World Passup Studio Knitting Machine Tel1Y's Yam Shop Yarn·Tt·AlI

Equipment

Classic Cloth

Sa

1029783 9629 96 10098 1019897 10298 96997 9411

Knitting Macbines

Dyes

AVL

Crafts By Donna D'Anton Dismlctive Fibers Donna lyer's Elisabetll's Garden Fairies Trading Co. Global Village TmpOlts Homespun Mekong River Textiles Mini-Magic Oppenheinl's Qualin International The Rainshed RUpelt, Gibbon Spider ShmV Style Smocking Bonnet Testtabtics Thai Sill<s

; 146 9497 Krul 1039483 21, 8785 97

Craft Supplies

&:

Advertisers

10198 10583 8595 9929 9597 101 10399 100 1029421 9929 99 96, 98, 102 10398 102 10297 28 101 101 103 102 102 95

books, patterns, videos, and all BOND accessories-each pre-tested to guarantee you the ultimate fabric expe­ rience, And of course you'll find, in a convenient pouch at the back, the actual samples of all the yarns we

Ii; /l yVES

supply on cones and skeins.

Over

450.

���� r::: ORDER FORM --,I Hurry, order your samples and catalog today.

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Sample Day by Lucia Karge I ran down the bustling New York City street with my two heavy suitcases. Out of breath, I still felt like breaking into song. Too many movies and an addiction to losing myself in good books has given me a tendency to relate to myself as a dramatic character. Today I was Julie Andrews as Malia, fresh from the convent and ready for a new life. Thank goodness I was headed for more excitement than being a governess could ever offer. She can have the captain, I'm not looking for romance-I'm marned. (Oops, that didn't come out right.) I on my way to something more exciting-Sample Day at Henri Bendel's! My suitcases were loaded with sweaters I had designed and made. No two were alike, and I was sure that the buyer would scream with delight when she saw tllem. She would use words like "new star" and "genius," and bark at her assistant to get W n's Wear Daily on the phone. The freezing cold weather and my aching arms brought me rudely back to reality. Back then, Bendel's held Sample Day one Friday a month to give the hoard of undiscovered designers a chance to sell their wares. Strict instnlCtions were given to me over the phone: It certainly wouldn't do for vendors to be loose in an

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elite department store, so the freight entrance was my portal to discovery. I was stunned as I entered the dingy hall next to the elaborate front entrance on beautiful 57th Street. Huge strips of paint peeled off the banister of the c bling staircase. The walls were etal grey; the floor looked centuries old. And people packed every square inch. They all turned to look at me as I entered, accompanied as I was by a blast of frigid air. A middle-aged man standing on the stairs called out, "So after this are you going to Europe?" Everyone laughed, including me, and conversations resumed. I began to visit with all the intriguing artists around me. One woman, a knitter, carned only a small plastiC bag with a half-made sweater. I envied her. She probably lived just down the street and popped over once a month. "It's all they really need to see," she told me in broken English, looking with pity at my huge collection. An hour later I found myself nervously unpacking my suitcases in a tiny dressing room and arranging my sweaters for the buyer's critique. It was going well in the booth next to mine. The designer was obviously not new to this game. I was starting to feel really nervous, and suddenly my wonderful sweaters lost their luster and seemed

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out of place in this sophisticated realm. The curtains were thrust aside as the buyer burst into the little booth. Her perfectly made-up face fell as she glanced with dismay at my artfully displayed sweaters. The silence was painful. "Oh, but they're CROCHETED!" She uttered the last word as if it were a disease. I quickly launched into my speech about the advantages of crochet over knitting, but it fell on deaf ears. I could tell that even though her body was still in the tiny dressing room with me, her mind was already on to the next one. The polite critique and dismissal was almost a relief as I hurriedly packed my bags so I could return to the "normal" world where I was appreciated. I had been shot down-but not killed-and the experience of rej ection helped me to grow and made me even more determined. A year later, the accessories buyer purchased a dozen berets from me. It didn't make me famous, but I exult, knowing that my hats are on heads all over the country.

Lucia Karge oj Quincy, CA, is a free­ lance crochet designer and a home economics teacher.

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Threads magazine 32 december 1990 january 1991  
Threads magazine 32 december 1990 january 1991  
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