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Bradford’s Weekly Newpaper

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Bradford Journal

VOL. 174 NO.36 BRADFORD JOURNAL/MINER THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 www.bradfordjournal.com Bradford Journal/McKean County Miner/Mount Jewett Echo Phone 814-465-3468

Steve With His Bears

Work Parking Detail

Lives For Car Shows

Photo by Mary DePalma Photo by Mary DePalma Steve Martin, of Lewis Run, PA poses with his chain saw sculptured bears, September 12, at his 40-acre ranch. He tells us that it takes about four hours to carve a bear plus some finishing time for grinding and staining. Also an acrylic painter of nature scenes, Steve mentioned, “I like to create, and I love art, like the people that are inspired by it.”

Members of the Bradford Township Volunteer Fire Department usually help with traffic, and parking the entries for the Autumn Daze Car Show, and this year was no exception. On duty for the event, September 13th, are (l-r) Bill Webster (works at Bisett Building Center), Matt Mongillo (works at Minich Electric), and Zach Webster (works at Graham Packaging). Considering the rainy, cold weather, they tell us there was a good turnout with over 200 cars.

Photo by Mary DePalma Jeff Southard, of Lawrenceville, PA displays his entry, a 2011 Chevy Camero, “Bio-Hazard” during this year’s Autumn Daze Car Show, September 13th. He has been attending car shows for the last fourand-a-half years and this is his 28th show this year. Jeff originally bought the car for his wife, but she didn’t like it, so he turned it into a show car. That’s this guy’s amazing story.

Socialize At Bradford Vet Club Following Show

INDEX

Bradford Journal Photo Left to right, Cindy Utter-Peters, Debby Filarecki, and Rick Filarecki, give us a smile following their attendance at the clubs Comedy Night held in their Event Center, September 12th. They tell us members of the Comedy Company, Dan Liberto (head honcho), Stephen O’Connell, and Joel Bruno did a great job this year and that they were well satisfied with the show.

Local News/Weather 2 Comments & Opinions 3 Obituaries 4 Business page 5 Banner Store page 11 Comics/Sudoku/ DVD New Releases 13 Classifieds 19 Senior Information page 20 Bradford Journal P.O. Box, Bradford, PA 16701 www.bradfordjournal.com Phone: 814-465-3468


Page 2 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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LOCAL & AREA NEWS Speed Display Sign In Bradford

Break In Busy Day

(Bradford, PA – Motorists traveling will be reminded to obey the posted through Bradford, McKean County, speed limit on Route 46 (Kendall Avenue). The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation recently placed a radarcontrolled speed display sign between Euclid Avenue and Brad Penn Way. The speed display board is to aid in curbing speeding, a common type of aggressive driving. The sign faces northbound traffic and Check Out Our utilizes radar to determine the speeds Melissa & Doug of oncoming traffic. Vehicle speeds are Special Needs Toys then posted on the lighted section of the sign. The posted speed limit in this area In Store Now of Route 46 is 25 miles per hour. Or The speed display sign will remain on Shop Our Catalog location for up to four weeks. Speeding and other aggressive drivResource For Therapists & Families ing behaviors are among the leading Check Facebook For BIG Savings! causes of crashes and fatalities in Penn͕3 ͔36Š‡•–—–3–Ǥǡ35”ƒ†ˆ‘”†ǡ34 3͕͘͜Ǧ͕͗͗Ǧ͘͘͜͜ sylvania. Other aggressive driving behaviors include running stop signs or red lights, passing illegally and tailgat• Joanne Culbertson ing. • James Campbell Aggressive driving behaviors were • Dave Caldwell listed as a crash cause in 48 percent of McKean County crashes in 2014.

Timeless Treasures

Photo by Mary DePalma Dr. Tandon of Bradford Oncology takes a lunchtime break in the sun September 14th near his office along the Tunungwant Creek.

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VFW to Celebrate POW/MIA Day Sunday, September 20th See Details at the Club!

THE BRADFORD AREA 5-DAY WEATHER FORECAST Thursday, Sept. 17 : Patchy fog in the morning, then sunny and warm today with a high of 80°.

Saturday, Friday, Sept. 19: Sept. 18: Partly Mostly sunny and warm sunny today with today with a high scattered showers this afternoon. of 80°. High of 78°.

Saturday Night: Friday Thursday Mostly Night: Night: cloudy with scatPartly Mostly tonight tered showers toclear tonight with cloudy with a low of 57°. night. Low of 56°. a low of 54°.

Monday, Sunday, Sept. 21: Sept.20: Intervals Partly sunny today and of clouds and sun cooler with a high today. High of 71°. of 72°.

Sunday Night: Partly cloudy and cooler tonight with a low of 48°.

Monday Night: Mainly clear tonight and cool with a low of 49·.

CHECK OUT OUR PHOTO GALLERY

WHEN YOU VISIT THE BRADFORD JOURNAL ON THE WEB!


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 3

5 ¢ENTS WORTH

by Grant Nichols

While there are many pictures of interest in this edition of the Bradford Journal, those in the spotlight this week come from the Comedy Night event held at Bradford VFW Club’s Event Center, Saturday, September 12th, and the Autumn Daze Car Show held in downtown Bradford, Sunday, September 13th…….This week we ask our readers to remember way back to the year 2009 when the Affordable Care Act, sometimes referred to as “Obamacare” was under attack by such notable politicians as Sarah Palin, former Governor of Alaska and her cohorts. She claimed that the legislation for the ACA would include death panels to reduce the cost of such health insurance by selecting for elimination, the terminally ill and the lowest IQ segments of the population. While it was true that the original bill would have paid physicians for providing voluntary counseling to Medicare patients about living wills, advance directives, and end-of-life care options, this was the extent of it. There were no death panels, and Sarah Palin’s remarks concerning the subject (now known as the “death panel myth) were officially discredited and debunked. And due to public concern caused by the myth (30% of the people thought it to be true), the provision to pay physicians for providing voluntary counseling was removed from the Senate bill and was not included in the law that was enacted. But what was Sarah Palin thinking when she made her claim, and implied that the law would attempt to save money by doing “thus and such”. She certainly knew that the insurance companies were corporations that were obligated to make as much money for the stockholders as possible. And she certainly knew that insurance companies would be helping our representatives in Congress to write the bill itself. But most importantly, she was old enough to have witnessed for herself that allowable payments for medical treatments, diagnostics, and drugs often determine the treatment made available to the patient by our hospitals and physicians. In short, she would have known that in a contest between the profits of insurance companies and the best care for their clients (the patients), while it may not be pretty, stockholders would win, and patients would lose. The questions remain, “Is this still happening?” and “Who will speak out?”.......Mark your calendars. The Bradford VFW Post 212 will commemorate POW/MIA day in Veteran’s Square, September 20th at 11:00AM, and hold a free steak dinner at 3:00 PM at their events center for those who fought in Korea on the same day. Guest dinners are available for $15.00 (call for reservations).

It’s A Matter Of Opinion... Guest Columnist “Refugee Crisis” The number one (1) destination for displaced families fleeing Syria is Turkey with a reported 1.9 millions todate. Lebanon has accounted for 1+ million; Jordon with 629,000; Iraq with 250,000; Egypt with 130,000+; Germany 99,000+; Sweden with 65,000; France 6,700+; UK with 7000+; Denmark with 11,000+; Hungary with 18,000+; U.S. with 1,800. Since the start of the civic war, the devastating effects on the mere ability to have a job and feed the families have been forcing Syrians to seek refuge. A major reason this tragedy to have continued is the unwillingness of the political leaders in the United States to take action after a red line was drawn and crossed. The red line has turned into red blood and it continues to flow. Thank you Mr. President, after all it was your red line. Since nothing has happened to solve the Syrian crisis it must be assumed it is because it is the way the President wants it along with other problems in the area. Annually, the United States imports and distributes across the nation some 70,000 refugees from around the world. Now there will be more, many more. Recently it was announced the President has ordered more Syrians (10,000) allowed next fiscal year which starts in October with the quota admissible refugees increased to 75,000. Hold your breath as the number may well increase. You should expect some to show up in your neighborhood as time passes. It must be noted that the appearance of ISIS, or ISIL if you prefer, has been a major contributor to the spreading of fear of being captured and being treated other than what they declare is acceptable. Horror stories are reported by news agencies describing the treatment being handed out, most which is not worth describing. It is abundantly clear that ISIS would not exist had the crossing of the red line in Syria been dealt with as well as the retaining of troops in IRAQ. The Status of Forces Agreement with IRAQ leadership would have been achieved with proper military leadership from the top. We did not have to give up our presence and should not have. This particular recent surge of refugees from the Middle East will notably include radicals which intend harm and will pose problems to all countries taking them in. Looking at the European Union it is important to note that once one enters

-by Bob Perry

the Union they are guaranteed unrestricted movement from country to country. The countries in the Union have become welfare states and in time the money will run out and civil unrest will grow. The money here in the United States ran out some time ago and unrest is surely ahead of us. FYI: To be a refugee trying to enter the U.S. one must: Be located outside the United States; Is of special humanitarian concern to the United States; Demonstrated that they were persecuted or fear persecution due to race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social. group is not firmly resettled in another country; Is admissible to the United States. Will the day come when the U.S. will be exporting refugees?

A Good Show Car

Photo by Mary DePalma Fran Auman of St. Mary’s, PA shows us his car, a beautiful 1949 Mercury, during the Autumn Daze Car Show, September 13th in downtown Bradford. This car, that took him two years to build, has already brought him three awards on its first year out. Fran says that while the weather could be a little warmer, it was a nice show and that Gary Hoy, the organizer, does a good job every year.

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Page 4 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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OBITUARIES Ronald Millington Sr. Ronald L. Millington Sr., 60, of 47 Belleview Ave., passed away Thursday (Sept. 10, 2015) at the Pavilion at BRMC, surrounded by his family. Born in the Adirondacks on Oct. 12, 1954, in Glens Falls, N.Y., he was a son of the late Roger F. and Eleanor Bruno Millington. On Jan. 31, 1981, he married Edith Tyrell Millington, who survives. He attended schools in Brant Lake, N.Y. After high school, Mr. Millington worked in saw mills in New York state, then worked on a farm in Florida for a time. He came to Pennsylvania and owned and operated R & S Logging along with his sons for a number of years. He was an avid outdoorsman and enjoyed camping, boating and hunting. He also bred Doberman Pinschers and also enjoyed spending time with his grandkids and his family. In addition to his wife, he is survived by four children, Ronald (Brandy) Millington Jr. of Bolivar, N.Y., Nick (Sheree) Millington of Wellsville, N.Y., Al (Susan) Younes of Bradford and Jackie (Robin) Smith, also of Bradford; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a sister, Penny Millington of Glens Falls, N.Y.; four brothers, Ricky Millington in Florida, Rusty Millington and Robin Millington, both of Queensbury, N.Y., and Rian Millington of Glens Falls, N.Y. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister, Barbara Davis and three brothers, Roger Millington Jr., Randy Millington and Richard Milling-

What A Beauty

Photo by Mary DePalma Tom and Jan Caden present their 1934 Chevy during this year’s Autumn Daze Car Show held September 13th, in downtown Bradford. The couple, hailing from Roulette, PA, have attended the event for the last four years, and have previously won two awards. ton. Friends are invited to attend a Celebration of Ron’s life from 4-8 p.m. Sept. 18 at The Church of The Ascension Parish Hall. Memorial contributions, if desired, can be made to Kids and Cancer, PO Box 1299,

A Routine With Sound

Bradford Journal Photo Joel Bruno, a member of the Comedy Company, engaged the audience with his on stage antics and potty routine during the Comedy Night show at the Bradford Vet’s Event Center, September 12th. Bruno, a long time stand-up comic, hails from Macedon, NY. Bradford or to the charity of the donor’s choice. Arrangements are under the direction of the Hollenbeck-Cahill Funeral Homes Inc. Online condolences may be made at www.hollenbeckcahill.com

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USPS-062-740 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Bradford Journal P.O. Box 17 Bradford, PA 16701-0017 Phone: 814-465-3468 Subscription In Advance (By U.S. Mail) Yearly/$55.00 Within County Yearly/$70.00 Outside County Periodicals postage paid at USPS Bradford, PA 167019998 Copy Deadline: Noon Saturday Published every Thursday

at 69 Garlock Hollow. Bradford, PA 16701, Except for the third Thursday in the month of June. Internet Color Version - $15.00 yearly Email Color Version $26.00 yearly Grant Nichols, Publisher Debi Nichols, Editor Don Poleteo, Military Correspondant Lisa Hannahs, Eldred, PA Correspondant Bob Perry, Political Columnist


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 5

BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCES How The Tooth Fairy Can Teach Your Kids About Money When those first baby teeth start wobbling, you and the Tooth Fairy can combine forces to teach your kids about money. Visa’s latest annual Tooth Fairy survey indicates that the average price of a lost tooth is $3.19 in 2015. This is the fourth consecutive year that young Americans are finding more than $3 under their pillows from the fabled fairy. That puts a full set of 20 departing baby teeth around $63. The survey also found that the most common monetary gift given by the Tooth Fairy is $1, and that dads report the Tooth Fairy is more generous, giving nearly 27 percent more than what moms report. First, how much should parents give? Visa offers a free Tooth Fairy app (www.practicalmoneyskills.com/apps) for iOS and Android devices and an online calculator (www.practicalmoneyskills.com/toothfairy) to help parents determine an appropriate amount for children to receive per lost tooth. While not an endorsement of how much money children should receive, the app and calculator uses Visa’s latest survey data and demographic factors such as gender, age, home state, family size, marital status, income and education levels to formulate how much money the Tooth Fairy is leaving in comparable households. You might consider giving kids a piggy bank – or a series of piggy banks for specific purposes such as spending, saving or investing – to have ready once that first tooth comes out. Talk with your child about the importance of putting some money away when it comes in for various purposes including charity, so he or she learns about the importance of helping those with less. Here’s how the Tooth Fairy can help you guide your kids through their important, first-time money activities: Learning to handle coins and currency. Kids need a bit of time to get to know coins and bills – what they feel like, what they’re worth and how they’re used. Start by letting them handle a few coins and then start identifying their value – how five pennies makes a nickel and two nickels make a dime, and so on. Before a child can save, spend, invest or share, they have to understand the value of money that the Tooth Fairy has left under their pillow. Making their first purchases. Tooth Fairy money may be a child’s first source of income. Teaching your kids about the value of money is an important lesson. It’s a chance to balance fun

-by Nathaniel Sillin and priorities, wants and needs. Once a certain amount of money is set aside for savings, then head to the store with your kid to look for a small toy or treat. It’s important to discuss the item first and to encourage comparison-shopping for the best price. But once the item is selected, put the child in charge of the transaction. Dealing with other sources of monetary gifts. The Tooth Fairy often provides that first connection between kids and cash, but other money resources usually arrive soon afterward. Starting school means allowances and children may already be getting birthday and holiday gifts of cash from friends and relatives. With every new source of funds, keep the discussion going on the importance of spending wisely while saving, investing and giving to those in need. Budgeting. As kids get older and start using money more extensively, introduce them to the concept of budgeting – the practice of tracking, counting and allocating spending. Parents might want to give themselves a refresher course (http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/budgeting) if they’re not consistent about budgeting their own money. Moving from piggy banks to real banks. Kids can keep a piggy bank around as long it’s effective, but kids need to see how adults handle money.

Regular trips to the bank allow children to ask questions about how banks work and why they’re important. Eventually, they’ll be ready for their first savings account. See what account savings options your bank provides for young children. Bottom line: Lost teeth are an educational gold mine for your kid. You and the Tooth Fairy can work together to make each little windfall an important lesson about money.

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Page 6 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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AREA SOCIAL NEWS Studio B Dance Academy Proudly Introduces The Queen B’s

Photo provided Pictured above are: back row (from left to right)- Katherine Roessler, Madeline Kloss, Rainey Updegrove, Katie Neidich, Bri Pattison, Sailor Campbell and Lilly Kemick. Front Row (from left to right): Emilee Bruno, Cadence Panol, Dylan Giordano, Ashley Keane, Grace Dalton, Cailee Shanks and Mariah Gow Studio B Dance Academy proudly announces the members of its elite dance company, The Queen B’s for the 2015/2016 season. This year the Queen B’s have divided into two small dance groups: the Diamonds and the Rubies. The diamonds are the returning Queen B’s ages 12 an up and the Rubies are the younger dancers ages 10 to 11 and new Queen B’s. Advanced level students of the dance academy auditioned for spots in the company. The students, ranging in ages from 10 to 17, learned and performed a quick combination routine and also performed a short individual dance. Members of the company were selected after much careful deliberation by Katie Neidich, studio owner, and Bri Pattison, the studio’s new part-time instructor and Assistant Coach for the dance

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company. Neidich acknowledges and appreciates the work and dedication of those who auditioned and regrets that all could not be in the company. Neidich announces that members of the Diamonds are Emilee Bruno, Grace Dalton, Dylan Giordano, Mariah Gow, Ashley Keane, Cadence Panol and Cailie Shanks and members of the Rubies are Sailor Campbell, Lilly Kemick, Madeline Kloss, Katherine Roessler and Rainey Updegrove. Members of this elite dance company have committed to rehearsing together every week and any other additional time as deemed necessary to achieve the quality of level of performance that we have come to expect from Studio B Dance Academy. The Queen B’s are also expected to represent Studio B Dance Academy and be role models for current dance students. The Queen B’s recently performed at the Autumn Daze Car Show. Keep an eye out for the Queen B’s at local events such as Autumn Classic, Pumpkinfest, Old Fashioned Christmas, First Night and local parades. The Queen B’s will also perform an additional dance number during the annual dance recital on Saturday, June 4th. This year’s recital celebrates the divas of the decades. If you are interested in having the Queen B’s perform for a community event, please contact Katie Neidich. Studio B Dance Academy and the Queen B’s appreciate the local support.

TOPS CLUBS NEWS BRADFORD #16 NEWS

- Article Submitted The Thursday afternoon meeting of T.O.P.S Club ( take pounds off sensibility) was held On September 10, 2015 at The First Presbyterian Church with the Tops Pledge and a song “ Help me Slender “ to the tune if Love me Tender by Leader Vickie Johnson. The weekly row call was given by Carole VanSickle with 28 members weighing in and a loss of 11.75 pounds loss. Six members stayed the same. Best Loser in Waiting was Barb Torrey .Officer of the Week was Donna Douthit. The secretary report was given by Sue Della Valle. The Treasurer report by Donna Douthit. The forbidden food for the week is mashed potatoes. The Healthy Tips were given by Elaine Harris, the joke by Jean Miller, the Inspiration by Bev Hannon, and the Fashion tip by Chris McCracken. This week for the contest the Vegetable is squash, the fruit is plums, and the “No No” food is pretzels. The program was given by Barb Torrey on Flax Seeds. The meeting was closed with the Tops Prayer and the Friendship Circle. Anyone who would like to join T.O.P.S.for support is welcome the meetings are at The First Presbyterian Church. Weigh in from 11:30 to 1:00. Meeting from 1:00 to 2:00. Everyone is Welcome.

BRADFORD #1704 NEWS - Article Submitted The Tops Rally was hosted by T.O.P.S. Chapter# 1704 Bradford at the First Presbyterian on Saturday September 12, 2015 with eight chapters and 65 members attending from the Pennsylvania chapters for the summer months of June, July and August. They include Johnsonberg, Smethport , Warren, Mt Jewett. Geneses! Coudersport , Bradford#16, and Bradford#1704. Mary Mullane had a program on The Nine Emotions,(we should live our life in courageous ness , acceptance, and peace.) Our main speaker was our Pennsylvania State Queen, Sonya Parks. She talked on her Weight Loss Journey with Tops and losing 185 pounds in a year and a half, and then taking questions. A skit was given by the Smethport Chapter, called The Nursery Rhymes. The Warren Chapter played their Kazoo Band and members sang songs. Awards were given to 19 members for Perfect Attendances of thirteen weeks. Perfect Attendance for eleven weeks. Officers attending there were 24 ,There were nine K.O.P.S.(keeping pounds off sensibility) awarded , and there were awards for three pounds and up weigh loss. The largest loser for the three summer months was from the Smethport Chapter with 23 1/2 pounds loss. A chapter Angel is awarded to a member in each chapter. The 50/50 auctions was won by Jessie Skillman. There were ten door prizes auctioned off and there were nine baskets one from each chapter auctioned off. Next year the Rally will be hosted in BradSON, Sept. 11, 2015, to Melissa John- ford by T.O.P.S. #16

BIRTHS

son and Jordan Wilson, Bradford, PA.


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Page 8 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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ON THE HEALTHY SIDE Five Tips To Tackle Baby’s Little Tummy Troubles

AICR HealthTalk

-by Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN American Institute for Cancer Research

Q:How am I supposed to use those “% Daily Value” figures on food labels? A: Checking “% Daily Value” information can help you in two ways: as a guide for identifying foods relatively high or low in certain nutrients, and as a tool for comparing different food choices. The Daily Value is a research-based estimate of how much of that nutrient an average adult should eat as part of a healthy 2000-calorie diet. The % Daily Value tells you how much of the target amount for that nutrient is in a serving of that food, based on the serving size listed on the label. For a nutrient that’s best to limit, such as saturated fat or sodium, containing less than 5 percent of Daily Value means a food can be an especially good choice, while containing 20 percent or more of the Daily Value signals need for caution. But if it’s a nutrient you’re trying to boost in your eating habits, such as dietary fiber or vitamin C, a food that contains 20 percent or more of Daily Value can be a good choice to help you reach healthy levels. The % Daily Value (%DV) figures won’t give you – or any individual – precise help because people’s needs vary depending on age, gender and overall calorie requirements. But you can use the %DV to compare brands to help you choose a lower sodium soup or a higher fiber breakfast cereal, for example. When you compare %DV, check the serving sizes on the packages to make sure you’re com(NAPSI)—A baby’s first year can paring the same amounts. be a delightful but sometimes stressful time for new parents as they try to dis- created by a father and pharmacist who ents—that means no artificial flavors, grew tired of searching for products artificial colors, or dyes. cern their infant’s needs and wants. For further information, visit: Bridget Swinney, MS, RD, a mother for his children that were effective but made with ingredients he could feel www.LittleRemedies.com of two, understands how troubling it is good about. The brand’s line of prodto help calm a fussy baby with tummy troubles. An award-winning author and ucts feature only the necessary ingrediwell-regarded nutrition expert in the field of prenatal and children’s nutrition Ahh Those School Days Body Begins To Sag and family eating matters, she offers these tried-and-true tips to tackle baby tummy troubles. • Check the baby’s position: Keep baby upright while feeding and keep him or her sitting up for 30 minutes after a feeding. Make sure the baby has a good latch on the breast or bottle. • Check for places where babies can gulp in excess air: • When bottle-feeding, make sure that the nipple opening of the bottle is not too big, which can cause babies to gulp air between large mouthfuls. Tip the bottle up so that the nipple is filled with milk and baby doesn’t get any air. • Forceful letdown and an overabundant milk supply in breast-feeding can also cause baby to gulp in excess air. • Work it out. Baby massage and a baby “bike ride” (pumping legs back and forth while baby is on his/her back) can help get rid of extra gas. A warm bath can soothe both baby and mom. • Comfort your baby quickly. Crying babies swallow a lot of air, so respond to Bradford Journal Photo your baby right away. Consider “wearBradford Journal Photo It was Comedy Night at the Bradford Vet’s ing” your baby in a sling if he or she is Dan Liberto, in the middle of his school Club Events Center, September 12, and fussy. • Try gas drops or gripe water. Prod- days routine, captures the crowd on Com- comic Stephen O’Connell, during a nice ucts such as Little Remedies® Gas Re- edy Night at the Bradford Vet’s Club routine, touched on the embarrassments lief Drops and Little Remedies® Gripe Events Center, September 12th. He and and the humor of getting older. Stephen Water can help relieve excess gas from two other members of his Comedy Com- hails from Corning, NY and is associated pany were well received during the three- with Dan Liberto’s Comedy Company, food or swallowing of air. Rochester, NY. The Little Remedies® brand was hour show.


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It’s An Autumn Classic!

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12 Kennedy St., Bradford, PA Ph: (814) 362-9565


Page 10 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

One Special Car

Photo by Mary DePalma Bill Huber shows off his 1932 Dearborn Deuce Roadster for a photo during the Autumn Daze Car Show held September 13th, in downtown Bradford. He is the former owner of Pure Tech (now owned by his sons Rob, and Shawn) and has been taking part in car shows for 30 years. Bill and his wife Carol are snow-birds, living half the year in Bradford, and half in St. Augustine, FL.

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Young Couple At Club Cousins From Worcester

Bradford Journal Photo Mike Givan and Jennie Jackson continue to have a great night at the VFW Club lounge, September 12, following a show in the Events Center there. They enjoyed the Comedy Night presentation by Dan Liberto and his company of comics and they tell us that this was a good way to spend a “date night”.

Bradford Journal Photo Gerald Krieger and his wife Kathy stopped in for a short visit with his cousins of all ages, Grant, Debi and Sarah Nichols, September 12th, at the Nichols’ home in Bradford. The Kriegers who hail from Worcester, MA were in town for Gerry’s fifty-fifth year Bradford Area High School Class Reunion (Class of 1960). Gerry tells us that he still feels a connection to the school and to his classmates and enjoys revisiting the home of his youth, Bradford.


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Timeless Treasures

Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 11

The Michaels

Cabin

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Bradford Vets’ Club Event Center 94 Barbour St., Bradford, PA

VFW to Celebrate POW/MIA Day Sunday, September 20th See Details at the Club!

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Page 12 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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JUST PASSING TIME THEME:

20. Beyond suburb 22. Unagi “NURSERY RHYMES” 24. Composing or writing 25. *Little Jack Horner’s ACROSS treat 26. Religious doctrine 1. Covered with water 27. To one side 6. Fox competitor? 29. To furnish with a ceil9. R&R spots ing 13. Port in Portugal 31. J.F.K. or Dulles post14. *Turtle dove’s sound ings 15. Gorillalike 32. Short for University of 16. “Animal House” party Miami mascot wear 33. Unforeseen obstacle 17. ____ of corn 35. Type of cell 18. Bank in Mexico 37. Curved molding 19. *He went to Glouces39. *It ran away with the ter spoon 21. *He kissed the girls 42. One up and made them cry 45. Little application 23. Witch’s curse DOWN 49. Mining product 24. Like Piper of Hamelin 51. Dr. Seuss’ Yertle 25. School organization 1. Quick on the uptake 54. About to explode 28. Clare Booth ____ 2. *Sound of Mother Hub56. Twig of willow tree 30. Bloodsucker bard’s pet? 57. Come clean, with “up” 34. “____ is more” 3. Mythological ship 58. Cuzco valley empire 36. Nevada city 4. Narc’s fi nd 59. June 6, 1944 38. Respectable and quiet 5. Youth lodging option 60. Data Universal Num40. Military group 6. Tree having winged bering System 41. *Dog’s name-o fruit 61. Strikes with an axe 43. Like nay-sayers 7. Feathery neckwear 62. Cocoyam 44. Jason the Argonaut’s 8. Welsh dog breed 63. Droops wife 9. Boxing action 66. *Tucker who sings for 46. “In ____ of” 10. Golf club maker his supper 47. 1/60 of mins 11. Ascus, plural 68. “Go Set a Watchman” 48. Dancer’s beat 12. *My dame has lost author 50. As opposed to gross her what? 52. “Be quiet!” 15. “Humble ____,” pl. 53. Arrogant snob 55. Simon & Garfunkel, e.g. 57. *One of King Cole’s three 61. *”If wishes were ____” 64. Empower 65. *What Little Miss Muffet did to her curds 67. Kind of wave 69. Hardly worth mentioning 70. Haul with a hitch 71. Pigeon’s perch 72. Simon does what? 73. Emergency helpers 74. Clear, as in blackboard

WORD SEEK

(Crossword Solution on page 14)


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 13

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT! SEPT. 8:

NEW DVD RELEASES

Age of Adaline PG-13

American Heist R

Checkmate Not Rated Barbie in Rock ‘N Royals Not Rated Homeland: The Complete Fourth Season TV-MA Haven: Season 5 - Volume 1 TV-14 Supernatural: The Complete Tenth Season Includes Digital Copy; UltraViolet TV-14 Beyond the Mask PG Blood Lands R Harvest

Not Rated

SEPT. 15:

Furious 7 PG-13 Cinderella PG Love & Mercy PG-13 Monkey Kingdom Blu-ray/DVD Not Rate Empire: Season 1 Not Rated Aquarius TV-MA Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst Not Rated Sleepy Hollow: The Complete Second Season

Not Rated Avalanche Sharks Not Rated Avenger Not Rated Call Me King Not Rated Closer to the Moon Not Rated Exeter Not Rated Haunting at the Rectory Not Rated

Jack Strong Not Rated Overnight R Shark Killer Not Rated Suicide Theory Not Rated Turning Not Rated Pups United PG

Solution on page 14

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Page 14 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Plant Now For A Beautiful Garden Now And In The Future Don’t pack away that shovel and trowel. Fall is a great time to plant a few new additions in the landscape. Here are just a few ideas for adding immediate and long term beauty to your garden. Add cool season annuals like pansies, snapdragons, ornamental kale and stocks to brighten the fall garden. Those in milder regions will enjoy them throughout the winter. Consider adding cold hardy pansies. They provide color in the fall garden, survive most winters, and are back blooming in the spring just as the snow melts. Fall is also a good time to plant perennials, trees and shrubs. The soil is warm and the air cooler, so the plants are less stressed and establish more quickly. Select plants suited to the growing conditions and be sure to give them plenty of room to reach their mature size. Plant trees so the root flare, the place where the roots curve away from the trunk, is even with the soil surface. Dig a hole, the same depth as the rootball, and two to five times wider. Roughen the sides of the hole and backfill with the existing soil. Water thoroughly and spread a two to three inch layer of mulch over the soil surface, keeping the mulch away from the tree trunk. Follow a similar planting procedure for shrubs. Plant these so the crown, the place where the stems meet the roots, is even with the soil surface. And be sure to keep the mulch away from the stems. Plant daffodils, tulips, hyacinths and other bulbs in fall for extra color next spring. Set the bulbs at a depth of two to three times their height deep. Then cover them with soil and sprinkle on a low nitrogen slow release fertilizer, like Milorganite (milorganite.com). This organic nitrogen fertilizer promotes rooting without stimulating fall growth subject to winter kill. Start planting spring flowering bulbs after the nighttime temperatures hover between 40 and 50 degrees. Be patient – waiting until the soil cools reduces the risk of early sprouting that often occurs during a warm fall. Those gardening in the far south and along the gulf coast can purchase pre-cooled bulbs to compensate for the warm winters. Or the chilling can be done at home by storing the bulbs in a 35 to 45 degree location for at least 14 weeks before planting. Those tired of battling the animals may want to plant resistant bulbs such as daffodils, hyacinths, Fritillaria, alliums, Camassia, glory-of-the snow, snow drops, squills, and grape hyacinths. You may find it is easier to avoid the problem than battle the ani-

-by Melinda Myers

mals with repellents and scare tactics. Plant a few short season vegetables in your garden for fresh-from-the garden flavor this fall. Simply count the days from planting to the average first fall frost to determine how many growing days are left in your area. Select vegetables that will mature and can be harvested in that amount of time. Leaf lettuce, spinach, mustard greens, radishes and carrots are fast growing, cool weather tolerant vegetables that make great additions to the fall garden and your dinner plate. Get these vegetables off to a good start with a side dressing of low nitrogen fertilizer. Incorporate it into the soil prior to planting or sprinkle a narrow band along the row of plants. This organic nitrogen will provide needed nutrients without damaging the tender seedlings. Extend the harvest season with the help of floating row covers. These fabrics allow air, light and water through while trapping the heat around the plants. No construction is needed; just loosely cover the plants with the fabric, secure the edges with pipes, boards or landscape staples and let the plants pro-

vide the support. So be sure to get a jump on next spring’s garden season with a bit of fall planting now. Gardening expert, TV/radio host, author & columnist Melinda Myers has more than 30 years of horticulture experience and has written over 20 gardening books, including Can’t Miss Small Space Gardening and the Midwest Gardener’s Handbook. She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone” DVD series and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment segments. Myers is also a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. Myers’ web site, www.melindamyers.com, offers gardening videos and tips.

SUDOKU SOLUTION

CROSSWORD SOLUTION


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 15

FAMILY FEATURES

ooking to add a little spooky flavor to your haunted celebration that is sure to keep all your little ghouls, ghosts and goblins in a festive mood? Look no further for the perfect ideas to dress up those Halloween treats. Take your All Hallows’ Eve to the next level with these Halloween concoctions sure to delight.

L

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Bringing Frankenstein to Life

Cast a Sweet Spell

You can’t have a mad scientist Halloween party without Frankenstein. This easy buttercream cake makes a big statement, a fantastic centerpiece for your sweets table and will make others green with envy over your decorating skills. For more Halloween party ideas and inspiration, visit wilton.com.

Use fresh Chilean navel oranges, mandarins and lemons to cast a spell on your frightful Halloween party goblins with Bubbling Witches Brew and Spook-tacular Fruit Cups. Looking for more festive ideas? Add orange pumpkin treats to the menu. Just peel a mandarin and insert a small piece of celery in the center for the stem. Find these and more sweetly satisfying recipes at fruitsfromchile.com.

Frankenstein Cake Serves: 12 6 cups favorite cake recipe or mix 4 cups Wilton White ReadyTo-Use Decorator Icing (4.5-pound tub) Wilton Color Right Performance Color System Wilton Black Icing Pouch with Tips Wilton Large Candy Eyeballs Tools: Wilton 6-by-3-inch Round Pan Wilton 10-by-16-inch Cooling Grid Cake plate Wilton Cake Leveler Wilton 13-inch Angled Spatula Wilton 12-inch Disposable Decorating Bags

Prepare cake according to box instructions and make two layers using 6-inch round pans. Bake and cool on cooling grid. Prepare Spring Green icing using this color tint formula from the Color Right Performance Color System: 4 cups icing + 30 Y + 6 B. Stack layers on cake plate for a two-layer cake, using leveler as needed. Ice cake sides smooth with green icing. Use black pouch icing without tip to cover top of cake. Use tip of spatula to create spiral effect. Use black pouch icing with star tip to pipe pull-out bangs around top edge and two hair strands on cake top. Prepare a disposable decorating bag with green icing; cut a hole in point of bag the size of tip 3. Attach candy eyeballs with dots of green icing. Pipe green eyelids. Use black pouch icing with round tip to pipe dot nose and neck bolts, outline mouth and stitches.

Bubbling Witches Brew To make 5 cups, freshly squeeze 3 1/2 cups mandarin orange juice and 1/2 cup lemon juice. Cover and chill. When ready to serve, pour chilled juice into punch bowl or pitcher and stir in 1 cup chilled sweet sparkling soda and ice cubes. Taste for sweetness. Peel and slice mandarin oranges to make pinwheel shapes that resemble spider webs to garnish each drink. Use frozen red or black grapes as an additional optional garnish.

Spook-tacular Fruit Cups Cut off top 1/5 of an orange and use paring knife to separate fruit from inside of orange, being careful not to cut through peel. It’s not necessary to get all of the flesh out, just enough to fill with cut fruit. Squeeze juice from removed fruit and add to Bubbling Witches Brew. If necessary, shave small amount of peel off bottom so cups sit level, being careful not to create an opening in the base. Use paring knife to carve faces, and fill each cup with orange pieces, melon balls, grapes and blueberries.

How to Host the Perfect Spooky Gathering Halloween is the perfect time to throw on a costume and act like a kid. Of course, you want friends and family there to partake in the spooky fun, too, so here are a few tips to make sure your party is remembered long after the witches put away their cauldrons:  Set a festive mood: Creepy Halloween decor, such as spider webs and Jack-O-Lanterns, can be placed around the house and yard to help get guests into the holiday spirit. Halloweenthemed music, such as “Monster Mash” and movies, such as “Dracula” and “Frankenstein,” can help offset any down time, as can sharing scary stories.





Play some ghoulish games: Bobbing for apples is a Halloween tradition you can’t leave out. Halloween bingo or a pin the tail on the donkey-type game, such as pin the nose on the skull, can also add to the fun. Or try a treasure hunt for a ghost ship’s loot by scattering clues around the house that lead to ghastly goodies. Vampires, ghosts and zombies, oh my: Add a costume contest to the mix and hand out prizes to some of the best. Try breaking the contest into a few categories or by age, and awarding prizes, such as most creative, judge’s choice and crowd favorite.


Page 16 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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Don’t Let The Flu Mean Missing Memorable Moments (NAPSI)—While the cold and flu season often coincides with holiday celebrations and family get-togethers, there are preventative measures that families can take to stay healthy and not miss out. To help you get to the next “can’t miss” life event, consider these top preventative tips: • Get an annual flu shot. It’s the most effective way to help prevent the spread of influenza. For your convenience, you can get a vaccine at any of the more than 7,800 CVS/pharmacy and 900 MinuteClinic locations across the country. The flu shot is available every day with no appointment needed, including evenings and weekends. As a preventive service under the Affordable Care Act, it’s fully covered and available at no cost through most insurance plans, including Medicare Part B. The pharmacy can also be a one-stop shop for flu prevention resources, including over-the-counter cold and flu remedies, multivitamins and anti-bacterial cleaning products. Plus, anyone enrolled in the ExtraCare Rewards program gets a 20 percent off CVS Shopping Pass upon getting the flu shot in most places. • Seniors, take extra precaution. There’s a high-dose flu shot designed for those 65 and older, who have a greater risk of severe illness from the flu. • Plan ahead: the earlier, the better. It

DEXTER’S SERVICE & COLLISION •Inspections •Collision Work

29 Yrs Exp

•4-Wheel Alignments 156 W. Wash. St. Bradford

Phone 814-362-3888

We Do PA State Inspections Cheapest Cigarette Outlet In Town!*

Choice *STATE MINIMUM

CIGARETTE OUTLET

Tobacco & Cigar Accessories 84 W. Washington St., Bradford, PA Ph: (814) 368-3606

takes up to two weeks for your immunity to build up after getting a flu shot. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone who is at least 6 months old get a flu shot as soon as the vaccine is available. • Stay home if you’re ill. While it may seem like a no-brainer, two-thirds of employed Americans would still go to work even if they were feeling ill with flu-like symptoms. It’s important to understand the preliminary symptoms of the flu and, if you experience them, to stay home. This will help bolster your immune system and prevent the germs spreading.

• Practice healthy habits. Door handles, desks and other everyday items are ridden with germs. Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your mouth and eyes. Additionally, eat nutritious foods, drink plenty of water, and get sufficient sleep to keep your immune system in top shape. Lead by example to educate children about these habits. Learn More: For further information and to find a nearby store, visit www.cvs. com/flu or download the CVS/pharmacy mobile app.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 17

FAMILY FEATURES

iving a healthy lifestyle can be a challenge when faced with a lack of time and the ease and availability of convenient foods. There’s no time like the present, however, to get your body in tip-top shape. The impact of good health on your quality of life, regardless of age or physical ability, can be far reaching. From controlling weight by eating right, even on a busy schedule, to making that smile shine a little brighter, use these ideas to help you become a happier, healthier you.

L

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Clean Your Teeth with Style Only 1 in 10 moms feel like they have bathroom clutter under control, according to a survey conducted by Kelton Global. With the new REACH Complete Care 8-in-1 Mouth Rinse it’s easy to transform clutter and chaos into clean and serene. Featuring a convenient toothbrush holder for the REACH Curve Toothbrush, the bottle’s sleek design upgrades your normal routine while looking great on the counter. Both are available at Walgreens and CVS for $6.99, or visit www.Reachtoothbrush.com to learn more.

Balance Brings Results Managing your weight doesn’t mean giving up flavor and convenience. Seattle Sutton’s Healthy Eating is designed for busy lifestyles, providing healthy food choices that take the work out of planning. Each week, 21 freshly-prepared, portion- and calorie-controlled meals are delivered to your door, from crunchy salads to stuffed peppers. Unlike other prepared plans, meals include fresh fruits and vegetables, and come in a variety of delicious options. To learn more, visit seattlesutton.com or call 800-442-3438.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Stretch Your Limits Aside from the physical benefits associated with yoga, including weight loss, increased energy and improved flexibility, it can help manage stress and the effects it can have on the body and mind. Because of its rise in popularity and the different ways to practice yoga, it has never been easier to do in the comfort of your home. Getting your own yoga mat, available at local sporting goods stores, is an inexpensive way to help sculpt your mind and body.

Monitor Activity on the Go

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Keeping track of your personal metrics, such as steps walked in a day, quality of sleep, heart rate and calories consumed, can be time consuming. Wearable wireless-enabled activity trackers automate this task and allow you to easily log your data on your smartphone or computer while also keeping up-to-the-second track of your progress. Fitness trackers, which are available at most local sporting goods and electronics retailers, can help you identify areas for improvement and reach your goals.


Page 18 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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CHRONOLOGICAL LISTINGS Engagements, Marriages, Births & Deaths

ford, PA.

ENGAGEMENTS:

(None) MARRIAGES: (None) BIRTHS: SEPT. 5, 2015: DAUGHTER, to Trinity Tracy nd Daniel Williams, Portville, NY. SEPT. 8, 2015: SON, to Laurie Conley and J. Frank, Olean, NY. SEPT. 11, 2015: SON, to Melissa Johnson and Jordan Wilson, Brad-

DEATHS: SEPT. 3, 2015: PONTIOUS, Renee N., 31, of Water St. Ext., Johnsonburg, PA. SEPT. 4, 2015: MIX, Mike, 44, of 7 Keesler St., Mt. Jewett, PA. MESLER, Lina L., 87, of Shinglehouse, PA. SCOTT, Eileen M., 72, of Ulysses, PA. SEPT. 5, 2015: WHITNEY, James D., 81, of Conrad.

Timeless Treasures Hidden Treasures In The Courtyard! Wind Chimes Yard Stakes - Flags- Decorative Ironwork Planters - Garden Statuary And More..........! Check Facebook For BIG Savings! 3͕͔36Š‡•–—–3–Ǥǡ35”ƒ†ˆ‘”†ǡ34 3͕͘͜Ǧ͕͗͗Ǧ͘͘͜͜

ROBINSON, Richard Mark, 66, of 102 Center St., Ridgway, PA. JOSEPH, K. C., M.D., 68, of 647 Evergreed Rd., St. Marys,PA. DORGUZZI, Lois Wamblade, 88, of State College and Marco Island, FL. SEPT. 6, 2015: PETRY, Marlene J., 80, formerly of Genesse and Wiliamsport, PA. DUNHAM, Bonita H. “Bonnie”, 84, of Westfield, PA. FUENFFINGER, Melvin F., 85, of 1325 Glen Hazel Rd., St. Marys, PA. BROWN, Manley J., 69, of Eldred, PA. SEPT. 7, 2015: KIMBLE, Carolyn S., “Sue”, 70, of Route 46, Coleville, PA. SEPT. 8, 2015: GULLEY, Mary

Petterio Keator, 85, formerly of Duke Center, PA. LOUK, James R., 54, of Raleigh, NC, formerly of Bradford, PA. SEPT. 9, 2015: HANES, Aileen M., 50, of 154 Laurel Ln, Kersey, PA. SEPT., 10, 2015: PEIRSON, Nancy J., 76, fo Harrison Valley, PA. CRIPPEN, Barbara J., 70, of Ulysses, PA. McGRAIL, John Henry, 77, of Chambersburg, PA. M I L L I N G TO N , Ronald L., Sr., 60, of 47 Belleview Ave., Bradford, PA. SEPT. 11, 2015: HERSEY, Philip L., 57, of Coudersport, PA. ARNOLD, Miriam, 95, of 267 Charles St., St. Marys, PA.

YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE SEPTEMBER 17 - SEPTEMBER 23, 2015

ARIES - (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19) A fact needs to be faced but in ways that can only be positive and helpful. TAURUS - (Apr. 20 - May 20) You’re now pushing on a door that is very much half open. State your case confidently. GEMINI - (May 21 - June 20) Developments this week should do much to reassure you that this frustrating situation is becoming much less of an issue. CANCER- (June 21 - July 22) This week’s enlightenment will put you in a much stronger position. LEO - (July 23, - Aug. 22) Developments this week should help confirm who is truly on your side. VIRGO - (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) The Solar Eclipse in your sign is about to replace confusion with crystal-clear clarity. LIBRA - (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) All you need to do is be receptive to questioning what needs questioning. SCORPIO - (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) This week, make an effort to let go of a pessimistic attitude that might have grown unnecessarily deep-rooted. SAGITTARIUS - (Nov. 22 - Dec. 20) This week brings new levels of authority and obligation. Try to embrace both. CAPRICORN - (Dec. 21 - Jan. 20) At long last, a new level of stability is coming. AQUARIUS - (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19) Allow this week’s developments to confirm how - and why - you ought to be congratulating yourself. PISCES - (Feb. 20 - Mar. 20) This week, don’t rule out the possibility of a delightful and unforeseen development

Keeping Your Joints Healthy (NAPSI)—Knowing a few facts about the wear and care of your joints can help you take steps to keep them healthy. Healthy joints have cartilage, which acts as a spongy shock absorber on the ends of the bones so they don’t rub against each other. When you don’t have enough cartilage, you can have pain. To Keep Your Joints Healthy • Exercise. Walking, jogging or swimming helps keep muscles strong, and takes the strain off the joints. • A healthy diet and a healthy weight. Carrying extra weight stresses your joints. Eat less fat and sugar, and more fruits and vegetables. • A healthy lifestyle. Get enough sleep and eat a balanced diet. What To Know About Joint Pain Joint pain often indicates arthritis. Common types are osteoarthritis, gout and rheumatoid arthritis. Other diseases or injuries can also lead to joint pain. As you age, joint pain becomes more common as well. Fortunately, you can do a lot to feel better and stay active, even if you have these problems. How To Feel Better • Exercise, moving all your joints. Walking helps circulation, supports the joints and strengthens the muscles. • If you have a sore joint, you can use an ice pack or a bag of frozen vegetables on the sore spot. • Do your best to maintain a weight that is right for you, since too much weight can make your knees and hips ache. • Speak up. Tell the doctor if your pain is improving or getting worse. Medicines can reduce pain and stiffness, and a doctor will know if joint replacement is an option you should consider. Joint Replacement Surgery Joint replacement surgery involves removing a damaged joint and putting in a new one. It’s usually done by an orthopaedic surgeon. Sometimes, the surgeon will not remove the whole joint, but will only replace or fix the damaged parts. The new joint, called a prosthesis, can be made of plastic, metal or ceramic. It may or may not be cemented into place, and your bone will grow into it. New joints generally last at least 10 to 15 years. Learn More: The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, has free, easy-to-read information in English and Spanish about joint health. Download or order publications on other topics at www.niams.nih.gov/multicultural or call toll free (877) 226-4267.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 19

JOURNAL CLASSIFIED ADS CARS & TRUCKS: 2003 F150 4x4 std, 98k miles, 8 ft. box, everything VGC $7,499.00 362-7050 ATV’s/ MOTORCYCLES/ SNOWMOBILES:

2005 Goldwing Trike. If interested call 814-598-3022 APARTMENTS FOR RENT:

erences & Sec required. Open immediately. 716378-2407

couple No smoking, small pets possible. Background check req., 814880-6160

2 Br 1 Ba Apt Smethport. $645/util/sec: pawildssuites. com/ sartwellrental

1743 Newly remodeled 2BR modular trailer for rent. Kings Run Rd., 20 min. from Bradford. G/W/S incl in rent. $550/mo. + sec. 814-659-4280 (day) 814-6977072 (night)

Small quiet 1BR efficiency, bath w/ shower all util. included. Furnished or unfurnished, near hospital and 2BR, 79 South Ave. school, $300/mo., W. Washington St, 4BR, 191 Con- 598-7565 3BR, 1 1/2 BA, off gress St 814-366street pkg, stove 1447 or 814-596HOMES FOR and fridge avail9398 RENT: able. $600/mo incl. city util. Sec. de2BR, BA, 2 lg.yards, 189 Williams St. posit req., no pets. convenient loca2BR + Garage No 814-368 4403 tion, safe parking pets. Call Scott & area, NO PETS, HOMES FOR East Main St. 716- Chase 368-5060 SALE: 688-7304

(2) 1BR apts in Smethport, newly remodeled off street pkg, 5987442 For Rent: 2 bdrm apartment No 1BR upper, all util. Pets Call: 814incl, off street pkg, 558-3048 $550/mo. 350 East Main St. 814-706- Large 2BR $490/ 6773 mo + sec., no smoking or pets, 1BR, $425/mo + utilities not incl. G&E, Laundry - 558-4738 W/D 1BR upper, $575/mo includes Large 2BR free G&E, stove and standing Cottage, fridge. Security re- fully remodeled, quired and no pets $600/mo. Utilion both. 362-3051 ties not incl. (but or 368-4806 would be approx. $250 month) Ideal 1BR, no pets, ref- for professional

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CATERING ASSISTANT Looking for a Catering Assistant, around 2030 hours per week. Must be a self starter with proven organizational skills, good multi-tasking abilities and positive time management skills. Experience in food service preferred but will train the right applicant. This is a physically demanding position. Ability to lift 50+lbs a must....Please respond to: aderx@roadrunner.com with Name, work history, hours of availability and any other pertinent information. Salary commensurate with experience, free meals, all major Holidays off, Most Sundays off. WAITRESS Part time waitress, must be available between the hours of 7am and 3 pm. Sundays and all major Holidays off / Free meals. Experience in food service preferred.Must have a good work history.Please respond to: Aderx@roadrunner.com with information listed above.

Cute, cozy 2BR home in Port Allegany w/ garage. $550/mo. 1st and last deposit required. Landlord pays W & S minimum. 814-8872678 or 814-366-

100 Lost Lane 3 bed 2 bath 5 acres city utilities and barn $225.000.00 call Dave 814-5981071 2BR, 119 Oakwood - $28,500

er: 3BR, 2BA, garage, quiet neighborhood, Call for appointment 3622214 Well maintained 3-4BR, 1 1/2 BA, HW floors, 3 car garage w/ nice 1BR, 1BA apt. 6 1/2 acres, 1 acre yard, 5 1/2 acres wooded. $160,000. Taking offers. For appt. call 814-362-4546 PETS & SUPPLIES:

They are indoor cats and are litter trained CALL: 814-778-5110 Anytime MISCELLANEOUS:

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Page 20 Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015

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SENIOR INFORMATION PAGE Getting The Pain Prescription Right For America’s Seniors -by James Appleby September is national Pain Awareness Month. And one of the major issues policymakers, healthcare providers, and average citizens alike need to focus on is how to improve pain management among older Americans. Unsurprisingly, this population experiences more pain than younger Americans. Among active seniors, it’s estimated that 25-50 percent experience persistent pain. For these Americans, finding ways to manage pain without reducing quality of life is essential. Among seniors residing in nursing homes or receiving in-home hospice

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care, as many as 85 percent experience persistent pain. Plus, older Americans account for an outsized shared of American drug consumption. People 65 years and older make up just 13 percent of the U.S. population, yet they’re responsible for a full third of all pharmaceutical purchases. And seniors rely heavily on opioidbased treatments, which are extremely powerful but come with elevated risks of addiction and abuse. Since 2007, the number of opioid prescriptions for patients aged 60 years or older has jumped by nearly a third. That’s double the rate of growth for middle-aged patients during that same period. Of course, responsible prescription drug use – opioid-based based or otherwise – can be transformative for patients, alleviating chronic pain, speeding up post-operative recovery, boosting emotional well-being, and enhancing cognition. However, opioid drugs can also cause huge, potentially fatal, problems for seniors. Elderly patients tend to be taking other drugs that can interact with opioids and cause adverse side effects. Their physical frailty exacerbates these problems. And opioid overuse can slow post-surgery recovery and speed up cognitive function decline. Abuse also puts senior patients at much higher risk of falls, which can cause serious bone fractures and shorten life. In fact, a 2010 paper in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that Medicare patients using opioids were four times more likely to suffer a fracture than enrollees using non-opioid treatments. These risks are a big reason that the Joint Commission, a national non-profit that certifies healthcare organizations, specifically warns that opioids may not be appropriate for all patients. The Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee, which is run by the federal Department of Health and Human Services, recently published a comprehensive strategy for improving pain management that includes specific steps for helping seniors. Policymakers should heed its recommendations. Avoiding addiction and overdose requires careful care management and regular dialogue between doctors and their senior patients. Caregivers need to adopt treatment protocols that can help prevent addiction, such as using drugs with the few-

est adverse effects first. Providing nonopioid pain medication before and after surgery can also help. Likewise, caregivers should embrace proven non-opioid pain management alternatives, such as intravenous acetaminophen and over-the-counter painkillers like ibuprofen. These medications can be just as effective at reducing patient suffering without running the high risks of addiction. And even nonpharmaceutical pain management techniques such as yoga, stretching, massage, or acupuncture can help relive senior suffering. All courses of treatment should begin with an honest and open conversation between patients and their caregivers about how pain affects them, how they are prepared to deal with pain, and how their ideas can be woven into treatment. This month represents the perfect opportunity for healthcare providers to improve senior pain management. James Appleby is the executive director and CEO of the Gerontological Society of America. This piece originally appeared in The Tampa Tribune.

A Special Evening

Bradford Journal Photo Left to right, James Skaggs, Eric Schuler, and his wife Ida give us a pose following the Comedy Night show at the VFW Post 212 Event Center, September 12th. Ida tells us that this was the first live comedy show she has attended and that it was an especially exciting evening for her. While Eric and she have known each other for a long time, this was their fourth month wedding anniversary.


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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 21

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Bradford Journal & Miner Thursday, September 17, 2015 Page 23

FAMILY FEATURES

ulie Beall might be a cancer patient, but she’s truly defined by any number of other titles. She’s a wife and mother, a registered nurse, a real estate professional, an MBA graduate, a small business owner and a public speaker. She owns a glass art studio. She regularly volunteers at a medical clinic in Africa. The 50-something is nowhere near retired, although she is nearing retirement age. And she has a message for people of her generation and older. Get annual eye exams. Your life might depend on it. John Lahr, OD, EyeMed Medical Director and a fellow baby boomer concurs. “The single most important thing anyone 50 years or older can do for their vision and eye health is to book an annual eye exam,” he said. “Once you pass the 50-year mark, your risk for several serious eye diseases increases and the odds of you requiring vision correction also climbs. What’s more, your optometrist may see signs of a serious physical health condition you never associated with an eye exam.” Nobody knows better than Beall. Two years ago she went for a routine eye exam near her home outside Dayton, Ohio, not knowing that her life was about to change forever. “I didn’t really suspect anything was wrong,” Beall said. “Maybe I was getting a little older. I thought I might need reading glasses; maybe my eyes were getting a little tired.” Beall’s optometrist noticed an area off the side of the retina that looked unusual. After dilating her eyes, he noted what he thought was a detaching retina. Considering it an ocular emergency, her optometrist referred her to an ophthalmologist who specialized in retinal diseases. She saw that doctor later the same day and was told she had choroidal melanoma, a potentially fatal form of cancer. Doctors treated Julie with radioactive plaque therapy. According to Dr. Lahr, Beall’s story of uncovering a serious health concern at the optometrist is not unusual. In addition to preserving eyesight, annual exams can be a window to serious medical conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and high cholesterol. “The average optometrist sees 2,500 to 3,000 patients annually. And it’s not uncommon for there to be hundreds of times each year you have someone in the optometrist’s chair who hasn’t had a physical in a while. You take a look at the back of their eye and you see early signs of something potentially serious,” said Dr. Lahr. “More often, eye doctors recognize symptoms of serious eye disease when it’s early enough to correct the condition or manage long-term vision issues.” Ironically, for many aging Americans, an annual eye exam becomes harder to access at a time in life when they most need to see an eye doctor regularly. According to The Vision Council, less than half of Americans age 65 or older have vision benefits. Studies show that this aging population will double to 71.5 million by 2030. Regular adult eye health and vision care is not provided through original Medicare or the Affordable Care Act. Plus, an increasing number of Americans in their 50s and early 60s are without access to employer-sponsored health benefits due to self-employment or circumstances. This gap sparked an idea from EyeMed, and it began working on an insurance product for AARP members. “There is a certain segment of the target population that might just say, ‘Why should I get an eye exam every year if I don’t have a vision benefit to help with the costs?’” said Dr. Lahr. “I even talk to people who have the means to cover vision care costs out-of-pocket and are interested in an individual vision benefit.” AARP MyVision Care from EyeMed, the first vision plan with features to meet the specific vision needs of senior consumers, launched in February in California, Illinois, Ohio and New Jersey. For more information go to https://aarpmyvisioncare.net/. Today, Julie Beall has added a new role to her ever-expanding list of titles: eye exam advocate. “If I could just get everybody in the country to get an eye exam,” she said recently. “Do it.” “It may save your life.”

J

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

Isn’t vision loss just part of getting older?

Ask the doctor

Worsening vision is an inevitable part of aging, but according to AllAboutVision.com, lifestyle and vision care impact the rate and degree of deterioration.  If your diet includes zinc, lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E and Omega-3 fatty acids you may delay cataracts and control the progress of agerelated macular degeneration.  If you smoke, stop. The odds of developing cataracts and macular degeneration increase 400% if you’re a smoker.  Presbyopia, a natural part of the aging process, makes it difficult for you to focus on close objects. Optometrists can prescribe contact lenses, reading glasses, bifocals or even progressive lenses (no-line multifocals). Lens technology allows you to wear multifocal glasses without the traditional look of multifocals.  Advancements in lens technology can correct and enhance your vision in ways unimaginable a decade ago. Cataracts can be removed efficiently with accurate focus outcomes. Glaucoma, in its early stages, can be treated with eyedrops and lasers. Lasik treatment continues to evolve.

EyeMed Medical Director John Lahr, OD, answers some questions about eye exams for aging patients: Q: When optometrists look into the eye, what are they looking for? A: We see important eye structures and signs of glaucoma or cataracts or other diseases. But what’s most important is the ability to see blood vessels. The blood vessels tell us important early-identification signs for diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol — three of the most costly diseases we face today. Q: Aren’t those things that should be picked up by primary care physicians? A: Unfortunately, some people don’t engage in general healthcare. They might only go to a doctor for specific issues. So they kind of get lost in the system. Is their medication up to date? Are they doing what they’re supposed to do to be healthier? Are they monitored? Because many of these people come in annually to get their eyeglass or contact lens prescription updated, we have opportunities to diagnose them when they might not be otherwise. Q: What advances in technology have changed vision care for older patients? A: Just look at cataracts. Cataract surgery has gotten very sophisticated. And the outcomes have been fantastic. You’re taking out a cloudy lens and putting in an artificial lens. And with that lens, you can literally pick your prescription. It’s amazing what can be done with that procedure.

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