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LOVE KILLS12 THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA’S INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER OCTOBER 20TH, 2011 • VOLUME 64 • ISSUE 11 • MARTLET.CA

DOWNTOWN DEMOCRACY 6 PROTEST ANTHEMS 15 PAN AM GAMES 16


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NEWS

“Hate is not the opposite of love; apathy is.” – Rollo May

People’s Assembly persists peacefully > BRANDON ROSARIO Despite criticism for its lack of focus and relatively convoluted goals, the People’s Assembly of Victoria (PAOV) opened the Oct. 15 international day of solidarity, Occupy Together, with a well-attended demonstration and successful overnight occupation of Centennial Square. “I have felt so empowered seeing everybody with us today,” says Simon Schopman, a landscaper from Salt Spring Island. “To look back during the march and see thousands of people smiling, cajoling, screaming out for direct democracy . . . It’s not an us and them, it’s an everybody together.” Schopman was one of many who took part in a march to the legislature during the afternoon of Oct. 15. Nearly one thousand festive demonstrators gathered in Centennial Square cheering, chanting and brandishing signs before marching toward the inner harbour. Police blocked traffic on Douglas and Government to facilitate the march, which was peaceful and inclusive of a wide range of issues. Ben Sheridan, a Claremont Secondary student who attended the rally with his two high school friends, says that general ambiguity surrounding the question of why participants are demonstrating is something to be embraced rather than criticized. “I think the whole de-centralized communication model has led to a lot of really positive expression,” he says. “It’s really good for making a community that’s based around the idea of positive change.” “The fact that we have so many diverse and different sorts of people here that are concerned about different issues, kind of makes this thing come together not as a representative of a [single] issue, but as a movement of people getting together and changing something for the better,” says Sheridan, adding “Fuck capitalism.” Daniel Vanwords, a Camosun student who was recently laid off, echoes Sheridan’s anticapitalist sentiment, which proved to be one of the day’s more popular stances. “I think everyone should come out and sup-

TESS FORSYTH

Occupiers took to the streets of Victoria to protest corporate greed and the negative effects of capitalism, while asking for positive change. port this because it’s a transnational movement and we’re here against financial greed,” he says. “The earth has finite resources and we could all live comfortably if we’d just live within our means . . . what’s happened in the States could very easily have happened here in Canada,” continues Vanwords, on the recent economic repercussions of American bank bail-outs. Nearly one hundred cities in the U.S. and fifteen in Canada took part in the Oct. 15 global occupation movement. Upwards of 4 000 protesters rallied in Vancouver and 3 000 in Toronto, which, like the Victoria demonstration, were cohesive but leaderless. In solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York, which has been active for over a month, PAOV organizers have created a similarly self-sustaining atmosphere in Centennial Square.. Several working groups — volunteers who specialize in areas like first aid, legal procedure and food allocation — have been given

duties to ensure that the camp maintains both a sense of security and longevity. The occupation has no specific end date and organizers have been adamant in their willingness to stay in the square as long as they can. Mayor Dean Fortin warned occupiers that they could legally be evicted on the morning of Oct. 16 at 7 a.m., but police who came to the square around 7:30 a.m. were co-operative and had no plans to remove campers. Mike Waight, who spent the night in the square, praised the relaxed police presence. “They have bylaws they’re supposed to enforce, but they’re looking the other way because they’re people who are getting screwed by the system too,” he says. A general assembly held at 2:00 p.m. on Oct 16 saw organizers, work-group representatives and occupiers discuss various issues pertaining to camp logistics. One of the discussions included a question of where organizers would keep money

obtained through donations. Some people were visibly angry when an idea was brought up to open a PAOV bank account, a debate that led to a tirade against the group’s financial committee — pointing out the hypocrisy of trusting banks with their money considering the values of the movement. A spokesperson for the camp’s food committee established the framework for both formal and informal meal times throughout the day. Local organizations have donated generously to keep campers fed — even businesses like Starbucks and Tim Hortons pitched in, bringing coffee to the square on Sunday morning. The Process group proposed a self-enforced system of “quiet hours” between 11 p.m. and 11 a.m. as a means to reduce noise for people who choose to spend the night. Friday, Oct. 21 is student solidarity day and UVic students are encouraged to attend and voice their opinions. For more information, visit occupyvictoria.

IN MY HONEST OPINION

Municipal elections: what would make you want to vote?

Jamie Tanner Visual Arts, third year

Samantha Kasdorf Geography, fourth year

Layla Amarir Psychology, third year

Janna Reed-Côté Social Work, fourth year

“I’d probably be swayed the most by environmental policies, development. There aren’t any issues in the campaigns on the municipal level that I feel really disaligned with.”

“I’m not really looking into the current issues. I’d want to vote knowing the issues and the different platforms, where they stand. I wouldn’t want to just vote without knowing that.”

“Well, I’m an international student, so I can’t vote here anyway.”

“When you’re coming from a university atmosphere your priorities may tend to be elsewhere, or you get caught up in the academic life, and you forget about the bigger world out there.”

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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Victoria groups pursue supervised injection site > MARK WORTHING Stephen Harper had his political noose tightened a notch by the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling last month allowing Vancouver’s supervised injection site, Insite, to keeps its doors open. Insite enables intravenous and illicit drug users to consume drugs safely under the supervision of medical professionals. And Victoria is already falling behind other major cities that have their gears in motion for injection sites of their own. The landmark ruling upheld an exemption to a federal drug possession law that allows Insite to provide medical supervision, advice, supplies, detox options and counsel for users who bring in their own illegal substances. To refrain from providing this essential health service would violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the court concluded. The report, written by Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, states, “Insite saves lives. Its benefits have been proven. There has been no discernible negative impact on the public safety and health objectives of Canada during its eight years of operation.” Additional supervised injection sites are in the works for Montreal, Vancouver and Quebec City — all empowered by the Supreme Court ruling that slayed Prime Minister Harper’s third attempt to close Insite. “It’s just not fair. It’s against human rights, when you’re just trying to survive,” says Katie Lacroix, board member of Victoria’s Beddow Center and SOLID (Society of Living

Intravenous Drug Users). “People suffer from addictions. You wouldn’t look at someone who was mentally ill and put the same judgment on them as drug users receive.” The question for Victorians ultimately is: where would a supervised injection site be located, and what are the major obstacles, considering the 2008 closure of the Cormorant Street needle exchange? It has been over four years since Victoria has seen services like this, and many feel there is a need for fresh innovation, compassion and energy to emerge from the streets. That is exactly what The Beddow Center is doing. Along with SOLID, the Center has stepped forward to spearhead an initiative of a peer-run, supervised injection site for Victoria, despite opposition from business groups like the Downtown Victoria Business Association (DVBA) and the Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce. “Basically the DVBA is not in favour of an injection site,” says Ken Kelly, DVBA General Manager. “If there was to be an injection site, we would appreciate it being out of downtown.” The DVBA has found that the closure of the Cormorant street needle exchange, and the relocation of the StreetLink Emergency Shelter to Rock Bay, has had positive and stabilizing effects on downtown Victoria. And they feel it has changed the overall perception of Victoria for the better. “There is a need to have tranquility prevail,” says Kelly. The Victoria Chamber of Commerce agrees.

“It’s not something that we’re in favour of,” says Bruce Carter, CEO of the Chamber of Commerce. “For every consumption in a supervised injection site there is an associated property crime.” “The Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce believes public funds are better invested in other forms of treatment, such as detoxification beds and withdrawal management programs and in increased enforcement,” they state in their organization policy. However, Lacroix questions the perceptions people and organizations like the DBVA and the Chamber of Commerce hold of drug users. “These people are not a plague of society; they are a product of society,” says Lacroix. “When you’re walking downtown, maybe talk to them instead of seeing them as a piece of trash in front of the store.” City Councilor Philippe Lucas, who is also a researcher with the Centre for Addictions Research B.C., hopes to find a balance between the important service and community impact. “One of the main challenges is how to address NIMBYism (Not In My Back Yard) around the proposal and how to manage the site effectively,” he says. “We need to make sure that we can mitigate any impact on the community that would be hosting this. But I think that the public is really supportive . . . Every day we don’t have a supervised injection site, we continue the transmission, unnecessarily of disease endangering our injection drug use population, and the general public.” Mark Johnson, a Beddow Centre board

member and SOLID rig digger (a person who collects, cleans up, searches for and disposes of discarded syringes) suggests the site would have a positive community impact. “SOLID has been offering a needle exchange service as well as picking up needles off the street and we’ve operated for a few years right across from the police station, and in the so called no-go zone running our services, without the community even noticing,” he says. “They didn’t even know we were here. And if we hadn’t have been doing that they would have been finding hundreds of needles around the neighborhood.” While social stigma and political controversy shroud the debate around illicit drug use and the provision of medical services, the numbers are hard to ignore. Insite has observed more than one million injections with no deaths and has intervened successfully in 1 400 overdoses. Since the service started there has been a 30 per cent increase in addicts entering detox programs A study published in The Lancet found that overdose deaths had declined by 35 per cent in the area of Insite’s clinic, with a nine per cent decrease city wide. The Beddow Center is calling on the City of Victoria to provide property and to act as the landlords for a supervised peer-run injection site that the Center hopes to spearhead. “It’s not so much the illicit drugs that people die from; it’s the lack of knowledge, on how to prevent infection; safe use and alternative options,” says Johnson.

Publishing companies hurting used-book market > KAILEY WILLETTS More than $25 000 in student money sits in the front window of SUBtext that will likely never make it into student hands. That’s because SUBtext has more than $34 000-worth of used textbooks that it won’t be able to sell due to edition changes and online components. Students make 75 per cent of the selling price for each book they sell in SUBtext. “Essentially, there’s a few things we’re coming across, but what we’re coming across that we find is the worst for the students is the new online components,” says SUBtext manager Melissa Pritchard. Online components are often sold as a package with the new book, meaning students can’t buy the used version of that book. When the book and component are sold separately, the price of the component alone is often nearly as much as the entire package. “What’s happening is, as soon as they bring in those mandatory components, the students that had that book the year before can no longer sell it,” explains Pritchard. “A lot of these people paid full price for a book that they were only able to use for a year, then got nothing back for it.” Another roadblock to selling used textbooks is edition changes. “UVic likes to make custom editions of things specifically for UVic,” says Pritchard. “My understanding is one of the reasons the bookstore’s pushing for the custom editions is to stop the edition changes from happening so frequently.” However, Pritchard has seen as many as

three editions in three years in some UVic textbooks. Often, the textbooks are very different in appearance, but only slightly different in content. Pritchard demonstrated this by holding up two Earth and Ocean Science books, one nearly twice as large as the other. “What they did was they took a book and they kind of changed the way they set up the book to make it twice as thick and they used a thicker paper, but when you go to the table of contents of these two books and start to compare them, there’s very little difference,” she says. Aside from the financial impact on students — Pritchard estimated the Earth and Ocean Sciences textbook at $140 new — there are also environmental impacts. “This one irks me because this, to me, is one of the departments that should be really conscientious of our planet and how they use paper,” she says. “And I’m really adamant that a book never goes in the recycle here. They always find a home.” SUBtext’s difficulties in selling used textbooks results in a lot of disappointed students. “There are students coming up to check accounts, and we pull up their accounts and we see that they have . . . all the first year science books . . . and we say, ‘I’m really sorry, but you’re not going to be able to sell your book,’ ” says Pritchard. Pritchard says often, since professors aren’t the ones buying the book, they don’t take factors like cost and sustainability into account. “We see all the time books come in, they use them for one semester, and then they never get used again,” she says. “I would argue that they should be doing a bit more care and at-

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MARTLET October 20, 2011

These texbooks can’t be resold due to online components and edition changes, representing more than $25 000 students won’t get back. tention — like pick a book that’s going to last.” Part of the problem, according to Pritchard, is the way books are marketed. “It’s an issue that the publishers are marketing directly to the professors in the department and marketing in such a way that ‘[online components] will make your life easier, it will make your job easier’, but I don’t know it’s necessarily doing the service to the students that needs to be done,” she says. With online components becoming prevalent in classrooms, Pritchard questions what students are paying for with their tuition. “The online components, something needs to be looked at there. And how usable are they? And how much work are they saving the professors?” she says. “So, if you’re having to

TESS FORSYTH

spend an extra $70 on an online component, maybe your class should be $70 cheaper.” SUBtext tries to reach out to professors to discuss book choices to serve students better, but Pritchard says students need to speak up. “Students are the only ones who can say anything about the money they spend on textbooks. I personally don’t really have a voice because I’m not a student. So I can’t create . . . the hubbub around it that there needs to be,” says Pritchard. “When it comes down to it, I’m not an end-user of the product. But the students really are. And their feedback forms, at the end of the classes, are a great spot to provide that feedback, but I also think somebody needs to start questioning how and why books are selected the way they are.”

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Debate club hosts early tournament > AARON COTTON You know that dry feeling in your throat, that sudden quickening of your heartbeat and that rush of dread that comes with public speaking? Well, some endure that for fun — welcome to the UVic Debate Club. From Sept. 30 to Oct. 2 the club joined teams from all over Western Canada as well as several teams from the University of Alaska Anchorage to compete in the first debate tournament of the season. Hosted in UVic’s David Strong Building, the tournament consisted of five preliminary rounds with the top eight teams breaking off to compete in the semifinals before four of them moved on to the final round. Despite being an early tournament — the first of the year is usually the Fall Open held in Calgary — UVic debate team leader Emma Litzcke said the tournament was successful. “Overall the tournament went really well. We had to deal with plenty of minor crises but we managed to work through all those things,” says Litzcke, who was in charge of organizing the tournament. “We’re hoping that next year clubs will be more used to the idea of such an early tournament, and will be more likely to send people after this year’s success.” UVic is new to the debating scene. The club was founded two years ago by Litzcke. “I got to UVic and realized there was no debate club. Clearly, I had to fix this,” says Litzcke. She says she had debated in high school and enjoyed it. While UVic did not make the finals this time, Litzcke wasn’t worried. “This wasn’t a tournament for UVic to be competitive at, because all of our top debaters were involved in organizing it,” she says. “The central goal of hosting a tournament is not to win it but to give other schools an opportunity to debate.” The debates were in British Parliamentary style: each debate round consisted of eight seven-minute speeches with 15 minutes given to prepare. There were four teams, two on each side of the debate. The whole debate round is based off a motion given by the Chief Adjudicator; teams must argue for or against the motion.

“I start to keep a running list of interesting topics that are inspired by current events and then when I go to actually pick the motions I pick seven that hit a breadth of areas,” said Garrett Richards, chief adjudicator. Once the debate is over all of the contestants leave the room and the judges decide on a ranking. “Judging decisions are based on a combination of material and role fulfilment,” says Litzcke. “What that means is that each speaker has a role to fill based on when they speak in the round, and also must provide interesting and persuasive arguments.” The debaters then come back into the room where they are told why they placed where they did and what they can do to improve. Motions covered a wide breadth of topics, including: “This house believes that Sesame Street should marry Bert and Ernie,” “This house would forgive the debts of Greece,” This house regrets adulthood,” and “This house would never allow children to testify in court.” In addition to the formal debates there are also public speech rounds. “Public speech is three-minute impromptu speeches,” says Mike Renaud, a member of the organizing committee. “The only criteria are how entertaining you are, which generally gets reinterpreted to how funny you are.” Debate can prove to be an exhilarating experience for participants. “I would be quite calm until about two minutes before my own speech. At that point a feeling of pure terror would strike me and I would wonder why on earth I continued to subject myself to such an experience. As soon as I got up to speak, however, the terror would disappear and I would feel fine again,” says Litzcke about when she first started to debate “I don’t know if it ever completely goes away. I still get a bit jittery before speeches.” Despite the nervousness, all the participants emphasized how much they love to debate and how much they’re looking forward to the rest of the tournament season. For students interested in joining the debate club or simply watching a round, meetings are Mondays and Wednesdays at 6 p.m. in Clearihue A314.

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October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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DOWNTOWN DEMOCRACY

Students can affect municipal election issues > JENNY BOYCHUK Downtown Democracy is the Martlet’s ongoing coverage of the municipal elections. Raise your hand if a bus has ever passed you, or if you pay as much for your leaky basement suite as you would for a penthouse anywhere else in Canada or if issues like development in the Juan de Fuca parklands piss you off. Chances are, you’ve just raised your hand for at least two out of three. Now, raise your hand if you’re planning to vote or get involved in the upcoming municipal elections. Anyone? Youth voter turnout has always been low — this is nothing new. But why is it that student voter turnout is lowest at the municipal level, when we are dealing with issues that affect us every day? “I think it’s a challenge to inform students — particularly those who are new to Victoria or who are from out of town or out of province,” says Tara Paterson, UVSS chairperson. “[It’s a challenge to inform] what the issues are and what the differences are between the candidates because we don’t have a party system in municipal elections. It can sometimes be quite difficult to differentiate where the candidates stand on different issues.” UVic Political Science Professor Janni Aragon added that many students don’t see the stakes as being as high. “It doesn’t resonate as being as important as maybe a federal or provincial election — it’s mayors, city council and that sort of thing. In some youth’s opinion, they’re really not the “sexy” topics, if you will,” says Aragon. Aragon says that students are finding other ways of speaking for themselves. “We’re more apt to see youth participating in unconventional political participation,” she said. “So [for instance], of the two or three dozen people who are downtown in the Occupy

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MARTLET October 20, 2011

Victoria event in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street, I would imagine that the majority of them are college-aged, or aged 25 and under.” Paterson says that one of the issues contributing to poor voter turnout is that students are constantly moving around. “I do recognize that people or youth aren’t as invested in their communities when it feels temporal, when it feels like we’re going to be moving away in a few years,” said Paterson. “But, with municipal issues in particular, these are issues that affect our day-to-day lives right here as we’re living in Victoria.” UVic students also live in many different municipalities. “There are thirteen municipalities within the Greater Victoria regional district — which I think can be a deterrent in the fact that it does make it a little confusing,” she says. “And the sheer array of candidates within those municipalities — I think it can be a little overwhelming for students and for everyone.” Aragon and Paterson agree that it’s not just students who aren’t voting. “Voting populations across the spectrum are less likely to vote in municipal elections; it’s not just youth who aren’t voting, it’s everyone,” says Aragon. “I also think that low voter turnout is something we see at all levels [of elections], especially among youth,” says Paterson. “I think a level of disengagement and apathy play a hand in it, as well as a disregard for the way our political system works.” Aragon sees the student body as actively involved in political issues — but in ways other than voting. “This whole idea of these apathetic students is inaccurate, because I actually think that they are involved in [things like] anti-sweatshop movements, anti-racism efforts or are very involved in social justice efforts. They’re not apathetic, as a matter a fact, and I think we could learn a lot from the students on

campus and their energy,” she says. However, some of the main issues that affect students occur not at the provincial or federal level, but municipally. TRANSIT Many students have been late for a midterm or have tried to stealthily sneak into the last half-hour of a class. They feel frustrated, even helpless. But, as a student, you can have more impact over the issue than you think. “UVic and Camosun students all pay into the transit system through the UPass program. We’re one of the greatest stakeholders: between UVic and Camosun, students currently contribute $4.8 million to transit through the UPass program — with the contribution projected to be more than $5 million by 2012,” said Paterson. There is strength in numbers. “With numbers like that, it’s significant that we get a quality transit system in return for our investment, which can include things like the Light Rail Transit project, as well as transit priority lanes and cycling infrastructure to support those who prefer to cycle to school and work,” said Paterson. Aragon also notes that transportation is a major issue. “I can echo what lots of faculty on campus see when the weather is rainy: students who come in late and they look at you and they say ‘Sorry, the bus passed me and it wasn’t even full,’ ” said Aragon. “It happens so much during the start of the school year, but for whatever reason, [it happens] especially on rainy days. I drive in and if I’m at a stoplight, it’s not uncommon for me to see a bus that is not completely full not stop for students.” What would happen if we saw more students vote? “I think we’d see better transit for the students — probably more frequent bussing,” says Aragon.

HOUSING “Affordable housing is a big one — we’ve seen initiatives taken by council members and mayors in recent years to address the issue of affordable housing in Victoria — but we still have a long way to go, I believe,” says Paterson. “It’s something that affects students in particular who tend to move the most often and who also tend to be at the greatest subject to landlords taking advantage of them.” Aragon agrees: “I would think that students would be very concerned about housing because of the rental vacancy rates, and how expensive rent is in Victoria.” Secondary suites have been an issue in municipal elections. “For example, not all secondary suites are legal in Saanich — so some places of residence where people are living may be deemed illegal,” said Paterson. LAND DEVELOPMENT “Recently, we saw a major issue with proposed development on the Juan de Fuca parklands, which was defeated because of massive public and civic engagement on the part of community members,” said Paterson. “But I think also having students engage with councillors and mayors who also share their views on development and sustainability is important.” Aragon says development is an issue students are likely to engage with. “With the Juan de Fuca, students on this campus were very active in their support against the development. If anything I would say that most students, or at least the ones I interact with, are apt to oppose most development in the Greater Victoria area,” says Aragon. So if students care, why don’t they vote? “Even if students vote and spoil their ballot, they’re still doing [something] good,” says Aragon.

NEWS


RADICAL MEDIA CREATES CONSCIOUSNESS

The Better Business Bureau of Vancouver Island put on a “shred-it” event to help people avoid identity theft.

JENNY BOYCHUCK

Students at risk of identity theft > JENNY BOYCHUK It’s late and you’re cramming for an exam. You’re in serious need of a study snack — but your fridge contents include one egg and a bottle of ranch dressing. Your study buddy (whom you’ve known since first year and think is pretty cool) offers to go get a pizza. You know you have exactly $22 left on your Visa — which you hand over to your Midnight Saviour with the PIN on a sticky note on the back. Yeah, don’t do that. Identity theft is on the rise on Vancouver Island — and even students with maxed-out credit cards and empty bank accounts are at risk. As an effort to help reduce identity theft, the Better Business Bureau of Vancouver Island (BBBVI) held a free paper-shredding event in the Tillicum Centre parking lot on Oct. 14. “Students need to be just as careful as anybody else — even if you think, ‘Oh well, I don’t have a whole lot,’ ” says Rosalind Scott, BBBVI executive director. “Well, a con artist can turn that into a whole lot. They could potentially ruin your credit for years — and at a time when you’re just starting up and you need it.” Scott says students tend think they’re invincible. “Unfortunately, even if you don’t have very much, someone can happily dip into your bank account. If you have a credit card, they can increase your limit and then spend it,” says Scott. There is very little avenue in Canada for victims of identity theft to seek justice. “Basically, we don’t have any legislation in Canada around identity theft, which means that it is very difficult to prosecute and for RCMP to do anything for a victim,” says Scott. “We certainly need the legislation, but it’s not there yet.” Scott says that a compromised credit card isn’t the worst thing that could happen. “A con artist knows that if they get a certain amount of information, they can do anything — they can put your mortgage in their name

BE INVOLVED, SHARE IDEAS AND SAVE THE EARTH

ATTEND THE MARTLET’S AGM OCT. 28, 2:30 P.M., SUB B011

and then you lose your house,” says Scott. “[Identity theft] happens on a daily basis to millions of Canadians. It’s very frightening and not something that’s going to go away in a hurry.” Scott says there’s a reason why confidential information should be kept confidential. “It’s amazing how many students will lend debit and credit cards to their friends. And, I hate to tell you, but most victims of identity                             theft are preyed upon by people they know,” says Scott. “This includes their very good   friends, their colleagues and their family (NEXT  TO  THE  BSHOW AY)  US YOUR VALID STUDENT ID FOR: — those are the most likely people who are SPECIALIZING  IN:           going to do this.” Scott says everyone shares equal LOCATED   ON   THE  3RD  FLOOR  -­‐  THE  BAY  CENTRE   • Sexy   Costumes     risk.                         • Leg  A    venue,  Dreamgirl,  Playboy   “It doesn’t matter   SPECIALIZING if you have a little   Corsets,  Fishnets,  IN: &  Petticoats   (NEXT  TO  THE  BAY)   • • Sexy Costumes or have a lot. Young, • Beer   P ong,   D uff   M an,   P imp   Daddy,   SPECIALIZING   IN:   old, doesn’t matter,”         • Leg   Avenue, Dreamgirl, Playboy Superheroes   &  Animal  Costumes   says Scott. “Your LOCATED   ON   THE  Fishnets, 3RD  FLOOR  -­‐  THE   CENTRE   • •Corsets, &BAY   Petticoats   Sexy   Costumes     ‘buddy’ may have • DWigs,   Hats,   Mustaches,   Makeup,   Leg  Avenue,   reamgirl,   PPimp layboy   • Beer•Pong, Duff Man, Daddy, Superheroes & alternate motives   Masks,   W ings,   &   C apes   • Corsets,   F ishnets,   &   P etticoats   Animal Costumes regardless of how   Beer  Pong,   Duff  Mustaches, Pimp  AD  addy,   •Man,  And   Whole   Lot  More…………………….   • •Wigs, Hats, Makeup, Masks, Wings, & Capes well you think you   Superheroes   &   A nimal   Costumes   know them.” • And A Whole Lot More……….   • Wigs,  Hats,  Mustaches,  Makeup,   Scott says the paper-shredding Masks,  Wings,  &  Capes     event was a step in • And  A  Whole  Lot  More…………………….   the right direction and that she’ll be planning for more like it.                                 “It’s the first time we’ve tried this and   I would say it’s an                                 Show  Us  Your  Current  Valid  Student  ID  Card  For:   unqualified success.   When we arrived at   Show  Us  Your  Current  Valid  Student  ID  Card  For:   8:30 a.m., we had a   lineup of people waiting. We’ve had a steady   stream of people coming through ever since,”   says Scott. Prevention is key, she adds.   “I’m hoping we will eventually get some   legislation and that will help. But, as long as people do what they’re doing today — coming in steady droves and shredding documents, guarding their credit cards and PIN, watching their bank accounts and statements — as long as people are careful, we can stop this.” She says it all comes down to common sense. “When I give workshops, I say, ‘Would you go to your car in the corner of a dark parking lot at 3 a.m. by yourself?’ No, you wouldn’t because that would be stupid. We need to have the same common sense around our identity and around our documents,” says Scott. “So don’t go into that parking lot by yourself.”

10% OFF

Even if you don’t have very much, someone can happily dip into your bank account. Rosalind Scott BBBVI

NEWS

10%  Off   10%  Off  

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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OPINIONS

The lives of two people don’t amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world, Ilsa. That’s why you’re getting on that plane.

EDITORIAL

Tasty solution for UVSS apathy

OCCUPY UVSS AGM

Dear UVic Students’ Society: Please bring back the pizza at Annual General Meetings. No, seriously. We know you saved a couple bucks. But maybe if there’d been pizza there would have been quorum at the recent AGM. We suggest there is a direct correlation between the quality of free food and other goods at AGMs and student apathy. First there was pizza, then cookies, then a chance to win an iPad or some such thing. Now there’s nothing. You know what else there isn’t? Quorum. And that’s what you need: a minimum number of students in attendance to host a valid meeting where real change can be effected. In all seriousness, though, it’s important for students to attend AGMs. In fact, we here at the Martlet encourage it, even though they’re often long and frequently boring. So, dear students: Attend UVSS general meetings, even if you don’t get pizza. Without you, your student society can’t vote on any special resolutions, meaning updates to student society election procedures, among other things, didn’t get to happen this month. Because of the lack of quorum, students also didn’t get to vote on the extensive bylaw package: “A Voice for All Students.” Somehow, more than 500 students signed a petition to have the opportunity to vote on this. A small fraction were present at the AGM. It’s kind of hard to claim under-representation when you can’t even be bothered to represent yourself. Even if there’s nothing particular on the agenda that you’re into — no hot button issues like fraternities and sororities or bunnies — you should still come out. Because the student society is kind of important. They make a lot of decisions. They decide what happens in the SUB. Important things are in the SUB! Like the Martlet! Student society activities and campaigns affect your entire campus experience. Late-night transit? Thank your student society. Lobbying for affordable education? Again: student society. The emergency food bank? You got it. So say thank you, and attend a general meeting to allow important business to be conducted, even if it is just maintenance and small changes and not the big, exciting issues. All UVic undergrads are members of the UVSS. You all get a vote. You get a say in your representation. You get a say in your SUB. You get a say in the issues policy that guides the students’ society. Heck, you can even have a say in where the comma is placed in that new bylaw about the chief electoral officer, if you want. And, if you really wanted, you could probably pass a directive to bring back the free pizza.

RYAN HAAK

LETTERS WHAT’S IN A WORD? Re: “Michael Ondaatje’s reading enchants,” Sept. 29 J. Boychuk’s review of Mr. Ondaajte’s visit and reading was fun. One question on her diction, however. She referred in the tenth paragraph to “attendees”; i.e., the people doing the session attending. By comparison, if I am writing seasonal greetings to folks — my gender regardless — I am the “addresser” and the people to whom I send my greetings are the “addressees.” Analogously, aren’t Ondaatje’s audience the “attenders” — the people actually doing the attending — and Ondaatje himself their “guest”? Otherwise the listeners become but a passive-voiced captive/victim audience, people being talked “at”, not “with”? W. Baird Blackstone Community member FOSSIL FUEL FAIL Re: “Parkade plan prevents urban sprawl,” Oct. 6

Editorial topics are decided on by staff at our weekly editorial meeting at 1:30 p.m. every Friday in the Martlet office (SUB B011). Editorials are written by one or more staff members and are not necessarily the opinion of all staff members.

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MARTLET October 20, 2011

Shortage of parking space is considered a fact of life for growing communities. As attendance grows we are all faced with a choice: find millions of dollars to pave over the problem, or lead community conversations about more sustainable options. Growing traffic congestion, increasing environmental concerns, more focus on active lifestyle, rising gas prices — it is not a new story. Developing and encouraging alternative modes of transportation should be UVic’s focus — not contributing to the problem. Think of the message it sends: state-of-the-art sports facility that promotes fossil fuel low occupancy transportation. Not forward think-

ing at all. What is most discouraging is that for all the education at UVic, there appears to be little smarts. A university that claims “intellectual skills that underlie discovery, creativity and innovation.” Not overly innovative or creative to perpetuate the status quo. William Perry Victoria resident SOWING A BAD SEED Re: Cover, Oct. 13 I was offended by the cover of the October 13th edition of the Martlet. The text “Occupy Victoria” is paired with an image of the legislative buildings accompanied by a stylized face, the bottom half of which is covered with a bandana. In the article on page three, there was no explanation of this choice of cover. It is only troublemakers who would cover their face at a demonstration. Your cover could encourage such troublemakers. We should all be doing what we can to discourage, not encourage, violence.  David Lowe Concerned reader

Happy? Sad? Enraged? Tell us: letters@martlet.ca The Martlet has an open letters policy and will endeavour to print every letter received from the university community. Letters must be submitted by email, include your real name and affiliation to UVic, and have “Letter to the editor” in the subject line. Letters must be under 200 words and may be edited.


Have you been to our Assembly? Volume 64, Issue 11 Editor-in-Chief Erin Ball edit@martlet.ca Managing Editor Kristi Sipes maned@martlet.ca Production Co-ordinator Glen O’Neill proco@martlet.ca Advertising Director Marc Junker ads@martlet.ca News Editor Kailey Willetts news@martlet.ca Opinions Editor Shandi Shiach opinions@martlet.ca Features Editor Sol Kauffman feature@martlet.ca Culture Editor Vanessa Annand culture@martlet.ca

Science & Tech Editor Alan Piffer scitech@martlet.ca Graphics Editor Ryan Haak grafx@martlet.ca Photo Editor Tess Forsyth photo@martlet.ca Web Editor Adam Bard web@martlet.ca Web Content Editor Brad Michelson newmedia@martlet.ca Copy Editor Jon-Paul Zacharias Distribution Ivan Marko, Michelle Wright, Jon-Paul Zacharias jpzach@uvic.ca Staff Writers Jenny Boychuk, Brandon Rosario, Clare Walton Investigative Reporter Mark Worthing Volunteer Staff Cody Willet, Stuart Armstrong Contributors Marcie Calewaert, Joseph Clark, David Cooper, Aaron Cotton, Marcel (Felix) Giannielia, Terri Gower, Nadia Grutter, Leila Howe, Brittany Huddort, Gordon Lee, Michael Miller, Chandra Merry, Blake Morneau, Pat Murry, Candace O’Neill, Shannon Palus, Mike Parolini, Brontë Renwick-Shields, Adrienne Shepherd, Emily Ternullo, Hubert Wang Cover Illustration/Photo Glen O’Neill The Martlet Publishing Society is an incorporated B.C. society and a full member of Canadian University Press (CUP). We strive to act as an agent of constructive social change and will not print racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise oppressive copy. Martlet (SUB B011) P.O. BOX 3035 University of Victoria Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P3 martlet.ca

OPINIONS

If you’re confused or skeptical about the Occupy movement, that’s all right — you should be. It’s true that the movement’s goals aren’t specific and its viability is questionable, given that bad weather is imminent. What’s more true, however, is that whether this succeeds or not is entirely dependent on you. So, no pressure or anything. You can hunker down and rightfully claim to be busy; you’re a starving student, after all. I am too, but you need to know what I’ve seen. Downtown on Oct. 15, I saw men in suits march with hippy children from Centennial Square to the legislature and back, demanding that we reject corporatocracy in favour of tangible, fair democracy. Later on I experienced the People’s Assembly of Victoria’s consensus decision-making process and watched street youth vote to support the Assembly’s participation in an upcoming day of student action against the high cost of education. That night I pitched my tent in the Square and helped decide how we would handle the police if they came to confiscate our shelters and ticket us for refusing to abide by the

restricted hours for tenting in parks. We clustered the tents and my tired eyes observed Assemblers serving each other hot chocolate while others played us to sleep with live music. It might have looked like easy livin’ had it not been so chilly. I woke up Sunday morning to find people sleeping on concrete steps and in hammocks. Sure enough, a sergeant with the Victoria Police Department visited just after 8 a.m. and basically said that they sympathize and would only enforce the camping bylaw in our case if City Hall asked them to do so. Then I saw him walk away without a harsh word and could only conclude that no mayor running for re-election this November wants to hassle such a well-meaning exercise in direct democracy. The People’s Kitchen, having served breakfast and donated coffee, got a hot lunch started and I was pulled in to cover serving it while the Food Committee met to decide how to keep the movement fed. I’d felt selfish for never having helped at soup kitchens before, but now, as homeless people came for meals, I found myself doing something meaningful for the joy of it. I got to meet everyone and it was those young people from the streets who really stood out as committed and excited

to be part of something worth stubbornly defending. Citizens showed up, some from as far as Salt Spring Island, with food and provisions to donate. I saw seeds of trust and love begin to embed themselves in our Assembly. I’ve seen media come each day to sniff out stories that show the humanity of people willing to stand in solidarity with brothers and sisters that are metres and thousands of kilometres away. I’ve watched youth from Victoria High prepare a community dinner while talking (more articulately than most university students) about our movement’s message and potential with passersby. I’ve witnessed frustration, idealism, passion and generosity come into their own. The spirit of these people is inspiring. Your warm bed is more attractive than a night in a tent, and I get that. But I’ve seen something more real than a lab report or an essay being created downtown. Our People’s Assembly is forging accessible and effective ways of living your politics. If you want to be part of it all, visit paov.ca, The People’s Assembly of Victoria on Facebook, or #OccupyVictoria on Twitter. Then go and see the beginning of our revolution for yourself — or, if you’re satisfied with the way things are going, pull that bedsheet a little higher over your eyes.

A friendly lesson in bus etiquette

Sports Editor Tyler Laing sports@martlet.ca

Newsroom: Editor: Business: Advertising:

> CODY WILLETT

250.721.8360 250.853.3206 250.721.8361 250.721.8359

> MICHAEL MILLER Pop quiz: Where is the back of the bus? a) Beside the front door b) Four steps away from the front door c) Beside the back door d) At the back of the bus On paper the answer is clearly D. However, in practice many seem to believe the answer to the question is C. Maybe transit bus passengers develop acute bathmophobia (a fear of stairs or steep slopes) when they get on a bus. More likely is that a good number of transit patrons are oblivious, or too passive or polite to pester others to move back. Wasted space — due to people blocking the additional standing space — and pass-ups leave passengers aggravated. Getting left behind by a bus, which has free space and even seats available at the back, is infuriating. Many people substitute the auditory assault of the commute with personal acoustic preferences via earbuds or headphones, but this doesn’t justify acting like a statue. Riders are responsible for moving back or making space even as they withdraw from the public space and into an iPod. Look for a seat and sit there if one is open. If there are no seats, move back to create space for new passengers. As more people get on, keep moving back until you reach the point where you cannot move back any more. Backpacks: On the bus there is often space in front of a person that a backpack can take up. When you board the bus, riders should remove their backpacks and carry them.

RYAN HAAK

Leaving a bulky backpack on takes up room and is a nuisance for everyone else. Other passengers trying to squeeze by an iPodlistening, oblivious person to get to the open seat up the stairs now have to shove by a needless obstacle. Be considerate. The bus gets busy. People do pile up at the back door, but there’s a simple way to facilitate disembarking. Those at the back doors when it’s packed and people are trying to squeeze-on-by to get off the bus can step outside to make space, then step back on. Although the concept of getting off and on the bus mid-trip might be frightening, it will

make the experience less painful for everyone. The bus stops, you step out, let others get off the bus, and then you step back on. If there is an open seat, nearby passengers should take it. The seats are not there to act as a buffer between two other passengers. Standees can wait a moment to see if anyone else wants the seat but if a seat stays empty, they should sit down. On a double-decker bus, space is likely available upstairs. The most important thing for passengers to remember is to be considerate: take notice of what is going on, make room for others, and enjoy the ride.

Questionable Plan B ad placement > CHANDRA MERRY The women’s washroom in Felicita’s campus pub, among others, currently bears an advertisement for Plan B, the morning-after pill. The blue colour and feminized font shape in the ad send the product message as a delicate whisper. In reality, this advertisement is extremely bold, reminding women of a readily available “quick fix.” While feigning as a friendly reminder as to options for females, this advertisement actually encourages unsafe sex, and makes the female central to the consequences of “the morning after.” I fully support what Plan B offers. However, situating a feminized ad for this pill in a female bathroom — the bathroom of a bar — has a host of degrading connotations. Placing this ad in a bathroom stall is an intrusion on a private and vulnerable, female

space. Such a space should provide a safe zone. Although an ad for Plan B can be seen as providing choice, it’s unlikely that a marketing campaign would be altruistically responsible for educating women on our sexual options. There are numerous other resources to learn about morning after pills, such as a conversation with a friend or a sexual education course. Educational value ruled out, what is the point? The fact that this bathroom is in Felicita’s adds another dimension to the significance. In a bar, a bathroom can be a space of temporary solace from noise and nausea. That this space is within a place that serves alcohol, implies that those using it may be extra vulnerable. A bar is a place where some people meet to hook up. And that can sometimes mean unsafe sex. What a coincidence, then, that a morning af-

ter pill ad is situated in a bar. It hits women in a vulnerable, private moment, when judgment may be impaired; reminding them that, should they have unsafe sex, there is an option. As this ad is in the women’s bathroom, it suggests that women specifically are responsible for the consequences of unsafe sex. There may be condom ads in the men’s bathroom, but condoms are preventative measures that relate more to power and pleasure than does the morning after pill. The Plan B ad in Felicita’s is offensive and sneaky. It suggests that the consequences of unsafe sex belong in the female domain, and it is manipulative by its location in a vulnerable space. In the ad’s placement, there is an assumption that women will need its services, likely in the near future. After all, advertising is about profit. This ad is not educational: rather, it is hugely inappropriate.

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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getting “I hate that people take ADHD medications to study,” Katie Ellston* says to me. She begins telling me about a side of so-called “study drugs” that I had never quite stopped to consider. “I’d give a million dollars not to have to pop a pill every day,” she says. The tale of the student who takes ADD/ADHD medication sans prescription is, to the modern-day university student, a familiar one. Alex (maybe an anonymous friend of a friend) is a great student, but needs more time for studying, the soccer team and partying. “Yeah, that’s exactly the type of person who drives me nuts,” says Ellston. Alex finds there are meds that improve concentration and keep you up all night. Alex buys the medication, probably the short-acting Ritalin or Dexodrin, from a friend who has both ADHD and a prescription that provides them with more pills than they need. Alex has a few sweaty, red-eyed nights, but has plans to work at Goldman Sachs and live in a nice apartment downtown. The drug will wash in and out of Alex’s system and leave not a trace. We know this story by now. If you don’t take concentration meds, you know how to get them, and if you don’t know how to get them, you go ask your friends. If you bet someone $5 that you can find a pill in the time it would take you to read a newspaper cover to cover, you’d probably make easy money. A recent editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal explains that an estimated five to 35 per cent of students abuse prescription stimulants. The editorial is titled “Time to address stimulant abuse on our campuses,” and calls for the denormalization of their use. The adults don’t think we’re all right.

LEGITIMATE NEED

But Ellston is not like Alex. During the school year, she takes a pill every day. She’s had a prescription for Concerta — Ritalin’s long-acting cousin — since she was diagnosed with ADHD at 15. “It’s a hardcore drug,” she says. She feels that people who take “study drugs” to try to get ahead in academics don’t understand that. When she goes across the border to the U.S., she can only take so much of the drug — one pill for every day she is travelling — with her and she has to be carrying a doctor’s note. She feels that people's taking the medications casually trivializes her illness, which is part of her everyday life. Concerta, like the other medications commonly used to treat ADD/ADHD — and also like caffeine or cocaine — is a stimulant. That is, it increases the amount of dopamine in the user’s brain. With Concerta, Ellston experiences many of the physiological aspects of an addiction. On days during the school year when she does not take her medication — when she forgets or wakes up after 10 a.m. (if she takes it later than this she cannot fall asleep at night) — she experiences headaches, nausea and slight depression, much like a cocaine user coming off a high or a coffee addict running too late for work to pop by Starbucks. During the summer, Ellston chooses to go off Concerta, and she has up to a week of nausea and depression. She referred to this period of time as “detox.” “Detox is hell,” she added. She’s going to start taking Concerta again next week, she tells me, once classes start gearing up. “I’ll basically be high for a couple of days.”

CONCENTRATE ON RISK

Concerta produces the same effect in people with ADD/ADHD that it does for people without, though the improvement in concentration is more dramatic for people who have a clinically diagnosable difficulty concentrating. Scientists aren’t exactly sure how it works though. The literature is littered with the words “might” and “probably.” The thinking goes that upping the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain — which ADD/ADHD medication does — improves concentration. People with ADD/ADHD may naturally have less of these neurotransmitters, the conventional wisdom goes, which is probably why taking Concerta can bring them up to the level of concentration that most people experience without the help of drugs. All stimulants have the effect of improving concentration to some degree. Robert Franck, the Clinical Director of McGill Mental Health Service, says that, more than once, he’s had patients come in with concentration problems that turn out to be ADD/ADHD, and has realized that they have been unconsciously self-medicating by drinking tons of coffee. (“There are lots of reasons people drink coffee,” he says, when I, in a moment of hypochondria, mention that I drink tons of coffee.) Like Ellston, he doesn’t like the fact that students take medication for concentration without a prescription. Though the drugs are relatively safe, they come with a suite of risks and side effects, and their use should be carefully monitored by a health professional — one who knows what other drugs you’re on, too. Hypertension, arrhythmias, and psychotic episodes are the more extreme negative things that can happen from taking ADD/ADHD medication. The CMAJ editorial rattles these off, and adds that, though rare, overdoses are “potentially lethal.” These are all true and valid reasons not to abuse ADD/ADHD medication, explains Franck. “But scare tactics don’t really work,” he says. Further, it’s not just potential physical harm that makes him concerned about medication being used to study. Franck explains that taking drugs as a band-aid

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MARTLET October 20, 2011

FEATURE


by or getting high By Shannon Palus · The McGill Daily (CUP) · Graphics by Ryan Haak solution to, say, anxiety about not being able to complete all your assignments during finals, is to ignore other problems and to potentially mask clinical anxiety or depression. Franck’s motto is, “Medication when necessary, but not necessarily medication.”

FROM 100 THOUGHTS AT ONCE TO 50

When Ellston was diagnosed with ADHD — a process of elimination of sorts — the medication was the last step of her treatment plan, and remains just one part of her regimen. In addition to taking the drug, Ellston sees a therapist every week. Through the Office for Students with Disabilities at her university, she’s allowed four hours instead of three to complete exams, and a short break to walk around during an exam. She also gets to bring in a fidgeter — a small object like a koosh ball or a bean bag that she can play with. She knows her own study habits incredibly well. She doesn’t work on any one assignment for more than half an hour at a time. “The information won’t stick if I try and make myself,” she says. She has a CD-case style binder with hundreds of DVDs in her apartment; she loves unwinding in front of the television on Saturdays by watching Harry Potter film after Harry Potter film. “But, see, that takes a lot of concentration. So even when I’m watching movies, which I love, I’m also painting my nails, and checking my email, and texting. I’ll take breaks to just walk around my apartment.” She describes the feeling of having ADHD as like having 100 different thoughts going on in your head at once, popping around and soaring off on their own little orbits. “When I’m on the drugs, instead of 100 thoughts, I only have 50. And when one tries to go off on a tangent,” she says, moving her hand away from her head, “I can feel it being pulled back. It’s like it hits a wall.” She says her thoughts behave in a different manner on the drug. “Being on the drugs is like running down a hallway, and not being on them is like running through a field.”

DOING DRUGS TO ACHIEVE

It’s odd, but the fact that these are prescription drugs with a medical use hadn’t quite settled in my mind before now. Perhaps it’s because of stories that have been popping up in the media over the past few years — each taking the tack that studydrug abuse is a new trend hitting the continent’s youth. Perhaps it’s because I went to a high school filled with overachievers who went on to universities that boasted as much of a problem with ADD/ADHD medication abuse as they did with any other drug. Though I’ve never taken Ritalin or Concerta, it’s never occurred to me that I should have any qualms about doing so — not even the basic concerns that come with smoking pot now and then. It’s not even treated like a recreational drug in the crowd I run with. It’s not done for fun — it’s done to achieve. According to Alan Desantis at the University of Kentucky, I’m not alone. He’s spent the past handful of years facilitating interviews with hundreds of students, and has found that, for some, taking the medication sans prescription was less of a concern than drinking beer or smoking cigarettes. For some, ADD/ADHD medication doesn’t carry the same weight as party drugs. In his research he found that students use a number of arguments to justify their use of the medication, including that they only take it during finals, that they are self-medicating for concentration problems, and what Desantis referred to as the “I’m-doing-itfor-the-right-reasons” argument. “No, they’re definitely a drug,” says George Bellwood,* a McGill student without ADHD who took Concerta about eight times last year. “Yes, eight, I think. I’m thinking about this in terms of the number of major assignments,” he says, counting on his fingers. For Bellwood — who has also done cocaine, pot and MDMA — the study drugs are a tool to be used during long nights of working that come free of particular health or moral concerns. Scare tactics referencing potential death do not concern him. Concerta is long release, so it allows Bellwood to work overnight. He’ll drink two or three cups of coffee in the evening, settle into the Arts computer lab, and get to work on a paper. Around 2 a.m., when the coffee stops being enough, he’ll pop a pill. The metallic taste of the Concerta hits his tongue, and will stay there in his mouth for a while (“like licking iron,” he says). He’ll feel jittery, sweaty. His mind will feel clear, he explained, making a desk-clearing gesture with his hands. And then he’ll work. He dispels my notion that these drugs offer a sort of trance. “Is it like kicking a soccer ball around for hours? That kind of focused?” I asked. “Oh God, no. You don’t lose track of time. You’re really aware of the next step.” He drummed the table with his index fingers. “And you don’t want to be doing the work. You just are.” He’ll continue in that robotic haze, one task, and then the next and then the next. By 4 a.m., there are only two or three other students left, at least one of them asleep. “It’s so fucking bleak in that room, with those fluorescent lights.” The janitor comes in at seven, signaling that the rest of the world has moved onto the next day.

FEATURE

TRADING THE PRESENT FOR THE FUTURE

Bellwood plans on going to grad school when he’s done at McGill — he explains that for his field, he has to. His normal facial expression is a sort of Cheshire-Cat grin, which makes him seem at once eager and carefree. He talks about history — citing paradigms and scholars — the way other people talk about TV shows. Last semester he got a 4.0, started a journal, edited a section of a campus newspaper, had a part-time job, and, though he insists his social life was cut in half, still went out every Saturday or so. The drugs are a prop he hopes he will cast aside when he’s finished hopping along the stepping stones to a successful future. But he can’t say when that will be. “When you’re in grad school? When you’re working an entry-level position?” He’s not sure, he just sort of knows that there will be a time in the future when the work will pay off, a spot in life where the things on his to-do list can be accomplished without him breaking out in a chemically induced sweat, accomplished with room left over for seven hours of sleep and a substantial social life. Sitting in Franck’s office, I outlined Bellwood’s reasoning: wanting to go to grad school, wanting grades and extracurricular activities to be a tangible currency he can exchange for a job after graduation, and knowing meds can help a person do more and do better. Shouldn’t we take a leg up in the world when we can? “I would say, to those people, why do you feel you have to study so hard?” Franck says. Wanting to get ahead in life does not necessitate medication — you can be organized and reasonable about what you take on. But it’s not just that: Franck thinks doing drugs to wend one’s way through undergrad amounts to cheating yourself out of the things that you actually enjoy in life. These are the things — whether coding, reading, playing soccer — at which you might end up being successful, the activities you love so much you can sit and do them for hours and lose track of time. “That, that is the kind of attitude that I fucking hate,” says Bellwood, when I bring up Franck’s argument. “It’s actually really harmful, that kind of faux naiveté. ‘Why are you studying so hard?’ Theoretically, this is the point of attending a university.” This brings up a much larger reality: that it’s a dream world, of sorts — a strange pocket of society filled with bright people, 24-hour study facilities, 24hour coffee shops, and an endless tunnel of hoops to jump through. There are small, flickering lights dotting the tunnel — if I can just pass this midterm, just make it through finals, just get my diploma — that make it seem like ad hoc solutions, like one more all-nighter, or two, or eight, could be enough. We’re judged by our peers, by the numbers that stare back at us from our transcripts, by the test-score requirements on grad-school information pamphlets. Perhaps most importantly, for Bellwood and for many of us, we’re here because of reasons that are genuine and innocent: because we love academia, because we want to grow up and be happy and prosperous. Doing well in academia can bring us those things, and drinking coffee and popping pills can bring us success in academia. It seems like such a simple transaction, like magic. But, to Franck, to the adults, you have to learn to live within the constraints of the real world. Franck explains “university is a wonderful opportunity to develop understanding — not just academic, but how to feel good about yourself, how to manage time and to develop coping strategies.” By popping study drugs, Franck believes, you set yourself up in a lifestyle that is unsustainable and potentially soul-sucking, one that’s not based on doing the things that make you happy, but on the things that you feel society — or the job market, or your parents, or your peers — want out of you. Still, he sympathizes with the plight of the George Bellwoods of the world. He knows the heat of the floodlights turned on students these days. That’s why he thinks people like him — adults and MDs — need to work harder to educate students about the perils of study drugs, and about ways to cope without the drugs. Ellston agrees. She’s studying high school education. When on field experience (a sort of mandatory internship for education students), she’ll often have a child or two in her classroom with ADHD. She feels she can effectively teach these kids in a way that teachers without ADHD can’t. “They’ll do things like stand up in the middle of class and start walking around, and their teacher will say, ‘no, no, sit down,’” she explains. Instead of becoming frustrated and disciplining them, or singling them out, Ellston can empathize: “I’ll talk to them about it, and say, ‘if you need to stand up during class, stand up. I need to do that too sometimes.’” She wants to teach for a few years, and then go into educational policy, where she will design curricula, and play with the way the classroom is structured, making it a more friendly place for kids who have different learning styles, whether they are diagnosed with a disorder or not. She loves being able to do that. *Names have been changed.

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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CULTURE

We’re looking for bloggers! If you don’t like newspapers because they make your fingers inky, this is the gig for you. Email culture@martlet.ca.

Love Kills — and not softly, either Phoenix Theatre opens season with musical starring star-crossed natural born killers > NADIA GRUTTER How far would you go for love? The Phoenix Theatre’s production of Love Kills by Kyle Jarrows as directed by alumnus Clayton Jevne delves into the minds of a teenage couple whose mad love drives them to murder 11 innocent people. Based on true events from Lincoln, Neb., in 1958, the play reveals 19-year-old Charlie Starkweather and 14-year-old Caril Ann Fugate’s twisted emotions toward their horrific crime. The play covers one night in which the couple reflects on their relationship while detained in separate jail cells. They are watched by the sheriff and his wife, who begin to question their own relationship in the presence of Charlie and Caril’s unusual connection. Charlie and Caril face immense pressure for a confession before the arrival of lawyers in the morning. Their love creates complex delusions in both of their minds, keeping the audience riveted. The actors faced the challenge of presenting their characters through dialogue and song. Considering the stark contrast between the dark subject matter and the upbeat rock music, they did a superb job. Marina Lagacé, a 2010 graduate of UVic’s Theatre program, played an exceptional Caril with stunning vocals and captivating emotion. Brendan Bailey seemed to have trouble with his accent but compelled the audience with his strong vocals and dedication to Charlie’s perverse nature. Cam Culham portrayed the stubborn sheriff, Merle Karnopp, and Donna Williams played his beautiful, maternal wife, Gertrude Karnopp. Lagacé stood out as the most comfortable soloist, but when performing together, the actors proved an impactful and dynamic group. Jevne’s careful blocking ensured that the audience had a clear view of every scene. Music director Donna Williams deftly incorporated rock music into Jarrow’s emotional script. Victoria band The Party on High Street provided the live accompaniment. The band and microphones used by the actors were situated at the back of the stage in plain view. Though this proved distracting at first, the three musicians maintained an

impressive background stage presence despite their character-less contribution. The transition between song and dialogue was somewhat jarring, as the actors had to depart from scenes and move downstage to join the band. This took the actors out of character at times. Independently, however, the acting and singing were hard-hitting. Drum beats or soft guitar solos were often used instead of sound effects, which added unexpected impact and realism to the scenes. Bryan Kenney artistically manipulated the lighting by using an array of techniques to enhance the simple set and create mood. The confines of the jail cells were no more than dim boxes of light, which I found very effective and natural. In Act 2, Charlie re-enacts his murders with bursts of white light as gunshots. This added shock to an already disturbing scene and highlighted the horror of Charlie’s actions. The band was illuminated with multicoloured lighting, which heightened the play’s 1950s feel. Love Kills provides a unique take on how far people will push themselves to prove love. The music adds a human element that casts a surprising light on an unthinkable event. Jarrow’s sharp script turns this tragic story into a reflective experience for the audience. Congratulations to the cast and crew on a fine start to the Phoenix’s 2011/12 season and a successful Spotlight on Alumni production. Although most of us wouldn’t kill for love, give Charlie and Caril a chance to show you why they did.

Although most of us wouldn’t kill for love, give Charlie and Caril a chance to show you why they did.

Love Kills Tickets: $13 Student / $18 Senior / $22 Adult / $24 Weekends @ 8 p.m. (previews $7, available after 5 p.m.) 8 p.m. Evening Performances: October 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. 2 p.m. Matinee Performances: Saturday, October 22. Season Subscriptions: $36 for 3 plays or $48 for 4 plays. Phoenix Box Office: (250) 721-8000

HUBERT WANG (PROVIDED)

The four stars of Love Kills: (from top left) Cam Culham, Donna Williams, Brendan Bailey and Marina Lagacé.

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MARTLET October 20, 2011


JAPAN JOURNALS

PHOTOS OF THE WEEK

A farewell to volunteering Joseph Clark’s final reflection on Japan > JOSEPH CLARK Joseph Clark is an undergraduate student at UVic majoring in English and taking the Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) program. He often goes to Japan to visit his family, which was affected by the earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011. Joseph spent the month of May 2011 volunteering in Sendai, Japan. June 15, 2011 About two weeks after I have finished my month of volunteering, I return to Sendai to see my new friends and volunteer one last time. We drive out of Sendai to a coastal town called Matsushima. The beaches of this town used to be a popular weekend destination, and all of us have memories of going there as recently as a year ago. When we arrive at Matsushima, we start working around the outside of a house that looks like it’s in relatively good condition. After about 30 minutes spent shovelling mud out of a garage, we are taken to the back of the house where a large greenhouse is still standing. The base of the structure is beneath a few feet of mud, so our job is to dig it out. I am already drenched in sweat from the preliminary work out front, and stepping into the greenhouse feels like stepping into a sauna. Men with small bulldozers also work here. One of the machines has overheated and stopped working. I begin to feel light-headed and have to take a break several times throughout the day. When I go inside the house to use the bathroom, the owner invites me to have a glass of homemade plum juice with her. She has done a remarkable job restoring the house to its former condition, and the only evidence left of the tsunami is that instead of a cabinet under the kitchen sink, there is a curtain that covers the mud that has filled the shelves. Before I leave, she gives me her son’s shirt to change into when our work is done. She is very appreciative of us; she says that volunteers are like angels to people living in her neighbourhood and that they

would be completely lost without us. Outside, we also have a chance to talk to one of the men working with heavy machinery in the same area. He is a local, and talks about what it was like when the sea water swept across the entire neighbourhood. He tells us a story about a local high school that did not let the pupils leave on the day the tsunami hit because of a pervert who had exposed himself to a few of the students. Because the students were in the stable structure of the school, they were all saved from the tsunami. Children at other schools were on their way home when the tsunami came, and as a result, the number of child casualties was huge. I can tell that this story of the pervert who accidentally saved an entire school has uplifted the spirits of many locals, but the man also tells us sadly that many of the local fish have been taken off the market because they have been feeding on bodies that were washed out into the ocean. At the end of the day, we get into our cars and head back to Sendai. When we arrive at the train station, a young man named Yamaguchi has us gather together because he has something to say. I have only volunteered with Yamaguchi a few times, and he has struck me as an odd person, insisting on wearing a jacket even in the heat because it is his “trademark.” This has been Yamaguchi’s 50th day volunteering, and he has decided that it will be his last. He begins a speech that is full of jokes and humorous memories of volunteering, but breaks down and cries like a baby. I cannot even understand him through his tears, and the other members suppress their laughter. I get the feeling that all the members feel uncomfortable because they share some of the emotions that overwhelm Yamaguchi, but make sure not to show it. Yamaguchi’s outburst of emotion probably touches on what is stirring beneath the surface of all the volunteers, and is it difficult for them to keep these emotions to themselves while Yamaguchi lets them out. Although this is supposed to be Yamaguchi’s last day of volunteering, I hear a few weeks later that he has already come back several times.

A grey squirrel munches on a snack outside Clearihue.

MARCIE CALLEWAERT

She says that volunteers are like angels to people living in her neighbourhood . . .

MARCIE CALLEWAERT

Near the fountain, Ryan Levis lets students know about a chance to win a trip to Thailand.

bristol townbristol town hair

fashion

250.477.3098 2562 sinclair road

down the hill from UVic

CULTURE

hair

fashion

250.477.3098 2562 sinclair road

down the hill from UVic

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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The play’s not quite the thing Belfry Theatre exploits beauty in the set, not the script of And Slowly Beauty > VANESSA ANNAND There’s a good reason that the story of creation comes at the beginning of the Bible — all that “Let there be light” and “Let there be ponies and peonies” business sets the stage for the drama that follows. Simply put, without the backdrop, there would be no Bible. To see the Belfry Theatre’s production of And Slowly Beauty — the English premiere of this French play — is to realize that intelligent design is alive and well in theatre. The action simply couldn’t proceed without lighting designer Michael Walton selectively illuminating the multi-doored, steeland-glass structure that occupies much of the stage. This sleek set, designed by John Feguson and Tamara Marie Kucheran, slips effortlessly from being an office building to a subway car, and from a community theatre to a suburban home or a hospital. Only a few props indicate each switch. Director Michael Shamata’s instincts are bang-on, too. Scene changes have a fluid solemnity — particularly when we are taken on the protagonist’s commute to work. The other characters act as landmarks — always the same chic lady strolling in the same wide-brimmed hat, always the same homeless woman shilling papers, always the same rush through the same revolving door. This is where the play feels most dynamic and, well, French. It’s worth noting that these are all moments in which there is no dialogue — only the original score by Victoria composer Brooke Maxwell. The script itself is where the dynamism falls flat. The problem is that we’ve all seen this play before, or something very much like it. We’ve seen the middle-aged man stuck

DAVID COOPER (PROVIDED)

Thomas Olajide, Mary-Colin Chisholm, Dennis Fitzgerald, Celine Stubel, Christian Murray and Caroline Gillis have seen the light — because it’s so well-designed. in a conventional, successful and stifling life where his family drifts away from him. They’re like so many pinballs bouncing off their shared stainless steel fridge. That fridge is covered in Post-It notes bearing messages like, “I’ll be out late! Kiss kiss!”

We’ve seen a man stuck in an office job where the myopic, pointless water cooler gossip leaves him cold. We’ve seen him give presentations to hostile corporate underlings about lateral integration. To be fair, in this play, the underlings speak in irate

gibberish (a la Peanuts teacher) — one of the show’s most humorous gimmicks. But again, it’s worth noting that there’s no real dialogue here. I can think of few moments where the dialogue works as well. What’s a bored, middle-aged everyman (his name is, pointedly, Mr. Mann) to do? Why, go to a Chekhov play of course (Three Sisters) and thrill to its melancholic beauty. Then he can safely fantasize about a fieryhaired coffee shop owner (played by the infectiously warm Mary-Colin Chisholm) and discuss the beauty of trees with a dying colleague (played by chameleonic Christian Murray). He can reach out to his children, reciprocate his wife’s tentative overtures to rekindle their romance and imagine taking to the air, buoyed up only by an umbrella. It’s pretty enough, but is it compelling? Not overly. Any play that feels like it could end at the intermission rather than running for a whole other hour probably isn’t saying anything new. And any play that closes with the clunky line, “What does it mean?” isn’t asking or answering anything that hasn’t be asked and left answerless before. But if you’d like to see impeccably monochromatic wardrobe choices (all blacks, greys and whites), or if you’d like to feel that it’s never been so divine for a lighting designer to let there be light, then that’s where you’ll find a slow beauty in this play, and that’s why you should attend. And Slowly Beauty ... Sept. 20 to Oct. 23 The Belfry Theatre $23 – $38 University students get 25 per cent off tickets, excluding Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. shows

DJ Aphrodite proves drum ’n’ bass is King > ERIN BALL DJ Aphrodite, a.k.a. Gavin King, is completely committed to drum ’n’ bass music. King has been producing and playing drum ’n’ bass (characterized by quick break-beats and heavy bass lines) and variations of the genre since before the rave scene exploded in the UK. The impressive thing is that he is still at it and he’s still good at it, touring the world and making tracks that get the dance floor jumping. “I just always loved DJing,” says King from his home southwest of London. “I was always the guy at school who walked into a room and whose tape went on for everyone. When I was in a vehicle it was always my tape or my CD in the machine. I DJed my first party when I was around 13 or 14.” Known as the “godfather of jungle,” King helped bring drum ’n’ bass to the forefront of the electronic music scene with Urban Takeover, the label that he created with fellow drum ’n’ bass DJ Mickey Finn. He later influenced the growing genre, most noteably playing and producing a sub-genre of drum ’n’ bass featuring melodic, wobbly bass lines called “jump-up,” among others. King says he’s always loved playing drum ’n’ bass, and despite being in the scene since the mid-’90s, he’s not slowing down yet. “I love DJing so much,” says King. “I don’t notice myself getting older. I still love DJing, I still love making an atmosphere and I still have fun. And the clubbing crowd is older these days. It’s more acceptable because the rave scene has been going so long.” King now has kids at home. He says the DJ lifestyle actually works well with family life. “It’s all about children,” he says. “I’ve got children now, and surprisingly for family life as a dad, I get to see my kids more than a lot of dads because I’m around during the week. So I do all the school runs, dinner, 14

MARTLET October 20, 2011

homework; if I was lawyer, I’d still be in the office.” After the kids go to bed, King says it’s time to make music. Weekends are often spent on the road to various clubs and festivals. “I’m quite hardcore,” he says with a laugh. “What’s okay for me for a weekend would be brutal for a normal person.” The popularity of drum ’n’ bass, as with many other styles of music, has ebbed and flowed over the years. But King says he’s always loved the hard-hitting genre and doesn’t plan on branching out anytime soon. “I’m a drum ’n’ bass DJ and I kind of specialize,” he says. “You don’t have time to cover all the genres and make all sorts of different things. Well, some people do, but I don’t find time to cover every genre; I don’t even have enough time to cover all the drum ’n’ bass I want, let alone making house or dubstep.” The explosion of dubstep in North America has caused a resurgence of interest in drum ’n’ bass. “Music-wise, there’s been lots of styles, and new trends have come. Some stay, some go. At the moment you’ve got this traditional [drum ’n’ bass] sound going on and then that’s being infested with dubstep thrown in,” he says. “Some DJs like the impact of dubstep. Me, I’m a purist. Whatever it is, I bring it all into drum ’n’ bass. To me, drum ’n’ bass is the most exciting.” King starts a five-gig tour of western Canada this week, including a stop in Victoria at Sugar Nightclub on Oct. 22. “I’ve always had a great time in western Canada. Had five gigs last year and it was great — hopefully it’s the same this year.” Aphrodite with Outsider and Reflex October 22 @ 10 p.m. Sugar Nightclub $18

Aphrodite has mastered the art of napping with his sunglasses on.

PROVIDED

CULTURE


MUSIC RAGS

We need our own protest anthems Occupy Wall Street highlights the musical discrepancy between us and our forebears > BLAKE MORNEAU “Music is what people create to survive and explain their circumstances. It also informs how [other] people can survive and explain their circumstances.” — Boots Riley of The Coup, 2011 interview with the Martlet During an online exchange with a friend about the ever-growing Occupy Wall Street movement and its solidarity offshoots, the friend sent me a link to Buffalo Springfield’s classic protest song “For What It’s Worth.” The song, inspired by the 1966 Sunset Strip Riot, was quickly adopted as a stirring protest anthem. It is a truly powerful song in both its simplicity and humanity, built on a great tradition of American protest songs like Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is Your Land” and Bob Dylan’s “Masters of War.” These songs, along with countless others, have been adopted and readopted over and over again with each subsequent movement. This makes a person wonder: where are our generation’s great protest songs? After all, ours is a generation that appears to be awakening to a new consciousness, built on unprecedented connectivity with the rest of the world. Doesn’t a new revolution deserve its own anthems? Don’t the participants in the trenches deserve their own fist-pumping fury, head-expanding lyrics and ass-shaking grooves? No one can deny the lasting impression of classic protest anthems like John Lennon’s aching dream-ballad “Imagine,” the militant march of Edwin Starr’s “War” or the muted rage of Bruce Cockburn’s “If I Had a Rocket Launcher.” But it’s time to look forward and embrace some of the amazing, versatile protest music that’s being made all around us, reflecting our current struggles, concerns, fears and worries. The ’80s gave us Public Enemy and the ’90s brought us Rage Against the Machine.

These were times choked by apathy and anger. Their music was a punch in the face, awakening millions of suburban and urban youths that had never been exposed to radical politics.  As we’ve amassed and traded vast wealths of information through the Internet and social media, it seems that we’ve calmed down as a generation. We’re less inclined to short, useless, violent outbursts of anger and are geared more toward a political and social philosophy based on patience and respect. There is an incredible array of musicians right now playing for us and our causes, reflecting our sense of community and humanity. While this music is informed by the politics of past activist-musicians, it incorporates new ideas and sounds into traditional protest music. The results are both diverse and specific. You can find the spirit of Bob Marley in the triumphant rhythms and deep-seeded humanity of Michael Franti and Spearhead. The incredible verbal news reels of Chuck D (Public Enemy) and KRS-One are alive and well in the rhymes of Street Sweeper Social Club and Talib Kweli. The voice of Pete Seeger, champion of the working class, lives on in Tom Morello’s alter-ego The Nightwatchman. The overpowering feminism of Patti Smith is holding strong in the soul of music by Nneka, a rapper of both African and European descent. The Clash’s militant intelligence (and penchant for white-boy reggae) comes to the fore every time State Radio takes to the stage. Even the great Bob Dylan’s unique, insightful eye is still finding humanity in all the nooks and crannies by way of new folk champion Dan Bern. And while we should treasure the songs that helped those before us explain their circumstances and struggles, I think it’s time we fully embraced our own music, in our own time, for our own revolution. Better yet, my friends, you could make your own music. Add your voice to the choral tide driving us forward. 

It’s decorative gourd season, students

FIND FOR $5 An item that’s under $5 and worth the pocket change. What: Mini pumpkins Where: Western Foods (and most other grocery stores) How much: $2.88

CULTURE

Why it’s cool: I used a black Sharpie on these little guys to make a cute/ cheesy Halloween decoration. This is perfect for a students’ small space and small budget. Hopefully your drawing skills are better than mine!

250.595.6044

Photo and Find by Terri Gower

October 20, 2011 MARTLET

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SPORTS

Mmmm. Nothing like warm Fudgsicles on a foggy day.

Pan American Games well-stocked with UVic content > TYLER LAING UVic athletics are being well represented at this year’s Pan American Games, currently underway in Guadalajara, Mexico. Eight current and four former Vikes don Canadian colours across seven events. Current male athletes include rowers Kai Langerfield, Eric Bevan, and Josh Morris; open-water swimmer Richard Weinberger; and rugby-sevens players Phil Mack, Sean Duke, and Nathan Hirayama. Because of his involvement in the World Cup and Pan Am games, Hirayama won’t join the Vikes team until January. The only present-day female Vike is fieldhockey goalie Kaitlyn Williams. “This will be the first major games I’ve been to,” she says. “Hopefully it will be the first of many, but it’ll just be a good learning experience.” Former Vikes participating in the games include: Mark Laidlaw (men’s rowing), Sarah Bonikowski (women’s rowing), Danielle Hennig (women’s field hockey) and Adam Kleeberger (men’s rugby sevens). Mack has been involved with the National Sevens since 2006. He’s been selected to captain the 2011 Pan Am team. “I think these multi-sport events are unique on their own. They offer something different and most of the boys are pretty excited just to get down there,” he says. Rugby doesn’t start until Oct. 29, Weinberger’s 10-kilometre swim isn’t until Oct. 22, and field hockey didn’t begin until Oct. 19; however, some events have already ended — and some Vikes have already medalled. Langerfield won silver in the men’s four rowing event while Bonikowski claimed bronze in women’s pairs. Both medals, along with a fifth place finish for Bevan in men’s doubles, took place October 17. If all works out, they won’t be the only Vikes taking silverware home at the end of the month. “We’re looking to medal at the games, for sure,” says Hennig. “All the teams that are competing are

obviously competing to get the gold medal,” says Williams. “It’s competitive and everyone wants it just as badly, but I think to medal would be a very realistic and attainable goal.” Unlike the varsity teams that most of these athletes are used to, national teams benefit from longevity. Players aren’t restricted by a set number of eligible years. This gives coaches and players a chance to gel over the long term. “We have been playing together for a number of years now and we all know each other and we’re all pretty cohesive as a group,” says Duke. “[The coaches have] been selecting for this tour a long time.” Hennig shares these sentiments. “We’ve got an awesome group of girls and a really dedicated group of coaches. It’s an exciting time for our program.” Hennig and Williams admit that Canadian field hockey isn’t as developed as in some of the South American countries (Argentina is ranked first in the world while Canada is 20th — they’re in the same pool), but they believe in their defence. “We’re a really strong defensive team, and so we’re hoping that we can just fight our way through and hold ourselves in games like [Argentina],” says Hennig. Conversely, the rugby guys are going in as one of the tournament favourites. Their offense can be punishing. “We’re a bit more direct than other teams play. A bit more physical. We’ve got some big forwards that like to smash people,” says Duke. Most of the rugby players have highlevel national experiences to draw from. Eight players featured in the recent Rugby World Cup, while many of the sevens players compete in the annual Sevens World Series. After playing in front of 40 000 spectators in Hong Kong and 50 000 in London during that circuit, Guadalajara’s 1 360-seat Tlaquepaque Stadium might feel a bit small. But that doesn’t diminish the importance of this competition. “This will only be the second multi-sport tournament that I’ve been to,” says Duke.

EMILY TERNULLO

Vikes rugby players are participating in the Pan American Games this month. “Those are huge. Rugby is just a small part of it.” “Any time you have an opportunity to bring a gold medal back to Canada, it’s kind of hard to compare that to anything else,” says Mack. “We have a really strong team going down there. If we play to our ability, I

have no doubt we can win a gold medal.” Competition aside, a trip to Mexico is never hard to take either. “It’s always nice to go and see new places and travel,” says Williams. “That’s one good thing about playing at this level is the travel opportunities for sure.”

Vikes women’s field hockey: rising stars on and off the field

BRONTË RENWICK-SHIELDS

Krista Thompson (left) and Lynne Beecroft (right) spread the love.

> BRONTË RENWICK-SHIELDS Vikes women’s field hockey head coach Lynne Beecroft’s office walls are covered in pictures of her past players, their families and their children. The well-loved coach, affectionately nicknamed “Buzz,” is as passionate about her players’ success off the field as on it. “This is not about me pushing them to be national athletes. It’s about me pushing them 16

MARTLET October 20, 2011

to be the best all-round athletes and human beings, too,” says Beecroft. Beecroft, in her 28th season with UVic, has learned a lot throughout those years. She says that in the past she was “demanding much, much more of athletes and forgetting they were students.” She has realized over the years that her players need “life skills as well as hockey skills” for success. Beecroft holds academic achievement

in high regard. She speaks proudly of her students’ success in the classroom. “Half my team last year were Academic All-Canadians,” she says. “They really want to excel in the classroom.” Beecroft says she couldn’t do everything she does just on her own. Thankfully she has had her talented assistant coach Krista Thompson working with her for the past 15 years. Equally committed and passionate about the sport and the Vikes, Thompson coaches four teams outside of UVic as well. Beecroft says she values her assistant coach’s ability to “inspire athletes in a completely different way than just telling them what to do.” Thompson says the high points of her coaching career have been watching her athletes grow and develop and seeing them give back to their sport and their community. The players are involved in the Rising Stars Program — a field hockey training program for girls aged eight to 18. The Vikes both mentor and coach the younger girls, which Beecroft says teaches her players that “You don’t always take, you have to give back as well.” When asked what trait she values most in an athlete, Beecroft says work ethic. “If you have an unskilled athlete with a huge heart and good work ethic, I think that they can surpass a highly skilled athlete without a good work ethic,” she says. Thompson also believes work ethic is essential to an athlete’s success and that all athletes must accept that “you don’t get anything in life unless you earn it.” Regarding the current season, Beecroft is not uncomfortable admitting, “This is the worst win-loss season for me as a coach at

UVic.” But she is quick to add, “This is in no way reflective of the players’ performance.” “It’s not about the wins or the losses, but about the special bonds you develop with your athletes,” says Beecroft. Beecroft holds high hopes for the future of her team. “I think if we get good quality people and good quality athletes we will have success. That may not mean winning, but we will create our own kind of success.”

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Men’s rowing team starts season with new talent > JENNY BOYCHUK

GORDON LEE

Brendan Downey (left) has high hopes for the season. about five of us who were freshman together and also a few guys who were older than us in the novice program. We have a great dynamic, just in that group — but it’s also sort of trickled down to the younger guys.” “All the guys connect pretty well even though it takes a little while for the freshmen to get used to it — but they’ve gotten more comfortable and started talking to the guys and joking around and everything,” says Gumley. “I think over the course of the fall we’ll develop and become a pretty cohesive unit,” says Campbell. The team has its standards set high, and will see its first test Oct. 23 in Burnaby for the Western Canada Rowing Championships. “We usually win everything we enter — we have that confidence,” says Chandler. “Overall, we’re looking pretty good, but

UBC is now also a Talent Development Centre and they’ve had a very successful fall with recruiting. I think it’ll be quite a battle between the two programs,” says Campbell. With two rowers away at the Pan American Games, the team will have to fuse quickly when they return, just days before the Western Canadians. “It will be a bit of challenge for them to jump right back into the university program,” says Campbell. “Our lightweight program is looking very strong — I think they’ll be successful.” UBC will be the Vikes’ main rivals at the Westerns. “Whenever we enter a regatta, the two dominant forces are UVic and UBC — we are the two best programs [in Western Canada],” says Downey. “UBC won marginally last year.”

FoR THe WeeK oF oCToBeR 17, 2011

CFUV Top Ten

Despite losing some senior rowers to graduation last year (including the team’s captain), the unusually young Vikes men’s rowing squad is showing some raw talent and promise for the coming season. “We’re working on a bit of a transition to what’s called a Training Development Centre for Rowing Canada — so we have one of the largest programs we’ve had in several years,” says head coach Howard Campbell. “But it’s pretty exciting with the number of new bodies and talent developing in our freshman novice program. It’s been a great start to the year.” Campbell says that younger rowers are filling in the gaps. “This year, it’s going to be a bit more of an inexperienced group because we lost some seniors last year — but we’ve got some second- and third-year guys who are stepping up nicely,” says Campbell. “It’s almost like there’s a new generation. It was a big shift — guys who learned a lot from the veterans are now the guys in charge,” says third-year lightweight Jonathan Chandler. “I think we’ve replaced them with some pretty good bodies.” Team captain and third-year Brendan Downey is pleased with the progress so far. “Everyone has had to adapt and I think right now we’re operating at a level very similar to where we were last year,” says Downey. Assistant captain and fourth-year coxswain Jane Gumley says team dynamics are shaping up. “We had a few of our really top guys graduate last year — our team captain graduated — but [Downey’s] picking it up pretty well,” says Gumley. “A lot of the freshmen went to high school together or raced each other,” says Downey. “I think it’s going really well — there are

When it comes to the Canadian University Rowing Championship (CURC) on Nov. 5 and 6, the Vikes are aiming for wins across the board. They hold three golds and three silvers from last year’s CURCs and would like to improve those totals this year. “We set our standards pretty high because of our past performances. Our goal is to go out and win six gold medals at CURCs, but we’ll do the best we can,” says Gumley. Downey says their biggest national rivals are Ontario universities Brock and Western. But with 11 practices a week and regattas almost every weekend, the team should be prepared by the time the CURCs come around. Campbell is ready to face the challenges ahead, but keeps his aspirations reasonable. “I think if we achieve on par with what we did last year, that will be good. We’ve got some fairly big goals to meet.”

1. THE BRITISH COLUMBIANS * Made For Darker Things (Rural) 2. NEON INDIAN Era Extrana (Dine Alone) 3. ST. VINCENT Strange Mercy (4AD) 4. ZOLA JESUS Conatus (Sacred Bones) 5. WILCO The Whole Love (dbpm/Epitaph) 6. DAN MANGAN * Oh Fortune (Arts & Crafts) 7. RY COODER Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down (Nonesuch) 8. PARANOID CASTLE * Champagne Nightmares (Fake Four) 9. MISTER HEAVENLY Out Of Love (Sub Pop) 10. APPARAT The Devil’s Walk (Mute) * Canadian artist

+ local artist

CFUV

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Hear the weekly top ten on Charts and Graphs Tuesdays at 3:00PM on CFUV 101.9FM or online!

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SCIENCE & TECH PS3 parts help paralyzed patients > SHANDI SHIACH “Your brain works 100 per cent. You’re completely coherent. You just can’t move,” says UVic student Ashkaughn Forghani. Forghani is referring to the disease known as Locked-in Syndrome (LIS), which, like Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), effectively separates the brain from the body The brain is conscious and capable, but can’t make the body do the simplest things, sometimes including breathing. Ordinary tasks remain very difficult. When French journalist Jean-Dominique Bauby had a stroke in 1995 that left him unable to control any part of his body except for his left eyelid, he wrote a book using a painstaking process called partner-assisted scanning. This involves a helper listing off options (in Bauby’s case, letters of the alphabet) until the paralyzed person blinks, or otherwise indicates a choice. Forghani, who is transferring from his third year in biological psychology to visual arts, engaged similar methods while volunteering in neurological rehabilitation at Victoria General Hospital this year. He describes holding up books and asking the person to blink to tell him which one to read. New technology is making it easier for people to overcome the physical limitations created by these conditions. People with full-body paralysis can now draw art on computers. Specialized programs with hover-to-click functionality and on-screen keyboards may allow them to type and surf the Internet using simple, homeassembled, open-source equipment. Anything accomplished by manipulating a cursor on a6 screen seems possible studentsuddenly news ad 242 4x7.5 sept 11for people who can only move their eyes.

One of these new technologies is the EyeWriter, which allows paralyzed artists to draw using only eye movements. When Forghani learned about the glasses after reading the website eyewriter.org, he says he had to build them. Eyewriter.org offers DIY instructions for EyeWriter glasses, listing only five components most people should be able to source locally and assemble by hand, including a pair of sunglasses and a hacked PlayStation Eye. The creators provide the accompanying software program for free, so that anyone can download it and build the hardware. Forghani spent about $100 (the site suggests $50) and 20 hours over three months building his first set of EyeWriter glasses. Most of the time it took him to build that first set was spent reading the instructions; now, he says he would only need two hours per pair. While Forghani says original EyeWriter prototypes frequently burned out, he has made a modification he plans to share with the creators, so others can make better hardware. “I set up the lights so they’re not attached to anything and can move independently,” explains Forghani. “So they don’t keep breaking anymore.” Dr. Paul Winston of VGH neuro-rehab is impressed with Forghani’s initiative, which he says he’ll implement for spinal chord injury patients. “He’s already identified a niche for himself,” says Winston. “All the software is free shareware, so it really expands the capabilities.” “It’s cool because it’s a way you can change someone’s life with something so simple,” says Forghani. “You just go and make these glasses, find someone who’s paralyzed and give it to them, and their life is changed.”

Potrzebie.

RETRO GAMING MADNESS

Classic handheld fails to find audience > ALAN PIFFER My last column featured a failed video-game system called the TurboGrafx-16. Now I’d like to talk about another spectacular failure in the world of video games, but this time in the world of handheld gaming — Atari’s Lynx. Atari was the original king of the home video gaming market in the late ’70s and early ’80s with its 2600 game console. But a series of spectacular business failures, including the mountain of unsold E.T. The Extraterrestrial game cartridges that was notoriously buried in the New Mexico desert, led to the end of Atari’s successful reign. A crash in the home video-game market followed, lasting until the introduction of the Nintendo Entertainment System in the late 1980s. But their earlier failures weren’t quite the end for Atari. In 1989, they released the Lynx, a spectacular hand-held system upon which the weakened video-game company placed hopes for a revival in its fortunes. Released in North America at about the same time as Nintendo’s Game Boy handheld, the Lynx featured technological advantages that not only put it in another league than the limited Game Boy system, but made it comparable to the powerful (at the time) Sega Genesis and Super NES game systems. While the Game Boy games were in only one colour and suffered from a non-backlit screen, the Lynx had a huge colour palette to work with, a backlit screen for playing in dark rooms, and an advanced graphics engine. The Lynx was also able to enjoy a solid library of games, with a unique look resembling the webcomic Diesel Sweeties.

It was able to draw upon a number of Atariproduced arcade hits that could be imported to the handheld system’s smaller screen while retaining their visual quality. Other games produced specifically for the Lynx showed impressive graphics, solid game play and innovative design. So how could such a system fail? Part of it could have been the Lynx’s bulky size, price and low battery life, three features where the Game Boy had an advantage. Ultimately, the Lynx’s failure was due to poor marketing. Nintendo’s Game Boy had a vast library of games and was readily available in stores, particularly during the allimportant holiday seasons. In contrast, it was difficult to find anywhere that sold the Lynx, and hard to find new games. Atari’s struggling game system also faced the catch-22 position of not being able to sell systems because of a lack of games, but not being able to attract third-party game developers to make games because of the system’s poor sales. By the mid-’90s, Atari abandoned the Lynx, but the system retains a strong retro gamer fan base. With a solid lineup of classic games such as RoadBlasters, Blue Lightning, Klax, Hard Drivin’ and ElectroCop, it’s not hard to see why. Ultimately, the Lynx deserved to fare much better than it did in the marketplace.

Do you have a story idea? Let us know! Email scitech@martlet.ca.

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18

MARTLET October 20, 2011

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DIVERSIONS

— Banana? Russian? I’ve got it! Someone Russian is going to slip on a banana peel and break their neck! — Precisely, Robin!

SEEING STARS

EVENTS

HOROSCOPES FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 20TH – BY CANDACE O’NEILL Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19): There are times when it is necessary to stand up for yourself, Capricorn, but there are also times when it is necessary to just let things go. Conflict abounds this week, so choose your battles wisely.

Cancer (June 21 - July 22): Those convictions you held about that certain someone in your life will be reaffirmed this week, Cancer. Whether good or bad, stay true to that intuition of yours, because it usually isn’t wrong.

Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18): All of your hard work will pay off this week, Aquarius, as things effortlessly fall into place for you. So take a deep breath and relax — you’ve certainly earned this cruise down easy street.

KUNDUN BY MARTIN SCORSESE Students for a Free Tibet present KUNDUN by Martin Scorsese Free admission! Thurs Oct 20, 6:30 p.m. in David Lam Auditorium (MAC A144)

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22):  Leo, you can’t change the people around you, as much as you’d like to think. It is a waste of time and energy and will amount to nothing. You have to accept people for who they are — good, bad or otherwise.

ROCK FOR REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE! Rock for Reproductive Justice! Sat Oct 22, 1–4 p.m. in Centennial Square Contact: sjcollective.vic@gmail.com

Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22):  Adventure is calling, Virgo. Now is the time to book that getaway and explore the world. Short on cash? Then it’s time to explore your own backyard. Visit someplace local you’ve never been before. It’s all about discovery.

Pisces (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20): The work keeps piling up and it feels like there is no end in sight these days. But don’t give up just yet, dear Pisces. This week is all about mental clarity and endurance, helping you to ease through that mountain of work. Aries (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19): With so much to see and so much to do these days, it’s hard to stay focused. However, discipline is crucial this week, Aries. Neglecting responsibilities and obligations will leave you in hot water.

HALLOWEEN IMPROV SHOW Halloween Improv show at Fort Cafe (742 Fort St) Tues Oct 25, 7:30 p.m. doors $8 admission/ $5 student w/ID

Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22): Feeling lonely these days, Libra? Then it’s time to shake off that “oh woe is me” attitude and get your awesome self out there! You’re not going to find love or make friends by sitting on your rump — and no, the Internet doesn’t count.

Taurus (Apr. 20 - May 20): No need to play the lottery this week, Taurus, as money will be flying at you from all angles. Friends will repay their debts, bonuses at work will drop into your lap and you’ll magically find $10 in your winter jacket. Enjoy!

Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21): It’s important not to forget just how much influence you can have over others, Scorpio. Your poor attitude will rub off on others this week, making you even more miserable. So try smiling and ditch the frown.

Gemini (May 21 - June 20): All you need is love, Gemini, and it won’t be hard to come by this week. Something about you will have friends, family and even strangers flocking to be around you. Let your wonderful self shine through.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21): They weren’t kidding when they dubbed you the lucky sign, Sagittarius. This holds especially true for this week. So go ahead! Play the lottery, wish on that falling star, and relish the good fortune headed your way.

SSD AGM AGM! Society for Students with Disabilities (SSD) SUB Upper Lounge, Tues Oct 25, 5 p.m. Please bring student ID if voting

CLASSIFIEDS ROOF & GUTTER INSPECTION & REPAIRS de-mossing. BBB member, (250) 380-5685

“the party starts here” a story in every bottle.

Share your story and win!

facebook.com/metroliquorstores twitter.com/metroliquor We’re just minutes away | University Heights Mall, (250) 382-2814 | Tuscany Village, (250) 384-9463 | metroliquor.com | Please use alcohol responsibly

EVENTS ALL WEEK LONG AT FELICITA’S MONDAY

Jamaraoke 9 pm ! NDAY O M Y EVER

TUESDAY

Quiz Night

& Band Hero

8 pm DAY!

S Y TUE EVER

WEDNESDAY

Master of the Tables DJ Competition 9 pm EVERY WEDNESDAY!

THURSDAY

UVIC Idol.

Enter to win a 40' TV with Surround Sound October 13th

8 pm

! SDAY

R Y THU EVER

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Spaceport Union with Chris Ho 9 pm

Premium Bottles $4.25 Buy one get one 50% off Appies

www.felicitas.ca October 20, 2011 MARTLET

19


DIVERSIONS

— Banana? Russian? I’ve got it! Someone Russian is going to slip on a banana peel and break their neck! — Precisely, Robin!

SEEING STARS

EVENTS

HOROSCOPES FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 20TH – BY CANDACE O’NEILL Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19): There are times when it is necessary to stand up for yourself, Capricorn, but there are also times when it is necessary to just let things go. Conflict abounds this week, so choose your battles wisely.

Cancer (June 21 - July 22): Those convictions you held about that certain someone in your life will be reaffirmed this week, Cancer. Whether good or bad, stay true to that intuition of yours, because it usually isn’t wrong.

Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18): All of your hard work will pay off this week, Aquarius, as things effortlessly fall into place for you. So take a deep breath and relax — you’ve certainly earned this cruise down easy street.

KUNDUN BY MARTIN SCORSESE Students for a Free Tibet present KUNDUN by Martin Scorsese Free admission! Thurs Oct 20, 6:30 p.m. in David Lam Auditorium (MAC A144)

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22):  Leo, you can’t change the people around you, as much as you’d like to think. It is a waste of time and energy and will amount to nothing. You have to accept people for who they are — good, bad or otherwise.

ROCK FOR REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE! Rock for Reproductive Justice! Sat Oct 22, 1–4 p.m. in Centennial Square Contact: sjcollective.vic@gmail.com

Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22):  Adventure is calling, Virgo. Now is the time to book that getaway and explore the world. Short on cash? Then it’s time to explore your own backyard. Visit someplace local you’ve never been before. It’s all about discovery.

Pisces (Feb. 19 - Mar. 20): The work keeps piling up and it feels like there is no end in sight these days. But don’t give up just yet, dear Pisces. This week is all about mental clarity and endurance, helping you to ease through that mountain of work. Aries (Mar. 21 - Apr. 19): With so much to see and so much to do these days, it’s hard to stay focused. However, discipline is crucial this week, Aries. Neglecting responsibilities and obligations will leave you in hot water.

HALLOWEEN IMPROV SHOW Halloween Improv show at Fort Cafe (742 Fort St) Tues Oct 25, 7:30 p.m. doors $8 admission/ $5 student w/ID

Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22): Feeling lonely these days, Libra? Then it’s time to shake off that “oh woe is me” attitude and get your awesome self out there! You’re not going to find love or make friends by sitting on your rump — and no, the Internet doesn’t count.

Taurus (Apr. 20 - May 20): No need to play the lottery this week, Taurus, as money will be flying at you from all angles. Friends will repay their debts, bonuses at work will drop into your lap and you’ll magically find $10 in your winter jacket. Enjoy!

Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21): It’s important not to forget just how much influence you can have over others, Scorpio. Your poor attitude will rub off on others this week, making you even more miserable. So try smiling and ditch the frown.

Gemini (May 21 - June 20): All you need is love, Gemini, and it won’t be hard to come by this week. Something about you will have friends, family and even strangers flocking to be around you. Let your wonderful self shine through.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21): They weren’t kidding when they dubbed you the lucky sign, Sagittarius. This holds especially true for this week. So go ahead! Play the lottery, wish on that falling star, and relish the good fortune headed your way.

SSD AGM AGM! Society for Students with Disabilities (SSD) SUB Upper Lounge, Tues Oct 25, 5 p.m. Please bring student ID if voting

CLASSIFIEDS ROOF & GUTTER INSPECTION & REPAIRS de-mossing. BBB member, (250) 380-5685

“the party starts here” a story in every bottle.

Share your story and win!

facebook.com/metroliquorstores twitter.com/metroliquor We’re just minutes away | University Heights Mall, (250) 382-2814 | Tuscany Village, (250) 384-9463 | metroliquor.com | Please use alcohol responsibly

EVENTS ALL WEEK LONG AT FELICITA’S MONDAY

Jamaraoke 9 pm ! NDAY O M Y EVER

TUESDAY

Quiz Night

& Band Hero

8 pm DAY!

S Y TUE EVER

WEDNESDAY

Master of the Tables DJ Competition 9 pm EVERY WEDNESDAY!

THURSDAY

UVIC Idol.

Enter to win a 40' TV with Surround Sound October 13th

8 pm

! SDAY

R Y THU EVER

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Spaceport Union with Chris Ho 9 pm

Premium Bottles $4.25 Buy one get one 50% off Appies

www.felicitas.ca October 20, 2011 MARTLET

19


COMICS

Would you like to see your comics on this page? If you draw funny things and want the world to see, email them to grafx@martlet.ca!

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250‐380‐1888 BBB:3#456-*$+"#93$+")$:3&4

New patients always welcome! 20

MARTLET October 20, 2011


October 20, 2011