Page 1

09281

01899


2

Sew Beautiful

April/May 2014


table of contents Volume 28, Number 2 • Issue 153 • Ap ril/May 2014

c 34 White House Princess Kathy Barnard This issue's feature pattern is a reproduction of a vintage dress worn by Caroline Kennedy. The full -size pattern is available on the pullout centerfold in sizes 3-6.

ll. 10 Kari Mecca's Whimsy Trims & Flowers Book Excerpt

14 Embellished T's Amelia Johanson

26 Happy Birthday Pins

& Needles

Shop Profile

28 Sweet Springtime Diaper Shirt Barbara Carter

42 Monogram Smocking Frances Messina Jones

54 Angel Babe Sampler Wendy Schoen

60 Cloverleaf Wrap Blanket Jan Moore

63 Harrison's Homecoming Gown Martha Broyles

65 Perfect Pleated Puffing Trisha Smith

70 Heirloom Sewn Baby Dress Jeannie Downs Baumeister

73 Olivia Blouse from Blank to Beautiful Hope Yoder

SewBeautifulmag.com

3


Flowers &Trims im

fGw, }1/le.cu?.o.,'1>-

Whims_y Flowers &Trims

,,.

hat Kari Mecca can make with a Whimsy Stick is nothing short of amazing, and with this, her third book, Whimsy Flowers & Trims, (KP Craft, $24.99) she walks you step-by-step through a glorious field of creativity. Unlike her previous titles, u1:;;;~; which focus on children's apparel, her new Stieks / '\ book features trims and flowers that can be Find it at store.marthapul/en.com! .::_} applied to wearables and accessories for any age. According to Kari, this book has grown out of the endless possibilities that originate from her specially designed Whimsy Sticks. While her flower clusters rival those in nature, her trim variations with ribbon and rickrack can turn an ordinary hem, neckline, bodice or sleeve into something truly unique. In addition to step-by-step instructions for creating various trims, medallions and flowers, the book includes three different sizes of Whimsy Stick punchouts made of durable cardboard, so readers can start creating immediately. (Original plastic sticks can be purchased separately.) Here, Wendy shares an excerpt on Trim Techniques, from Whimsy Flowers & Trims to give you a sampling of the embellishment inspiration held within its pages.


book excerpt whimsy flowers & trims

Trim Teehniques SINGLE LOOP TRIM

1. With ribbon right side up, tape end of ribbon to end of Whimsy Stick labeled "start here." Twist stick to wrap ribbon around length of stick, leaving 1/s inch of space between wraps.

4. Remove tape from end of ribbon and slide wraps off "start here" end of stick. If wrapping long lengths of trim, slide wraps leaving three to four taped wraps on stick. Repeat wrapping and taping trim length. Overlap tape ends wben applying. Remove stick from wraps before sewing.

2. Push wraps toward "start here" end, adjusting ribbon so it lies side by side and wraps are smooth. Continue wrapping and adjusting until entire length of stick is covered. If wraps are too tight, they are difficult to remove from stick.

3. Apply tape over center of wraps, on both sides of stick.

5. After removing stick, place taped trim under presser foot of your sewing machine and ew close to edge of wraps. Make sure you do not sew through tape. Remove tape to finish.


SCALLOPED TRIM These scallops quickly add style and pizzazz wherever they are sewn. Apply in a straight line (as shown), along a curved line, or extending off an edge.

1. Make single loop (pg

XX) trim using a Whimsy Stick wider than width of ribbon. Count number of loops in a scallop (seven shown) and fold trim up.

2. Pivot trim having upper loop lie over lower loop forming a point. Pin to hold. Do the same along length of trim.

Scalloped trims are layered and featured on the hem of a sundress .

12

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

3. On a pinning surface, mark a dot on fabric for each point of scallops (shown spaced 21.h inches). Pin scallop points to marked dots. If sewing trim to fabric, glue-baste in place and stitch over trim seam.


book excerpt whimsy flowers & trims

ZIGZAG TRIM This easy-to-make zigzag trim is a refreshing new approach to using single loop trim. Make trim using a two-sided ribbon as both sides show equally. Finished zigzag trim is twice as wide as looped trim.

1. Make single loop (page 11) trim

3. Untwist trim to create zigzag pattern. Q

using a short (L=l.4 to 1.6) stitch length and a small seam allowance.

2. Insert blade of seam ripper between loops. Carefully cut sewing threads between every loop.

Zigzag trim featured on skirt of a sundress. (See more details and how-to for this dress in our next issue, #154!)

Scalloped trims made with two-tone ribbon are stacked and shown around neck of a purchased sweater.

SewBeautifulmag.com

13


fashion embellishing t-shirts

~ason after season,

~ summer fashions include a selection of lace-embellished T-shirts. A retail T-shirt with lace is dressier, but the embellishment can add significant cost to what would otherwise be an inexpensive garment. Using your stash of lace pieces and scraps, you can create these fun, fashionforward looks at a fraction of the cost and in most cases, in little more than an hour. NOTE: Wet and dry lace and

launder shirts before proceeding to account for any shrinkage.

What you'll need _____ ______ ,

Black Lace Zigzag T \

I

General Supplies Mettler 60wt thread in black, gray and white White Sulky Machine Embroidery Thread Sewing machine needle for knits Seam ripper Small sharp scissors Wash-away, air-soluble or heat soluble marking pen Tear-away, wash-away or heat-away Sulky stabilizer Floriani Dream Weave Glass head pins 0-tips Fabric glue Fabric glue stick Hand sewing needle

I

I I I I I

This T-shirt style has a bias neck binding, which enabled me to hide the raw lace edge in the binding. Shirt used: Heather gray 100 percent cotton %-length sleeve T-shirt with button neckline from Gap Kid (size 7-8 shown) Lace used: 18-inch-long piece of black zigzag lace from stash

I

~----------------------~/ SewBeautifulmag.com

15


Lace Overlay Henley

ripper

FIGURE 1

FIGURE 2

This top takes a little more planning. First things first, make sure your lace yardage is w ide enough to reach over the shirt from side seam to side seam w ith slight give, and choose a shirt that isn't supposed to fit tightly; you don't want the knit to stretch across the body more than the lace can stretch. Also, if there is a centered design, see to it that the lace is positioned on top of the shirt so that the motif is in the right place (usually centered).

FIGURE 4

Shirt used: Mottled black and white 100 percent cotton 34-length sleeve shirt from Old Navy (size 5-6 shown, has two patch pockets on front and a drawstring hem) Lace used: Square of lace yardage with finished edges 131h inches long x 20 inches deep (lace sample is from Dentelle De Calais made in France) and 18 inches of 5/s-inch-wide black lace edging 1. Place panel just above patch

FIGURE 3

1. Mark center of front neckline with a marking pen, and extend a line down center of shirt. Using a seam ripper, carefully take out stitches from binding at center neckline just w ide enough to slip lace edge up under open binding (fig. 1). 2. Lightly run glue stick over both sides of top lace edge. Slide lace up under opened binding (fig. 2). Finger press to adhere glue and restitch binding with matching gray thread to secure lace under binding. Just in the ditch of where binding meets lace, straight stitch a second time with a short stitch (L=2.0) using black thread; this wi ll keep lace from pulling out of a single stitch line. 3. Using glue stick on wrong side of lace, lightly adhere strip down top making sure it is centered. Turn under lace edge twice the hemline width; pin. Back sewing area with chosen stabilizer. 4. Using a zigzag (W and L = 3.0),

black thread in machine and gray thread in bobbin, stitch down edges following lace line (fig. 3). Check to make sure zigzag stitching catches turned-under lace edge at bottom of top; if not, hand stitch to secure.

16

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

pockets; make sure you have enough width for a 'A-inch-wide seam allowance at both sides . Trim any excess lace.

FIGURE 5

2. Making sure piece is parallel with garment right side, position piece so it is right side down next to shirt and side seam allowance (raw edge) extends onto shirt beyond side seam (fig. 4). Pin lace in position down seam starting at underarm.

3. Place a piece of iron-away stabilizer (must be able to see through chosen stabilizer) on top over side seam, take to machine and baste lace down seam, making sure not to catch back of shirt (fig. 5). 4. Fold piece to front to make sure positioning will be correct once permanently attached. Fold back and stitch permanently along basting line.

FIGURE 6

5. To shape lace up angled armscye, fold excess lace under at angle of shirt/ sleeve seam and press into position with an i.ron to create a foldline (fig. 6). Fold lace back to wrong side; pin matching foldline to seamline. Top with iron-away stabilizer and baste lace onto armscye from underarm to neckband. Again double check positioning and stitch permanently. 6. Trim away excess lace from stitch line leaving a scant 1/8-inch seam allowance. At this point, lace is attached at one side and angled up right armscye.

FIGURE 7


fashion embellishing t-shirts Pull header thread to gather lace

~ ---------FIGURE 8

Zigzag lace to neckline

FIGURE 9

7. To complete lace panel, place

down onto shirt (attached at one side) and very carefully cut lace panel into shape 1/s inch larger all around than neckline and armscye (fig. 7). Fold under 'ls-inch edge all around neck, armscye and side seam; pin. Using a stretch stitch (slight zigzag) and chosen stabilizer, stitch lace down along seamlines.

8. To lend a little more femininity to the T and cover stretch stitching around neckline, gather 18 inches of black lace edging by pulling a header thread (fig. 8). Pin just over front neckline and zigzag stitch to attach (W=2.5; L=3.0) (fig. 9). Turn under raw edges on each end and stitch by hand for a finished edge.

Lace Bib T Shirt used: Light periwinkle T-shirt from VF outlet (size small shown) NOTE: This particular T has 5 percent stretch, but I liked the style and color combination. yYpically, unless you're working with stretch lace, a no-stretch cotton Tis optimal.

where neckband joins shirt (fig. 10). Take lace to machine and stay-stitch on top of traced line. 3. Cut around lace curve Y-i inch above stay-stitching and press under seam allowance along stay-stitching line.

4. Carefully pin lace to neckline so that fold rides flush with neckband seam. Take shirt to machine, back area with tear-away or heat-away stabilizer and topstitch lace to neckline, using a scant 1/16-inch seam allowance (fig. 11). Sew with a 1/,5" seam

Lace used: Rectangle of lace yardage

6-1h inches wide x 20 inches deep (lace sample is from Dentelle De Calais made in France) and 2 yards white Swiss edging with black bead edge from Farmhouse Fabrics 1. True up lace panel so that it is a

consistent width all the way down. Panel shown measures 61h inches wide. 2. Place lace panel on T-shirt centered and so that it is 1 inch above neckline curve. Trace curve of neckline on lace panel following lip

FIGURE 11 FIGURE 10 SewBeautifulmag.com

17


5. Dot back side of lace panel with glue, position straight clown shirt and finger press to secure. 6. Starting at left neck edge right where lace panel is attached begin positioning and pinning lace edging directly on top of raw panel edge. Leave at least a 2-inch tail above lace panel (fig. 12). Continue straight clown lace panel, and approximately 3fai inch from bottom edge, fold in a miter to create a corner; refer to figure 3. Press, pin and take to machine. Remove enough pins so you can comfortably stitch in miter. Press . Repin lace edging. FIGURE 12

7. Continue pinning edging straight across to opposite corner and repeat mitering proces . Pin edging straight up right side of lace panel. 8. When you reach point where lace bib ends at neck edge, create a slight miter so that lace wil l be positioned to curve around neckline (fig. 13). Stitch like previous miters. 9. From encl of lace, pull out a header thread and gradually draw up lace to curve around back of neckline, pinning it in ditch of band seam, a

FIGURE 13

Pin edging in ditch of seam

FIGURE 14

18

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

you did front lace panel (fig. 14). Continue around to where your lace meets at opposite side and join lace ends in a miter, mirror imaging the one you created on the right side. Trim away excess lace, turn under raw ends and band stitch. 10. Make sure panel and edging are positioned in a pleasing, even fashion. Place a layer of stabilizer inside shirt underneath panel. Take shirt to machine and baste stitch in header of lace edging, attaching panel and edging all the way around shirt. Stitch carefu lly around neckline to ensure lace is positioned evenly around neckband. 11. Change machine to a zigzag (1=3.0; W = 2.5) and zigzag header of edging completely around bib and neckline (fig. 15).

12. If back lace wants to flip up, take a hand needle with black thread and tack lace down, stitching right over black clots in lace. This is virtually invisible. NOTE: You don 't want this design to .fit terribly snuggly as it will distort the lace bib across the bustline.


fas hion embellishing t-shirts Downton Abbey Tank

Two tabs left to extend lace to neckband

I call this the Downton Abby Tank (page 14, left), not because it emulates the fashions of that era, which it clearly does not, but because I cut out the lace motifs, positioned and pinned them to the tank and hand appliqued around the outer edges, all while watching Season 3 of Downton on Blu-ray.

FIGUR E 17

Shirt u sed : Sleeveless black and white striped tank top from the Gap (size medium shown) Lace u s e d: Scrap of black lace leftover from Overlay Henley

1. Cut out around small black lace motif, removing most if not all netting base. Avoid clipping any motif threads. 2. Position motif under strap (consult photo on page 14 for p lacement) and above bustline in a pleasing fashion. Pin all around. 3. Hand applique in small stitches over edge stitching of applique, working completely around outer borders of designs.

4. Select a larger motif and cut out, this time leaving some netting around design edge (see photo on page 18). 5. Pin and stitch as you did the smaller motif, following outermost edges of entire motif not loose netting. NOTE: Add seed beads or sequins for glitz if desired.

FIGURE 16

Cut away excess lace at bottom of shirt leaving enough lace to fold under depth of shirt hem. FIGURE 18

4. Once lace is placed as desired, use a Q-tip to dab fabric glue under each "tab" along sides of lace; finger press to secure to shirt (fig. 17). Press from back side to dry glue.

5 . Back with tear-away or heat-away stabilizer. Take shirt to machine positioning needle in channel that runs at base of tabs (fig. 18). Using a stitch length of 2.0, straight stitch lace to shirt following scalloped line of channel. Be careful not to catch back of shirt in your stitching. 6. Check to see that turned-under edge was caught in your initial stitching; if not, simply hand stitch loose edges.

FIGURE 19

Striped Guipure T This simple design takes barely an hour to complete. Lace like this is durable and can be clipped between the bridging w ithout unraveling. Shirt used: Basic Striped T from the Gap (size X small shown) Lace u sed : 1 yard of antique guipure from my stash (a gift from a family friend)

1. Find center of T-shirt by folding in half and pressing; if desired, trace over impression with a marking pen. 2. Clip guipure so that it is in a curve that echoes curve of neck below neckband. As shown, all joins above center circle design were removed, but two side tabs were left intact to extend lace to neckband (fig. 16). This particular lace can be clipped without design unraveling. 3. Pin lace down shirt, positioning center of each circle on centerline.

Lace Leaves Button-Front Shirt Not a T-shirt, but a comfortable frontbutton knit design, this top seemed a perfect canvas for the stark white leaf motif lace from Farmouse Fabrics. The beauty of this lace is that motifs can be carefully clipped apart along the bridge stitching so designs can be p laced at whim. Shirt used: Black sleeveless buttondown top from VF Outlet (Pink •Rose brand) Rayon/spandex knit (size small)

Shirt front

ws

Shirt back

ws

FIGURE 20

Lace used: 1 yard white lace from Farmhouse Fabrics. 1. Carefully clip off motif cluster and

a single leaf and position at lower right side (facing you) of top as desired. Play around with positioning until it suits you. Pin (fig. 19). Press warm iron on top of placement to indent design through to wrong side. NOTE: This is a dense lace, and the

rayon knit is soft, so it easily makes an "embossed" indent with the pressure and heat of the iron. 2. Turn to wrong side and cut a circle of Floriani Dream Weave Fusible larger than indent of each motif; place over indents and press (fig. 20). This is a permanent stabilizer. Rayon SewBeautifulmag.com

19


defica/e;--;,.«.({t:i ~\'

. ,,

slllc11es1

., ~

~--------------------,

ip@,1-----·---------~~------~---------

t'incsl otton,,;. linen. Shirt front RS

1-;tlk.».

t'rcnch 0 t:nglt,;;h Lace,\;

lor all your smod.in5 Q,,."J heirloom

Label your "uniquely yours" items with 100% woven, sew-on, fabric labels to give them a truly professional finish! Our labels are offered in many font styles, colors, and small quantities.

co

(J_

h

FIGURE 21

knit is very soft and stretchy; if you back it with a general fabric stabilizer it will show, and if you don't back it at all, the stitching will pucker. Dream Weave is perfect.

tl°""·

:\u~trnlt,m 'kJ&WllC~. \l,Jci'-irJ oi!k rtoch ·. Pearl But k)n~. '!'attn~~- \X\."X.'I l)l:mkcin\:-, l\:x.""'I.."". ~'"dlt m.;. ll\ilk cl\alm Ribbon

3. Thread machine with white rayon machine embroidery thread; thread bobbin with black sewing thread. Set machine to a small applique stitch (1=1.0; W=l.5). Back design with chosen stabilizer. Applique around all outer edges of motif. Go slowly and pivot as many times as needed to follow curves and points of lace border.

4. Position remaining lace straight down left side of top so that it ends just below collar. Press and indent as you did for motifs. Turn to wrong side and back with a strip of Floriani Dream Weave.

5. Return to right side. To glue, remove pins from bottom half of strip. Fold back on top of upper half of lace strip. Slip a piece of paper between lace layers so glue will not seep through. Using a Q-tip and fabric glue, dot all around edges of lace (fig. 21). Flip lace back clown position to design indent (created from earlier pressing). Press to adhere glue. Unpin top half of lace and repeat. 6. Applique around all outer side edges of strip as you did for motifs.(IJ)

Featuring the finest quality fabrics and trims available for your sewing and heirloom projects!

Workshops scheduled for 2014: Cindy Foose Mayl4-16 November 13-15

Gail Doane August7-9

Claudia Newton June 19-21

Amelia Johanson has served as both editor and associate editor for Sew Beautiful magazine for 25 years, and in that capacity has contributed countless sewing articles to its pages. She edited many Martha Pullen publications and conceptualized and co-authored Sewing for a Royal Baby. She graduated from the University of Missouri with degrees in magazine journalism and home economics journalism and currently serves as a book acquisitions editor for F+W Media. She and her family live in Medina, Ohio

20

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

Shop online & view our exquisite selection ofMaline Laces and luxury fabrics!

GW!te'le d'lea/?~S/ a,'ze SetO/v p: 803.827.1801 f: 803.827.2026 270 Church Road, Beech Island SC 29842

6

mp£


_______ MASTER the Method ______ _ g/~{_52)~

~

Meets Shark's Teeth

Article by Lindsay Wilkes; Dress by Donna Williams

22

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


master the method

~favorite part of t__///{,- being a pattern

e) These techn iques were sewn on Pfaff

Press each line

14730 an d Husqva rn a Vi ki ng Ruby sewing machines .

designer is inspiring creativity in others. Through my pattern line, The Cottage Mama, I create classic, vintage-inspired children's clothing patterns. I often get emails from customers sharing their beautiful creations with me .. .it's the highlight of my job.

How to create shark's teeth ... You will make shark's teeth first and then cut out bib and apron pattern pieces. Find shark's teeth template on pullout centerfold . 1. Mark horizontal lines every 3;.i inch w ith wash-away marking pen.

FIGURE 1

2. Fold and iron each line (fig. 1).

Donna Williams made The Cottage Mama "Georgia Vintage Dress" pattern, embellishing it with a Shark's Teeth technique she had seen more than 20 years ago in Sew Beautiful magazine (Summer 1991, Volume 4, Number 4). It was inspiration from two different sources brought together in one magnificent garment. The dress was vintage, classic and heirloom quality, yet still modern for today's child. It combined solid and printed fabric as well as trim. It was, by my definition, pe1fection. By incorporating the following changes into the "Georgia Vintage Dress" pattern, you can create the same look. -Lindsay

Sew a %" tuck on each fo ld; press tucks down

3. Sew a 3/s-inch tuck on each fold. 4. Iron all tucks clown toward bottom edge of fabric (fig. 2). Turn fabric over

and press backside of tucks, pulling fabric as you press. 5. Trace shark's teeth design lines using template provided on centerfold (figs. 3 & 4). All vertical lines are perpendicular to fold of tuck.

FIGURE 2

6. Cut through each vertical line

marked on tuck with sharp scissors. Clip up to but not through stitching line.

Mark fabric using template

7. Turn tucked fabric to wrong side and fold back first tuck so it is only tuck showing (fig. 5).

What you'll need ___________ , \

Pattern "Georgia Vintage Dress" by The Cottage Mama, View A minus the collar (size 6 month to 10 years available in paper and PDF download at thecottagemama. com/shop) Shark's Teeth Template on pullout centerfo ld

Fabric (Use fabric yardage guide per pattern instructions, however with the apron you will eliminate one of the overskirt pieces on the double layer skirt thus reducing yardage.) Main Dress: Hello Sunsh ine by Ri ley Blake Designs Bib and Apron: 3Ji yard Robert Kaufmann Kana Cotton - Banana (Bib yardage (Size 5): 11 inches width x 27 inches length* ; Ap ron yardage (Size 5): 33 inches w idth x 27 inches length*)

Trim Piping: Make you r own with Y, to 1 yard of contrast ing fabric or purchase storebought.

9. Sew a zigzag stitch CL and W=2.0) right below stitch line to secure shark's teeth (fig. 7). 10. Move to second row and repeat steps above for rema ining rows. Continue folding and pressing each row until design is fi nished. Press well . NOTE: If some shark's teeth did

not get stitched down with zigzag stitch, tack those down by band, using a very small needle and single thread.

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

8. Fold at cut line to stitched line to make diagonal fold and press (fig. 5). Press as you form each shark's tooth with tip of iron . Continue folding lines creating first row of shark's teeth across bottom tuck row (fig. 6). Press entire row of shark's teeth o n back and front side.

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I I

I

FIGURE 3

Mark fabric using temp late I I

I I

I

I

I

I

I I

I I

I

I

I

I I

I

I I I

I I

I

I

I

I

I

I I

I I

I

FIGURE 4

Fold at cut to stitched line

~--- ______ l/:K?KZ[ Fabnc WS

FIGURE 5

Mark all teeth across bottom tuck

r::<lvlvlvL~

Supplies Tracing paper Wash-away marking pen Quilting ruler *Adjust accordingly based on size.

I

FIGURE 6

Zigzag on front below t uck stitch ing to secure

bzoov~ FIGURE 7

>â&#x201A;Ź:--- - ------------------/' SewBeautifulmag.com

23


How to make the bib . .. 1. Trace bib pattern piece onto

tracing paper to see through it and make sure pattern piece is lined up correctly and vi ually pleasing. Pay attention to placement of sash pattern piece, as it is placed on top of bib and needs to line up nicely with shark's teeth. 2. Using olid Kona cotton fabric for bib, cut a piece 27 inches long x 11 inches wide (for size S). You may need a larger piece if making a size 6 to 10.

3. Mark parallel line 3 inches above bottom raw edge with fabric marking pen. Continue marking 11 to 12 parallel lines 11/,i inches above each other using a quilting ruler. 4 . Sew a tuck % inch wide. Continue

sewing tucks at each fold . 5. Iron all tucks down toward bottom edge. NOTE: The number of

parallel lines that you will draw will vary based on the size dress you are constructing. 6. Cut out bib pattern piece using

traced pattern piece; make special note of your front sash placement. Apply bib to front of dress; however, do not use fusible interfacing. Simply topstitch or edge stitch bib to dress front according to pattern instructions

24

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

and then cut out additional fabric behind bib from front bodice. This will reduce bulk that is added when sewing bib with shark's teeth. This is the same technique used when applying front sash .

How to make the Apron . .. The apron will be made in the same steps as the bib. Shark's teeth will be created first along hem of apron and apron pattern piece cut out with desired size. The "Georgia Vintage Dress" pattern has a double-layered skirt, to create an apron, simply cut width desired (one overskirt piece would be perfect) and use length of original overskirt piece based on size you are sewing. 1. Fold % inch in toward wrong size

of fabric on all three sides of apron and press. Fold another 3ls inch and press again. Leave top edge raw. Machine stitch three sides or sew hem by hand using a blind-stitch. 2. Gather apron as you would skirt in pattern and center it on front of dress. Sew apron in at same time as you would attach skirt. NOTES: Insert

additional piping into top of waist sash or around neckline. Consider using rickrack or other trim instead ofpiping to make this dress your own. The options are endless! G)

Lindsay Wilkes is the owner and designer of The Cottage Mama (thecottagemama . com). a boutique children's clothing and sewing pattern company, and the writer behind the popular sewing and crafting blog, The Cottage Mama (thecottagemama. com/blog). She is known for her use of contemporary printed designer cotton fabric, her love of unique trims, timeless style and vintage details. Lindsay enjoys sewing, cooking, and crafting and all things domestic. She resides in Chicago with her husband and three young children . Donna Williams (isaacandanniesewing. com) has been sewing since she was 10 years old on her mother's Singer Featherweight machine. She made many of her own clothes in high school and college, and even her own wedding gown. Once she had children she learned smocking and French machine sewing and now sews for her grandchildren. Donna has an Etsy sewing shop "Isaac and Annie's Sewing" selling premium cotton fabric for boys and girls prints, quilts, crafts, and clothing and handmade clothes.


feature pattern sweet springtime diaper shirt

Where to find it... Diaper shirt pattern is available on the pullout centerfold.

~~pie,

one-piece baby diaper shirt is a perfect weekend project for heirloom beginners and seasoned stitchers alike. Barbara drafted the design from one she found at an antiques street sale in Holland; the original was cut in one piece, just as this one, but was made with a heavier fabric and had a partial lining. By using Swiss batiste, lace-shaped scallops and delicate hand-embroidered rosebuds, Barbara has created a light and airy diaper shirt that will help baby stay cool and comfortable in warm weather.

How to p-r 9 ll" i 1. Cut an 18- x 33-inch rectangle from

Pattern

Swiss batiste. Lightly starch and iron fabric and laces.

"Sweet Springtime Diaper Shirt" pattern provided on the pul lout centerfold

Fabric

2. Pin pattern to right side of fabr ic on shaping board and use a blue washaway marking pen to trace pattern onto fabric, being sure to mark bisecting lines of scallops well (fig. 1). Mark placement of buttonholes, buttons and embroidered rosebuds. Remove pattern, but do not cut out fabric yet.

1h yard Swiss cotton batiste

Thread Tanne 80 weight

Floss DMC Six Stranded Embroidery, #3713 vy It salmon Madeira Silk Floss, #1210 green

Laces 1% yards of 'h- or %-inch-wide lace insertion 3 yards Y2- or %-inch-wide lace edging

Notions

I

I I I

Four %-inch mother-of-pearl buttons Spray starch Lace shaping board Pins Blue wash-away marking pen

18'

I

I

I I

Batiste RS

I I I I

Th is proj ect w as sew n o n a Pfaff 5150 sew ing m achine.

I I I

161h'

FIGURE 1

SewBeautifulmag.com

29


Batiste RS Pull header thread

FIGURE 28

FIGURE 2A

Batiste RS

Pin at points A and B

Lace triangle

FIGURE 48

FIGURE 4A

FIGURE 3

Batiste RS

Zigzag insertion to batiste A /

At peaks. pivot fabric with needle down

\

FIGURE 6

FIGURE 5

How to make it ... SHAPE LACE INSERTION 1. Working from left to right and starting at left front edge, lay top edge of lace insertion on upper drawn line of scallop, leaving about 1 inch of lace extending over center front edge (fig. 2a). Curve lace to fit first scallop by pulling one header thread from top of lace insertion. Pin lace header to hold at every 'l2 to ~ inch, inserting pins at an angle (fig. 2b). 2. When you reach point of scallop, place a pin at both top (point A) and bottom point (point B) of bisecting point of scallop (fig. 3). Fold lace back on itself from right to left, remove pin from point B and place pin back through both layers in same location (fig. 4a). Lay lace back to right to reveal a mitered point (fig. 4b).

3. Continue shaping lace insertion along one scallop at a time,

30

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

manipulating lace-to-scallop curves and mitering each point. After pinning last scallop on right center front, leave about 1 inch of lace extending over edge (fig. S). 4. Set machine to a narrow zigzag stitch (L = 0.6; W = 1.5) and sew

header of shaped lace insertion to fabric around entire scalloped edge. When you reach top of each mitered point A, stop machine with needle down, lift presser foot, pivot fabric and lower presser foot again before continuing to stitch down next scallop (fig. 6). 5. Working slowly and deliberately, carefully trim away excess fabric from behind lace scallop very close to zigzag stitching, w ithout cutting into stitching or lace (fig. 7). 6. Stitch over each mitered fold using

a narrow zigzag stitch. Carefully trim away excess lace from fold under scalloped lace (fig. 8).

FIGURE 7

Stitch over mitered fold

~ Trim excess lace

FIGURE 8


feature pattern sweet springtime diaper shirt

Dia er shirt opened flat right side

SewBeautifulmag.com

31


Continue shaping one scallop at a time

At peaks, pivot fabric with needle down

FIGURE 9

Lace edging

ws

FIGURE 12

FIGURE 10

FINISHING

1. Working from left to right, pull

1. Using pattern markings as a guide, machine-stitch buttonholes onto straps and center front.

header thread to curve lace edging along bottom edge of shaped lace scallops, leaving about 1 inch of lace extending over center front edge. Butt edges of laces adjacent to one another and use a narrow zigzag stitch (L = 0.6; W = 1.5) to sew laces together as you go (fig. 9).

2 . When you reach top points of each scallop, stop machine with needle down, lift presser foot, pivot fabric and lower presser foot again before continuing to stitch down next scallop (fig. 10). Note that there is no miter in lace edging as there was in lace insertion; pivoting here will create a tiny ruffle at points of lace edging.

Lace edging

ATTACH LACE TO SHIRT EDGES

FIGURE 13

Turn under hem, stitch in place Trim away excess

G

'tJg~

~~

~~ Ji ~

FIG UR E 14

32

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

FIGURE 11

ATTACH LACE EDGING

3. Continue shaping and stitching lace edging to scallops, leaving 1 inch of lace extending at end over right front edge (fig. 11).

ws

Zigzag edges of lace together

1. Starting at bottom left edge of shirt

and working on top of excess lace from scallops, lay right side of lace to right side of fabric along shirt edge, leaving about 1A inch excess beyond bottom edge (fig. 12). Use a short, straight stitch (L = 0.8) to sew lace header to fabric around entire shirt; pull header threads to adjust lace around any curves as you go (fig. 13).

2 . Trim fabric seam allowance to about 'Is inch all the way around shirt. Starting at lower left edge, zigzag stitch (L = LO; W = 2.5) over edge of fabric and into lace heading to create a rolled and whipped seam. 3. Trim away excess lace edging from center front edges and turn under a tiny hem; stitch hem in place by hand (fig. 14).

2.Embroider bullion rosebuds in marked locations: a. Use two strands of #3713 vy It salmon floss to work a seven-wrap bullion stitch for left petal and an eight- or nine-wrap bullion for right petal.

b. Use one strand of #1210 green silk floss to stitch lazy daisy leaves onto each side of rosebud. 3. Sew on buttons. 4. Rinse garment to remove all blue markings; press. E) Barbara Carter's fascination with heirloom sewing and embroidery led her from sewing for family to teaching classes in the needle arts. Travelling abroad to visit museums, study and collect antiques has enhanced and inspired her love of clothing and embroidery. Barbara currently serves as Vice President of the Houston Embroidery Guild and on the board of the Midnight Oil Smockers, groups that help to satisfy her interest in historical needlearts as she continues to learn .


Where to find it... Dress pattern is available on the pullout centerfold in sizes 3-6.

NOTE: We were unable to obtain rights to reprint the Richard Avedon photo of Caroline in the original dress. An online search for "Richard Avedon photos of the Kennedys" will lead you to images if the dress. The book The Kennedy's Portrait of a Family (Harper Coffins, 2007) is stiff available for purchase.


feature pattern white house princess

WHITE G~

H c)

~

A

REPRODUCTION OF CAR

ENNEDY's HEIRLOOM DRESS By Kathy Barnard

d 'this country had a Caroline Kennedy would have been an American princess. It was just by chance that a portrait of her at about age 4 or 5 wearing an organdy heirloom dress caught my eye. I was in a bookstore, casually thumbing through a book featuring a collection of unpublished Kennedy family portraits when I happened across 10 pages featuring Caroline with her dad, the late President John F. Kennedy. I knew that anyone with a basic knowledge of heirloom techniques could make this spectacular organdy dress. It's simple in style with its buttonshoulder bodice and gathered skirt, yet still ornate-looking with rows of lace and organdy embroidered insertion, trimmed with embroidered edging and detailed with gathered lace. -Kathy

t_/ ~oyal family,

What you'll need __

Getting started .

Pattern

Prewash organdy to soften fabric. Machine wash on cold with mild detergent like Aqualawn on a gentle cycle. Allow to air dry a few minutes until just damp and press. NOTE: The embroidered lawn was not prewashed, for fear it may pucker around the embroidery, should be dry-cleaned.

"White House Princess" on the pullout centerfold (sizes 3-6)

Fabric (see yardage requirements for each size on layout guide) PA yards cotton embroidered voile (from B and J Fabrics sku 737224202) (borders on both sides and insertions cut from center) 1 yard organdy Y2 yard cotton batiste for skirt lining

How to cut

Lace

1. Cut scalloped border from each

6 yards of %-inch-wide lace insertion 12 yards of %-inch-wide lace edging

Notions Six shank pearl buttons Two 'A-inch two-hole or four-hole buttons

Supplies 80wt thread for lace application 50wt thread for construction Size 65 or 70 machine needles Pilotâ&#x201E;˘ Frixion iron-away colored marking pens Quilter's ruler Pinning board Glass head pins

1

I I I I I

I I I

I I

E) This project was sewn on a Pfaff sewing machine.

: I

I

>t----------------------~'

it .

side of embroidered fabric for front and back skirt edging. The size 4 dress shown has an SO-inch finished skirt circumference (40 inches front and back before seams). Cut skirt fabrics 42 inches long to allow for trimming side seams once all rows are joined. Finished width of border shown is 7 inches.

2. Cut a wide insertion strip from wider vine of embroidered flowers for bodice. Allow % inch of allowance from edge of embroidery to cut edge of fabric on each side (fi.g. 1). There are no side seams on bodice, it is one continuous piece from center back to center back.

Cut

The embroidered cotton voile yardage comes with a scalloped border on each edge with stripes of embroidery running between the borders. The wide edging for the skirt was cut from each edge, and the remaining yardage was cut into strips to create the wide and narrow insertions. Lace insertion joins the strips to create the needed yardage from which to cut the bodice and skirt. Cotton organdy lines the bodice and creates the shoulder strap extensions. The skirt is constructed of embroidered voile, lace and organdy with a gathered skirt lining of white cotton batiste. Gathered lace edging trims the insertions and outlines the bodice edge. The bodice buttons in the back and at the shoulders. FIGURE 1

SewBeautifulmag.com

35


Lace insertion is joined to fabric using the roll-andwhip method. Since the organdy does not roll and whip, read instructions below carefully to create a rolled-and-whipped look.

fingernail. Organdy creases beautifully and stays put. Roll and whip with same zigzag setting along fold edge of crease, catching lace header in stitching (fig. 5).

- T

~n,...

Gather lace on top of insertion seams: Roll and whip seam on cotton lawn: 1. Pin lace edge 1/8 inch from raw edge of cotton edging or insertion. Sew a securing stitch along lace header edge before rolling and whipping. Use a straight stitch or a very narrow zigzag (W=l.0; L=l.5 or 2.0). I found this reduced skipped spots, or "holidays" in the lace join (fig. 2).

1. Pull header thread to gather lace edging. Gather very slightly to achieve more of a fluttered look than a tightly gather look. Pin to outer edges of lace/fabric joins with lace facing down along bottom seam and up along top seam; refer to photos. 2. Zigzag over header edge from right side, catching

rolled-and-whipped seam on wrong side.

2. To roll and whip seam, set zigzag to CW=3.0) and

zigzag so that needle strikes into lace header at left and off fabric on right (fig. 3).

Gather lace on edge of bodice:

3. Press seam away from lace. For seam that are not covered by gathered lace edging, zigzag once more right over lace/fabric seam from right side using a narrow, opened zigzag (W=l.O;L=l.5) (fig. 4). This neatens seam and keeps it from flipping up behind lace. It is a worthy extra step. For seams with lace edging, zigzagging edging secures seam in same way.

1. Place bodice on pinning board. Pin gathered lace with scalloped edge facing in toward bodice. Stab pin header edge to stay-stitching along bodice neck and straps leaving a IA-inch seam allowance extending along edges. Gather less around concave curves (neck and armholes) and more around convex curves (straps). TIP: Use clear tape to hold down and control gathers temporarily. Pin lace flat. Zigzag around header edge.

Roll and whip seam on organdy:

1. Repeat step 1 above. 2. Since organdy is too stiff to roll and whip properly, crease 'h-inch allowance toward lace using your Zigzag tightens and pulls fabric inward

Ve' organdy edge

2. Clip neck and arm curve seam allowance to stitching and notch around strap curves. Remove tape and flip lace upward and finger press seam allowance back toward bodice on wrong side. Press with an iron to flatten well.

3. From right side, zigzag along lace join, catching fold edge of seam allowance (fig. 6). 4. Using embroidery scissors, carefully trim away seam allowance next to stitching on wrong side.

\Needle off edge of fabric

Organdy RS

Long, narrow zigzag

Fabric will roll as it is stretched

Lace header

FIGURE 2 Zigzag to catch seam

Cotton fabric RS

FIGURE 3

Organdy seam

Press fabric seam over lace before finishing seam

se"am FIGURE 4

36

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

FIGURE 5

Bodice RS

FIGURE 6


feature pattern white house princess

3. Cut narrow insertion strips of small flowers from remaining embroidered fabric. Allow 1h inch from edge of embroidery to cut edge of fabric; refer to figure 1. Some strips will not have enough allowance and will be wasted. Reserve three strips with seam allowances (two for skirt and one for bodice).

4. Cut or tear two strips of organdy 42 inches wide x 8'h inches long each for front and back skirt. The finished length of the skirt is 15 inches for a size 4. Adjust length of skirt to taste. 5. Cut a strip of organdy long enough and wide enough to accommodate bodice lining. Remember, front and backs are one continuous piece with no side seams.

6. Cut or tear two 30-inch-wide x 16-inch-long strips of batiste for the skirt lining. Lining is sewn in separately from skirt. It is less full to reduce bulk at waist seam. Hem allowance is 21/.i inches deep. 7. Cut one 11/.i- x 10-inch placket strip from selvedge edge of organdy. 8. Cut one 11/.i-inch x 10-inch placket strip from selvedge edge of batiste.

9. Cut two 11/.i-inch x 8-inch strips of organdy for back placket facings (cut these from each side of organdy fabric and reserve middle for bodice lining strip).

How to construct it .. SKIRT 1. Build skin border from bottom up. Join lace and insertions one row at a time ending lace insertion at top. NOTE: !found that side seams are much neater if you create an independent front and back separately and then join them with French seams on each side after all insertions are joined.

ends up being It will all be gathered into the bodice, so if you have to cut 2 inches ojf to meet at scallop point don't worry. 4. Sew one side seam with a French

seam using 50wt thread so that sca11op peak aligns on right side once seam is complete. Press. 5. Gather lace slightly and pin to lace insertion seams as shown. Apply lace with a zigzag using 80wt thread (see side bar for application if needed).

2. Sew organdy to prepared bottom portion of skirt with a rolled-andwhipped seam along lace insertion (see facing page for application if needed). 3. Before attaching gathered lace edging, trim each side skirt to even the side seam edges. Cut side seam where scallop edging comes to a point in the valley and allow 1h-inch seam allowances (fig. 7). NOTE: It does not matter how wide your skirt

FIGURE 7

SewBeautifulmag.com

37


6. Sew final side seam with a French seam matching scallop peak as before. Make sure laces are in the correct direction before sewing seam. 7. Mark tuck lines with iron-away

Frixion pen. NOTE: I like these pens because they apply dark like an ink pen and vanish completely when pressed. Working with skirt in a tube, stitch only one tuck at a time, mark first tuck line PA inches from lace seam. Fold and press on line (line wi ll disappear). Stitch a 1A inch tuck with 80wt thread. Repeat for second tuck, marking it 1 inch from stitching line of first tuck. This creates continuous tuck over each side seam. 8. Mark center front and center back at waist. Draw a 5-inch line at center back for placket. Straight stitch a V along drawn line as shown using a 1.5 stitch length (fig. 8). Cut along drawn line to open slit. Apply placket strip as a continuou bound placket. Allow left side to extend and press right side inside skirt. 9. Run gathering stitching in top of skirt with 50wt thread stitching 1A inch and ~ inch from raw edge with a 4.0 stitch length. Do not draw up gathers at this time. Set skirt aside to construct bodice.

BODICE 1. Build bodice fabr ic from bottom

up starting with wide embroidered strip. Join lace insertions and narrow embroidered strip ending with insertion.

2. Sew gathered lace edging to first lace joined with lace facing down.

3. Place join strips on top of organdy strip cut for bodice. Align bottom edges and pin well all around . Zigzag across top lace insertion edge to attach it to organdy lining (fig. 9). 4. Baste bottom edges together.

Zigzag I

I

5¡

I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I

Center back

I

FIGURE 8

Organdy lining

FIGURE 9

38

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


fe ature pattern white house princess 5. Place bodice pattern on top and trace around top edge. Cut back edges, but do not cut out top edge . 6. Stay-stitch Y-1 inch from back edges and Y-1 inch inside traced pattern lines along top edge (fig. 10). Cut out top edge along traced line. This will leave a Y-1-inch seam allowance all around except for bottom edge, which is 'l2 inch.

Scrap of organdy over RS

,,_..

-

-

......

;I; ' '

'

',

\

: :~ Stitch , ~! 1.0 I

7. Gather and stitch a small strip of lace edging to top edge of lace on each strap with lace pointing upward; refer to photo. 8. Create lined buttonholes for straps: This method is a little sturdier for delicate fabric that could easily tear with a conventional buttonhole.

FIGURE 11

FIGURE 10

a. Cut two squares of organdy from scraps that are larger than top portion of front straps from lace edge up. b. Mark %-inch buttonholes on right side of bodice front straps; refer to pattern.

Cut slit and stuff

c. Place an organdy square to right

side of strap. Straight stitch a tiny rectangle with a 1.0 stitch around buttonhole line (fig. 11). Cut slit between stitching and push square through buttonhole to wrong side (fig. 12). Flatten and press hole. d. Set machine to a tiny, narrow zigzag setting (Wand L=l.O) and stitch around buttonhole, stitching off edge and catching just the slightest edge of hole seam. When you have stitched one side, change zigzag setting to 2.5 width and center buttonhole under foot to stitch a tack stitch at end. Repeat when you stitch other side of hole to tack stitch other end (fig. 13).

FIGURE 12

Organdy onWS

9. On wrong side. Trim and fold

edge of square facing under to meet lace join edge and pin. From right side, zigzag along lace header edge catching facing on wrong side; refer to figure 8. Stay-stitch organdy square around curve and trim to match bodice.

' RS

O~

11. Place bodice face-up on pinning board and pin gathered lace edging to top edge (see side bar for application instructions).

Zigzag \ \ hole

10. Place back facing strips to right

side back edge of bodice and trim length to fit if needed. Sew a Y-1-inch seam and press facing to inside (do not stitch).

' I Fold under edge of scrap

~

Zigzag along ace, join to catch scrap on back

FIGURE 13

SewBeautifulmag.com

39


T

T

SHT G

1. Sew a 5-inch long continuous

bound placket in center back of batiste skirt lining.

2 . Sew side seams of batiste skirt lining with French seams. 3. Turn hem under 1A inch, and then 2 inches and sew hem.

4. Run gathering stitches in top edge of skirt lining and set aside.

5. Gather organdy skirt to fit bodice (leave back bodice facings extended). Pin skirt to wa ist with skirt placket stopping at facing seams on back bodice. Sew a 1h -inch waist seam . Remove gathering thread that shows below seam (holes will heal naturally and wi ll be covered by gathered lace late1). Do not fin ish seam at this time. 6. Gather batiste skirt lining to bodice, distributing fu ll ness even ly and matching side seams, center front and back edges. Wrap back facings over skirt lining and stitch a 1h-inch seam. 7. titch again Y,6 inch from seam and trim seam allowance next to second row of stitching. Overcast tiny seam edge with a zigzag (W=3.0; L=l.5 or 2 .0). 8. Flip back bodice up and back bodice facings to inside. 9. Gather lace to waist seam and

zigzag stitch from right side. Turn lace ends under at each end. 10. Mark and stitch buttonholes and

sew buttons on back bodice or use beauty pins to close. 11. Stitch two pearl shank buttons to

back bodice straps. To secure buttons to delicate fabric, use tiny 1/s-inch flat button on wrong side. Sew both buttons on at the same time. Ei) Kathy Barnard was employed as a designer/writer/instructor at Martha Pullen Company between 1992 and 2013 . She served as editorial director of Sew Beautiful magazine for 19 of those years. She designed many of the patterns for the Sew Beautiful Pattern Collection and taught design and construction techniques on Martha's Sewing Room PBS television show for 13 years (now available on MPTV). Her most recent project includes co-editing Sewing for a Royal Baby with long time friend and co-editor, Amelia Johanson (released in July 2013 by F+W Media). She holds a BS degree in Apparel Design and Consumer Affairs from Auburn University (1988). She retired from Martha Pullen Company in March 2013 and now enjoys spending time with her son, Aiden (9) and helping her husband with their family business.

40

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


inspiration smocking

SMOCKING

~nogrammed and smocked clothing are t_//"[, ;~on-trend as it gets for boutique-loving moms these days, but we sewists know the truth: there is nothing mass-produced that couldn't be made better with our own two hands! Take your custom sewing to the next level with Frances Messina Jones's stylish smocked monogram designs (francesmessinajones. com). Letter designs are offered in both small and large sizes and can be used singly, in a trio or even overlapping; plus, ornamental motifs are included for framing your designs. Extra smocking graph paper is provided with the Smocked Monograms booklet so that you can sketch out a monogram layout before stitching. Monograms a.re shown here on brightly colored spring dresses and a fun bag; consider stitching a monogram in white or ecru on baby's christening gown, or create a one-of-a-kind smocked ring bearer's pillow. G) TOP LEFT (TOP LEFT ON FACING PAGE) Pattern is "The Bishop Dress" by Ellen McCarn; lavender chevron print is by Riley Blake Designs. Ruffle sleeves are trimmed with lime rickrack. Lime chevron applique on dress hem was created using a Quick Points Ruler. Monogram smocking design includes geometric accents. ABOVE Aqua polka dot print is by Michael Miller and floral print is by Amy Butler. Bag top seam is accented with mini aqua pompom trim, and smocked panel is lined with pink piping. Monogram smocking design includes a simple geometric border on top and bottom.

Frances Messina Jones is a smocking designer and teacher of smocking and heirloom children's clothing. She is self-taught and her interest in smocking began 32 years ago. She began designing smocking plates in 2001, and in 2008 created a line of patterns called Katie Beth Designs. Her smocking plates and kits are available online from her website, francesmessinajones.com.

TOP RIGHT (BOTTOM LEFT ON FACING PAGE) Pattern is "The Bishop Dress " by Ellen Mccarn; lavender chevron print is by Riley Blake Designs. Ruffle sleeves are trimmed with lime rickrack. Lime chevron applique on dress hem was created using a Quick Points Ruler. Monogram smocking design includes geometric accents. FACING PAGE, RIGHT Pattern is "Jacqueline" by The Children's Corner; floral print is by Fabric Finders. Collar is accented with mini lavender pompom trim . Monogram smocking design includes a floral design motif on left and right.

SewBeautifulmag.com

43


e prettiest pairing of white and the blush

a soft pastel give our springtime collection projects the gentle splendor you expect heirloom sewing.


gallery springtime heirlooms

Angel Babe Sampler By Wendy Schoen â&#x20AC;˘ Instructions on page 54

Create a sweetly nostalgic, shadow-embroidered sampler for a special baby. Embroidery design is provided on the pullout centerfold.

SewBeautifulmag.com

45


Cloverleaf Baby Wrap Blanket By fan Moore â&#x20AC;˘ Instructions on page 60 The unique design of this simple swaddle blanket provides unlimited opportunities for embellishing with your favorite machine or hand embroideries or appliques. Blanket pattern is provided on the pullout centerfold.

Sew Beautiful ApriVMay 2014


Harrison's Homeco By Martha Broyles â&#x20AC;˘ Ins Adapt New Orleans-style with these sweetly stitch

fleur-de-lis and streetcar Embroidery design is provided on t

r '

47


' I ApriVMay 2014


Olivia Blouse from Blank To Beautiful By Hope Yoder â&#x20AC;˘ Jnstructiom

011

page 73

Combine blank linens with vintage-look machine embroidery and delicate trims to create a romantic women's blouse.


j

'

,..r

.. ..â&#x20AC;¢

54

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

......

..........

7


how-to springtime heirlooms

~r:~>z,e

heirlooms

X INSTRUCTIONS

Angel Babe Sampler By Wendy Schoen (from page 45) Wha~

rl..1'11

~c"d

Embroidery Design

'I I

"Angel Babe Sampler" template provided on the pullout centerfold

Fabric 12- x 16-inch rectangle of white handkerchief linen

FIGURE 1

DMC Floche Embroidery Cotton Ecru #210 md lavender #369 vy It pistachio green #437 It tan #738 vy It tan #745 It pale yellow #762 vy It gray #775 vy It baby blue #776 md pink #800 pale delft blue #818 It pink #964 It seagreen #5200 snow white

~ry now and then when

C ;~~ting through treasures at antiques stores, you come upon special vintage pieces that were lovingly detailed with handwork. Someone - an expectant mother, a doting grandmother, an adoring friend - poured her love and care into these treasures from our past. Let your nostalgia inspire you to create a sweet sampler for a special baby in your life. This family heirloom can be handed down from generation to generation, heralding the love brought forth by your hands. The name of the babe and date of her birth can be substituted for the prayer if desired. Either is a touching remembrance of a special arrival.

,,,,': 11' I\\

I

I

I

I

: \'::.//

Embroidery Needles #7 betweens (shadow stitch) #1 O sharps (granitos, French knots, lazy daisy, long and short stitches)

Supplies 4- or 5-inch Susan Bates Hoop or small hands-free hoop (wrapped) Fine-point blue marker or Sewline fabric pencil Embroidery scissors Thimble

FIGURE 2

4. Use a fine-point blue fabric

1

lou. o t¡ a 1sfe "t

1. Lightly starch and iron fabric, being

careful not to scorch it. Remember which side you starched.

2. Carefully pin fabric to pinning board over design with starched side up. Beginning at top center edge, place a pin. Smooth fabric down tightly and place another pin at bottom center edge. Place another pin Ph inches away and repeat smoothing process to apply pin at lower edge. Continue pinning process until entire top and bottom edges of fabric are pinned in place. 3. Repeat process for pins on left and right sides.

marking pen to transfer embroidery template, making sure design is centered and on grain. 5. Remove fabric from board and tautly hoop it, centering circular motif within.

How to stitch it. .. CENTER MOTIF Refer to figures 1 and 2. 1. Working from foreground to

background, stitch facial features using #738 (vy It tan) for eyelids and eyelashes and #776 (md pink) for nose and mouth. Eyelids and eyelashes are backstitch, nose is straight stitch, and mouth is granito.

SewBeautifulmag.com

55


Shadow embroidery (closed herringbone), simply put, is basically a backstitch that is stitched alternately from one boundary point to another. The stitches are lined up head-to-toe and share holes. Usually the stitches are very short (less than Yi6 inch long), and it is important that they be stitched carefully so as not to "jump the track" of the stitching line. The stitches look prettiest when they are placed exactly on the drawn line, so take extra care to trace your design exactly.

.. •• •

' t

1. BACKSTITCH Working along design line with one strand of floss, tie on with a split-backstitch directly on design line. Take a short stitch from A to B and out at C, a stitch length away from B, covering tie-on stitch. Place each stitch head to toe, each sharing a hole with previous stitch.

j I

2. PIGGYBACKING This term applies to the technique of stitching over an existing stitch and is only done when two shapes share a common wall.

::::·· .. .,_.·:;::

._:;:_-_-_-_-_:_::c_:_:_;_-:----_-: ~

·::::·.:-.·..-.::::::

Take stitch into exact two A and B points as previous section. If shapes are the same color, work stitches on top of each other. If they are different, work them side by side, but still share holes.

3. TYING ON TO SHADOW EMBROIDERY The best method of tying on is with a split-backstitch. This is a backstitch that pierces the carry-over thread on back as it is brought through the fabric. The first stitch covers the tie-on stitch.

2. Shadow stitch face with #818 Cit pink) using techniques for stitching a circle. Stitch hands with same color.

Emerge at A and sew down at B. (Notice thread is pierced on B.) Go back to A and stitch over split with first stitch.

3. Shadow stitch scalloped bonnet brim with #5200 (snow white). Shadow stitch bonnet with #775 (vy It baby blue). 4. Shadow stitch sleeves with #964 Cit seagreen), but outline stitch around lower edge and sides of gown. Shadow stitch bow with same color.

'' '' ''

..-?11

, , ''

•'

''

,./ ~:: ,.:,' •'

•'•'

I

56

i"

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

5. Shadow stitch circular background with #776 (md pink).

6. Stem stitch around cape using #745 Cit pale yellow). Fill in entire background of cape with tiny seed stitches. 7. Straight stitch a few hair wisps on forehead using #745 Cit pale yellow).


how- to springtime heirlooms ·. ·...{

.. ..

"

·.

·-·

·- -

~

;;:•

... ~

FIGURE 3

.,.-. . .

_

FIGUR E 5

FIGURE 4

GIRL AND BOY FACES 1. Stitch facial features first. Eyelashes, eyelids, and eyebrows are #738 (vy It

tan) backstitches. Noses and mouths are #776 (md pink) backstitches. 2. Shadow stitch faces using #818 (It pink) (figs. 3 and 4).

3. Stem titch around girl 's hair with #745 Cit pale yellow). Fill in hair with long and short split stitches, following outer edges as a guideline for movement (fig. 5).

FIGURE 6

4. Stem stitch around boy's hair with #738 (vy It tan). Fill in hair with Jong and short split stitches, following outer edges as a guideline for movement. Straight stitch a few wisps of hair along forehead with same color (fig. 6).

BIRDS 1. Stitch eyes first as tiny granitos

with #762 (vy It gray). 2. Shadow stitch wings as a teardrop. Stitch body and tails, backstitching along eyebrows and neckline. Shadow stitch bird's body with #800 (pale delft blue) (fig. 7). 3. Stitch beaks with #745 Cit pale yellow) in straight stitches. 4. Stitch branches with #437 (vy It tan)

in stem stitch. Stitch leaves with #369

FIGURE 8

(vy It pistachio green) in lazy daisies

(fig. 8). 5. Shadow stitch last bird beginning at forehead (fig. 9). 6. Shadow stitch ribbon with #964 Cit sea green).

.. :

... . '' '.' ~

. ..,.. ..

__________ :~\-

·.

,.. :

FIGURE 9

:'

-·-;,:

SewBeautifulmag.com

,:

57


...

., .

. ...

·.

• '!

·. I

'

I ' •

.. "

..

58

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

..

.

.


h ow-to springtime heirlooms BABY IN HAMMOCI<' Refer to figures 10 and 11. 1. Backstitch eyelids and eyelashes with #738 Cit tan). Stitch nose and mouth with #776 (md pink). Mouth is a granito; nose is a straight stitch.

2 .Shadow stitch face and hands with #818 Cit pink). Add straight stitch wisps of hair with #745 (It pale yellow). 3. Shadow stitch collar as a rectangle using #5200 (snow white).

FIGURE 10

FIGURE 11

4 . Shadow stitch gown with #775 (vy It baby blue).

\.-(\-...

5.Shadow stitch hammock with #210 (md lavender).

--

',',i

6. Shadow stitch blanket with #776

(md pink). 7. Add French knot flowers with yellow centers and white petals. Use only one strand of floche for all knots. 8. Branches and ropes are stem stitched using #437 (vy It tan).

LEFT BUNNY Refer to figure 12 . 1. Begin by shadow stitching inner

ear with #776 (md pink).

~ )

' '' ''

:

Q '' ''

.

:

',,_--.,

Stitch as ~\'<>·:: separate i / .. section J•.-' "., ',,, __ ',

__ ...',,

. _.

··--·~-~

'·--- -~---~

FIGURE 12

FIGURE 13

2. Stitch eyes and nose with #762 (vy It gray) in granito stitch. 3. Backstitch whiskers using #5200 (snow white). 4. Shadow stitch entire bunny with #762 (vy It gray), beginning on tip of right ear. Second ear will be stitched separately. Continue down entire length of bunny, separating sections at hind quarter, arms and belly. NOTE: When stitching shadow animals, keep crossover threads as horizontal as possible, stitching only to nearest wall. Backtrack to complete open areas.

5. Stitch tail entirely with white French knots.

PAIR OF BUNNIES

3. Complete ears and head before moving to body. Whiskers are backstitched in ecru.

3. With #775 (vy It baby blue), stitch petals of smaller flowers in lazy daisy stitch.

4. Work body as you would a circle.

4. Fill in centers of smaller flowers with three French knots in #745 (It

5. Shadow stitch bunny on right with #762 (vy It gray). 6. Stitch ta ils entirely with white French knots.

LETTERING

6. Stitch all stems with #369 (vy It pistachio green) in backstitch. 7. Stitch all leaves with #369 (vy It

2. Stitch second line with #818 (It pink).

8. Stitch all granitos in background

3. Alternate medium pink and light pink from line to line.

1. Bunny on left is ecru with pink

2. Starting at uppermost tip of left ear, shadow stitch using ecru. Second ear is stitched separately.

5. Stitch smaller flowers along hammock in white with yellow centers.

1. Backstitch first line of poem with #776 (med p ink).

Refer to figure 13. ears. Shadow stitch inner ears first with #776 (md pink).

pale yellow).

1. Stitch centers of all large flowers as granitos with #745 (It pale yellow).

2. With #800 (pale delft blue), stitch petals in lazy daisy stitch.

pistachio green) in lazy daisy stitch. white. G)

Wendy Schoen is the owner of Wendy Schoen Design and designer of Petite Poche Patterns. Wendy hosted the hand embroidery segments on Martha's Sewing Room and has served as a primary teacher for many years at the Martha Pullen School of Art Fashion . Find Wendy's book, Mastering Shadow Work Embroidery, and embroidery DVD's online at store. marthapullen.com. Visit her website at wendyschoendesign.com.

SewBeautifulmag.com

59


Cloverleaf Baby Wrap Blanket By Jan Moore

(from page 46)

son with these blankets, without any awkward square corners poking out; and now that I sew my own versions, I appreciate not having to miter corners as I stitch! Additionally, the unique design provides unlimited opportunities for embellishing with your favorite machine or hand embroideries or appliques.

, . . - Umother always

t__Y,/'(, ~~lcomed babies into our family and circle of friends with a cloverleaf-shaped baby wrap. Many years ago, as a young mother myself, I appreciated how easy it was to wrap my infant

60

Sew Beautiful ApriVMay 2014

The wrap blanket may easily be modified for boy or girl babies, and can be adapted for cool or warm seasons by switching up the fabric choices. The boy's version shown was made using sky blue cotton seersucker by Stylecrest Fabric for the outer layer, with a blue pima cotton broadcloth from Spechler-Vogel Fabrics for lining. The bias binding and applique is 1/s-inch beige gingham by Stylecrest Fabric. The girl's version was made using white ultra-fine cotton flannel by Fabric Finders, Inc. for both outer and lining layers, as well as pink cotton floral print for bias binding. -]an

What you'll need ___ _

'

Pattern

\

:

"Cloverleaf Baby Wrap Blanket" pattern is provided on the pullout centerfold

: 1

Fabric*

:

1% yards fabric for outer layer 1% yards fabric for lining layer

Trim 4Y2 yards of 1%-inch-wide bias binding (or create your own)

Thread Coordinating sewing and embroidery threads suitable for choice of fabric and machine embroidery

Machine embroidery Boy's version uses Circle Monogram Alphabet from planetapplique.com Girl's version uses Interlocking Floss Stitch Monogram #428 from jolsonsdesigns.com *This pattern is designed for 45-inchwide (or wider) fabrics; however, after prewashing, many cotton novelty prints will measure closer to 42 inches wide. A smaller version of the wrap may be made by folding the straight edges of the pattern until it fits on your fabric, and will still be suitable for newborns and smaller babies.

E) Th is project was stit ched on a Husqvarna Viking Des igner 1 sew ing machine.

\.

---

__ __

,,,...

1


how-to springtime heirlooms

Fold

ffuL

"l '1YIS 1 IC

It

Pre-wash all fabrics before beginning. 1. Fold each piece of fabric in half

lengthwise, and then fold in half again, resulting in four thicknesses of fabric. Place straight edges of pattern along folded edges of fabric. Cut out one piece from outer fabric and one piece from lining fabric (fig. 1). NOTE: For heavier fabrics or slippery fabrics, a block method of cutting may produce more accurate results. To do this, trace pattern onto one layer of fabric and cut out. Using this piece as your pattern, lay it on top of second (lining) piece offabric, smoothing out all wrinkles before cutting. For versions with binding, you may place

Place on fold

fabric wrong sides together and stitch along traced seamline, cutting out both pieces together at once. 2. Cut bias strips for binding, joining end-to-end if necessary. NOTE: Bias

strips for featured wraps were cut 10 inches wide, which results in a .finished binding of slightly less than % inch. 3. Complete machine or hand embroidery or applique as desired. 4. Place blanket pieces wrong sides together, matching all raw edges and curves. Smooth away all wrinkles and make sure there is no excess fabr ic at interior of blanket. Baste together along a scant %-inch seamline (fig. 2).

• Sandwich lightweight batting between two layers of fabric and hand or machine quilt before applying binding. • Instead of using two layers of fabric, use a single layer of fleece or other blanketing fabric to create blanket, finishing edges with bias binding or a handembroidered blanket stitch . Or, for an especially lightweight blanket, omit lining altogether, and finish edges with a hand- or machine-rolled hem. • Create a tailored version by trimming with narrow piping instead of bias binding. • Create a version with no trim at all! After stitching and turn ing blanket right side out, sew two rows of topstitching (or a decorative machine stitch) around perimeter of wrap. • Use coordinating fabric to create a ruffled edge .

0

LL :E"

1~

Cloverleaf pattern

0

::J

0

c: Fabric

~

Cut out fabric using pattern

FIGURE 1 Baste layers together . with a%' / seam :'

Outer fabric RS

------ ----FIGURE 2

SewBeautifulmag.com

61


Press binding to lining side, fold under raw edge and handstitch binding to lining

5. Place bias binding along edges of blanket with right sides together and raw edges even. Using a 3/s-inch seam allowance, stitch bias binding to blanket around entire blanket (fig. 3).

~

6. Press binding away from blanket, wrapping around and over raw edge. Fold under raw edge and handwhipstitch binding to lining fabric along seamline (fig. 4). 7. Press finished blanket.

Jan Moore developed an appreciation for many types of needlework through her grandmother and mother. Marriage to a Memphis-born husband introduced her to heirloom sewing and smocking, especially fol lowing the birth of their son. Jan also owned an heirloom sewing and smocking store, BessieMary, named after her grandmother and mother. She and her husband currently reside in a suburb of Dallas, Texas .

FIGURE 4

FIGURE 3

Create a novelty p rint version using coordinating fabric prints and trims, such as the pair of prints shown here from the Pieces of Hope collection by Riley Blake Designs. Trim is 1h-inch cotton cluny lace by Jay Company Trimmings. Here's how:

1. Baste trim to fabric along %-inch seamline. Trim seam allowance to inch (fig. 5).

I;.\

2. Place outer fabric and lining fabric wrong sides together. Stitch along ¡%-inch seamline, leaving an opening of 5 to 6 inches along one edge. Clip curves if necessary (fig. 6). NOTE: For most lightweight fabrics, 1/4-inch seam allowance will turn nicely along curves without clipping; however, different trims, and especially heavy fabric, may require clipping. 3. Press blanket flat and hand-whipstitch opening closed. Topstitch around perimeter of blanket (fig. 7). Press.

sfo~~~~~;s

,./ -- ------------

with a% ' seam

Fabric

ws

Topstitch around perimeter of blanket

I Trim seam to 14'

1'

FIGURE 5

Leave an opening 5-6' long fo r turning

FIGURE 6

62

Sew Beautiful ApriVMay 2014

G)

FIGURE 7


how -to springtime heirlooms

H rr¡son's Homecoming Gown By Martha Broyles (from page 47) .

{)) 0

Marth~

en Broyles was plannmg a daygown for the homecoming of her third grandchild, she wanted a design that would be distinct for him. Little Harrison would be living outside New Orleans so Martha searched online for something representative of the area. She found a painting of a streetcar, and while replicating the entire painting with shadow embroidery was virtually impossible, her simple outline of the streetcar worked perfectly centered between two French-look fleur-de-lis motifs.

\...../Ff/

Photo by Katherine Holly Photography

What you'll need \

Pattern " Neal's Nightshirt" by Kathy Neal "Baby's Summer Clothes" by The Old Fashioned Baby (with sleeve and collar modifications)

Embroidery Design

I

Silk embroidery floss, blue Fine cotton sewing thread, white

Fabric

Needles

1 yard ribbed pima cotton pique Vi yard cotton chambray for piping

Notions

Trims

x

1. Pre-treat fabric, laces and entredeux. Fabric may be washed, dried and pressed. Steam Swiss laces and entredeux; allow to dry completely.

Thread

Streetcar and fleur-de-lis shadow embroidery on pullout centerfold

1 yard Swiss scallop edging with entredeux

I

Y2 yard Swiss insertion beading 1Vi yards 'A-inch-wide silk satin ribbon for beading Five small % -inch antique glass buttons

How to prepare fabric and trims

2. Cut out pattern pieces according to pattern cutting guide.

Crewel or between

3 . Using a wash-away marking pen, trace embroidery design onto front daygown fabric piece at center front.

Blue wash-away marking pen One small snap â&#x201A;Ź} This project was stitche d on a Bernina 11 30 sewing machine.

_____ ,,,

I I

I I

SewBeautifulmag.com

63


Shadow work

Granitos

FIGURE 1

FIGURE 2

FIGURE 3

Backstitch

l

FIGURE 4

How to emb oider it . 1. Using a single strand of silk floss ,

begin stitching fleur-de-lis by shadow embroidery technique. Beginning with oval shape in center of fleurde-lis, start stitches at left (fig. 1) and complete oval (fig. 2). 2. Complete fleur-de-lis design with shadow embroidery making sure to share holes and keep outside stitches larger and inside stitches smaller on curves (fig. 3).

3. Using a single strand of silk floss , begin streetcar design with granito stitches on front headlight of streetcar and wheels (fig. 4). 4. Using a backstitch with one strand of floss, stitch track lines and windows.

5. Complete streetcar roof with shadow embroidery. Martha Broyles is a registered nurse by education . A lifelong love of needlework began in middle school with the aide of formal Home Economics classes. A wife and mother of four, she sewed for her children and now three grandchildren. A long time member of SAGA, she is always striving to improve her skills as well as share the needlearts with others . Visit her blog at southernmatriarch.blogspot.1>om.

Wrong side view

64

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


how-to springtime heirlooms

Perfect Pleated Puffing By Trisha Smith (from page 48)

What 1 ot '1l PeA Embroidery Design

Notions

Any basic, full-bodice dress pattern with an empire waist (try "Addyson' by Trisha's Treasures)

Four 'h-inch mother-of-pearl buttons Size 70 Metafil needle

Fabric White batiste, yardage as required by dress pattern plus 1 yard extra (44 inches wide)

Trims 1'h yards of 1Vs-inch-wide Swiss embroidered beading (enough for up to a size 10) 31h yards of l3/s-inch-wide Swiss embroidered edging (enough for up to asize10) 5 or 6 yards of 1-inch-wide pink silk satin ribbon for sash

Thread Size 60 or 80 lightweight sewing thread, white Quilting thread, white

~tailored dress is ideal

~ }~: dressing older girls in heirloom style. The bodice is made of Swiss beading interspersed with pleated smocking inserts, giving the appearance of a unique puffing effect. The lower edge of the bodice is accented with wide beading, allowing for ribbon ties at the side seams.

2. Unfold pattern piece. Mark vertical center front of pattern piece by drawing a line over crease line from top to bottom; refer to figure 2.

3. Mark seamline by drawing a horizontal line ~ inch above bottom edge of pattern piece (fig. 2).

SOAK AND PREPARE FABRIC, INTERFACING AND SWISS 1. Soak all fabric, interfacing and

How to prepare it. ..

Swiss in hot water for 10 minutes to allow for shrinkage. Roll items in a light- colored towel and press to remove excess water. Hang to dry. 0

CREATE BODICE PATTERN 1. Fold a large sheet of paper in half widthwise; crease fold. Align center front of bodice pattern with fold and trace around pattern (fig. 1). Remove pattern piece and cut out pattern.

2. Lightly starch and press all items. 3. Measure bodice height at tallest point (length A). Add 2 inches to this measurement (length B). Cut

Supplies Water-soluble stabilizer, 41h inches wide x 14 inches long (such as Aqua Magic or Floriani Wet & Gone Tacky) 1'h yards fusible interfacing (such as German or Touch O' Gold) Basting glue (such as Crafter's Pick Basting Glue by AP!) Open-toe applique machine foot Pinning board Large sheet of paper Paper towels Light-colored towel Pleater Starch Glass head pins

E) This project was stitched on a Pfaff 2144.

three pieces of beading to length B, being sure openings and embroidery designs are aligned. NOTE: Bodice width of sizes 2 and 3 will likely only allow for two strips of beading. 4. Mark top edge and right side of each beading strip with a pin.

CREATE PLEATED STRIP 1. Measure 2 inches away from selvedge of fabric yardage; tear across width of fabric to get a straight edge. Measure 5 inches away from torn edge of fabric yardage; tear across width of fabric to create a 5-inch- x 44-inch-wide strip for puffing. Lightly starch and press to be very straight.

2. Cut a piece of lightweight interfacing slightly smaller than fabric

~ c:

Pattern RS

Ql

u Trace pattern and cut out

ÂĽ.!'< --------------- --------------Mark seamline

FIGURE 1

FIGURE 2 SewBeautifulmag.com

65

1


66

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


how -to springtime heirlooms Make sure pleats are straight

-~

_\

!

\

f

-;:__

~

T

A

f

f

'\

:s Fuse interfacing to fabric

p

\

Fabric

ws

FIGURE 4

FIGURE 5

. co=> . 44'

' 4..

• Q. •

Fabric

' => • <O

ws

Pat stabilizer to stick to fabric strip

.

lll~lllBeading

is centered on strip

.

Stabilizer·

FIGURE 6 FIGURE 3

strip. Fuse interfacing to wrong side of fabric (fig. 3). Cut away selvedges.

FIGURE 7

inches long. With right side of fabric facing up, use a pin to mark center of pleated strip on each short end.

3. Thread pleater with white quilting thread. Pleat 13 rows. Tie all threads together into one large slipknot at each end (fig. 4).

How to stitch it. ..

4. Place pleated strip onto a padded

TRIM BEADING

surface with wrong side facing up. Release slipknot on left side only. Pull pleating threads to top, 1lz inch from short cut edge of fabric strip. Tie off pleating threads two at a time in tight knots. Do not cut thread tails.

NOTE: Be careful not to trim wrong sides of beading strips. Batiste seam allowances are needed to stitch onto remaining bodice fa bric in a later step.

5. With wrong side still facing up,

Trim beading as follows:

securely pin left end of strip to board, leaving enough space on right to spread pleats out. Release slipknot on right end. Pull threads to top, 1h inch from short cut edge of fabric strip.

• Center piece: Trim away batiste edge from both sides of beading, next to entredeux.

6. Stretch pleated strip out to match length of beading strips. Pin right end of pleated strip securely to board. Tie off thread tails two at a time, knotting tightly against fabric (fig. 5).

• Right piece: Trim batiste edge away from left side only.

POSITIONING AND STITCHING BEADING ON PLEATED STRIP

7. Pull on all thread tails and anchor them to board with pins so that pleated strip is very secure. Distribute pleats evenly, making sure pleats are straight.

1. Position center beading strip onto

8. Peel paper backing away from water-soluble stabilizer. Place tacky side of stabilizer on top of wrong side of pleated strip; "pat" in place (fig. 6). This will keep pleats stationary while beading is stitched on.

2. Set up sewing machine with opentoe applique foot. Using a zigzag stitch (L = 1.0 - 1.5; W = 25), stitch sides of beading in place over edges of entrecleux (fig. 7). NOTE: Left swing of

9. Remove pleated strip from pinning

board. Cut all thread tails to about 5

FIGURE 8

• Left piece: Trim batiste edge away from right side only.

center of pleated fabric and pin or glue-baste in place.

needle should go into entredeux holes; right swing will go over edge into the pleated fabric. When sewing second

edge, pay close attention that beading does not start slanting; if it does, stop with needle down in fabric, lift presser foot, push beading underfoot, lower foot and continue to sew. This can also be prevented by sewing down beading on both sides (rather than down one side and up the other). 3. Position left and right strips of beading on top of pleated strip, placing trimmed edge 1% inches from center beading. Pin or glue-baste in place, keeping glue under entredeux portion of beading only. Zigzag trimmed edges only in place (fig. 8). With right side of puffing strip facing up, immediately fold side pieces of beading back out of the way instantly (so glue does not dry so firmly). SewBeautifulmag.com

67


4. Sew a zigzag stitch (L = 1.0 - 1.5; W = 1.5 - 2.0) down pleated strip at 'Is inch from stitched edge of beading (fig. 9); this will prevent edges from fraying.

Beading

ws

Zigzag pleated strip 1/a' from beading to prevent fraying

FIGURE 9

68

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

5. Trim away excess pleated fabric from far left and right, just beyond zigzag stitching. NOTE: Pleated fabric under center beading does not get trimmed away. 6. Briefly dip pleated strip into a container of very warm water. Quickly remove from water and place on paper towels. Peel or rub gently to remove stabilizer from wrong side of puffing. After removing as much stabilizer as possible, soak fabr ic strip again or place under running water and rub gently to remove remaining product in stitched areas.

7. Remove from water and use a towel to squeeze out excess water. Reposition puffing if needed. Let air dry completely.

CREATE BODICE FRONT 1. Cut two blocks of fabric,

measuring height of beading strips x 10 inches wide. Cut two pieces of interfacing slightly smaller than fabric blocks and fuse to wrong side of each. 2. Place one fabric block on top of

puffing strip with right sides together, aligning right edges. Pin together along entredeux edge. Stitch in ditch of entredeux using a straight stitch (fig. 10) (L = 2.0). Trim seam


h ow-to springtime heirlooms allowance to a scant 1A inch. Roll and whip seam allowance using a zigzag stitch (L = 1.0 - 1.5; W = 2.5 - 4.0). Press roll away from entredeux.

3. Repeat step 2 to sew remaining fabric block to left side of puffing strip. Resulting fabric block should be larger than full bodice front pattern piece. 4. Run 1-inch silk satin ribbon through bodice beadings, allowing a small amount to extend beyond each end (fig. 11). 5. Center and position bodice front pattern piece on top of pleated fabric and lightly pin in place, being careful to align placement at shoulder seams. Trace around bottom pattern piece at bottom of pleats using a watersoluble marker (fig. 12). Remove pattern piece.

Stitch fabric to puffing strip in ditch

t

Weave ribbon through beading

Fabric

ws

Bodice RS

FIGURE 10

Trace pattern onto pieced bodice

FIGURE 11

Stitch to secure

6 . Stitch just inside drawn line at neck edge and lower bodice edge to secure ribbon and prevent stretching (fig. 13). 7. Cut a block of fabric for lining that measures the same size as pieced puffing block for bodice front. Place bodice front to lining fabric with wrong sides together; pin. Cut out together on traced lines.

Pleated fabric RS

FIGURE 12

FIGURE 13

FINISHING CONSTRUCTION NOTES Follow pattern instructions to complete bodice and dress, referring to the following notes for additional construction information regarding neck, armholes, beading at lower edge of bodice front and ribbon side ties. • If Swiss edging will be used around bodice neck and armholes as shown on sample, remove seam allowance from neck before sewing on Swiss edging and bias bound neckband. Edging pieces on sample were gathered to be two times fullness. Armhole edging is stopped 2 inches from finished underarm seam.

• Fuse interfacing to wrong side of fabric block for back bodice before cutting out back bodice pieces. • Beading at bottom of bodice is sewn on after dress is complete. If desired, glue-baste beading in place before stitching to prevent edging from slanting as you stitch. On back edges, allow at least Ph inches extra to wrap around to inside of garment after ribbon has been inserted. Stitch lower edge of beading in p lace first, then

Lining fabric RS

Pleated fabric RS

upper edge. Do not stitch back ends in place until after ribbon has been inserted; refer to step 4. • Cut yardage of ribbon into three equal pieces. Starting at one side seam, run one piece of ribbon through front beading, stopping at opposite side seam. Insert pieces of ribbon through back beading, starting at side seams and ending at center back. After ribbon has been secured at each center back edge, trim ribbon lengths on front and back to match.

Trisha Smith is the designer of Trisha's Treasures patterns. Her patterns are unique and sassy and the backs of her garments are as cute as the front. Trisha travels and teaches throughout the United States. She has ta ught for many yea rs at the Martha Pullen School of Art Fashion and is a regu lar contributor to Sew Beautiful magazine. She also teaches weekly at The Children's Corner in Nashville, Tennessee. Her patterns may be purchased at specialty fabric shops across the United States. Find her on Facebook under "Patterns by Trisha's Treasures."

e

SewBeautifulmag.com

69


Heirloom Sewn Baby Dress By Jeannie Downs Baumeister (from page 49)

Wra you' 1l re'".:i Embroidery Design "Emma's Smocked Baby Dresses" by The Old Fashioned Baby

Embroidery Design Floral design from Jeannie B's Book of Heirloom Embroidery Designs & Stitches

Fabric Blue Swiss voile

Lace Ivory maline lace insertion, % inch to 3A inch wide Ivory maline lace edging, 3A inch wide Ivory Swiss lace insertion, 1 inch wide

Thread Madeira 80wt

E) Th is p roject w as st itc hed o n Bern ina

y definition, an heirloom is a fami ly possession that is passed down from one generation to the next. The term "heirloom sewing" or "heirloom sewn garment" comes from the understanding that a garment that is carefully and lovingly made for your child today will be saved and treasured by future generations. Such garments

1230 and Pfaff 21 44 sewi ng m achi nes.

are made from the finest fabric and lace available, as is the case for the pretty little blue dress pictured here. The fabric is Swiss voile. Voile has more body with fewer wrinkles than batiste and it drapes beautifully, making it a good choice for a yoke dress. -Jeannie

1

This baby dress was made using the Old Fashioned Baby pattern "Emma's Smocked Baby Dresses." The pattern was modified to create an exquisite heirloom dress with fancy lace bands embellishing the yoke, sleeves and hem. It is not difficult to transform a simple little dress into a lacy delight. NOTE: While machine French sewing instructions are included in the suggested pattern, some basic heirloom sewing techniques can be found in this issue on page 36. Fabric and lace for front yoke will be stitched into a fabric/lace block. Front yoke pattern will be used to cut out yoke from block. Embellish front yoke as desired using front yoke pattern as a guide. Directions are for dress pictured in this article.

Lfow to r ake fror y( h: 1. Cut a block of fabric that is slightly

larger than dress yoke (91h inches wide x 51h inches deep). 2. To make lace band for front yoke,

place a 1-inch piece of lace insertion between two narrower pieces of lace insertion (% inch to % inch wide) 6 inches long and stitch together.

Although this heirloom dress was made by machine, there are times when hand stitching will give you a special touch. It is best to stitch any gathered lace by hand for better control of gathers. When stitching lace, always use a fine cotton thread such as Madeira #8Qwt. The back facing on this dress was stitched down by hand using a running stitch; it gives the entire garment the impression of hand stitching. Often it is the little things that count.

70

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


how-to springtime heirlooms

SewBeautifulmag.com

71


Trim fabric edge from one side of entredeux and zigzag entredeux to each side of lace band. 3. Cut block of fabric in half on straight of grain (photo 1). Stitch fabric to either side of lace band using entredeux-to-fabric technique On either side of lace band, stitch a piece of lace insertion 1 inch away. This is the embellished block.

4. When yoke is finished, place pattern piece onto yoke to check positioning (photo 2). 5. Remove pattern and fold yoke right

sides together matching lace insertion and entredeux. This will ensure that both sides of yoke match perfectly. Cut out yoke using front yoke pattern (photo 3). Carefully stay-stitch along lace areas.

72

Sew Beautiful ApriVMay 2014

How to ma'

-leev

Fashion sleeve as you did the yoke. Make an embellished lace/ fabric block and cut out sleeve (centering lace band). Create lace band for sleeve using one piece of 1-inch-wide Swiss insertion between-two pieces of narrower lace insertion (photo 4).

How to make fancy band for sl:>i .. Make lace band for skirt following directions for View 2 in pattern but create only one lace band as pictured. Because lace widths can vary, be sure to adjust fabric as needed so dress is correct length. As shown, create lace band using Swiss insertion as center, bordered with narrow and wider lace on each side. Add entredeux to bottom edge of band. Attach lace band and gathered lace edging as instructed in pattern.

How to complete finishinq o l es To finish dress, gather lace edging (3,4 inch wide) to fit around yoke front; stitch by hand. Allow extra gathers for corners. Stitch lace to front only, ending just behind shoulder. Embroider as desired between lace on front yoke (embroidery design from Jeannie B's Book of Heirloom Embroidery Designs & Stitches). : Jeannie Downs Baumeiste r is an internationally known designer, teacher and needle artist. She is the designer of the popular pattern line The Old Fashioned Baby and author of the book Jeannie B's Book of Heirloom Embroidery Designs & Stitches. Visit her at oldfashionedbaby.com or her Old Fashioned Baby Shop in Baton Rouge, Louisiana . Suppliers: All lace, trims and fabric were provided by Bear Threads and are available at The Old Fashioned Baby (oldfashionedbaby.com) . Phone is (225)

313-6845.


how-to springtime heirlooms

e By Hope Yoder

Blank To Beautiful

(from page 50)

Open "Olivia Blouse Pattern" and cut out each tissue pattern piece. Use tracing paper to draw a full upper front and lower front bodice rather than using the half pattern piece with a foldline.

~~ seams away when

The blouse shown uses a purchased large bath towel with beautiful cutwork around lower hem area. Towel was wide enough to fit a size small blouse, which made it simple to use as a piece of whole cloth, to cut lower bodice pattern (fig. 1). If you don't have a blank wide enough, you can piece two blanks together or add fabric to sides to create width needed.

combining a little machine embroidery, cherished blank linens, laces, trims and few simple directions. Dig out your stash of blank linens, or shop to find vintage reproduction blanks that would be perfect for this lovely ladies' blouse.

Cut out lower bodice

r--- ~ -------, I

' ' "t 011'll

I

need __ _

Pattern "O livia Blouse Pattern" (hopeyoder.com) ViewD

Machine Embroidery Blank To Beautiful Lace machine embroidery design (hopeyoder.com)

Fabric

2. Select Repeat> Number Across: 1 > Number Down: 3 > Auto Resequence By Color > Apply > OK.

3. Select everything on screen> Group. 4. Select everything on screen > Right Click > Copy > Paste > Group.

LOWER BODICE PATTERN PIECE

(,/!) omance is just a few

1. Select File> Open and find Blank To Beautiful Lace design.

FIGURE 1

5. Move new row of lace off first row. Select row that was pasted > Flip Horizontal. 6. Move both rows so they are facing each other with tips just barely touching. To evenly space them vertically, Select both rows > Vertical Center Align.

7. Select all > Group > Save As. 8 . Hoop fabric with Wet n Gone stabilizer and embroider lace design using pale pink embroidery thread. When embroidery is complete, rinse in water to remove stabilizer. Center and trim your embroidered panel to 5 inches wide.

UPPER BODICE PATTERN PIECE Audition your Victorian and Swiss insertion laces and trims by positioning on upper bodice pattern, leaving a 5-inch opening at center front for machine-embroidered panel. On our sample, most of upper panel was created using trims, with exception of center front embroidered Blank To Beautiful Lace design.

%- and %-inch-wide silk satin ribbon

MACHINE EMBROIDE Y

If you don't have enough trims to cover upper bodice, substitute linen fabric. Once you have decided on lace trim arrangement for upper bodice, sew pieces together using roll-and-whip technique described below. If desired, weave silk satin ribbon through holes in beading. If entredeux is used, weave six strands of DMC floss over two holes and under one for added design interest.

Supplies

Embroider leftover scraps from towel for center front embroidery fabric or use white linen fabric as a substitute.

How to sew it...

White linen (see pattern for yardage)

Linen Blank Blank cutwork bath towel, pillowcase or square table topper (allaboutblanks.com)

Lace Victorian insertions in variety of styles 1h yard beading insertion 3 yards Victorian edging

Trims Wet n GoneÂŽ stabilizer Mettler 60wt white cotton thread Pale pink embroidery thread Clover Fabric Folding Pen Tracing paper Presser feet: edge-joining foot, allpurpose foot, 14-inch foot

BACK PATTERN P ECf Using leftover scraps from bath towel, cut out back pattern piece. If you don't have enough leftover towel to cut a back, use white linen fabric.

Sample was edited using Floriani Total Control ProfessionalÂŽ Software. If you are using another software program, steps will be similar.

HEIRLOOM TECHNIQUE: ROLL AND WHIP 1. Trim seam allowance to a scant 1A inch. Place trims right sides together, SewBeautifulmag.com

73


Stitch in ditch of heading

with raw edges even, and use an edge-joining foot to stitch in ditch of heading (fig. 2). 2. Use an edge-joining foot with a left needle zigzag (1=2.0; W=4.0). Place trim with most visible header on top (such as beading) and zig off fabric, and then zag back onto seam allowance causing fabric to roll toward straight stitch (fig. 3). 3. Use a Fabric Folding Pen to wet seam allowance before pressing. If using beading, weave 5/s-inch silk satin ribbon over and under holes (fig. 4)

TIE-BACK CASING Create a faux casing with beading insertion and edging trims using method described. Once you have joined edging to both sides of beading, weave two pieces of 5/s-inch silk satin ribbon from each side edge toward center. Leave a long tail in center for a bow tie. This forms tie back as ribbons meet at center back. Once ribbon is applied, sew side seams to keep ribbon from pulling; use a reinforced straight stitch.

74

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014

Right sides together

Trim edging seam allowance to 14'

Raw edges even

=

* FIGURE 2

FIGURE 3

vZig off fabric then back on, causing edge to roll toward previous stitch

FIGURE 4

Weave ribbon through holes (under design)

FIGURE 5


how-to springtime heirlooms

VICTORIAN BEADING TO • C.... O.... \ •" ,... 'G Remove seam allowances and use an edge-joining foot to zigzag two trims together using 60wt Mettler thread (L= 2.0; W= 2.5) (fig. 5). TIPS: Use a kabob stick to hold trims on either side ofguide bar. Use Wet n Gone stabilizer under trims if they are getting stuck in the throat plate. Use a Fabric Folding Pen to wet seam allowance before pressing.

I . L 0

S~RUC

.... ON

To complete, follow directions found on "Olivia Blouse Pattern" guide sheet. Optionally, roll and whip edging lace to lower edge to form a decorative hemline. Press hemline up and topstitch narrow seam allowance from right side. G)

---------·

•~Buzz Tools; Inc. "Buzz Tools is the first embroidery software program I ever purchased, and after all these years, I still use it every day!" - from thousands of home embroidery hobbyists we hear from by email and at embroidery events

BuzzXplore® • View in realistic 3-D, Unzip, Convert & Organize your designs all in one program • Writes USB drives and SHV formatted diskettes • Works with digital photos, too!

BuzzSize® • Resize designs retaining the original fill & density properties • Resize entire design or a color at a time • Adjust density without resizing!

Hope Yoder specializes in fine machine sewing and incorporates traditional techniques and machine embroidery into romantic ladies clothes and accessories. Hope is the author of Embellished Heirloom Treasures and Victorian Dreams Heirloom Shirt. She has created a series of machine embroidery CDs called ' Heirloom Embellishments' featuring heirloom techniques that are re-created in the embroidery hoop. Her work has been featured in Sew Beautiful, Sew News, Designs in Machine Embroidery and Clotilde's Sewing Savvy magazine . She also writes for Australian Machine Embroidery, Creative Machine Embroidery and House of White Birches. Hope travels the country teaching hands-on workshops using her special techniques.

BuzzEdit® • Full featured design editor with file splitting , stitch point editing & template printing • Automatically split designs for multi-hoops • Basic digitizing tools included!

Visit www.BuzzTools.com to see what the "Buzz" is all about!

SewBeautifulmag.com

75


~ What's Next

Summer 2014 The June/July 2014 issue of Sew Beautiful will celebrate warm-weather sewing in everso-classic shades of red , white and blue. The vintage-inspired feature pattern, a onepiece, button-on romper from designer Laurie Anderson, is ideal for keeping baby cool (and cute) in hot temperatures. You're sure to fall in love with Martha Broyles's stunning christening gown, which features one-of-a-kind handwork; and heirloom techniques abound in features from your favorite Sew Beautiful designers, including Debbie Glenn, Wendy Schoen and Kari Mecca. Issue #154 will be available on newsstands in May!

~:E:~()lJ~C:::E:~----------------------------------------------------- - ------------------------¡ Issue #153, April/May 2014 B&J Fabrics bandjfabrics. com

Martha Pullen Company store.marthapullen.com

The Old Fashioned Baby oldfashionedbaby com

Creations by Michie creationsbymichie. com

Michael Miller Fabrics michaelmillerfabrics. com

Trisha Smith On Facebook under "Patterns by Trisha's Treasures"

Frances Messina Jones francesmessinajones. com

Riley Blake Designs ri/eyblakedesigns. com

Kari Me Away karimeaway.com

The Children's Corner childrenscornerinc.com

Wendy Schoen Designs wendyschoendesigns.com

I

I I

~-------X Connect with us!

E CJ ÂŽ

Visit us at sewbeautifulmag.com to read our blog, find free projects and downloads, subscribe to our email newsletter, shop our products, and so much more!

78

Sew Beautiful April/May 2014


Sew Beautitu1¡ WITH MARTHA PULLEN

Patterns & Templates April/May 2014, Issue #153 White House Princess Kathy Barnard - Dress Pattern (sizes 3-6) Sweet Springtime Diaper Shirt by Barbara Carter - Diaper Shirt Pattern (one size) Angel Babe Sampler by Wendy Schoen - Embroidery Design Harrison's Homecoming Gown by Martha Broyles - Embroidery Design Master the Method: Georgia Vintage Dress Meets Shark's Teeth by Donna Williams and Lindsay Wilkes - Shark's Teeth Te Cloverleaf Baby Wrap Blanket by Jan Moore - Blanket Pattern (

'"----x

Angel Babe Sampler By Wendy Schoen

0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

-~

0

0

0 't'

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0

0 0

0

Now I lay me down to sleep I_ 1_

T


't

0

0

0 0

0 0

0

0

la~

me down to sleep I pm~ thee bord, :: ~,,~ ) M~ soul to 1-Zeep ~ ~ If I should die before I wake I pro~ thee bord) M~ soul to take.

Now I

\\.. 0

,,

0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0 0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0


~

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0

0

0 0

0

0

0

n 0

(.

0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

Harrison's Homeco By Martha Br


v

d\~

0 0 0 0 0

~~

o.y

~"- ~ 0

0

0

0

~~o~p

~ ~~

0

0

0 0

0

0

~

0

0 0

0 0

u

d2)2)1~ O:)_

0

0 0

0

0 0

a

(a


--00 u..

c

0

.Jai.JeJ e.Jeq.Jes AS l.J!LIS .Jade!o aw!i6upd5 iaaM5

co ~ /

co ~

\


Master the

By Donna

Gown


Master the Method: Georgia Vintage Dress Meets Shark's Teeth By Donna Williams and Lindsay Wilkes

- .I: -.. ____,___ _ _ -

____,...____...___,---1

"

~3/4"-7

ŠSew Beautiful Magazine April/May 2014 Issue #153 Martha Pullen Company 149 Old Big Cove Road Brownsboro, AL 35741 (editorial) 256-261-2532 for questions: e-mail editorial@sewbeautifulmag.com for orders visit: store.marthapu//en.com or call: (800) 547-4176


JaiJe) lJ!LIS Jade!a ~


.... '

c 0

Q)

u

cu

Q_

rap Blanket ore gthwise, . 1se, nesses. es along fabric folds.


-u Q) ("')

CD

0

,, :J

0

c..

·- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I

·----------------------------------------------------


'

Cloverleaf Baby Wrap Blanket By Jan Moore Fold fabric lengthwise, then crosswise, creating 4 thicknesses. Place pattern with straight sides along fabric folds.

Place on Fold


LO

30IS

JO!

u .i1sodat1 '£ azis

JOJ

. I .I I I. I I.

-0

Q.)

~

<O

iuawaoe1d a104uo:iins

("')

~

I. I. I. I. I. I. I. I. I.

3Nll Nl\itl8

('l 4c:J~-------------IO![>a~

~

Q.) (J)

paM011e wa4 (wog·o) .. vi~

'<t

I I . I

I.().

I I I I

<.O


0LL. LL.61

Sew Beautiful Copyright 2013

) White House Princess by Kathy Barnard w

0

U5

BODICE FRONT & BACK cut 1 on fold fabric cut 1 on fold lining

I I I . I I I . ~ w. zw ul<t: I ~ 1-1 r .I I I

z zl oO I- z· 0z 0::1 w ff:~, 0:: ~

< .., 0 0

() 0:::

CD

"'Tl

0

c..

orC"'

CD

Q)

......

()

CD ::J

co

,.....+-

::;

~ -· -CD (/)

-:l Q)

~

CD .....


Cloverleaf By

©Sew Beautiful Magazine April/May 2014 Issue #153 Martha Pullen Company 149 Old Big Cove Road Brownsboro, AL 35741 (editorial) 256-261-2532 for questions: e-mail editorial@sewbeautifulmag.com for orders visit: store.marthapullen.com or call: (800) 547-4176

Part B

Attach to Part A r~-·-·-·­

r=

i "r-= :-=:=-.

. I

.1 I j /

/ /

.,,,/. / . · / / .,,. _,,,,. ~o

~/ _,,,,.·~,o~e •

•/

/

/

e'O({'

roc({'"I '='

I / ~\().' \S)· . I I I . . I I ~CD

\I I~~~~ ,.

~~

~~M

Fold fa th creatin Place pattern with st

--------- ·am.:1NC5 ·

N~.u'Vd38~1-

GlO.:l NO lNO~.:l Cl31N38

-:::J

~

....., ·'+-

u

C/:J 00

~

0

u

'E ·ro (].) en .....

:::J

~

('1')

~

~

~ 8 ~ 0 00 a:l ..c00 ;::j ;>, ....... 0 N .......

...... '"" 0 ..c ~ ~~ ~ 0

u

~

(].)

Cf)

0

--+-J

~

',

;>,

.D

~

"O (.)

00

·c ~ .D .....=

~

~

..= ..

.Q «i

"O

-0

E c<J

- --

0 t2c:: .£c::

ft

~

u

II)

~

0

0 .......

(/J

II) (/J

,..... E

u

""!

......

......

;J

'-'

(.)

(.)

---

:l

~

0

0

~

3018

(-!


30IS

~

~

.z,r

----_..

.

-·--·

.......

~· --------~

·-·-·-·-·...-:· paM011e weas (wog·o) ..

vn

I/. iII .\\ \. \ .\ \

.

\

'.

0

~~~ • ~<9

''ii'~ ' · ' ''?90 \\ \·~ .\\ \ \ \ \ \ .,

.\ \

~ I•"¢~----·--·--·-

>18\18 H31.N38 £ ZS

. L.: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ..........._ _ _ _ _ _ _

·-·-·-·-·-

~

3Nll Nl\IH~

Sew beautiful issue 153 april may 2014  
Sew beautiful issue 153 april may 2014  
Advertisement