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Issue # 2, August - September, 2013

TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Connect, create, celebrate, Caloundra Contents 3

From the Editor

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Celebrating Culture

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“It’s Friday”

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A Passion for Writing

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Lal’s Story

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Op Shopping Caloundra

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A Purposeful Life

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Say “Cheese”

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Santosh Speaks Plainly about Cooking

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Daniel Toohey Adds some Magic

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Baby Turtles - Colouring-in Page

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Haiku Art

Articles and photos are by Mary Barber, unless otherwise attributed. Cheese photos are Google Images. Chris Postle’s art photos are contributed.

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Tamarind Book Club

Please seek permission from the editor to reuse any material, articles or photos in this issue.

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Caloundra Gallery

Every effort is made to accurately represent the people and their opinions in these stories. However, no responsibility is accepted for wrong or misleading information in any part of this magazine.

Cover Photo— Pelican, taken at Golden Beach by Mary Barber.

Views expressed by the contributors are not necessarily those of Tamarind Magazine. The publisher will not be liable for any opinion or advice expressed in Tamarind Magazine. Information given is believed to be accurate and from reliable sources. However, factual errors may occur and can be corrected in the next issue. Please address any concerns to the Editor. Thank you, Mary Barber

Editor

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From the Editor Hello Readers, Thank you for the positive feedback about the first issue of Tamarind Magazine. This second issue has been fun to prepare. I’ve met some amazing local people , such as Vivianne Dawalibi. I interviewed Lal Natvarlal. I’m sure many Caloundra folk will know him by his photo. I had a long chat with local author Anna Campbell about what she’s writing, what she’s reading and why she’s on Facebook. Our regular items are included, such as Chris Postle’s beautiful paintings, your chance to play with words and send in your art haiku. In this issue we have added a new item for the kids. It’s a colouring-in page. The illustration of Baby Sea Turtles was created for Tamarind Magazine by local artist, Daniel Toohey. Welcome aboard Daniel. The next issue will be out at the beginning of October. Until then, you can find updates on the Tamarind Magazine website. Your comments, suggestions or story ideas are always welcome. Send them to the editor. Enjoy Issue #2 of Tamarind Magazine.

Mary Mary Barber The Editor

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Celebrating Culture

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NAIDOC Week , 2013 On Sunday 14th July, hundreds of locals and visitors came together to celebrate NAIDOC Week at Cotton Tree Park, Maroochydore.

Why are you here today? To celebrate Aboriginal and Islander culture. To celebrate NAIDOC Week. To keep the community spirit going with culture, from the Aboriginal perspective. Mixing with people we don’t even know. Getting to know other people. We’re all busy people. It’s a beautiful time to come together and catch up with our co-workers from indigenous organisations. They’re all represented here today. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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I’m a social work student from the university. I’m volunteering here for today. I’m here with other students from our action and advocacy group, SWAANS.

My nephews are performing. It’s a good environment. I like it.

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We’re from Melbourne. We’re holidaying on the coast for the winter. We followed the dancers in yesterday.

To celebrate indigenous culture on the Sunshine Coast. I’m here to be with my people. Caring and sharing for everyone.

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Living out at Ayers Rock at the moment, so it’s wonderful to see the celebrations not only from the heart of the nation but all over the land.

Our band, Classik Nawu, is here to perform. We’re on tour at the moment so this is just our stop for the weekend. And we’re here with Impossible Odds and Cold Water band as well. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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I’m of aboriginal descent. I don’t know who my people are. This is my way to celebrate aboriginal culture.

We’re performing here. We’re Tha- L-La-Mintz. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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We’re bringing our family down to see our nephew perform.

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“It’s Friday!”

Detail from Di Keller’s painting, “The Gang”

Carol Spence has been painting with Friday Art for nine years. “It’s my escape hatch,” she says. “ I live in a unit so I can’t paint at home.” Twenty keen artists usually attend the informal Friday Art sessions at the Caloundra Arts Centre Association in North Street. “We’ve got to know each other . It’s lovely,” says Carol, who is one of the organisers of the group. “When someone calls, I just say come and see how you fit in for a few weeks. They tell us that they feel welcome,” says Carol. Carol explains that this is not a class. “We don’t have a teacher. We have mentors who’ve been painting a long time and they give us ideas on colour and shape.” “It’s a very loose group. It’s eclectic. We all do different things, different styles and different media. We just bring our individual stuff along and do it,” says Carol. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Carol Spence is one of the two organisers of the Friday Art group.

The mentors have taught art before or have been established in the community. “They come to do their painting now. They don’t teach anymore,” Carol says. The group members learn from each other and encourage each other in their work. “It’s a social group more than an artists’ group. We all enjoy coming. We get a bit of banter going,” says Carol, laughing . Then there are times when it’s all concentration. “Sometimes you can just hear a pin drop.” Heather Dunlevie (pictured at right) and her husband Brian have been painting with the group for 4 years. “We like the light, airy room and the inspiration that we get from each other,” Heather says.

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Di Keeler with her painting, “The Gang” . This painting was inspired by the work of Western Australian artist Wendy Binks. June Jones is working in the background.

Jenny Hart (left) and Jan Malkin discuss Jan’s painting. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Jenny Hart at work on her painting, “Outback after the Storm”.

The group keeps in touch with professional artists on the coast. “We have workshops and demonstrations from visiting artists. Chris Postle is coming in September and Raelene Hall is coming next year,” says Carol. Rod Hall, the other group organiser, has arranged excursions for the group to local galleries. At other times, they pack up their easels for an outdoor painting session. The members agree with Carol that it’s all lots of fun.

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The Caloundra Arts Centre Association is home to 19 vibrant arts and craft groups.

Aspects of Art Embroiderers

Information can be obtained from The Gift Gallery at 5 North Street Caloundra .

Floral art

You can call the Gift Gallery on 5491 6488.

Expressive Drawing

Textile and Fabric Art Silk Painting Quilting Friday Art

Shop hours are 10.00am – 4.00pm every day.

t r a Lace Making Pottery

Folk Art Porcelain Painting Tapestry & Needlepoint Sunshine Pastellists

Wednesday Art Machine Embroidery P.V.A. Gems Craft Spinning and Weaving

Decoupage Stitchers

t r

a TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Sunshine Coast author, Anna Campbell writes passionate historical romances.

A Passion for Writing Anna Campbell is a romance author with an international following. She has been voted Australia’s favourite romance author for the past 4 years by the Australian Romance Readers Association. Anna’s novel Seven Nights in a Rogue’s Bed was voted as having the Best First Meeting Between a Couple and the Best Love Scene for 2012 by these same readers. To top this off, the steamy cover was voted Best Cover of 2012.

Anna Campbell’s novels are set in the Regency period in England and Scotland. Anna says that readers relate to this period because it is not too far back in history. Readers are familiar with this setting from the novels of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer.

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Anna Campbell lives and writes here on the Sunshine Coast. In this interview, Anna talks about books, writing and storytelling …… What is your favourite Georgette Heyer Regency novel? I think probably my favourite would be Devil’s Cub which has got quite an alpha hero. It’s one of those ones where two people fall in love with the last person they think they’ll fall in love with. The dialogue’s just so funny. Do you have a daily writing routine or a discipline? You have to. It’s a job. You have the occasional magic day where things just sort of roll out in front of you like a beautiful carpet. I tend to set a daily page count. One of the good things about working for a publisher is you’re on deadlines, so you know how much time you’ve got to do things. So sometimes it comes down to something mathematical such as how many pages do I need to write a day, with everything else that’s going on, to get it in on time?

“I love social media. …. It’s wonderful

for an Aussie author.” How do you deal with the isolation of being a writer? Well, I actually enjoy my own company. I think you have to in this job. I love social media. If anyone follows Facebook or Twitter, I’m on Facebook and Twitter all the time. I can talk to people in America. I can talk to people in England. It’s wonderful for an Aussie author because say twenty years ago, we were actually at a disadvantage because we weren’t there on the spot. The beautiful thing about social media is you can talk to readers all over the world. You do that, do you? Oh, absolutely. Absolutely.

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You call yourself a history geek. How do you stop the historical detail from taking over? I think with historical romance you’ve got to make it as far as possible true to the time. That’s what I try and do. I try not to write 21st century people living in the time. I try to get into the mindset. I think the vocabulary is actually a really good way of easing yourself into the time. For instance, ‘damn’ was really strong language in the Regency. ‘Damn’ is not particularly strong language now but you’ve still got to convey the feeling that that’s strong language. People do like the history but they like the romance first. They like the relationship in an historically believable context.

“With the ideal romance, they’re actually better people at the end. They’ve earnt that happy ending.” It’s not Georgette Heyer – its’ raunchy and fast-paced. Yes, well you are writing to entertain. You are also writing to compete with everything else that’s out there to entertain people. If a reader puts down my book, I’ve failed to an extent. I love those emails that you get that say, ‘I hate you. I sat up to 4 o’clock in the morning reading your book.’ You just love those. I’m in the business of entertainment. Some of the loveliest letters you’ll get are from people going through awful times. They’ll write to you and say, ‘You swept me away to a different world for a couple of hours. Thank you so much.’ You wrote that romances follow an age-old story line. There’s trials, adversity, growth, redemption and happy endings. Yes. With the ideal romance, they’re actually better people at the end. They’ve earnt that happy ending. I think that this is a powerful story design. Fairy tales work on it. Myths work on it. Romances work on it. People wouldn’t keep coming back to it, if it wasn’t answering something that they want.

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Are we all story tellers? I think we are actually. If you sit around the barbeque, everyone’s telling stories. And I think the upsurge in blogging, a lot of that is stories. What are you reading at the moment? I’ve got hooked on Dick Francis. He writes the most wonderful romance heroes. They’re fabulous. He writes mystery thrillers. They’re edgy but not hyper-technical. They are man against evil. There’s a very firm moral world in it. They’re excellent. I think I’ve read about 20 in the last 6 months. How has digital reading changed things for you as a writer? What’s interesting about digital readers is that shorter formats have become really big again. Before the digital read, it was basically full length books. Short stories and novellas have really come back. I’m going to do a Christmas novella this year. They’re about 50 to 150 pages, which I really like. Sometimes you’d like to pick up a story and finish a story and you’ve only got two hours. Fantastic. You can do that with a novella and it’s a great way to try a new author.

A Rake’s Midnight Kiss is out on 1st August, 2013. It is the second novel in the Sons of Sin series. It follows Seven Nights in a Rogue’s Bed. Anna is currently writing the third novel in the series. Follow this link to Anna Campbell’s website .

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Lal’s Story Lal Natvarlal was born in Gujarat, India in 1936. He was an eleven year old school boy when India achieved independence from British rule. He remembers it as a time of great celebration. Lal Natvarlal at Caloundra’s Discount Blitz shop

Lal is a Hindu, “100% Hindu,” he says with a smile. Lal’s father left India seeking better work opportunities. He set up a tailoring business in Fiji. When Lal was fourteen, his father sent for him. Lal joined the family business and became a tailor. Lal spent 47 years in Fiji. During this time, he also had a retail business selling saris, clothes and souvenirs. Lal speaks four languages, Gujarati, Hindi, English and Fijian. There is a tradition of migration in Lal’s family. His son moved to New Zealand to study and then settled in Australia. Lal and his wife Pushbaben followed him here, when they retired in 1999. Initially the family settled in Brisbane. They have been in Caloundra for 7 years. Lal’s son opened the Discount Blitz shop in the Stockland Shopping Centre, on Bowman Road Caloundra, seven years ago. Lal helps out in the shop every day. He says, “It’s not compulsory, but what would I do at home? Nothing.” Lal has three children, seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He speaks to his grandchildren in Gujarati and Hindi. Asked what Indian values or customs he wants to pass on to his family, he says, “To believe in God, that’s all.”

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Sandra Herman (right) and the Thursday team at the Australian Red Cross Shop. Caloundra

Op Shopping Caloundra Tourists with young families bless Caloundra’s five op shops on a rainy day. It’s easy to fill a few hours browsing and searching for treasures. The Australian Red Cross Shop is on the corner of Bulcock and Otranto Streets, Caloundra. Its long shopfront window holds colourful displays. Sandra Herman, the team leader on Thursdays, says “We know we’re doing well, when we have to keep dressing the models…….. It’s a visual thing. People buy off the models.” The op shop prides itself on greeting customers and offering to help them. Sandra is enthusiastic about the quality of the donations. “The brand names are unbelievable sometimes. You get Charlie Brown, Dolce and Gabbana…….. High end brands like Perri Cutten.” “They might be ten years old but they’re still classic styles. We get a fair bit of Country Road because Red Cross have an agreement with Country Road. Sometimes during the year, we’ll have a promotion, that if you bring in a Country Road item, they’ll give you a $10 voucher to go to a Country Road store,” she explains.

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Some demands are hard to fill. “If we could get rope petticoats and things for Rock n Roll dancing, it would be wonderful.” Sandra snaps her fingers, “If they come in, they’re gone.” Funds raised at the shop go to support Red Cross programs, such as disaster relief and school breakfast programs. “Red Cross needs the money because we are first in line in an emergency or a disaster.” “ We have people after a disaster come in and say ‘ I want this to go to Bundaberg,’ but we explain to them that no, we would prefer to sell the articles here, send the money, then the money goes to the people in Bundaberg where the people will buy from their shops to kick-start their economy again.,” says Sandra.

Across the road at 87A Bulcock Street is Bloomhill Cancer Help Op Shop. Tracey Bean has been the manager there for two years. She says, “Our bric-a-brac and our clothing are our big sellers at the moment.” While some op shops have started to sell new items, Tracey says, “We don’t have any new stuff at all. Everything that we do get here is from donations from the public. “ Another difference with Bloomhill is that “we sell furniture in the main street which none of the other op shops do.” The shop has regular customers. “They just come in and say hello. We know them by name, so every week we see them and we get to know them,” says Tracey. Children are usually looking for toys, clothes and books. The shop stocks children’s videos, which Tracey says are still popular.

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“There’s always a chance that someone will come in and find that little treasure. ”

Tracey Bean, Manager of Bloomhill Op Shop

“The tourist season usually gets pretty busy. Even when it’s not tourist season, we have a lot of Victorians come through, ” says Tracey. Visitors also come from Brisbane regularly or from “up North”. “There’s always a chance that someone will come in and find that little treasure. We get a lot of people come in and they’re having dress up parties. They are looking for the different outfits. It’s always good to see them walk out and happy.” Many of the shop’s volunteers have had a personal experience or a family experience of cancer. Tracey says, “It’s touched a lot of peoples’ hearts.” There are six Bloomhill shops on the Sunshine Coast. Tracey is confident that “85% of what we earn goes to helping cancer patients and their families.” Bloomhill’s Cancer Care provides holistic care for cancer patients and their families. From their Buderim base, they offer a range of services including counselling, art therapy, palliative care, transport to medical appointments and family support. Back at the shop front, the final word goes to Tracey, “Come in and say hello. We are a lovely bunch of people. ”

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Viviane Dawalibi, owner and Practice Manager of Caloundra Bulk Billing Surgery

A Purposeful Life Vivianne Dawalibi was born in a village in northern Sudan in 1956. She was the eldest child. “I have one brother and we are three sisters. Being a girl, being Christian, being white, we were overprotected. I can’t say that I enjoyed a free childhood,” she reflects. “My grandparents fled Syria as refugees. They became refugees in Sudan after the Othomanic War. They established their trading business in the northern part of Sudan. They were clothes traders. My Dad was a clothes trader as well and he diversified into camel trading.” “I finished my HSC in 1974. However, my Dad did not allow me to go to university. I am the only girl in my family that was allowed to go to the workforce. I couldn’t stay at home. It was not for me” she says, shaking her head.

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A Purposeful Life ….. continued

Life changed when she married her husband and started working for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Vivianne says that her world opened up when she married her husband, Nubar in 1980 and moved to Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. Through a friend, she found work as a junior bookkeeper with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Sudan was then hosting 3,500,000 refugees from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Uganda and the Congo. Her first field experience came in 1981during the Ethiopian Civil War. Soldiers who had supported President Mengisto fled their homeland and crossed the border to the eastern part of Sudan. “Many of them were wounded and the government just gave them an open land in the middle of nowhere, in the desert. Our office was crying for help. My husband allowed me to go to the field. And that was my first mission,” she remembers. That year, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees won the Nobel Peace Prize for their humanitarian programs to help refugees in the Sudan. As a team member, Vivianne received this award.

Vivianne proudly displays her Nobel Peace Prize certificate in the reception area of her local business, the Caloundra Bulk Billing Surgery.

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A Purposeful Life ….. continued

“I have a mission and my mission is to serve. I am here to help people really have a different life. ” Vivianne worked for twenty years for the UNHCR in Sudan, Armenia, Georgia, Belarus, Bangladesh and BosniaHerzegovina. She was sent to assess emergencies, advise on relief plans and manage relief operations.

Vivianne saw that more than short term food and shelter was needed in these situations. She developed counselling programs, small business programs, agricultural programs, schools and artists collectives to assist people to integrate into their new communities. Asked what kept her in this work for so many years, with its challenges and risks, she says, “My faith. I was very strong in my faith. I faced many risks but my faith always kept me going.” Vivianne’s purpose is clear, “I have a An animal husbandry program in Armenia (Photo contributed.)

See the next issue for more of Vivianne Dawalibi’s story. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

mission and my mission is to serve and I am here to help people really have a different life. And that’s what I have been doing.”

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Say “Cheese” Local chef, Santosh Walunjkar answers some questions about Cheese to help you get the best from this everyday food.

Why does cheese sweat? Cheese is a living thing. Sweating is a natural part of the cheese-making process. As a cheese matures, moisture is drawn out of the surface. If you have brought cheese home and left it wrapped in plastic, what happens is that as it matures, or if there is a rise in temperature, moisture builds up and can't escape. This causes the cheese to "sweat”. This is not an ideal way to keep your cheese as it will spoil the flavour of the cheese.

What’s the best way to store cheese? Soft cheeses, such as camembert and brie, need to breathe, so wrap them loosely in grease proof paper. Keep fresh unripened cheeses such as haloumi and fetta in the brine or oil they are sold in. It’s best to use fresh cheese within 3-4 days of purchase. Hard cheese is less likely to sweat and can be wrapped in plastic, a zip lock plastic bag or stored in a sealed plastic container.

What can I do about mould on cheese? Even with all these precautions, cheese sometimes develops surface mould. This can be removed without spoiling the remaining cheese. Gently wipe the mould off or cut it off. As mould needs oxygen, it only grows on the surface of the cheese. Wash your knife after cutting off any mould to make sure it doesn’t contaminate the rest of the cheese.

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What’s the best way to serve cheese? The aromatic and complex taste of the cheese is at its best at room temperature. Take your cheese out of the fridge for at least 30 minutes before serving it. The texture of the cheese, especially soft cheese, is best when the cheese is at room temperature. However, don’t cut the cheese until you are serving it as any exposed surfaces will start drying out.

Santosh’s Final Words on Cheese Buy cheese in smaller quantities and regularly rather than in bulk. Check the quality and use by date of cheese before buying it. Be creative with leftover cheese. Add it to sauces, stuffings, dips and spreads. TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Santosh Speaks Plainly about Cooking

Santosh Walunjkar (third from left) and his cooking class. Photo contributed.

Santosh Walunjkar has done it all. In his ten years as a professional chef, he has cooked up a storm in India, England and Australia. He has worked in Marriott hotels, Best Western hotels, in restaurants and in cafes. Santosh has been creating fusion food on the Sunshine Coast for four years. In July 2013 Santosh started his business Talking Turkey to provide cooking lessons for local people. These days there is a focus on gourmet ingredients and exotic dishes. Santosh’s approach is different. He is teaching basic cooking techniques, using readily available ingredients. Santosh says that gourmet food can be hard to make when you are back at home in your own kitchen and it is not very practical for everyday life. For Santosh, it’s all about sharing, caring and having fun. He believes that sometimes it’s hard for people to talk about their cooking abilities. He aims to help people speak plainly about cooking. He wants to “Talk Turkey”. Talking Turkey can also provide a private chef for your party or event. Contact Santosh on 0429535734 or email chefsantosh4u@yahoo.com.au

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Adding Some Magic Coast artist Daniel Toohey exhibits his work at the Seaview Art Gallery at Moffat Beach. As the gallery is always staffed by the artists, chances are that you’ll meet him there one day. For this issue of Tamarind Magazine, Daniel has generously prepared an illustration of baby sea turtles. This image on the next page, can be downloaded for colouring-in by kids of any age. A PDF copy can be found on the website. Enjoy!

About the Artist Daniel Toohey’s artworks show his ability to present a subject at its best and his painstaking attention to detail. His paintings cover a range of subjects from birds to vehicles. His colourful works have a wide appeal. Daniel’s paintings have been exhibited at many galleries, including: Blue Dolphin Gallery Mooloolaba Seaside Artists Gallery Redcliffe Redcliffe Cultural Centre

Seaview Art Gallery Moffat Beach See Art Gallery Redcliffe Lethbridge Gallery Brisbane

“Light is the most important aspect of my work. Observing and visualising the way light is reflected by, or is transmitted through the elements in the painting, is all-encompassing,” Daniel explains.

Born and raised on the Sunshine Coast, Daniel continues to push forward in his career as an artist. With paintings already hanging in Australia and the UK, he is developing new works with a view to entering the art world in the USA. When he is not painting, Daniel enjoys spending time outdoors with his family, sailing, surfing and bushwalking. (Text and photo contributed)

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Baby Sea Turtles by Daniel Toohey

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Haiku meets Art

Teewah Sunrise by Chris Postle

Swirling sand on beach Shining white with rising sun Promise of morning by Mary Ann Wright

Thanks to Mary Ann for sharing her haiku with other readers of Tamarind Magazine. You are a trendsetter, Mary Ann. ‘Promise of morning’, yes, I agree. This painting is full of the hope that comes with a new day. Tamarind readers can enjoy Chris Postle’s art in each issue. You are invited to slow down, take a moment with art and nature, wonder and create. I hope to see your haikus in the next issue.

The Editor TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Forest Fantasia by Chris Postle TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Forest Fantasia - The Artist’s Notes Woongoolba Creek on Fraser Island is the inspiration for this work. For Chris Postle, Fraser Island is “an artist’s paradise.” Chris says, “Fraser has a multitude of natural wonders to inspire artists and photographers.“ “I have taken an impressionist’s approach towards this painting. It is a place of magic and I have hopefully captured this here to the satisfaction of the viewer.”

Forest Fantasia by Chris Postle

Enjoy. Wonder. Create. Send in your haiku.

Visit Chris’ Postle’s website at www.chrispostle.com TAMARIND MAGAZINE

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Tamarind Book Club August, 2013 In Stockmen’s Footsteps is our book of the month for August. It’s an Australian autobiography written by the accomplished rural journalist Jane Grieve. Graeme Bowden from the Bookshop at Caloundra has selected this book for Tamarind readers. Here is Graeme’s review:

“This is the story of Jane Grieve, Queenslander. Born in 1953, Jane was destined to live a life that was far from ordinary. When she met the legendary RM Williams, he persuaded her to join the group planning the building of the Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame at Longreach. But this is not just a story about an iconic Queensland landmark. It is also the story of a remarkable woman and her association with a number of Australian characters such as businessman RM Williams and artist Hugh Sawrey.” In Stockmen’s Footsteps is available from The Bookshop at Caloundra, 22A Bulcock St, Caloundra. Phone 5491 4836 Email: thebookshop@eftel.net.au

Tamarind Book Club A blog page is now open where you can discuss our July book, The Orchardist. On the Let’s Talk Books page, you can add your own reviews of books or start a conversation about books. See you there. The Editor

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Caloundra Gallery featuring Moffat Beach

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Thank you for reading Tamarind Magazine. Please send your comments, suggestions or story ideas to the Editor. Let me know what you liked in this issue, so that the next issue can be even better. Best wishes,

Mary Mary Barber The Editor

Advertising enquiries are welcome. Contact the Editor.

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Tamarind Magazine - Issue # 2