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“RING”, BY MARLEY STERNER THE MARTLET’S SUMMER WRITING CONTEST WINNER p.6

UVIC STUDENT SUITS UP

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THE BENEFITS OF HORSING AROUND   (p. 8)

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BUSKING FOR SOUP (p.5)

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NEWS Lilia Zaharieva suits up for her next fight

B.C. cystic fibrosis patients file class-action lawsuit against the government ABBY NEUFELD CONTRIBUTING WRITER

After a year of campaigning, petitioning, and lobbying, UVic student Lilia Zaharieva has taken the next step against the provincial and federal governments in the hopes of improving accessibility of medicine for Canadians with cystic fibrosis (CF). On the afternoon of July 24, Zaharieva joined a $60-million classaction lawsuit against the provincial and federal governments and the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies of Health (CADTH). Led by Chris MacLeod, a Toronto lawyer who also lives with CF, the lawsuit aims to injunct the CADTH review process, currently set to conclude at the end of the summer. The review process, conducted by both CADTH and the provincial government separately, functions as the official recommendation as to whether Orkambi, a drug that treats CF, is an effective drug. In the past, Orkambi has not passed the review , and the injunction hopes to change that. Along with tackling the review process, MacLeod and Zaharieva are suing for $60 million in damages, representing all CF patients in Canada who may have otherwise accessed Orkambi.

According to the Times Colonist, the Health Ministry declined to comment on any specifics with the case before the courts. Zaharieva can personally attest to the positive effects of Orkambi. Since receiving a compassionate care supply of the drug from manufacturer Vertex in March 2018, Zaharieva says her day-to-day life has changed. “I finally am settling into life,” she says, “and I’m out of survival mode.” She continues to gain back her health and strength with each day, but Zaharieva could lose the medication at any point. When they granted her the supply, Vertex stated that they don’t plan to discontinue Zaharieva’s supply. As is the case with their compassionate use program, however, it is within their discretion to do so at any time. In addition to the injunction of the review, the lawsuit aims to expose CADTH as a biased organization. CADTH works as an advisory to all Canadian health-care decision makers, claiming to work solely off of evidence, remaining uninfluenced by outside forces. But because CADTH isn’t a government organization, there is no access to Freedom of Information requests and a very limited appeal process. “We want to uncover that CADTH is in fact acting as a government organization, in violation of the Charter

Lilia Zaharieva at a rally in December 2017. Photo by Belle White, Photo Editor of Rights and Freedoms,” Zaharieva says. With MacLeod, Zaharieva is ready for a long road of fight ahead. “We’re acknowledging that it’s a marathon, not a sprint,” Zaharieva says. “I am nervous. I am naturally a very private person, and suddenly I’ve been thrust into being the main plaintiff, representing all British Columbians with the Delta F508 gene mutation. It’s a lot, but it’s the right

thing to do.” On the afternoon of Tuesday, July 24, Zaharieva travelled to Vancouver to file the lawsuit. Having previously asked for support from others living with CF in the area, Zaharieva was shocked to see that a young woman came straight from St. Paul’s Hospital, with her medical bracelet and mask, to support Zaharieva in her mission. “It was a sobering experience to see

Chris and I, both currently on life-saving drugs, walking without great effort and speaking to the press, while there is a living example of how the lack of medicine can affect someone in the room.” Zaharieva recalls her emotions running high during the encounter. “I’m watching her cry, and she’s there to be my strength,” she says. “My past is her present. This is exactly why I’m doing what I’m doing.”

UVic researchers and students combine to find potential depression cause JOSH KOZELJ STAFF WRITER A recent study led by UVic researchers Lisa Kalynchuk and Hector Caruncho has found a potential correlation between the production of a brain protein named reelin and depressive symptoms in humans. Kalynchuk, Associate Vice-President of Research at UVic, and Caruncho, a neuroscientist based in UVic’s division of Medical Science, were co-authors on a peer-review paper titled ‘Mitochondria and Mood: Mitochondrial Dysfunction as a Key Player in the Manifestation of Depression’ that explained an intriguing link between mitochondrial disease and depression. “For a long time we didn’t know very much about the neurobiology of depression, and that’s partly because we didn’t have tools for studying it,” said Kalynchuk. “So, much of what we knew about the neurobiology of depression came from understanding what antidepressant drugs do, so if you can’t study the disease, well then figure out what the drug does and the opposite of what the drug does should be the cause.” Kalynchuk and her team decided to look beyond the old scientific belief that an imbalance of the neurotransmitters serotonin and

epinephrine cause depression. Instead, they focused their attention on developing models that measured mitochondrial production—specifically the matrix protein reelin — through manufactured depression in animals. The mitochondria is the main energy factory of the cell, and the brain relies on it for its energy use and ability to store large amounts of glycogen in its energy reserves, the paper writes. So, when mitochondrial dysfunction occurs — triggered by a slowing of reelin production—not enough energy is sent to the brain and could cause depressive symptoms. “There seems to be a very close association with the decrease in reelin and the onset of depressive symptoms. So that really has really opened up new doors, because that’s totally a novel mechanism that no one has looked at before — people have spent so much time focusing on serotonin and epiffnefrim, and other molecules in the brain,” said Kalynchuk, explaining that the protein reelin holds a unique position in biology. “Reelin is a very different. It’s a large protein that sits outside cells, and it really provides a scaffold that helps cells connect with other cells and facilitates communication.” In the study, the researchers used lab rats as subjects to observe changes of reelin in their brain. The duo injected

4 NEWStMARTLET I AUGUST 09, 2018

stress hormones into some of the rats, and watched to see if that experimental group displayed depressive symptoms that differed from the rats not given stress injections. “More than 10 years ago, my group and some other researchers started developing good tools to studying depression in animal models,” said Kalynchuk. “So, if you create symptoms, what does that look like? Well, the animals will be lethargic, they won’t show interest in things they used to like to do, they’re not very active, they show helpless behaviour.” One of the ways the team measures those depressive symptoms in rats is with a forced swim test. In the experiment, the researchers filled a 60-centimetre cylinder with water and dropped the stress-injected rats and regular rodents in the water t o m e a s u re t h e i r ‘ i m m o b i l i t y behaviour’ — a form of learned helplessness. There was quite a discrepancy between the normal rats that fought and swam to stay afloat and the depressed rats that simply did enough to barely stay above the water. Kalynchuk and Caruncho said the normal rats would swim around for the whole five or ten minutes they left them in the water, while the stressed rats would give up in one or two minutes, and just move their paws

Graphic by Austin Willis, Design Director enough to keep their snouts above the water. It’s only been a little over 20 years since reelin was discovered in the human brain, but with the recent findings of its potential link to depressive symptoms, Kalynchuk and her team are eager to help develop future antidepressants for the over 300 million people that battle the disease worldwide. The team was comprised of numerous students in the lab, including doctoral student Josh Allen and postdoctorate Raquel Romay-Tallon, whom Kalynchuk and Caruncho were quick to credit for the majority of the team’s discoveries.

“The credit goes to the students for the hard work they put into this, and their passion and dedication to these experiments,” said Kalynchuk. The researchers say the idea of mitochondria and reelin production is a new one, and right now they don’t have any specific data of the involvement of mitochondria in depression. But, the team will continue to conduct studies and experiments over the summer, in hopes of one day finding novel mechanisms for depression treatments.


LIFESTYLE

Hey, we’re hiring. Wanna come work for us? Send us your resume to hiring@martlet.ca

UVic student cleans up 1000 pounds of beach garbage for Plastic Free July JOSH KOZELJ STAFF WRITER It’s safe to say that Levi Hildebrand is a busy man. After travelling through Europe last semester to create video content from the Netherlands and Switzerland for 1300 (and counting) YouTube channel subscribers, the vlogger from 100 Mile House, B.C., arrived back in Victoria, to a group of friends begging for one more video. Hildebrand’s friends thought he would be the perfect applicant for the City of Victoria’s ‘BYO Bag’ video contest, a competition to promote the use of reusable bags and the overall reduction of plastic waste in the community in the wake of the city’s July 1 checkout plastic bag ban. “I had like four or five friends be like ‘Dude, you should do this.’ And by like the fifth one, I was like ‘Yeah, I know. I’m on it.’” Hildebrand says, laughing and sipping tea on a chilly mid-July morning at Habit Coffee downtown. With a promise of up to $1 000 in winnings, Hildebrand and his video partner and fiancée Leah Tidey created a one-minute clip to show all the different alternatives to plastic bags that Victorians can use. The video, titled ‘Leah’s Ditching Plastic Bags,’ showed Tidey using a variety of plastic alternatives — from reusable fabric bags to baskets. It was selected as one of seven finalists for the $500 ‘People’s Choice’ award. After the voting period, Hildebrand’s video was selected by a jury as the

top video in the ‘Youth and All Ages’ category and voted as the ‘People’s Choice’ winner, winning him a total prize of $1000. Despite being a cash-strapped, recently engaged student, Hildebrand made the decision to give back his winnings to his community, using the $500 from the People’s Choice award to host a beach clean-up day in July. “I was just saying to my fiancé, ‘What if we won the People’s Choice and we won the First Choice [award]? We could just use that $500 and just do a big beach clean-up or something?’” Hildebrand said. “I’m like, ‘We’ll get super dramatic about it, make a big video about it, and there’ll be a launch, and then newspapers will pick it up, and it’ll be all epic!’ And that’s kind of exactly what’s happened.” In partnership with the Surfrider Foundation, a global non-profit organization protecting oceans and beaches, Hildebrand and Tidey organized the clean-up at the Gorge Waterway in West Victoria on July 8. They wanted it to coincide with ‘Plastic Free July,’ a movement started in 2011 that has inspired over two million people across 159 different countries to ditch single-use plastic waste in the month of July. Hildebrand spent the week confirming dates, promoting the clean up on his YouTube channel, and spending the winnings on items from local shops in Victoria to give away to volunteers that showed up for the clean-up. “We took the $500 and spent $330 on just prizes alone,” Hildebrand said.

The garbage cleaners pose with a selection of the plastic found at the Gorge Waterway. Photo provided “Then donated $150 to the Surfrider organization afterwards as well.” In the end, over 50 volunteers showed up and cleaned up 1000 pounds of garbage off the shores of the Gorge Waterway. “Normally [Surfrider] get between five people to show up and usually the average is around 10, and so we brought out more than five times the normal number of people to show up,” Hildebrand gushed. This isn’t the first time the UVic student has promoted environmentalism. In April 2017, he hosted an event on campus for students to dump empty coffee cups on his head, to physically represent the 3 000 coffee cups tossed in campus garbage cans every day. In everything he does, Hildebrand

promotes positivity. He’s currently working to organize a second clean-up in early September with Surfrider in a remote location on the mainland, and he’s planning a ‘Good News’ bike-ride event in partnership with U-bicycle to bike around downtown shouting positive news headlines on the lime green bikes later in the summer. “Just to see a bunch of people getting together and participating with something I believe in, and just having fun, messing around — I’m like, ‘That’s it.’ That’s it, that’s the whole point. The whole point of this channel is to get that to happen. To make people go ‘Hey I wouldn’t have normally gone to a beach clean up, but I came out to a beach clean-up and here I am laughing with my hands in the mud.’ That’s just great.”

From dawn ‘til busk EMILY FAGAN STAFF WRITER On any given summer day, Alyssa Jean Klazek can be found dancing barefoot on the sidewalk of the inner harbour, guitar in hand. Busking keeps her on her toes—both literally and figuratively—as she pulls from her skills as a former ballet dancer. “I use the whole space. I love to go up toward people and back again,” says Klazek, who at the age of 17 was a Top 18 Canadian Idol finalist. “It’s really fun.” Of the approximately 32 buskers participating in the Victoria Harbour Festival throughout June, July, and August, 80 per cent are returnees like Klazek. While the youngest buskers are in their early teens, about 70 per cent are over the age of 50. In order to land their two-hour spots

in the weekly rotation, all prospective acts must first audition in April before a four-person panel. If selected, buskers pay $235 to be a part of the festival. “We rate them on how loud they are, how talented they are, the type of pitch the instrument has . . . [and] their repertoire,” says Joseph Gonyeau, market coordinator at the Victoria Harbour Festival who puts together the panel each year. “We try to make it as diverse as possible.” Not all acts are musical, or even vocal, in the case of mimes. This year’s performers include a harpist, a cellist, a Chinese violinist, and an accordian player who specializes in Russian music that Gonyeau says “really blew everybody’s socks off” in her audition. “It’s like a little microcosm,” Klazek says of the inner harbour, where she continues

to play each year until the weather gets too cold for her fingers and vocal cords. “With that comes a very different way of manipulating the energy that surrounds you—so for the meek and mild, I’ll tone it down and I’ll play something softer. For the more spicy individuals that I see around, I’ll play something that is funkier.” A good day for Klazek consists of six hours of performing, with a few breaks between her two-hour shifts. She tends to play lighter, recognizable covers during the day and saves more explorative and original songs for the evening—all entirely unamplified, as mandated by the festival. “I’ll have some people that come by and you can tell that they are sensitive to loud noise and so I will start to tone it down for them as they pass by, and there’s other people that come by and you’re like ‘Oh, you would much prefer for me to rock your

face off,” says Klazek. “So that’s what I’ll do.” Depending on the act and talent of the performer, some buskers in the inner harbour can make anywhere from 30 to a couple hundred dollars in two hours. “When I was 15 and I was busking on the inner harbour, there weren’t really any rules and stipulations yet, not like there is now,” says Klazek. “I could write a book about the intricacies of down in the inner harbour and the various characters—the characters that pass by, but also the buskers themselves, and some of the drama and the ridiculous things that end up coming up.” The bombast of the inner harbour meant Klazek had been apprehensive about continuing to busk when she first moved to Victoria.

Hildebrand in April, demonstrating how wasteful coffee cups on campus are. Photo by Belle White, Photo Editor

“It felt a bit cutthroat for me, for sure — that sort of, ‘this is my turf’ feeling and not necessarily the warmest welcome from other buskers,” Klazek says. Gonyeau, meanwhile, has witnessed a change in this climate over his 14 years of working at the festival. “I think it’s become more congenial, everybody seems to get along really well.” “We try to do nice things like when we pass by each other, we give each other a loonie or a toonie to say, you know, tip your hat,” says Klazek. “It’s hard, because it truly is a competitive game.” But Klazek sees a common thread between the performers that have what it takes to perform on the streets through the heat of the summer. “There’s definitely a really cool strength that I find in all of the buskers and the fact that everybody is so unique, all coming from different walks of life with different styles of music and a different take on the art that they want to give,” she says. “If you are putting yourself out there, you are in front of other people, and you’re baring your heart, you’re baring your soul, and you are expressing yourself, it is absolutely impossible to control any outcome.” Buskers encourage people walking along the inner harbor to slow down or have a seat and enjoy the view with a bit more excitement, says Gonyeau. “You know, you can’t get that from playing canned music.” Photos by Belle White, Photo Editor

AUGUST 09, 2018 I MARTLET t NEWS 5


WINNER OF THE MARTLET’S SUMMER WRITING CONTEST:

RING MARLEY STERNER CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Whenever

my father wiped the kitchen counter, his wedding band scratched against the granite. I’d watched him clean in the mornings for so many years that even from my bed I could visualize the scene through sound alone. Sinatra seduced the bleached air, and my father whistled along to “Autumn Leaves” in cringed harmony. He’d swivel his hips with the saxophone and unclog sludge from the garburator. Dip the mop, fifties-style, and give it a kiss, but that might’ve just been to make me laugh as a little kid. With a wet cloth he’d scrub every visible surface, so when my mother returned from the hospital night shift she could unwind in a clean kitchen. My mother no longer returns to us. She returns to Larry. I don’t know if that’s his name, but “Larry” rolls off the tongue with the right amount of slime. She served the divorce papers, as though she was the victim. My father begged her to reconsider, to think of their twenty years, to think of me. I didn’t want her to think of me. Not when she had paused halfway out the door with her ringless fingers hooked around the handle of her last wheeled suitcase and stared at the pink C o n v e r s e I w o re , m y l a s t feminine article. Said she’d miss her little girl. Left without using my boy’s name. Even with her gone, every mor ning the sound of my father in the kitchen still seeped into my room. Sinatra’s “ A s T i m e G o e s B y, ” accompanied by the whistle. The tap and scrape of the ring. It started as a haunt of the past, of family movie nights and Casablanca reflected in the surface of gold rings on twined fingers. He cleaned the kitchen in the morning, cleaned the ring in the afternoon, set it under her pillow at night. Until one evening my father broke the ritualistic loop and left the ring

6 FEATURE tMARTLET I AUGUST 09, 2018


Graphics by Austin Willis

on his bathroom counter. I found it after a shower, and first thought to plunk it down the sink and let it drift through toenail-infested wastewater forever. But then I remembered the roof, and my parents’ polarized faces when I had asked them from up on the leaf-stickered tiles to call me by a boy’s name from then on. So instead I crept into the backyard at twilight, with just enough light to see each rounded leaf of the fat oak tree. A thick rope, saturated with dirt after years without use, still dangled from the tree’s lowest branch. I sucked the ring into my cheek, rolled it in saliva, and contorted my body around the rope. Shimmied up, knot by knot, like my mother taught me. My hands and feet looped around the gnarled bark at the top, and I lounged from the branch like a sloth. The ring threatened to slip down my throat. Once straightened, I laddered up the branches and made for the roof. A thinner branch sloped and groaned, not used to my teenage frame. I thought it might snap off, and then we’d both fall to the grass, and my body would snap too. They wouldn’t find the ring until the autopsy, tucked under my tongue or otherwise lodged in my neck, sticky with half-dried fluid. But I reached the jigsawed roof tiles without so much as a c r a c k l e . T h e o a k t re e ’s branches umbrella-d the house i n s u m m e r a n d s h o w e re d pumpkin-orange leaves in the fall. The leaves sponged up rainwater and then baked in the sun until they smelled like rancid milk and old soil. Every

year before winter my mother would climb up and thwack them from the roof with her broom. I’d comb the leaves into piles on the lawn and swallow them up in garbage bags. For the occasion she’d abandon her skirt and we’d dress in sweats and baggy shirts, hair tucked in a cap. Like skater boys, my mother joked. Or twins. The leaves’ smell nauseated my father, so he’d sit inside and watch us work with his cheek smudged against the window. He tried once to go up himself, but froze on the third rung of the ladder and looked up at the dead leaves. He made this expression I’d never seen before. His face tied up in an ugly knot, mouth so tight his lips disappeared. But then he climbed down, and his tongue wagged toward his chin like at any moment he might hurl. A week before she disappeared with Larry, my mother had promised to get rid of the leaves with me again. Now four months had passed. They wadded up the eaves trough in foot-high mounds from the winter rain. That familiar, sour-milk stench embraced the air. As I scuffed forward on hands and knees, the leaves leaked juice that soaked through my sweats. I squatted in front of the biggest pile in the eaves trough and bathed my hands in the leafy sludge. A grainy, cool liquid coated my fingers, like sand underwater. I kneaded my

thumb into the peak of the leaf pile and sculpted it into a walnut-sized bowl. Spat the wet ring into my palm and nested it inside. My hands pulled free without the ring, sticky and stained brown. Barely visible in the hole I’d made, the metal painted my reflection gold.

In

the morning I woke to a bang. No Sinatra, no whistle. I tugged on my Canucks jersey, slipped an unneeded hair elastic around my wrist, and as I left the room dragged fingers over each of the facedown picture frames on my desk. Sheets piled outside my parents’ bedroom. Inside, a minefield of polo sweaters and Trojans. The chest of drawers teetered off-balance, thrown open and empty. A broom with curls of dust protruded out f ro m u n d e r t h e b e d . T h e bedposts shifted on a diagonal, and exposed sunken indents in the carpet. The master bathroom. Cabinets cleared out, medicine littered the cream tiles. Fallen bottles splattered conditioner on the glass shower door. A bottle of Advil had cracked open and spilled seaweedcoloured pills into the sink. Multivitamins. Pepto-Bismol. Viagra. Hallway. I navigated around the pillow cases and coiled b e d s h e e t s . To w e l c l o s e t ravaged. Linen closet destroyed. But my bathroom:

untouched. Downstairs, the living room. Leather couch cushions overturned, blankets tossed away, every cupboard drawer yanked out. The table with the family pictures stood intact and freshly dusted. I found him on his stomach with half his body shoved under the c o u c h , a n d o u t f ro m t h e lumberjack pyjama-bottoms peeked the crack of his ass. My mother and I used to call him Mr. Skellington. He jacked the couch up on his bare shoulders, swiped the mop handle beneath. A muffled moan echoed — something like a pregnant cow. “It’s gone,” he said. “Get out of the couch, Dad.” Reaching toward my ear, I tugged for a tendril of hair but groped air instead. Over a year since I chopped it off and the habit still surfaced. He scuttled out, and knocked the coffee table with his foot. Cold tea splattered on the hardwood. He sat shirtless like a kindergartner and wouldn’t look at me, eyes pinked by months-old tears. The couch had bruised each ridge of his knobby spine, and dented his shoulder blades. Hardwood frizzed his wisp of chest hair, left red imprints on his ribs and chin. He scratched the scruff of mulch hair by the nape of his neck, coated with d u s t f r o m t h e c o u c h ’s underbelly. With his pinky he fingered the hole in the heel of his sock. This man, my

father. “I can’t find it, not anywhere.” He pried loose a sock thread. Four months since she left. “It’s all my fault.” Four months. “Should have just taken it to bed again — ” “ Yo u l e f t i t b e h i n d o n purpose?” I said. My father looked at the mirror leaned against the wall, at the child high above him. Called me by the boy’s name, said it with tenderness. Then he stared at the broken man on the floor, lips twisted into something foul. Shame, m a y b e . I re c o g n i z e d t h e expression, familiar as my own face. His features and her beauty, my mother always said. He too hated what he saw, what he couldn’t change about himself. At least, not yet. “I’ll check upstairs again.” And I left, but didn’t take the stairs. My hands reeked of lavender soap when I returned to the living room. My father had straightened the couch, repositioned the cushions and blankets. I held out the ring in my palm, and clenched the other hand by my side. “Found it behind your toilet. Gave it a rinse, too.” He didn’t smile, or sigh with relief, when it settled back on his finger. Instead, he looked at the wedding band like he had the autumn leaves once. As he walked into the kitchen, I glimpsed a morning where I’d lie in bed and hear his whistle, the patter of a wrung cloth, and nothing more.

AUGUST 09, 2018 I MARTLET t FEATURE 7


LIFESTYLE

Equine health

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08 LIFESTYLE tMARTLET I AUGUST 09, 2018

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LIFESTYLE “Our mission is to enrich the lives of children and adults with disabilities through the provision of therapeutic horseback riding programs and related activities,” states the VTRA website. Since opening in 1982, the VTRA has provided therapeutic riding lessons to children and adults with a variety of physical and mental challenges. They help over 160 riders, and have a team of over a 100 volunteers who keep the business running. Not only is the VTRA a nonprofit charity, its location is accessible by the #75 bus for those who can’t drive. Places like the VTRA provide hands-on experience to participants, both individually and in group sessions. Once a participant has learned how to care for the horse and is comfortable to begin riding, an instructor may stand in the middle of the ring, observing and coaching the participants as they transition into being fully fledged riders. “Don’t give up,” Chantelle says to new riders. “It takes a lot of practice, and you’re not going to fit with every horse like how you don’t fit with every human. There’s a difference between respect and fear. A lot of people don’t realize. They think establishing fear is going to bring respect, but that doesn’t work with partnerships.”

Cassie’s kids are able to do things they couldn’t do before participating in therapy. One of Cassie’s favourite memories of Kiowa Farm came from Lillith overcoming her own great challenge in a unique way. When Lillith first started riding, she was on a pony named Crystal. During her session one day, Lillith and Crystal got tangled up in some vines, causing Lillith to fall off and break her arm. This was upsetting for Cassie, as she worried Lillith would be too afraid to ride horses again. They allowed Lillith to return to the farm at her own pace, but this time she didn’t pick Crystal, she picked the biggest horse on the farm: a Percheron named Viktor. “True to Lillith’s nature, my little lioness, she picks Viktor. The biggest horse they have. She looks like a little Lego figurine on his back,” Cassie says. “She literally fell off [one] horse and got back on the biggest one. It’s just amazing what horses can do to make these kids overcome their natural anxieties. It’s been wonderful in helping them overcome their social problems, their irrational fears, their natural anxieties, you name it.” Some scholars theorize that horses function according to a concept called “feedback and mirroring.” They say that horses contain more mirror neurons than cats or dogs, which cause them to reflect more emotions as they receive them.

aug 10 & 11 (7:00 & 9:00)

BOUNDARIES

aug 17 & 18 (7:00 & 9:10)

POPE FRANCIS

aug 19 (4:45 & 7:00) // aug 20 (7:00 & 9:00)

BELLE DE JOUR

aug 22 & 23 (7:00 & 9:00)

“Don’t give up, it takes a lot of practice, and you’re not going to fit with every horse like how you don’t fit with every human.” “I always say that she brought me back to life. She made me feel alive again,” Chantelle says. Another organization serving the greater Victoria area is Kiowa Farm. Kiowa contracts licensed professionals like therapists and counsellors in their riding program. They service many needs, including ADHD, autism, anxiety, depression, brain injuries, addiction, and more. Cassie Hooker, a mature student attending UVic, and her entire family have been through equine therapy. Cassie and her husband participated during a veterans retreat in Ontario, discovering all the advantages it has to offer. Cassie’s kids — Colin, six, and Lillith, eight — have both been through equine therapy sessions at Kiowa Farm. Both of Cassie’s children have high-functioning autism and have found great success there. “Essentially we have taken health care and learning assistance services out of the clinics, offices, and classrooms, and brought them to the farm with horses and other animals,” the Kiowa Farms’ website reads. “We find that adapting these animals to traditional, evidence-based approaches to therapy and learning enhances the effectiveness of the treatments and interventions, as well as aiding in the prevention of illness. Furthermore, clients can draw upon the numerous service options, combining them in ways that are uniquely suited to their needs.”

ADRIFT

SUB, UVIC - CINECENTA.COM

Kim says that a horse receiving negative emotions from its rider will react negatively, whereas a horse receiving positive emotions will react positively. According to The Anxiety Treatment Centre, a California-based facility that treats anxiety, OCD, and related conditions, a horse’s intuition means they can often provide feedback earlier and more consistently than a human therapist. Kim Scott knows the power of her horse, and she and Adam are currently training for a future in the paralympics. For someone who was once unable to sit up on their own, this is a huge accomplishment for Kim. “When I started on him, because he is so much bigger, my body had to develop muscles that weren’t working before,” Kim says. “I went to physio this morning so I could improve on my horse. I used to do riding for therapy and now I do therapy for my riding.” Kim now also coaches other riders in their para-equestrian therapy journey. “It’s important to have the rider as still as possible on the horse, so the horses can be the most balanced as possible underneath the rider,” Kim says. “It’s a big motivation to those little kids, who don’t have the motivation at all to do it themselves. If you say ‘this is something your horse needs,’ it makes them actually do it.”

AUGUST 09, 2018 I MARTLET t LIFESTYLE 09


HUMOUR Aggregate hatred for dandelions to hit record highs in the coming weeks: study That’s right, we interviewed your aunt for her thoughts on dandelions

A very scientific graph from a very scientific study. Graphic by Cormac O’Brien, Editor-in-Chief MARSHALL SCOTT-BIGSBY & CORMAC O’BRIEN

CONTRIBUTING WRITER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF “Satan’s Yellow Pube,” “The Lawn Pimple,” and “The Beast with Golden Fangs.” All names for every gardener’s bane: the dandelion. According to an academic survey conducted by the Martlet in the men’s restroom of a Tim Hortons, dandelion hatred continues to surge to record highs. The chart says it all — according to the 18 people we surveyed (19 if you include the Campus Security officer who yelled at us for using the handdrying machine to cook herring), the start of allergy season means that animosity for the weed is soon to be spiking. Though the study shows considerable hatred for the dandelion, experts predict a resurgence in popularity come the fall and winter. “People always forget just how much they hate dandelions during the year,” says grass scientist Dr. Racki Tabaki. “This grace period allows people to get excited for the summer before their expectations are crushed time and time again by their weak bodies and noses.” Reasons for the dandelion detestment varied. “I always mix up dandelions and buttercups and end up sticking dandelions under my chin,” said one surveyed student, adding, “those bastards can really get you.” “I never used to hate dandelions,” explained fellow surveyed student Dan D. Lyon, “but after the rabbits left UVic and stopped doing all the pruning work for UVic Facilities Management I realized just how devastating the dandelions we have on campus are.” “I—I—I—I—,” one participant said,

before sneezing right into the Martlet’s face. The participant could not be reached for further comment. “Reef” R. Madniss, president of Victorians for Dandelions (VD), says the study’s negative results are the fault of marketing campaigns aimed at destroying the reputation of the weed. “It’s a Big Petunia plot,” Madniss told the Martlet, also accusing Youth Against Gross and Annoying Weeds (YAGAW) of skewing results. “I can’t tell you how much money those corporations put into Home Hardware advertisements meant to turn people against dandelions on their lawn.” Madniss did, however, commend Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for his endeavours in ensuring the resurgence of dandelion support in Canada. “The legalization of weeds by Trudeau’s government I think will be a really positive thing,” Madniss said. “I can’t tell you the number of teenagers I’ve had coming into my garden store asking about buying pots, grass, and weeds. It’s really been remarkable.” The aforementioned study concluded that the dandelion is the most disliked of all the lions, following closely behind Alex the lion, the MGM lion, and the Lion from Aesop’s Fables. I mean, really, what kind of animal would let a mouse go? You’re a damn lion, why would you listen to a mouse? It’s Darwin’s theory of evolution, not Darwin’s theory of sparing-the-life-ofa-mouse-just-because-it-asked-nicely. And mice can’t even talk, so the Lion probably just inferred what it was saying. What a stupid lion. It deserved to get captured in a trap and mounted on Don Jr’s wall. Nevertheless, the dandelion made the top of the list, and we’ll all just have to accept that.

9711 Fourth Street, Sidney 250-657-2000 elizabethmaymp.ca Conscientious, caring, non-partisan service for all.

AUGUST 09, 2018 I MARTLET t HUMOUR 11


The Martlet Crossword

Send us a photo of your completed puzzle to enter to win a Martlet tote bag!

ANSWERS AT MARTLET.CA/CROSSWORD / MADE AT KEIRANKING.COM/PHIL 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

14

15

16

17

18

19

10

11

12

13

9 Trinidad partner 10 ___ ___ familiar 11 Insult 12 E. E. Cummings novel

20

25

26

27

21

22

23

24

28

29

13 Cavernous 21 Silver, in Seville

30

22 Neck’s backs

31

25 A few Photoshop extensions, for short 32

33

37

38

42

43

34

39

40

35

36

41

26 “That’s not good” 27 Emotion’s enemy 28 Anti-pregnancy device, for short

44

29 Modern nuke 45

46

47

48

49

30 Christmas minion 50 52

53

54

60

51 55

56

61

31 Walks with an affectation 57

58

35 Alt-right mascot and meme

59

62

63

36 Stark daughter 38 Anti-dandelion organization

64

65

66

67

68

69

Across 1 “Never have I ____” 5 Annoys 9 Shot with an electrical current 14 Goodbye, in Genoa

mentioned on pg. 11 39 Winter sport requirement

32 Yell

64 “It’s an ____ but a goodie.”

33 French wheat

65 Reddit mascot

34 Hoppy beer, for short

66 Spice Girl Halliwell

37 Hottest part of the year —

67 Last-place finisher

or a hint to the four themed clues 68 d’Urbervilles daughter 42 ___ Davidi, baseball reporter

69 Greek mountain

43 Assault rifle variant, briefly

Down

16 Beginner skateboard trick

44 Overly sentimental

1 Engineering building at UVic

17 Subgroup, usually religious

45 Holiday hound, or see 37A

2 See, as in a house for sale

18 H. P. exams

50 Norwich uni.

3 Per item

19 Children’s author Judy

51 “Eureka!”

4 Indian flatbread

20 Holiday hound, or see 37A

52 Holiday hound, or see 37A

5 Mid-2000s computer animal

23 ___ Miserables

60 Use, as a weapon

6 MLB Division

24 In the past

61 Middle of the day

7 ___-edged opportunity

25 Holiday hound, or see 37A

62 ___ and graces

8 Just OK

15 Young protagonist in Call Me By Your Name

40 Turkish carpet type 41 Daisy ___ 46 Stay on edges 47 Bookworm 48 Cheers for a favourite search engine? 49 Marvel villain 52 Soldier skipping out on WW3, maybe 53 Metric measurement, for short 54 The Hurt Locker antagonists, for short 55 Musical device, for short 56 Timbre 57 Othello antagonist 58 Private school accessories 59 Messes up 63 “Cheap Thrills” artist

August 09, 2018  
August 09, 2018  
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