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MaryJane’s Cluck

February 2012 Monthly Sisterhood Newsletter

... where the braggin’ begins!

Life made us FRIENDS, MaryJanesFarm made us SISTERS!

CONTENTS Hello from Sister #1 ................. 1

{ H EL L O F RO M S IST E R #1 } with MaryJane

Each Other ............................... 4 Farm Kitchen ............................ 6 Garden Gate ............................. 8 Stitching & Crafting ................. 10 Make It Easy .......................... 12 Outpost ................................. 20 Cleaning Up ........................... 22 The Farm Scoop...................... 24

Girl Gab Have you seen the wondrous array of content and heartfelt sharing on girlgab.com? I am just so VERY pleased with how it’s turning out. It looks like we’ll be able to update it every day, mid-day, around 3 p.m. PST, so you can count on fresh content every day of the week. Farmgirl Sisters are amazing. Come read our personal blogs, all in one place now.

Sisterhood Specials ................. 25 Farmgirl Chatter ...................... 26 Sisterhood News ..................... 30 Merit Badges .......................... 40 Farmerettes & Young Cultivators .. 48 Magazines, Books & More ........ 55

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Print Shops: You have our permission to print this in color for your customer, one of our readers. We do not consider it a violation of our copyright. –MaryJane Butters of MaryJane’s CLUCK™.


... continued


Each

In the Shelter of Each Other

�ther

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ E A C H O TH E R } with Megan Rae | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { E A C H O TH E R } category, CLICK HERE

S nack Time I have something to admit. My 5-year-old is a picky eater. But it isn’t junk food she craves. The first time she refused to eat something sugary, I tried to convince her to just eat it anyway, but after the second and third time she begged for something different, I made adjustments.

Megan Rae (Sister #2) grew up “on the farm”— MaryJanesFarm. She attended Gonzaga University and received a bachelor’s degree in Journalism. After marrying her college sweetheart, they moved to Kansas and bought their first home on a cobblestone street. Her love for writing, editing, and well, her Mom, finally brought her back to the farm. Raising her 5-yearold and 2-year-old farmgirls and working alongside her husband, mother, and family is the perfect lifestyle mix for Megan. She rounds it out with travel across the country to visit her five dearest college girlfriends who she loves with all her heart (they’ve all been in each other’s weddings), and one of her favorite farmgirls that she met when she lived in Kansas (scheduled around working the cows, of course).

When she started school this year, I was pleased to learn that the protocol was a snack calendar and parents would take turns supplying snacks for all 24 kids. Yes, I am my mother’s daughter and I love feeding people! Well, it never occurred to me that my daughter would be the one refusing the other kids’ snacks. It started out with a complaint that she didn’t want the cupcakes the parents brought. Finally, she asked me if it was okay if I would pack her something healthy so she didn’t have to eat the designated snack on what she called “cupcake day.” In the end, I was more than happy to pack her some cheese and crackers or a banana or apple. So on HER designated snack day, I was puzzled as to what I could send that would be healthy (meet my daughter’s approval) as well as something her classmates would like. Something cool, basically. Even at age 5, cool matters. I settled on kabobs. They’re simple and can be any variation of food that fits on a stick. In other words, lots of options, enough to fill an entire school year. After filling the wooden skewers, I use end-cutting pliers to snip the sharp end of the skewers off to avoid any injuries. Huge success! Her teacher said the kids love them. And so does my daughter.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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{ E A C H O TH E R } with Megan Rae | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { E A C H O TH E R } category, CLICK HERE

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Farm

Whe r e the c oo kin’ beg ins!

Kitchen

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ FA R M KI TC H E N} with Alyson Oüten | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { FA R M KITCHEN} category, CLICK HERE

Giving I’m sure you have them in your family … those who insist they have it all. Those who want scratched off your Christmas list before the shopping even begins. The “tough-to-shop-for” relatives! In my family, it’s my father and his wife, Ruth who are not only difficult to buy for, but further complicate matters by being extremely generous!

Alyson Oüten (Sister #100) is a farmgirl, trapped in a city-girl career. A two-time Emmy-award-winning reporter, Alyson spent 20 years in the hustle and bustle of television news. Alyson recently hung up her microphone and parlayed her professional experiences into a new career as Corporate Communication Strategist for the international semiconductor company, Micron Technology. Alyson lives in a 1910 Craftsmanstyle bungalow in downtown Boise. She spends as much time as possible cooking for friends and preening and pruning her cottage garden. Alyson is a regular guest at our wall-tent bed and breakfast, where she soaks up our little piece of paradise in a bath under the stars. “It’s my happy place!” she says.

This Christmas, however, I had a stroke of (selfproclaimed) genius! While both are retired, Dad and Ruth travel and volunteer and “work” nearly full-time. They are busier now than they ever were as working folks. So … what would really make their lives better? In crafty collaboration with my graphic-artist friend, I designed a punch card with 12 little circles on it and the following (cheesy) text:

What to give those who want not, A tie, perfume, a coffee pot? To honor your wishes (of which there are few), I shall cook and do dishes just for you two. For Christmas 2011, I offer a deal, For every month, I shall bring you a meal.

Their reaction was priceless! At long last, I’d found a gift they really did want. Eureka!! Last week, I delivered the first of 12 meals: • Turkey potpie with cheddar-cheese biscuit topping • Lettuce salad with pickled onions, shaved Brussels sprouts, and toasted pecans in a balsamic vinaigrette • Fresh-from-the-oven mini mincemeat pies The ooey-gooey potpie (recipe on opposite page) is the perfect warm and comforting antidote to cold winter temperatures. And, the perfect start to my gift that will keep on giving.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Fe a ture d Rec ipe TURKEY POTPIE MAKES: 8 SERVINGS 1 2 2 1 1 3 1/2 1/4 3 1/2 4 10

medium onion, coarsely chopped carrots, cut into 1/2" pieces celery ribs, cut into 1/2" pieces parsnip, peeled, cored, and cut into 1/2" pieces t thyme, minced T butter pound mushrooms, trimmed and quartered cup flour cups turkey stock cups roast turkey meat, cut into 1/2" pieces oz package frozen baby peas, thawed

For biscuit crust: 2 cups flour 2 t baking powder 1 t baking soda 1/2 t salt 1/2 t black pepper 1 cup extra-sharp cheddar cheese, coarsely grated 1/4 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated 6 T cold butter, cut into 1/2" pieces 1 1/4 cups buttermilk, shaken well 1. In a 3–4 quart covered oven-safe pot, cook onion, carrots, celery, parsnip, and thyme in butter over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are almost tender, 10–12 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, uncovered, stirring until tender, 5–7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Sprinkle with flour and cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes. Stir in stock, scraping up any brown bits, and bring to a boil, stirring, then simmer until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. 3. Stir in turkey and peas, and add salt and pepper to taste. Reheat over low heat just before topping with biscuit crust. 4. Preheat oven to 400°F with rack in middle of oven. 5. In a medium bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and pepper. Add cheeses and toss to coat. Blend in butter with a pastry blender or your fingertips until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add buttermilk and stir just until a dough forms. Drop biscuit dough onto filling in several large mounds, leaving spaces between biscuits. 6. Bake until biscuits are puffed and golden brown and filling is bubbling, 35–40 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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�ar�n

Bloom Where You’re P lanted

�ate

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ G A RD E N G A T E } with Mary Ann Newcomer | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { GA RDEN GATE } category, CLICK HERE

Drea ming of Gardens This just in from the Farmgirl Chatroom (Garden Gate, in particular) … Hot topics? I just want to plant my garden (NOW!), favorite seed catalogs, favorite flowers, and whether or not to join a CSA. Ahhh, February—the month when many of our gardens are still fast asleep and yet we yearn for the first ripe tomato of summer. How to reconcile these two? By planning, daydreaming, and sketching out the garden for the upcoming seasons! Right now, it’s all about possibilities and potential.

Mary Ann Newcomer, (Sister #246) is a MaryJane Farmgirl, living in Boise, the capital of Idaho. Her great grandparents’ homestead was established in 1899 on the Palouse prairie and is still in the family. She learned to cook, garden, can, and sew with her grandmother. Never without a garden or, at the very least, a shelf of plants in an apartment, she followed her passion to become an Advanced Master Gardener, a director of the Idaho Botanical Gardens, and a scribe, scout, and speaker for all things gardening.

I want to accomplish several things in the garden this year. First, plant enough greens for sautéing and salads that I won’t have to buy them. Micro greens, Asian greens, mustard greens, and kales. Note to pasta lovers: We love to shred up some lacinato kale or chard leaves and toss them in at the last minute when boiling the pasta. This wilts the greens enough to lose their toughness, yet really makes them vibrant. Toss with a bit of good olive oil, fresh pepper, and a grating of good cheese. Call that dinner. Dedicated to dahlias: I want to plant more, more, MORE of them. I made a preliminary shopping list, and between three online catalogs, I had $300 in orders. Um, that will have to be pared back and pared back substantially! It is the time for dreaming, right? Berries and fruit trees: A couple years ago, I spent entirely too much money to buy the coveted Mara des Bois strawberries from White Flower Farm. Those six plants have produced lots of “daughters.” I’ll bet I now have about three dozen plants that will bear this year. The flavor is incredible and the fragrance of the berries makes me giddy. I’ll continue to dote on these delicious little darlings and hope they multiply and repeat. You can buy 25 plants for $18.95 plus shipping at Burpee this year. Even urban farmgirls can have fruit trees. Please consider espaliered fruit trees for the smallest of garden spaces. I have a terrific espalier of apple trees: three trees, each tree with six different kinds of apples grafted onto the main trunk. I harvested 48 apples last year, and while that’s not a lot by some standards, I am on my way. The trees are trained against a framework of rebar against my foundation. The bed is only about 18" wide. Deep, good soil is a must. The year before last, we planted two espaliered pear trees along our fence line using the fence to train them and they are just getting their “roots” under them. Two peach trees were planted in the fall. All of these are dwarf varieties and fit nicely into my urban garden. I tucked them right into my flower beds. As my grandmother used to say, “Girl, make yourself useful as well as ornamental.” Apply that philosophy to your perennial borders. And please, dream BIG.

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{ G A RD E N G A T E } with Mary Ann Newcomer | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { GA RDEN GATE } category, CLICK HERE

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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�titching &

S titc hes o f Fun & Laug h ter!

Crafting �oom

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ STITCHING & C RA FTING } with Rebekka Boysen-Taylor | to earn a Sisterhood badge in this category, CLICK HERE

Vintage Valentines

Rebekka Boysen-Taylor, (Sister #40) was born in Spokane, Washington, right around the time Mount St. Helens blew her top. She studied Geography at Portland State University and taught grade school in the Bronx and inner-city Los Angeles. She lives with her family on the Palouse. As a stay-at-home mama to two organically growing little ones, Rebekka rounds out her organic lifestyle by volunteering at the Moscow Food Co-op, working as an instructor for MaryJane’s Pay Dirt Farm School, embracing a DIY ethic, winning blue ribbons at the county fair, and living simply.

Imagine my luck a few weeks ago when I stumbled across a dozen packs of Dennison’s Seals at a thrift shop. These seals (gummed stickers) were manufactured in the ’50s and ’60s for around 15 cents a pack. According to the package, the seals are “for gifts, favors, placecards, and school use.” They come in themed packs with around 48 seals in each. Among the sets I picked up were farmyard friends, game birds, and floral seals. To find your own vintage seals, go to Etsy and search for Dennison Seals. An Etsy tip: To make sure you are searching all items, look at the tab directly to the left of the search box. This tab indicates which category you are searching under and says “handmade” by default. You can scroll down and select “all items” to broaden your search. Since Etsy offers categories like handmade, vintage, and supplies, it is a good idea to customize your search so you find exactly what you need. There are oodles of fun seals to be found; in one search, I found holiday, seals of the world, sports, and even George Washington. When I picked up my bag of seals, I knew they would come in handy for making valentines. These mini-valentines are a sweet, cost-effective alternative to store bought or full-size valentines. To make your own “vintage” valentines, you will need seals and small rectangles of cardstock. In addition, gather a few varieties of ribbon and bakers’ twine, glitter, and glue. A word about the glitter: I use real glass glitter because it tarnishes over time, giving it much more depth than craft glitter. You can order the same German glass glitter I use from Bird Song Studio. Nicole and Deborah offer a variety of glitter, along with vintage French charms and beautiful millinery flowers that come in handy for spring crafting.

Vin tage Valen tine 1-2-3 1. Grab your cardstock and fold it in half. 2. Position your seals, moisten, and adhere. 3. Add a ribbon and some glitter!

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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{ STITCHING & C RA FTING } with Rebekka Boysen-Taylor | to earn a Sisterhood badge in this category, CLICK HERE

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

February 2012 • MaryJane’s Cluck

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Make it

Happy Hearts Make Light Work

Easy

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ MA KE IT EA SY } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { MA KE IT EA SY } category, CLICK HERE

A Cowgirl’s Herd of Hear ts Hearts have long been a favored folk-art motif. In bygone days, when expressing affection was much more subdued (even forbidden), symbols of love were common. Heart images have been used as symbols of love for a long, long time. The heart, as a shape, was used in early America to decorate all kinds of utilitarian objects: weathervanes, bellows, horse harnesses, quilts, cookie cutters, butter molds, trivets, candle holders, blanket chests, and much more. Handmade valentine hearts from the latter 1800s are prized finds for avid heart collectors. Many were stuffed and beaded or embellished with lace, ribbon, and flowers.

Shery Jespersen (Sister #753) is a Wyoming cattle rancher who’s been horsecrazy all of her life. Shery is a leather and lace cowgirl. Her other interests include “junktiques,” creating eclectic “make do” arts and crafts, collecting antique china, and cultivating mirth.

With the above in mind, let’s take another little trip down memory lane. Remember sitting at your school desk a week or so before Valentine’s Day … and your teacher showed you how to make a heart by folding red construction paper in half? Then, she showed you how to easily draw and cut a heart out. After that, you decorated it with more little hearts glued onto it or maybe a white lacy doily. If memory serves me right, it was suggested that we give our handmade valentines to our mothers. Handmade valentines are for the special people in our lives, and Valentine’s Day is the perfect occasion for offering handmade tokens of affection. Heart-shaped pillow keepsakes are easy and fun to create. I’ve made a herd of hearts to inspire you and get you started. Begin by making your patterns just like you did as a child at your school desk. Cut out a herd of heart shapes … or better yet, have your children or grandchildren make the patterns for you. Valentine’s Day is all about lots of love! So, make plenty of little hearts … some for your special friends, and enough to decorate your home. These handmade valentines will be even more special than the centuryold antiques because yours will be fresh from love’s oven!

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{ MA KE IT EA SY } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { MA KE IT EA SY } category, CLICK HERE Getting Started … The large accent pillow at right is 12" high x 14" wide. Use those numbers when making your pattern. I like parchment (baking) paper for creating patterns because it is easy to come by and you can trace other patterns too. For the smaller pillows, make your patterns in various shapes and sizes from about 2" to 8"–10".

Preparing the Details … You’ll need hand-sewing basic tools plus polyester fiberfill, a large crochet hook or chopstick, ecru button thread, large-eye needles, etc. In addition, you’ll need trims and decorative accents like buttons, charms, tassles, fabric yo-yos, paper tags, skeleton keys, eyelet, lace, ribbon, bells, and bits of crochet. I used rubber alphabet stamps to print words onto lace trim and paper tags. I also tore fabric into strips to make tiebows. I age lace and trims with leftover coffee.

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Make it

Happy Hearts Make Light Work

Easy

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ MA KE IT EA SY } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { MA KE IT EA SY } category, CLICK HERE

... continued I crinkled the ribbon on the flag heart to make it look older. I used scalloped-edge scissors to edge the paper tags. I rubbed them with ink to antique them and then added a word. I love to make hearts from old quilts, and there are lots of “cutter quilts” and pieces available on eBay. I prefer mixing old textiles and reproduction vintage prints, but you might want to go with bright-colored contemporary prints or the natural tones of linen and muslin.

Making the Hearts … Pin your heart pattern onto two pieces of fabric and then cut out the heart, adding 1/4" seam allowance around. Sometimes, I like to use different fabric for the back of the heart. Stitch up your heart. Carefully clip the edges so that the rounded edges will curve nicely when the heart is turned out. Cut a horizontal slit into the center back of the heart, about a third of the heart width. Turn the heart inside out through the hole. Gently push the seams out with a chopstick or a large crochet needle. Then roll the seams very firmly back and forth between your thumb and forefinger to smooth out the seams; the heart should lay flat when you’re done. Also, be sure the point is smooth by poking the chopstick down into it—carefully. Stuff the heart firmly. Anything you stuff should be firm and smooth to the touch, not uneven and lumpy. Stitch the opening shut and smooth out the heart.

Embellishments … Now, the fun part … adding the goodies! I have a loose plan for each heart. But some plans are better when they change. To coin a phrase, “follow your heart” and your inner child. Play with the things you have to work with. Stitch on all that needs stitching and use a hot glue gun if you’re that kind of girl. If you hang your hearts, add a hang loop. I use button thread because it is strong. Quilting thread works for attaching some of the goodies that don’t require stout thread. I also use crochet thread sometimes. If you add a tassel on the bottom, tuck it inside when you sew the heart together and stitch it into place. When I sew buttons all over the heart, I go all the way through the heart with my needle so that the buttons are snug. Make sure all of your add-ons are secure—not too tight, just right.

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{ MA KE IT EA SY } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { MA KE IT EA SY } category, CLICK HERE Displaying Your Valentines … I hung my valentines on branches stuck down into an old watering can … and added a few more on the tines of an old wooden rake. Here are a few more ideas: make a heart “sampler” by attaching a variety of hearts onto an old weathered board, either horizontally or vertically. You could hot glue them on or hang them on nails. Or make a heart bunting (or banner) by fashioning a wire “swag” from tie-wire from the hardware store. At each place you intend to hang a heart, make a little loop in the wire and then go on to the next location. Leave about 3–6" between each loop. At each end of your swag, make two little hang loops. Then, cut 2" pieces of wire to make simple S-hooks for the hearts. Very easy and oh-so-artsy!

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Love-inspired C acao Recipes Giving chocolate on Valentine’s Day is an old tradition, dating all the way back to the 1800s. Not only does it taste delicious, but numerous studies have suggested that the guilty pleasures of chocolate may not be quite so guilty after all. Cacao (Theobroma cacao), the raw material for chocolate, is high in flavonoids and antioxidants, and contains a host of vitamins and minerals.

Irene Wolansky (Sister #1144) is the Marketing Director at Mountain Rose Herbs. Born and raised on the Oregon coast, Irene spent her childhood learning about beekeeping, growing and preserving fruits and vegetables, building forts in the forest, and going on adventures with her dog. She has many interests, which include making her own body care products, mushroom harvesting, gardening, arts and crafts projects, nature photography, mead and beer making, camping, herbal medicine, baking, traveling, hiking, and spending time with her boyfriend and friends. Click here to visit Mountain Rose Herbs on the Web.

From the 16th through the 20th centuries, medical texts reported no less than 100 medicinal uses for cacao. Scientists are now rediscovering the benefits of this botanical. Cacao can positively lower cholesterol for those with high cholesterol; provides the same amount of antioxidant polyphenols as a glass of red wine, more antioxidants than most fruits, up to four times as many antioxidants as green tea; stimulates the production of natural antidepressants in the body (serotonin and endorphins); and contains phenylethylalamine and anandamide, two chemicals that elevate the mood, help increase focus, and give feelings of attraction, pleasure, and excitement. Plus, cacao is rich in magnesium; calcium; iron; zinc; copper; manganese; potassium; pantothenic acid; and Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C, and E. Our adoration for cacao has been traced all the way back to 1900 BCE when ancient cultures in Mesoamerica enjoyed bitter beverages made from cacao. The Olmecs, Mayans, and Aztecs believed that the beans had magical properties and reserved cacao for sacred rituals and sacrifices to their gods. Those chosen for sacrifice by the Aztecs were often given a gourd filled with cacao to cheer them up before being sacrificed, and the Aztec ruler, Montezuma, would consume chocolate for its aphrodisiac properties before entering his harem. Cacao beans were a form of currency in Aztec society, traded for food, livestock, supplies, and other goods. Since it was so valuable, common people were unable to afford it for consumption. After the conquest of these peoples, cacao was brought to Spain. The bitter beans were not

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enjoyed by the Spaniards until they realized that sugar and honey could be added to make a sweet beverage. Cacao then quickly became a popular and fashionable drink throughout Europe. In the 1800s, a process was discovered for turning cacao beans into solid chocolate confections. Chocolate shops soon sprung up throughout Europe, one of which was owned by the Cadbury brothers in England. In 1861, they created the first heart-shaped box for Valentine’s Day, thus spurring the tradition still celebrated of giving heart-shaped boxes filled with chocolates for Valentine’s Day.

Cacao & Vanilla Body Polish This scrub smells scrumptious and exfoliates skin, making it soft and smooth. It will leave a faint aroma of chocolate and vanilla lingering on the skin. • • • • • •

3/4 cup organic granulated or brown sugar, or fine sea salt 1/4 cup plus 2 T organic apricot kernel, sweet almond, or sunflower oil (or other carrier oil of choice) 1 T organic cacao powder 1 T organic vegetable glycerin or honey 1–2 t organic vanilla extract Essential oil of choice (optional): cinnamon leaf, geranium, lavender, lime, mandarin, peppermint, sweet orange, tangerine, ylang ylang, or other

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Package in jars, and enjoy!

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... continued Creamy Cocoa & Ylang Ylang Massage Oil Adding cocoa butter gives this massage oil a creamy consistency. It is wonderful for massages, but can also be used as a general body lotion for moisturizing the skin. This massage oil has the seductively sweet floral scent of ylang ylang flowers with undertones of cocoa. • • • •

2 T organic cocoa butter or 6 organic cocoa butter wafers 1/2 cup organic apricot kernel, sweet almond, or sunflower oil (or other carrier oil of your choice) 1/4 cup organic jojoba oil 15 drops organic ylang ylang essential oil

In a double boiler, gently warm the oils and cocoa butter until the butter has melted. Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool for a few minutes at room temperature. Then, add the essential oil and mix together until thoroughly blended. Pour into a bottle. The mixture will continue to thicken, so allow up to 24 hours for it to reach its final texture. Note: Use less cocoa butter if in colder climates, otherwise the massage oil will become almost solid. If it is too firm, simply re-melt and add more carrier oil. If you desire a firmer consistency, re-melt and add additional cocoa butter.

Sweet Orange & Cocoa Lip Balm A wholesome and nourishing lip balm with the uplifting aromas of citrus and chocolate. This recipe has an abundance of rich oils, perfect for protecting and conditioning lips during cold winter months. • • • • • •

1 T organic cocoa butter or 4 organic cocoa butter wafers 1 T organic sweet almond or sunflower oil 2 T organic avocado, olive, hemp, or jojoba oil 1 T plus 1 t beeswax 15–20 drops organic sweet orange essential oil (or other essential oil of choice) A few drops of vitamin E oil (optional, but recommended)

Coarsely chop the beeswax or use beeswax pastilles. Place beeswax, cocoa butter, and oils in a small pot or glass Pyrex measuring cup and gently heat in the top of a double boiler until the beeswax and butters have melted. Once melted, remove from the stovetop and add essential oil and vitamin E oil. Immediately pour the mixture into lip balm tubes or jars. Allow to cool completely before placing caps onto the lip balm containers.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Cacao Hot Chocolate I recently discovered just how simple it is to whip up a decadent cup of hot chocolate at home with a few simple ingredients. For Valentine’s Day, try enhancing this recipe with vanilla, powdered rose petals, or a tiny pinch of warming cayenne pepper. • • •

1 T organic cacao powder 2–3 t sweetener of choice: organic honey, maple syrup, agave nectar, or sugar 1 cup organic milk (or milk substitute)

Heat milk or milk substitute in a pan until hot. Be careful not to scorch! Remove from burner, add cacao and the sweetener of choice to taste, stirring until well dissolved. Use a whisk if desired for a frothier consistency. Pour into a mug and enjoy the pure chocolaty goodness, or add powdered herbs, spices, and flavorings. The cacao and additional herbs or spices may settle a little as the beverage cools, but you can simply stir with a spoon if necessary.

Happy s ’ e n i t n e l a V Day!

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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�utpost

The Wo r k o f Ou r Ha n ds

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ OUTPOST } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { OUTPOST } category, CLICK HERE

The Valen tine Box

Shery Jespersen (Sister #753), Wyoming cattle rancher and outpost writer (rider), shares the “view from her saddle.” Her longtime love is Apple Pi “Dolly” Rose, a 20-year-old Morgan otherwise known as “The Best Darn Horse in the Universe.” In our Make It Easy section, Shery also shares her other love, “make do” arts and crafts.

When I was a schoolgirl (lower grades), the custom was to make and decorate a slotted box that would receive our valentines before the class party on Valentine’s Day. We worked on them during art class. ‘Cowgirlish’ tomboy though I was, I loved dressing my box up by gluing on lots of red and pink hearts, lacy paper doilies, and sparkle. The boys, well, they weren’t all that keen on making pretty boxes. Best as I can recall, I think many of them opted out and just used plain shoeboxes. As Valentine’s Day grew closer, we eagerly shook the boxes and peeked inside the slot to see the cards that had been secretly dropped in. The highlight of the class valentine party was sharing cookies made by our mothers, Kool-Aid, hard candies with little messages on them (like “Be Mine”) … and opening our valentine box! Some of the girls (and boys) were eager to see if they received a valentine from that “special someone.” Generally, there were about 20 kids in our class and everyone brought valentines. Do the math. That’s a lot of valentines! I loved going through all my cards at home in the evening. Favorite friends always wrote a little more on their card for you. My sister, brother, and I always received valentines from my mother and grandmother … small cards, maybe a 50-cent piece, and, of course, a bag of heart-shaped candies. I’m a big girl now, but I still love Valentine’s Day… and hearts. I never outgrew the feeling of delight that a day dedicated to showing a little extra affection inspires. And I’ve never outgrown the warm, fuzzy rush when a valentine card arrives in the mail.

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{ OUTPOST } with Shery Jespersen | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { OUTPOST } category, CLICK HERE A Valentine’s Day memory that sticks out in my mind in recent times involved a different kind of discovery—one that would normally make my nostrils flair: muddy cowboy boot prints on the kitchen floor. However, when I spied a red card and a bouquet of daisies on the kitchen table that the prints led to, well, it was a little hard to stay mad. Never let it be said that romance is lost on a cowboy, mine anyway. His favorite thing to do as a couple is ride together at the ranch. While that may not be the dream of some gals, it was a dream come true for this one. Every Valentine’s Day, I’m reminded of it. I giggle to myself as I get a visual of us riding … with little animated hearts floating around us on the prairie breeze. Thankfully, I’m still suffering from an ailment Thumper described in the movie Bambi as being “twitterpated.” The flame has softened as the years have passed, but the affection is wider. I dreamed of making memories together … and we did. We are. Fondly recalling the early days of finding the love of your life is a valentine you can give to yourself. Go ahead, open up that old “valentine box” and remember.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Cleaning

The Wo r k o f Ou r Ha n ds

�p

According to MaryJane, the seven aspects for living the farmgirl life are: EACH OTHER | FARM KITCHEN | GARDEN GATE | STITCHING & CRAFTING ROOM | MAKE IT EASY | OUTPOST | CLEANING UP

{ CLEA NING UP } with Toni Salerno | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { CLEA NING UP } category, CLICK HERE

Make a Clea n Sweep

Born and raised in Florida, Toni Salerno (Sister #197) left her city life as a Theatre Director/Teacher to live a more holistic, serene life in Idaho. Eight years ago, she found her dream home in Troy, Idaho, and embraced the Palouse way of life. Now, Toni and her husband, Adam, and their four daughters own Clean Green, an organic cleaning service. This company specializes in chemical-free cleaning using their own line of environmentally safe products.

In the dead of winter, everyone should know precautions to take to have a safe and clean season. First of all, after snow has fallen, it is best to shovel all walkways and entryways and then apply ice melt or gravel to avoid slipping or falling. Everyday natural products like sand, sawdust, kitty litter (non-clumping), and ashes are proven ways to add traction to a slippery surface. They’re better for you than chemical compounds, comparatively better for your immediate environment, and often cheaper, too. An extended snow brush a great tool to remove the snow off sheds, roofs, and barns to prevent them from collapsing under the weight of heavy snow. Also, you want to have your driveways plowed thoroughly to keep travels safe to and from your home. A sturdy rubber matted rug is handy inside your entryways so you can keep your floors clean when you remove your boots and shoes. With wood floors, it’s best to not let snow and ice melt get on your floors—it can cause them to buckle and warp. Be sure to stomp the ice off your boots before entering your home and remove them on the rug as soon as you enter. Once inside your home, you want to remember to keep your heat sources clean to keep air quality at its highest and to avoid potential fires. The National Fire Protection Association found the No. 1 cause of home heating fires was failure to clean creosote from chimneys and pellet stoves. Creosote is the byproduct of wood burning, and it can stick to the inside of chimneys. According to the Chimney Safety Institute of America, creosote is highly combustible and it can build up in the flue. Once there, if it lights, it can cause a chimney fire. It is best to have a professional check out your chimney and flue regularly. In addition, change your filters in furnaces and electric heating units seasonally to avoid poor air quality and build-up of dust and debris. There are also some other important precautionary measures you can take to keep your heat sources clean and safe.

K Make Mine

GREEN

1. Keep a 3-foot rule when it comes to fireplaces: keep kids, pets, and flammable items at least 3 feet from the fire. 2. Dispose of old ashes, even if you believe they’re cooled, at least 10 feet from the house or keep in a metal container for future gardening needs. 3. Keep portable heaters at least 3 feet from kids, pets, and beds. And remember to turn them off when you’re not in the room.

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{ CLEA NING UP } with Toni Salerno | to earn a Sisterhood badge in our { CLEA NING UP } category, CLICK HERE 4. Even if you have a gas-powered fireplace, there’s a danger: carbon monoxide poisoning. Make sure your home is well ventilated and put a carbon monoxide monitor in the hallway of sleeping areas in the home. 5. Never use alternative heat sources inside the home like barbeques or grills. These are made for the outdoors, and their fumes inside the home could make the occupants sick. Always check with a professional before trying to clean your furnace and chimney. Keep your fire alarms stocked with new batteries and periodically test them. Cheers to a clean and safe season!

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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The

M a r y Ja n e s Fa r m N e ws

�coop

The Scoop from MaryJanesFarm Indexes Available! MaryJanesFarm Magazine Index in pdf form available for searching and downloading! The index covers issues back to MAY/JUNE/JULY 2008 (She’s A Keeper). New magazines will be indexed as they are released. CLICK HERE to download the MaryJanesFarm Magazine Index. We also now have all the back issues of MaryJane’s Cluck available for download on our website. CLICK HERE to read the back issues of MaryJane’s Cluck.

[TIP] Use the seach/find tool in your browser to look up keywords in the Magazine Index and the back issues of The Cluck.

Farmgirls Unite!

If you are hosting a farmgirl event, open to all farmgirls, send the event description, date, location, and contact info to megan@maryjanesfarm.org. Megan is going to start a calendar to keep Sisters up-to-date on upcoming gatherings. (See p. 26 for upcoming events.) If you’re a Sisterhood member, click here to download a FREE Farmgirls on the Loose logo! Enter your Sisterhood number; password is: FGLoose (case-sensitive) (Fun logo ideas: frame it, use it for transfers on shopping bags, totes, and pillows, or make it into a sticker for your Airstream trailer!)

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Februar y

Farmgirl Sisterhood Specials

Exclusive Offer! 20 % OFF MaryJanesFarm Bed

& Breakfast

(For Farmgirl Sisterhood Members Only) (2-night minimum stay.)

For Reser vations or Questions (Call or e-mail the farm at 208-882-6819 or bb@maryjanesfarm.org) Offer good through the month of February.

Calendar Sale! 25 % OFF MaryJanesFarm Calendar (For Farmgirl Sisterhood Members Only)

To Purchase Click Here Offer good through the month of February.


Farmgirl

S h a r e in the f un!

Farmgirl Chatter

Chatter

|

What are farmgirls chatting about? Check it out at The Farmgirl Connection link here!

A Farm of My Own: Color & Interest on a Winter Day—Farm Pic Tour! Submitted by tangledthreads This afternoon, I decided to walk around my acreage and find some color and interest on an otherwise drab winter day and this is what I came across ... What have you found on your farm today? Share here. A Farm of My Own: Looking for the Perfect 4-season Farm. Submitted by ProgressiveHomemaker So a fantasy exists in my mind (and has for some time) that there exists this perfect place to settle. There are 4 seasons, each 3 months long. They give me daffodils in the spring, fireflies in the summer, falling leaves in autumn, and a white Christmas. Do you know some place that fits this profile? If so, please share here. Outpost: Sisterhood Get-Together 2012. Submitted by Kampercatt Are there any plans for the Farm Girls on the Loose getting together this year in 2012? Maybe some regional outings? Anxious to get out with the glamper this year and meet up with some of the sisters. I’m in WI, any ideas out there? Outpost: Sisterhood Get-Together 2012. Submitted by Meg Mom and I are toying with the idea of a Farmgirls on the Loose event in our neck of the woods also. Wouldn’t it be fun if gatherings sprouted up all over the country? So far, we’re thinking we’ll hold our “glamp-out” in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho the weekend of June 1 (May 31-June 3). We’re going to set aside some campsites, cabins, and hotel rooms (for those not so big on tents or glampers) and then come up with a list of amazing options for what to do all weekend--everything from boat rides to horse rides to shopping to potlucks to fishing to tatting lessons. Plus, we have our store in CDA where sisters could stop by for round-the-clock free chocolate or something like that:) Anyway, with it snowing here non-stop today, we’re enjoying thinking about glamping with our sisters next summer! MaryJane’s daughter, Meg Outpost: Sisterhood Get-Together 2012. Submitted by Meg I’ve been calling some of our favorite campgrounds, etc. in Coeur d’Alene and it looks like those are going to be our dates for sure (May 31, June, 1, 2, and 3) because it fits into our B&B schedule that has already been set in stone and Mom agreed a month or so ago to be a keynote speaker for a gathering of professional women in the construction trade on Sunday evening at the Coeur d’Alene resort. It would be four full days of ya-ya sisterhood! Won’t you join us? Details coming soon. MaryJane’s daughter, Meg Click here to join the conversation.

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A n yo n e c a n c a tc h y our e y e , bu t it takes so meo n e spec ia l to c a tc h y our he ar t. – Author Unknown

Across the Fence: Work on Gratitude Badge Together. Submitted by EastTXFarmgirl I have attempted the Beginner’s Gratitude Merit Badge many times, but have yet to complete it. It seems like one of the easiest badges to work on, but usually about 3–4 days into it, I forget to write a daily note and start over and so on. I thought maybe we could work on it together. If you are needing this badge, join me here daily for the next 30 days. I will be working on this until February 29, but if you get started later, just continue on until your month is done. Here are the requirements for this badge: 9. Farmgirl Gratitude Beginner Level • Write a gratitude journal every day for a month. Don’t repeat the same gratitude more than once to qualify for this merit badge. • Read The Book of Awesome by Neil Pasricha, one entry, once a day, to help you appreciate the simple things. I got The Book of Awesome by Neil Pasricha for my Kindle through Amazon. I’ll be writing my daily gratitude and then I’ll do a virtual reading out loud to you of a section of the book. You can read whatever section you want in your book. I’ll just be going in order of the book, not picking out any special passage. You can use whatever format you wish for your posting, just be sure to post every day and include your gratitude and the title of your reading passage. If you joined in on the virtual reading out loud, just list the title of the passage or you could put “listened outloud.” This will be an honor system. Nobody is going to go back and check that you posted daily. This is your badge, so if you don’t mind others knowing what you are thankful for, join me here daily for a dose of gratitude. What do you say? How about a couple hundred of us apply for the Beginner-level Farmgirl Gratitude Badge on March 1, 2012? See post here. Across the Fence: Age or Brains? Submitted by Okie Farm Girl Well, have you ever made a mix-up that just leaves you feeling totally stupid or wondering if your brain is even there?? We were supposed to attend a surprise party for a dear friend of ours and I was supposed to bring a snack that wasn’t sweet. Convinced that today was the 27th, I made a big batch of sweet and sour meatballs with pineapple chunks and put them in a crockpot, got dressed (as did hubby), and hopped in the car. The party was at a church, and I noticed somebody inside, so I went in and asked where the party was being held. The party? THAT was LAST night! And you want to know what is even worse? I saw a post on FB by the honoree’s daughter-in-law about how she was going to veg out tonight and I chuckled to myself that she was really laying it on thick to keep him fooled. Am I an idiot or what?? I dropped the meatballs off at the home of the birthday boy and his wife. Click here to see post.

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{tips, ins p ira tio n, & jus t p la in f un!} the chatter continues ... Barnyard Buddies: This chicken thing is getting way out of hand. Submitted by one_dog_per_acre I ordered an incubator yesterday. I can’t help it. It’s all the egg auctions at Backyard Chickens.com. Who’s got Frizzled Polish Bantams? Ducks in the bathtub soon! DH cleared 1/4 acre of blackberries and stumps last weekend. This neighborhood homesteader is out of control. Click here to go to topic. Barnyard Buddies: Screeching cockatiel. Submitted by prayin granny Good evening ladies! I got two female cockatiels a few months back. One of them screeches whenever I leave the room. Pidgett gets louder and louder by the day! Anyone have any thoughts on how to re-train this behavior of screech/scream?? Any help or thoughts would be appreciated!! Share advice here. Cleaning Up: Laundry Detergent Help. Submitted by Hawkin_Farmgirl I’ve been converted to cloth diapers and cloth wipes and I’ve gotten my husband used to not having paper towels. Yay, me! So now I want to make some laundry detergent. But what kind? I’m washing cloth diapers and wipes, plus my husband has sensitive skin. Currently we are using “All, Free & Clear.” I would prefer to just make one batch of soap. Is there a recipe that I could use for everything? Which should I use? Thanks for any help ladies! Respond to topic here. Cleaning Up: Paper Towels or Kitchen Towels. Submitted by Bear5 I save a lot of money by using kitchen towels. However, I sure wash a lot because my hubby uses the kitchen towels to wipe his hands with once, then throws them into the laundry basket. I do still use paper towels, but not as much as I used to. Click here to see post. Cleaning Up: Toilet Bowl Cleaner Help. Submitted by amarquardt I make all my own cleaning products, but the one thing I still purchase is a heavy-duty toilet-bowl cleaner. I would really like to get away from using chemicals all together, but we have very hard water. Even if I scrub it down daily, I still get build up. Can anyone recommend an alternative? Click here to share your answers. Family Matters: You know you’re a mother when… Submitted by Montrose Girl You figure out how to go to the bathroom with an infant in your arms. It’s the little things that amaze me through this new adventure. What made you finally say, “This is real and I’m a mom.” Click here to see topic.

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the chatter continues ... Farm Kitchen: Looking for side dishes to go with a Thai dish … Submitted by FieldsofThyme I’m looking for more ideas on side dishes to go with a Thai Lime Chicken we made. This last time, I made jasmine rice with coconut milk and lime (and tossed in some coconut too). I would love other side dish ideas that you are using with a Thai main dish. Leave your comments here. Farm Kitchen: What’s for dinner tonight? Submitted by texdane MMMmmmm, mmmm. I am making one of my favorite meals for my dd and dh tonight. Homemade Texas chili, served with fresh buttermilk cornbread baking in my cast-iron skillet. Will top the chili off with cheese and sour cream, and wash it all down with fresh-brewed ice tea! It’s a chilly night out, so it’s a “chili” night in! Wishing I had a kitchen-full of farmgirls to share it with! Does anyone else have anything yummy you’re cooking up tonight? Share what you're having for dinner here. Farm Kitchen: What’s Your Go-To Recipe? Submitted by sjmjgirl Everybody has those staple recipes they use when they are in a bind for dinner or need a dish for a potluck, school function, etc. For dinner, mine is usually tuna casserole, for potluck it’s Hawaiian Dream Pie. Super good and super easy. What’s your go-to dish? Share here. Garden Gate: I know it might be silly to cry, but … Submitted by LuckyMommyof4 We’ve been having some very unstable weather in our area lately, including days of high winds. We discovered today that these winds damaged several of our trees pretty severely (split, snapped, or cracked trunks). The arborist was out today and said for safety all the damaged ones will have to be cut down Monday (and this is a wonderful tree service we’ve worked with for years—I know they wouldn’t recommend this if it wasn’t necessary). This includes the family’s absolute favorite tree, a big 100+ year old maple. It’s a 4-trunk tree, and the arborist said they would try to save as much of it as they can, but I really started crying when he told me the bad news. I know we still have lots of healthy trees left, but losing even these makes me so sad. Is it silly to be so upset? Respond to post here. Garden Gate: New Plant Hardiness Zone Map. Submitted by StrawHouseRanch The USDA has posted a new Plant Hardiness Zone Map on their site. It has some really nice features to it. Click here to go to the USDA website. Go to topic here. Parenting & Farm Kids: Traditions. Submitted by FieldsofThyme I am considering starting up an old tradition we used to do ... anyone else starting new ones this year? Leave your comments here.

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Farmgirl

News

Sisterhood

NEW Merit Badges for Farmgirl Sisters! WATER CONSERVATION for Cleaning Up: Beginner: Check all taps in your house for leaks and fix any you find. Research and make a list of simple ways to conserve water, like taking shorter showers or collecting in a pail the water wasted before it’s hot or turning off the faucet while you’re brushing your teeth. Measure the volume amount of water saved in one week. Intermediate: Research the concept of gray water, how to collect it and what you can use it for. (Find simple ways to reuse water in our Simple Solutions from the “Attitude of Gratitude” Oct/Nov 2010 issue of MaryJanesFarm magazine.) Devise a rain barrel system to collect rainwater to use for your garden or to wash your car. Expert: Calculate your household’s water usage for an entire month. Over the next few weeks following, lower your household’s monthly water usage by at least 10%. BLOGGING for Each Other: Beginner: Read Blogging for Bliss: Crafting Your Own Online Journal: A Guide for Crafters, Artists & Creatives of all Kinds by Tara Frey. Choose your topic. Pick something you are passionate about. Intermediate: Start your blog. Find a blogging host that works for you, or host your own. Pick out a name, and publish your first post. Don’t forget to add your blog to MaryJanesFarm’s GirlGab.com. Expert: Learn how to add pictures and customize your blog. Publish at least 10 posts along with photos. Network! Create a blogging circle by visiting other blogs, writing comments, and leaving your blog’s address so they can visit you, also. Remember, building a blog and finding readers takes time. Be patient and have fun.

GREATEST GENERATION for Each Other: Beginner: Spend time with your elders. Visit a retirement home, your local senior center, or a neighbor or family member. Spend at least 10 hours playing games, listening to music, or simply keeping good company. Intermediate: Continue to spend time with your new friend. Volunteer to help organize old photographs, or to record their favorite memories or experiences. If possible, cook them a favorite meal or family recipe. The time requirement for this badge is an additional 20 hours. Expert: Continue to spend an additional 40 hours in the company of your elders. Share your experience with your local Farmgirl Chapter. If you don’t belong to a local Farmgirl Chapter, share your experience with the farmgirls on the chatroom.

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RECIPES for Farm Kitchen: Beginner: Gather your family’s favorite and well-loved recipes. Talk to your grandparents, parents, and aunts and uncles. If any are not written down, write them down now! Intermediate: Create a recipe box or book to keep all your heirloom recipes safe. Make three more to give to other family members. Expert: Host a family gathering featuring all your newly organized recipes. BIRDS for Garden Gate: Beginner: Research birds native to your area. Make a bird “wish list” of birds you’d like to observe in the wild. Intermediate: Build a bird house, bath, or feeder for your yard or garden. Watch and identify the kind of birds it attracts, recording your observations. Observe the type of bird, the time of year, time of day, and the bird’s behavior. Expert: Go on a bird watching expedition. Identify at least 10 different species of birds and record your observations. If you are able, try to photograph each one.

MUSIC for Make It Easy: Beginner: Learn about three of the basic elements of music: rhythm, melody, and harmony. Listen to three songs from three different genres of music and identify the elements in each. Intermediate: Research one classical composer and one musician from the last 100 years. Compare and contrast each, identifying the similarities and the differences between their music. Share what you have learned with your Farmgirl Chapter, or with the farmgirls on the chatroom. Expert: Learn to play an instrument, or choose an instrument to research and attend a concert or recital featuring that instrument. Join a local choir, or support your local singers by attending at least two open mic nights or choir concerts in your town.

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Farmgirl

News

Sisterhood

... continued ROCKS AND MINERALS for Outpost: Beginner: Research the difference between rocks and minerals. Learn about the characteristics of minerals and identify the three types of rocks. Research the ways rocks and minerals are used in our everyday life. Intermediate: Find a museum near you that has a rock, mineral, or gemstone display. See how many you can identify. If there isn’t a museum near you, find pictures of rocks and minerals online and create your own display to share with your Farmgirl Chapter or family. Expert: Become a rockhound! Collect at least 10 different rocks or minerals. Identify if each is either rock or mineral, and write your observations down. Keep an eye out for fossils or gemstones. FISHING for Outpost: Beginner: Learn how to tie the following knots commonly used in fishing: clinch, Palomar, turle, barrel knot, and double surgeons loop. Intermediate: Obtain a copy of the fishing regulations near you. Check out your state’s Department of Fish & Game website. Familiarize yourself with the types of fish in your area, and how each are caught. Research the different types of bait used to catch fish in your area. Expert: Buy a fishing license and gear up. Catch a fish! Or two! If your area’s regulations permit you to keep it, clean and cook it.

WILDGAME for Outpost: Beginner: Research different types of wild game. Research safe handling of wild game meats. Research the laws in your area concerning wild game. A good place to start is your state’s Department of Fish & Game website. Intermediate: Successfully complete a hunter safety program. Go hunting with someone who has a license. Make your own jerky or sausage. Expert: Buy a hunting license and go hunting. Follow proper care in the field while dressing. Process your game or visit a local processor to learn about the following: importance of temperature control, aging cutting, the location of various cuts, and curing and smoking. Use as much of the animal as possible for culinary purposes and otherwise.

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BASKETRY for Stitching & Crafting: Beginner: Take a class or research the four types of basket weaving: plaited, coiled, ribbed, and wicker. Start with a simple pattern and weave your first basket. Spend at least three hours on this badge. Intermediate: Take some time to research Native American basket weaving. With your next basket, take a step up and weave a basket with a handle. A minimum of 10 hours is required for this badge. Expert: Start and finish a basket of expert level. Create a gift basket for a friend, using one of your homemade baskets. A minimum of 20 hours is required for this badge.

QUILLING for Stitching & Crafting: Beginner: Quilling has been around for hundreds of years. Research quilling and the materials used. Start by becoming familiar with the different shapes, coils, and scrolls used in quilling. Create a small design to put in a picture frame or on a card for a friend. Intermediate: Start and finish an intermediate level quilling project. This project should take minimum of three hours. Expert: Start and finish a project of expert level using three-dimensional quilling. For this merit badge, you need a time investment of at least 5 hours.

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Merit Badge Details: Farmgirl Legend

Become a Legend in Your Own Time! There are now two ways to become a Farmgirl Legend. Become a “Schoolmarm” when you complete all the badge requirements in any one category. For example, in Each Other, you would need to complete the beginner, intermediate, and expert levels in Community Service, Community Action, Public Service, Lend a Hand to Families, Lend a Hand to Farm Families, Little Squirts, Plant It Forward, Connecting Growers and Eaters, Farmgirl Gratitude, Get ‘er Done, Farmgirl Spirit, Families Forever, and Entrepreneurial Spirit. Once you become a “Schoolmarm,” the next step is to become a “Head Mistress” when you obtain the Schoolmarm title in ALL categories. When you become a Schoolmarm or a Headmistress, you will be awarded a certificate and your new lofty title will be applied to your Farmgirl Connection chatroom I.D.

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Exclusive for Sisters! Sisterhood Necklace

We’ve partnered with Elaine Tolson of Washington to offer this lovely bit of vintage-style jewelry— for Sisterhood members only. Your necklace will be emblazoned with your own unique Sisterhood number, setting your braggin’ rights in stone. Whether you wear it as a secret code for those in-theknow, or as a conversation starter about the Sisterhood, is up to you. Click here to order yours.

Fr ont

Ba c k

Hello Elaine! Hi, my name is Veronica and you made a charm for me. It is a Farmgirl Sisterhood charm necklace and I just had to e-mail you. First off, I never expected such quality and attention to detail. When I saw my name on the package, I thought it was from someone I knew! Then when I opened the package and saw the little burlap pouch, I smiled and my daughter (who is 3) said, “Mama, what’s that?” Then, when I pulled out the necklace, I literally gasped. It’s so beautiful! I knew what it would look like from a photo on the MaryJanesFarm website, but this necklace exceeded my expectations. I loved the length of the chain. I have bought some necklaces on Etsy.com and I’m always disappointed that the ball chains are soooo short. The charm looks small to me on the website, so when I saw it, I was like, this is the perfect size! I just wanted to thank you personally for such detail and the obvious love you put into your craft. Are you on Etsy? I’m definitely sharing your website with all of my friends. And I am most definitely going to be buying another charm(s) from you in the future. Thank you again, and I feel like I got a bargain for this necklace. Sincerely, Veronica Laviolette

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Jewelry

MAKE YOUR OWN

Farmgirl Sisterhood

MERIT BADGE

Farmgirl sisters have earned a whopping 4,789 Merit Badges to date, and their Young Cultivators have earned 350 (see a complete list of our Merit Badge Awardees at www.farmgirlsisterhood.org). (Already, we have some “sharpshooters” who’ve earned more than 200 badges!) Here’s how I turned my badge insignias into jewelry—you can make necklaces, bracelets, chest medals, ring or earring signets, or even aglets and stampede straps! Using a few basic jewelry tools, the Internet, and a visit to my local craft store, I took my badges (that arrive in an e-mail when earned/approved) and sized them down. You can size your badges yourself using this step-by-step process, or take your jpeg files to your local copy shop and have them do it for you. If you have other ideas on how you like to resize and color your badges, feel free to share your ideas on our Farmgirl Connection™ Chatroom. 1. Download your jpeg badge file (right-click (PC) or command-click (Mac) the image, then choose “Save Picture As...” or “Save Image As...”). Save them to your computer somewhere you can find them again (like the desktop). 2. My design team knew how to color them on the computer using Paint or Photoshop, but when left to my own devices, colored pencils worked just fine. I left many of mine black and white, aiming for that vintage, somewhat industrial, frugal, farmish look. 3. Open Microsoft Word. Click “Insert,” “Picture,” “From File,” and select the badge image to insert. Select one of the corners of the badge image. Using Word's rulers for size reference (under toolbars), resize your badge the desired amount by clicking, holding, and dragging. If you make a mistake while resizing, simply hit the “Reset Picture” button on the picture editing toolbar and start over (“View,” “Toolbars,” “Picture”). 4. To make a circle cutting template around your badge, you will need to again select “View,” “Toolbars,” “Drawing.” Select the oval shape, and while holding your shift key down, drag until the circle is the correct size for your badge. Click the paint bucket on the drawing toolbar while your circle is selected, and click “no fill” to make your badge visible through the circle. 5. Print and enjoy!

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For Scrabble tiles, I found the best quality and most reliable gear on Etsy. First, I brushed the paper badge with a thin layer of matte-finish Mod Podge to seal the paper, then I let it dry. You will use Mod Podge for all of these jewelry crafting projects; it works as both a glue and a sealer. Next I cut out my paper badge insignia and brushed the blank side of the Scrabble tile with Mod Podge and placed the paper badge onto it, gently working out any air bubbles with my bone folder (find at your local craft store.) After it dried, I placed a self-adhesive square epoxy dome on top of the badge insignia and used a bone folder to remove the air bubbles. Next, I glued a metal bail (see left) on the lettered side using a 24-hour clear epoxy. Finally, I attached it to my chain necklace using a jump ring.

Bone Folder

For smaller, round bezel cups (my favorite), I turned to scrapbooking supplies for the most economical source. Idea-ology™ “Type Charms” (the stickers that come in the package look like typewriter keys, but I used my badge insignias instead) are sold in packages of 16 that include self-adhesive round epoxy domes that insert into each cup and sell for around $8 (50¢ each). Available at Michael’s or online here. I think the 1/2" diameter size of this charm is good because of the price and availability. Soon, we’ll all be charming! (You can go a more expensive route using bezel cups made from sterling silver and filled with liquid clear casting epoxy. You can purchase supplies here, or Google “sterling bezel cups.”) Sterling Silver Bezel Cup

continued…


… continued Look to Jill Schwartz for a line of jewelry embellishments for adding non-badge charms to your necklace. I used a variety of charms from her line, as well as Industrial Chic, Lost & Found, Pearls & Pumps, Bella Boho, Forged, Blue Moon, and Black Lace. If you haven’t discovered the jewelry aisle in your local craft store yet, head on out. There may be other lines or new lines available online or in stores near you by the time you read this.

Picking through the above lines of jewelry makings, I also Mod Podged my badge insignias onto any flat surface I could find, adjusting the size accordingly. I even used a locket from the Industrial Chic line for my main hexagonal Sisterhood Badge (inside are photos of my grandchildren). Note the cool safety pins you can buy that don’t have the bottom double curl.

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Or buy a button-making machine.

Merit Badge Buttons

Industrial Chic’s ring blank didn’t come with a self-adhesive resin dome, so I picked up some EasyCast to make my own. First, I followed the Mod Podge steps and gave the badge an extra coat to protect it from losing color and let it dry. I chose a well-ventilated area and covered the surface I was working on with wax paper. Next, I put on gloves and eye protection. Following the EasyCast instructions that come with the kit, I mixed my EasyCast and poured it into a squeezable condiment bottle with a spout (like a mustard container). I put the ring upright in a vice and gently squeezed the EasyCast onto my “bee kind to mother earth” badge that was nestled inside. (If you don't have a vise, you could use a bowl of uncooked rice or make jigs out of foam-core board or styrofoam.) Lastly, I covered the ring with a box while the EasyCast was hardening to protect it and followed the EasyCast instructions for proper clean up.


Merit �adge

Woo Hoo!

Awardees

Merit Badge Awardees Amanda Henning, mamahenning #2492 Beginner badge: Scrapbooking / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: The Secret Life of Bees / Garden Gate Amy Marquardt, Amarquardt #3706 Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Ashley Hotter, AshleyH #3108 Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Blogging / Each Other Beginner badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Blogging / Each Other Intermediate badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Ashley Montague, Lady in Pearls #3466 Beginner badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Barbara Roberts, Healthy Eating #2237 Beginner badge: Ink Slinger / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Get ‘er Done / Each Other Intermediate badge: Ink Slinger / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Intermediate badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other Intermediate badge: Get ‘er Done / Each Other Intermediate badge: Safe Toys / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Families Forever / Each Other Expert badge: Ink Slinger / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Expert badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Expert badge: Grow Where You’re Planted / Garden Gate Expert badge: Farmgirl Grammar / Each Other Expert badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Whe n lo ve is n o t m a dn ess, it is n o t lo ve . – Pedro Calderon de la Barca

Merit Badge Awardees Bea Campbell, QuiltingBea #2575 Beginner badge: Little Squirts / Each Other Intermediate badge: Little Squirts / Each Other Beth Pierce, Tree Sister #2557 Beginner badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Green Energy / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Green Energy / Cleaning Up Breanna Helgesen, Breanna #2507 Beginner badge: Cross-Stitch / Stitching & Crafting Cameron Kempson, Avlfarmgirl #3813 Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Water Conservation / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Little Squirts / Each Other Beginner badge: Know Your Roots / Each Other Beginner badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other Beginner badge: Pay It Forward / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Get It Together / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Icing on the Cake / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: The Secret Life of Bees / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Beginner badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Heirlooms Forever! / Garden Gate Beginner badge: What’s Your Beef? / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Birds / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Heirlooms Forever! / Garden Gate Expert badge: Heirlooms Forever! / Garden Gate Carrie Goad, Homestead Dreams #3028 Beginner badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Entrepreneurial Spirit / Each Other Beginner badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Entrepreneurial Spirit / Each Other Expert badge: Entrepreneurial Spirit / Each Other

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Merit Badge Awardees Carrie Meerwarth, Carrie M #147 Expert badge: Public Service / Each Other Chris Pruitt, Chip #3669 Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Know Your Roots / Each Other Beginner badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting CJ Armstrong, ceejay48 #665 Beginner badge: Blogging / Each Other Beginner badge: Recipes / Farm Kitchen Intermediate badge: Blogging / Each Other Intermediate badge: Recipes / Farm Kitchen Expert badge: Blogging / Each Other Expert badge: Make It Pretty / Make It Easy Colina Washburn, Rubyleesmom #3408 Beginner badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Darcy Toft, Mustang Rider #1315 Beginner badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Disconnect to Reconnect / Outpost Beginner badge: Horse Dreams / Garden Gate Deborah Lee, #2970 Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Doris Meisell, SouthForty #3794 Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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A wa y in a me a dow a l l c o ve r e d with s n ow The l itt le o l d gro un dh og loo ks fo r h is s h a dow The c lo u ds in the sky de te r m in e o u r fa te If win te r wi l l le a ve us a l l e a r ly o r la te . – Don Halley

Merit Badge Awardees Elli Metz, #2251 Beginner badge: Ink Slinger / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Make It Pretty / Make It Easy Beginner badge: Spinning / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Blogging / Each Other Beginner badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other Intermediate badge: Spinning / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Blogging / Each Other Intermediate badge: Civic Heritage / Each Other Expert badge: Spinning / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Blogging / Each Other Emily Race, Simply Satisfied #3591 Beginner badge: Woman-at-Arms / Outpost Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Beginner badge: The Secret Life of Bees / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Intermediate badge: The Secret Life of Bees / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Get It Together / Farm Kitchen Gail Springman, gspringman #486 Expert badge: Get ‘er Done / Each Other Grace Brooks, CountryGramme #2938 Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Gracey Larson, Gracey #3697 Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Community Action / Each Other

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Merit Badge Awardees Janet Doran, Jan49829 #3340 Beginner badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Little Squirts / Each Other Beginner badge: Farmgirl Gratitude / Each Other Beginner badge: Bee Good to Your Mother Earth / Garden Gate Beginner badge: The Secret Life of Bees / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Little Squirts / Each Other Intermediate badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Jonna Nesbella, Scout #2452 Beginner badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Intermediate badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Intermediate badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Expert badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Katrina Peabody, katnip05 #2763 Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Farmgirl Gratitude / Each Other Beginner badge: Families Forever / Each Other Beginner badge: Get It Together / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Get It Together / Farm Kitchen Expert badge: Get It Together / Farm Kitchen Kelda Reisman, FarmGirlonPark #2886 Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Kim Watts, Henlady35904 #2667 Beginner badge: Gaining Ground / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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B e l ie ve y o u c a n a n d y o u’r e h a lfwa y the r e . – Theodore Roosevelt

Merit Badge Awardees Kris Bulla, #3679 Beginner badge: Shopping Green / Cleaning Up Kristina Nelson, FieldsofThyme #800 Beginner badge: Safe Toys / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Water Conservation / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Recipes / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Quilling / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Know Your Roots / Each Other Laurie Conner, Montrose Girl #1587 Beginner badge: Nellie Will-do / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Farmgirl Grammar / Each Other Beginner badge: Water Conservation / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Scrapbooking / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Crochet / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Ink Slinger / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Self-sufficiency / Farm Kitchen Loyce Krogel, Traildancer #1272 Beginner badge: Carp-hen-try / Make It Easy Beginner badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Make It Pretty / Make It Easy Beginner badge: Know Your Roots / Each Other Beginner badge: What’s Your Beef? / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Cross-Stitch / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Green Energy / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Going Green / Cleaning Up Intermediate badge: Community Service / Each Other Marilyn Edlund, Edlund33 #1100 Intermediate badge: Tatting / Stitching & Crafting Mary Roberts, Maryburb #921 Beginner badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Merit Badge Awardees Melissa Bailey, MissLiss #724 Beginner badge: Icing on the Cake / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Blogging / Each Other Intermediate badge: Icing on the Cake / Farm Kitchen Intermediate badge: Blogging / Each Other Expert badge: Blogging / Each Other Melissa Kunze, #1836 Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Beginner badge: What’s Your Beef? / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Sew Wonderful / Stitching & Crafting Melody Tigo, Coffeemom #833 Beginner badge: Aprons / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Minh Do, kittenonpillow #3723 Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Nancy Marshall, Nancym #159 Beginner badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Intermediate badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Expert badge: Backyard Farmer / Garden Gate Paula Black, Sheepless in Seattle #2953 Expert badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Rain Klepper, Rain K #3381 Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Rebecca Ashley, Rashley1180 #2018 Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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I be l ie ve in the im ag in a tio n . Wh a t I c a n n o t see is inf in ite ly m o r e impo r ta n t th a n wh a t I c a n see . – Duane Michals

Merit Badge Awardees Rose Lynn, Christmasgal #1486 Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Sue Miller, #2277 Beginner badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting Tamara Burger, GrammyTammy #2495 Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Beginner badge: Carp-hen-try / Make It Easy Beginner badge: Let’s Get Physical / Make It Easy Intermediate badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Expert badge: Bustin’ Out / Farm Kitchen Tammy Duletzke, Rosefairiemom #2363 Beginner badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting Thelma Adams, #3568 Beginner badge: Farmgirl Gratitude / Each Other Beginner badge: Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Homespun Christmas / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Embroidery / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Community Service / Each Other Intermediate badge: Quilting / Stitching & Crafting Winnie Nielsen, Red Tractor Girl #3109 Beginner badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: Knitting / Stitching & Crafting

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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NEW Merit Badges for Young Cultivators! WATER CONSERVATION for Cleaning Up: Beginner: Talk to your family and think of ways that you (as a family) can save water. Make a plan to lower your family’s water usage. Intermediate: Keep track of everything you do to save water for three weeks. Expert: At the end of three weeks, give a report on water conservation to your family, a school or homeschool club, a local Farmgirl Chapter, or a Young Cultivators group. Continue to conserve water. COMMUNITY SERVICE for Each Other: Beginner: Spend time with your elders. Visit a retirement home, your local senior center, or a neighbor or family member. Intermediate: Visit your local food bank or meal center. Help organize or serve food. Expert: Help out at a fundraiser in your community. Or, host your own and donate the proceeds to charity. ICING ON THE CAKE for Farm Kitchen: Beginner: Think of fun ways to decorate a cake, like with nuts or dried fruit. Intermediate: With your Sisterhood mentor or parent, bake a cake from scratch. Expert: Decorate the cake. If you can, take a picture of the finished product before it’s eaten. GET BUGGY for Garden Gate: Beginner: There are way more insects doing good things for us than insects “bugging” us. Create an insect journal and make a list of some of the ways that insects help. Intermediate: Go out to your yard or garden and observe all the insects you see. Look on flowers, under rocks, and on trees. Write down your observations in your journal. Expert: Identify the insects you saw. You can use the Internet, ask your mentoring sister or an adult, or look them up in a field guide or encyclopedia. In your journal, make sure to keep track of what you learn.

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Farmerettes

& Young Cultivators

MUSIC for Make It Easy: Beginner: Listen to three different songs. Try to identify the different instruments that you hear in each. If you are older, learn about three of the basic elements of music: rhythm, melody, and harmony. Try to identify each element in the songs you listen to. Intermediate: Hand-make an instrument, like a guitar or tambourine, and learn to play it. Hold a concert for your family with your new instrument. Expert: Go to a concert or recital with your Sisterhood mentor, parent, or other family member. Afterward, discuss the types of music you heard. What was your favorite song? Why? ROCK OUT for Out There Kids: Beginner: Throughout your day, keep an eye out for the different ways that rocks and minerals are used in everyday life. Make a list of how they are used in your home. Intermediate: Go on a rock hunt! Collect at least 5 different rocks. What makes each rock different? Expert: Create a display for your new collection and invite family members or friends to view it. TOYS for Stitching & Crafting: Beginner: Talk to your parents or grandparents about what kinds of toys they played with when they were little. How were toys different then from toys now? Intermediate: Make your own paper dolls or finger puppets. Expert: Put on a show with your new toys for your family.

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Farmerettes & Young Cultivators Merit Badge Awardees Christine Holmes, Young Cultivator of Julie Jacobs, #646 Beginner badge: Green Thumb Kids / Garden Gate Beginner badge: Do Your Eyes Light Up? / Make It Easy Emily Nelson, Young Cultivator of Kristina Nelson, #800 Beginner badge: Energize Me / Cleaning Up Elizabata Wilbur, Young Cultivator of Tamara Burger, #2495 Beginner badge: Energize Me / Cleaning Up Beginner badge: Thank You! / Each Other Intermediate badge: Thank You! / Each Other Hope Haley, Young Cultivator of Cathy White, #3318 Beginner badge: All Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Intermediate badge: All Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Expert badge: All Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Laura Marquardt, Young Cultivator of Amy Marquardt #3706 Beginner badge: All Buttoned Up / Stitching & Crafting Beginner badge: Weaving In and Out / Stitching & Crafting

What’s a Farmerette? Farmerettes are young farmgirls-in-training between the ages 14–18. They can earn the same Merit Badges as adult Sisters, so long as there is a Farmgirl Sisterhood member nearby to work with them. Click here to find out more.

What’s a Young Cultivator? Young Cultivators are girls and boys between the ages 6 and 13. They can work with Farmgirl Sisterhood members to earn badges, but have their own unique program. Click here to find out more.

Lucy Funderburk, Young Cultivator of Amanda Tressler #3804 Beginner badge: Weaving In and Out / Stitching & Crafting

Woo-Hoo!

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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Young Cultivators Group Rebekka Boysen coordinates a Young Cultivators group and reports on their activities here and in future issues.

C hic ke n Keep ing with Kids I wanted chickens for the nostalgia, the clucking, and of course, the fresh eggs. From a kids’-eye view, our backyard flock is something a bit different. My children see our chickens as entertainment to be sure, but these birds are also their first taste of responsibility. It was a delight to hold the baby chicks last spring and to chase them around the yard all summer. In February, with temperatures dipping into the 20’s, it is an act of commitment—not joy—that leads them to the coop each morning. Later in the day, they rush out together to look for eggs—they know from experience that if they wait too long, the eggs might freeze and crack. After dinner, they grab flashlights and run to tuck the girls in. At first, there was some complaining about wanting someone else to do it all, but I was firm. These chickens are ours to care for and they need us. The moaning gave way to great observations about what part of the roost the chickens slept on, how much cracked corn the chickens should be given each afternoon, and who laid which eggs. Now of course, you don’t need chickens to teach your children responsibility, but it sure helps. There are natural consequences and rewards each step of the way. It also creates curiosity about other animals and how foods of the animal variety get to our dinner table. To set yourself up for success, find out as much as you can before starting your own flock. Whether you build or buy your coop, check to see that the latches and doors can be opened by little hands. Make egg collection easy by keeping nesting boxes down low, and buy the kids muck boots to keep poo off their good shoes. You will need a chicken sitter if you go out of town, but that is relatively easy—the chickens pay our sitters in fresh eggs.


meet our bloggers Farmgirls are tapping away at their keyboards to bring you news from the homefront, no matter where you live or what your interests. Rebekah Teal, a former judge, writes about being a farmgirl in the city; Libbie Zenger blogs from the rural perspective; Nicole Christensen gives you the suburban viewpoint; Cathi Belcher shouts-out from her mountain top, Shery Jespersen shares the ranch view from Wyoming, and Debbie Bosworth writes from the beach. You can click to our farmgirl blogs right on our home page (www.maryjanesfarm.org). While you’re there, sign up for our e-mail blog alerts and recipe of the week.

city

rural

suburban mountain

FARMGIRL

FARMGIRL

FARMGIRL

FARMGIRL

Rebekah Teal is a farmgirl who lives in a large metropolitan area and brings you our City Farmgirl Blog. She’s a lawyer who has worked in both criminal defense and prosecution, and she has been a judge, a business woman, and a stay-at-home mom.

Libbie Zenger is a small-town farmgirl who writes our Rural Farmgirl Blog and lives in the high-desert Sevier Valley of Central Utah with her husband and two little farmboys—as well as 30 ewes, 60 lambs, a handful of rams, a milk cow, an old horse, two dogs, a bunch o’ chickens and two cats. She lives on a 140-year-old farm, in a farmhouse built by her great-great-grandfather, and tries to channel her grandmothers.

Nicole Christensen, our current Suburban Farmgirl Blogger, calls herself a “knitter, jam-maker, and mom extraordinaire”. Born and raised in the great state of Texas, she now resides in suburban New England in picturesque Connecticut, just a stone’s throw from New York state.

Cathi Belcher, who pens our Mountain Farmgirl Blog, lives in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. As a “lifelong learner,” she fiercely values selfreliance, independence, freedom, and fresh mountain air. She’s also a multi-media artist, with an obsession for off-grid living and alternative housing. Cathi is married to her childhood sweetheart, and owns and operates a 32-room mountain lodge.

She’s not only “downhome” citified, she’s a true-blue farmgirl ... in a pair of stilettos! “Mustering up the courage to do the things you dream about,” she says, “is the essence of being a farmgirl.” Learning to live more organically and closer to nature is Rebekah’s current pursuit.

Libbie says, “When I found MaryJanesFarm, I found a new sort of sisterhood—one in which hard work, ‘heart’ work and handwork are truly valued, appreciated, and shared.”

Married for 18 years to her Danish-born sweetheart, Nicole has worked in various fields and has been a worldtraveler, entrepreneur, knitting teacher, and homemaker, but considers being a mom her greatest job of all. Loving all things creative and domestic, Nicole considers her life’s motto to be “Bloom where you are planted.”

“Mountains speak to my soul, and farming is an important part of my heritage,” says Cathi. “I want to pass on my love of these things to others through my writing.”

Being a farmgirl isn’t where you live, but how you live!

www.maryjanesfarm.org


N E WS F R O M T H E H O M E F R ONT ... whether that home is

city, rural, suburban, mountain, ranch, or beach

ranch

beach

FARMGIRL

FARMGIRL

Shery Jespersen, Wyoming cattle rancher and outpost writer, shares the view from her saddle in our Ranch Farmgirl Blog. Shery is a “leather and lace cowgirl” who’s been horse-crazy all of her life. Her longtime love is Apple Pi “Dolly” Rose, a 20-year-old Morgan otherwise known as “The Best Darn Horse in the Universe.” Her other interests include “junktiques,” creating eclectic “make do” arts and crafts, collecting antique china, and cultivating mirth.

Debbie Bosworth left her lifelong home in the high desert of northern Nevada 10 years ago and washed up on the shore of America’s hometown, Plymouth, Massachusetts, where she, her “beach-bum Yankee” husband of 20 years, and her two homeschooled kids are now firmly planted. “I found a piece of my farmgirl heart when I discovered MaryJanesFarm. Suddenly, everything I loved just made more sense! I enjoy unwinding at the beach, writing, gardening, and turning yard-sale furniture into ‘Painted Ladies’! I’m passionate about living a creative life and encouraging others to ‘Make Each Day their Masterpiece.’”

Happy WINTER


Maga�ines, Books, & More Our Feb/Mar issue, “Folklore,” hit newsstands on Jan. 10. In it, you’ll find exquisite handmade German fairies, make cupcake and pot roast recipes, discover art quilting, create lovingly restored “junktiques” and lights from colorful colanders, and more.

Click here to subscribe to MaryJanesFarm magazine. If you have a subscription, you should have received your magazine by about Jan 5. (Those of you near postal hubs get faster delivery; rural delivery takes a little longer.) If you didn’t receive your magazine, you can call our publisher’s subscription department at 800-476-4611 to check on your delivery.

MaryJanesFarm

2012 Calendar

AVAILABLE NOW! Our 2012 Calendar is available for purchase. Each month’s top page features a full-color image from our farm and each calendar page includes dates, holidays, inspirational sayings, lunar phases, and fabulous farmgirl culture. This is a Project F.A.R.M. (First-class American Rural Made) product. All 26 pages are printed here at the farm on 8 1/2" x 11" card stock and are bound with black spiral wire, unfolding to 11" x 17". As part of our Sisterhood Special, calendars are 25% off in February! Click here to order. Current Holidays: February February February February February February February February February

1 2 14 17 20 21 22 23 29

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

National Freedom Day Groundhog Day Valentine's Day Random Acts of Kindness Day Presidents' Day Fat Tuesday/Mardi Gras Ash Wednesday National Chili Day Leap Day

Magazine “Goodies” on the MJF Website “For those who are looking for the magazine portion of the website, here is the place to find additional patterns, instructions, recipes and such! Yum!” – Alee, Farmgirl Sister #8 To find the goodies, click here!

�� �� �� � �� �� � � �� �� �� �� �� �� � � �� �� �� �� �� �� � � �� �� �� �� �� �� � � �� �� �� � �� �� � � �� �� �� �� �� �� � � �� �� �� � �

������������� ���������

������������� �������������� �������������� ������������� �� ������������� ������������ ��������������� ��������������� ���������� – Marguerite

© 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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®


Magazines, Books, and More continues ... Gift Items

Inspire yourself or inspire a friend with tote bags, Sisterhood memberships, candles, dolls, and other gifts from MaryJane. From the kitchen to the campfire, there’s something special here for every farmgirl-at-heart. Click here to shop our gift items.

Product S hop

Don’t forget to visit our “Product Shop” ... Click Here. You will find everything from beautiful organic bed sheets and bed sets to aprons, chocolate and over 60 organic instant or quick-prep meals and desserts as well as much, much more! Check out our chocolate collections. Each box comes with three bars and four farmgirl-inspired postcards.

�� �� �

If you know of someone who may be interested in receiving this newsletter, send their e-mail(s) to us at sisterhoodhopeful@maryjanesfarm.org and we’ll e-mail them a sample issue. For other questions or general inquiries, e-mail FarmgirlSisterhood@maryjanesfarm.org.

Over Over 1,349 941Farmgirl FarmgirlChapters Chaptershave in 48been states started and 8in countries all 50 states and and46 8 Henhouses countries with with3,845 1196Sisterhood Sisterhoodmembers members—~ growing growingstronger strongerevery everyday! day! © 2012 MaryJanesFarm • Moscow, Idaho

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MaryJane's Cluck - February 2012  

The Monthly Farmgirl Sisterhood Newsletter

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