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teamLab ULTRA SUBJECTIVE SPACE

17 March - 10 April 2016

MARTIN BROWNE CONTEMPORARY 15 HAMPDEN STREET PADDINGTON NSW 2021 TEL: 02 9331 7997 FAX: 02 9331 7050 info@martinbrownecontemporary.com www.martinbrownecontemporary.com GALLERY HOURS: TUESDAY - SUNDAY 10:30AM - 6PM


LIST OF WORKS

Ever Blossoming Life II – A Whole Year per Year, Gold 2016, digital work, endless, 4 channels United, Fragmented, Repeated and Impermanent World 2013, interactive digital work, endless, 8 channels Black Waves 2016, digital work, continuous loop, 8 channels Flowers and Corpse Glitch, Set of 12 2012, digital work, 2 min (loop), 12 channels Ever Blossoming Life II – A Whole Year per Year, Dark 2016, digital work, endless, 4 channels Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Year 2016, interactive digital installation, endless


Ever Blossoming Life II – A Whole Year per Year, Gold 2016, digital work, endless, 4 channels

This artwork is in continuous change. Aligned to the passing hours of the day, and over a period of one year, a seasonal year of flowers blossom and scatter. Over the course of 365 days, the seasonal variations of plants in a Japanese garden are rendered in the artwork in real-time. That is, the full cycle of seasonal changes takes a full year to take place in the artwork. Flowers are born, grow and blossom in profusion before the petals scatter and the flowers wither and fade away. The cycle of birth and death repeats itself, continuing for eternity. The entire work continues to change and the same state will never be repeated again. While the artwork is from an edition of 6 plus 2 A.P.s., each work has its own life, producing different flowers, thus making it effectively a unique piece of work.


United, Fragmented, Repeated and Impermanent World 2013, interactive digital work, endless, 8 channels

The Internet has altered the relationship between viewers and art. People can become both united with, and participants in, digital artworks. This piece has been developed from an earlier artwork, Nirvana, 2013, which depicts the story of Buddha. In this new version, an interactive element has been added to allow the viewers to interact and influence the world of the finely drawn grid painting and its abstract world of square tiles. The square tiles are treated like pixel art; while the visual space continues to move, the fixed squares inside become more abstract and create an animation with new visual effects. The viewers’ presence causes the two different worlds to merge and mix – the world of the delicate ‘painted squares’ and the world of abstraction made by the grid tiles.


Black Waves 2016, digital work, continuous loop, 8 channels

The movement of water is simulated in a computer-generated three-dimensional space. The water is expressed as a continuous body after calculating the interactions of hundreds of thousands of particles. To express the waves, the behaviour of the particles at the surface of the water was then extracted and lines were drawn in relation to the movement of the particles. The 3-D wave created in a 3-D virtual space is then turned into an artwork in accordance with what teamLab refers to as “Ultra Subjective Space.” In pre-modern Japanese painting, oceans, rivers, and other bodies of water were expressed as a series of lines. These lines give the impression of life, as though water was a living entity. Did people in pre-modern times see the world (oceans, rivers and other bodies of water) as a living entity made up of a collection of lines just as depicted in classical Japanese painting? This form of expression causes us to question why pre-modern people sensed life in rivers and oceans. Also, why did they behave as if they themselves were a part of nature? Perhaps something can be discovered by fusing the fixed objective world of today’s common knowledge with the subjective world of pre-modern people. On viewing this artwork, regardless of the fact the waves are a reproduction of a physical phenomena, if we feel a sense of life in the collection of lines – what can be called the subjective world of pre-modern people – then perhaps this is one aspect of objective recognition, and there is a different side to the modern objective world view. If when viewing this artwork, as opposed to when viewing waves shot with a video camera, people feel that the barrier between themselves and the waves disappears, they feel immersed in the work, perhaps even feeling life in the collection of lines, and that the waves are luring them in, then perhaps we can find a connection to the way pre-modern Japanese people perceived the world and consequently behaved towards the world. If we regard nature as something not just to be observed but rather something of which we are a part – as people of old perceived rivers and oceans as living entities of which they were a part – then it is a way of seeing the world that draws us in, allowing us to feel that there is no boundary between us and nature. Black Waves, 2016 is available in 4, 6, 8 and 12 channel versions.


Flowers and Corpse Glitch, Set of 12 2012, digital work, 2 min (loop), 12 channels

This animation work is based on the concept of what teamLab has coined Ultra Subjective Space. The work consists of 12 film stories based on the themes of civilization and nature, collision, circulation, symbiosis. The surface of Flowers and Corpse Glitch, Set of 12 disintegrates to reveal the hidden underside of the animation. Through an abstract digital structural mesh, the computer creates the semblance of virtual objects and characters in three dimensions. When the digital surface is stripped away, the three dimensional mesh becomes apparent. Through this process of stripping down the image, teamLab wishes to reveal the concept of Ultra Subjective Space. Even though this work looks like a traditional Japanese painting on the surface, its underlying framework is built from a totally different concept using technology. This process reaffirms that new cultural developments, even in today’s information society, are born from a continuation of culture, even if at first glance these seem to have emerged from the most recent times.

Synopsis: 1: Capital City & Noble The capital city in all its wondrous glory. The noble, Hikaru Genji, is living amongst brilliant colors. 2: Disaster & Prosperity An evil disease spreads throughout the capital. In order to discover the cause of the evil disease, Hikaru Genji follows the disease and embarks on a journey outside of the city. 3: Mountain People & Festival Hikaru Genji follows the disease and ends up in a mountain village. To celebrate the blessings of nature, the village holds a festival. 4: Daily Life & Forest The village festival is over and the village returns to quotidien life. Even under the influence of the evil disease, people bravely live on. While receiving the benefits of nature, people live in abundance and civilization develops by cutting down the trees.

5: The Spirit Tree & Yamata no Orochi The mountain village is asked to provide a lot of timber to further develop the city. The villagers cut down a large tree deep within the mountains. When the sacred tree is downed, suddenly Yamata no Orochi appears from the fallen tree. Yamata no Orochi is furious with rage and causes heavy rain and flooding in the valley. 6: Yamata no Orochi & The Gods of the Forest Yamata no Orochi knocks down the houses of the mountain village. Following the rampage of Yamata no Orochi, the Gods of the forest appear and begin to attack the people one after the other. 7: Weapons & Battlefield The mountain villagers ask the samurai to come to the mountain village, and a battle between the warriors, the Gods of the forest and Yamata no Orochi begins. 8: Destruction & Victory After a fierce battle, the warriors make use of the developments of civilization, such as flaming arrows and swords. Eventually the samurai warriors begin to be victorious. 9: Hunger & Wasteland After the battle, the burned-out forest is a wasteland. The benefits of nature are lost and the mountain village suffers hunger and despair. 10: Flower & Corpse Hikaru Genji is surrounded by the dead bodies of the Gods of the forest and Yamata no Orochi. Desparate, he spreads seeds over the corpse of Yamata no Orochi. Then, from the dead corpse, buds appear and numerous flowers bloom. The flowers grow over the trees and the forest is gradually restored. 11: Festival & Forest The people of the mountain begin once again to reap the benefits of the forest and civilization is restored. The people of the village are determined to go on and live in harmony with the forest and the festival is once again held. 12: City & Festival The evil disease subsides in the capital city. The people still do not know the cause of the disease, but they carry out a festival of thanks at this auspicious change of fortune.


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Ever Blossoming Life II – A Whole Year per Year, Dark 2016, digital work, endless, 4 channels

This artwork is in continuous change. Aligned to the passing hours of the day and over a period of one year, a seasonal year of flowers blossom and scatter. Over the course of 365 days, the seasonal variations of plants in a Japanese garden are rendered in the artwork in real-time. That is, the full cycle of seasonal changes takes a full year to take place in the artwork. Flowers are born, grow and blossom in profusion before the petals scatter and the flowers wither and fade away. The cycle of birth and death repeats itself, continuing for eternity. The entire work continues to change and the same state will never be repeated again. While the artwork is from an edition of 6 plus 2 A.P.s., each work has its own life, producing different flowers, thus making it effectively a unique piece of work.


Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Year 2016, interactive digital installation, endless

This artwork is in continuous change. Aligned to the passing hours of the day and over a period of one year, a seasonal year of flowers blossom and scatter. The flowers spring up, grow, bud and blossom before their petals begin withering and the flowers eventually fade away. The cycle of growth and decay repeats itself in perpetuity. The interaction of viewers causes the flowers to shed their petals all at once, whither and die, or come to life and blossom again (depending on if the viewer is close to the work or standing back from the work). Neither a pre-recorded animation nor on loop, the work is being rendered in real time by a computer program. The interaction between the viewer and the installation causes continuous change in the artwork; previous visual states can never be replicated, and will never reoccur. What you can see right now will never be repeated again. When teamLab visited the Kunisaki Peninsula in spring, we saw many cherry blossoms in the mountains and rapeseed blossoms at the mountain base. We began to wonder how many of these flowers were planted by people and how many were propagated by nature. This place, which was simply overflowing with flowers, gave us great contentment. It also made us realize that this large number of flowers was an ecosystem that had been influenced by human intervention. The boundary between the work of nature and the work of humans was extremely vague. In other words, nature and humans are not antagonistic concepts, but rather this pleasant natural world is an ecosystem that also includes the work of humans. Also, unlike in the present day, we could see that human intervention over many years – albeit based on nature’s predetermined rule that humans are unable to understand or control nature – is precisely what had contributed to the creation of the beautiful environment. Before the present day, people used to flourish and prosper along sea routes. But nowadays our focus has moved onto land routes. During our trip, we were made to wonder whether there is still something left of the pre-modern time relationship between humans and nature within our secluded valley of human habitation of many years. We also wondered what kind of behaviour would constitute artificial behaviour toward nature based on this premise that nature cannot be controlled, and whether these behaviours could perhaps give us clues about the future.


teamLab Artist collaborative based in Tokyo. Formed in 2001. teamLab is a collaborative, interdisciplinary creative group that brings together professionals from various fields of practice in the digital society: artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians, architects, web and print graphic designers and editors. Referring to themselves as “Ultra-technologists,” their aim is to achieve a balance between art, science, technology and creativity. http://www.team-lab.net/en

2013 “Distilling Senses: A Journey through Art and Technology in Asian Contemporary Art”, Hong Kong Arts Centre, Hong Kong, China, Dec 11, 2013 - Jan 12, 2014 Singapore Biennale 2013 “If The World Changed”, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore, Oct 23, 2013 - Feb 16, 2014 2012

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2016 “teamLab: “Ultra Subjective Space”, Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney, Australia, March 17 – Apr 10, 2016 “teamLab: “Between Art and Physical Space”, Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul, Turkey, March 4 – Aug 21, 2016 “teamLab: “Living Digital Space and Future Parks”, Pace Art + Technology, Menlo Park, California, USA, Feb 6 - Jul 1, 2016 2015 “What a Loving, and Wonderful World”, Radcliffe Gallery, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, Oct 15 – Nov 13, 2015 “teamLab: Flutter of Butterflies beyond Borders”, Saatchi Gallery, London, Sep 10 – 13, 2015 “teamLab Exhibition, Walk Through the Crystal Universe”, Pola Museum Annex, Tokyo , Aug 21 - Sep 27, 2015 “Japan Kabuki Festival in Las Vegas 2015-2016”, Bellagio Hotel Fountain, Las Vegas, USA, Aug 14 - Aug 16, 2015 “teamLab & Kagawa Digital Art Festa in Summer”, Sun Port Takamatsu, Kagawa, Jul 25 - Aug 09, 2015 “teamLab: Flowers and People - Gold”, Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney, Australia, July 23 – Aug 16, 2015 “Summer Night - Bamboo Lighting”, Mifuneyamarakuen, Saga, Japan, Jul 17 - Aug 31, 2015 “Expo Milano 2015”, Milan, Italy, May 1 - Oct 31, 2015 “Prudential Eye Awards 2015 Exhibition”, ArtScience Museum, Singapore, Jan 17 - Mar 31, 2015 “Universe of Water Particles on the Grand Palais”, Grand Palais, Paris , France, Mar 26 - Mar 29, 2015 “Moving Light, Roving Sight”, Ikkan Art Gallery, Singapore, Jan 22 - Feb 18, 2015 “Espace teamLab” MAISON&OBJET PARIS 20th Anniversary, Paris Nord Villepinte Exhibition Centre, Paris, France, Jan 23 - Jan 27, 2015 2014 “teamLab Dance! Art Exhibition! and Learn and Play! teamLab Future Park”, National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Miraikan),Tokyo, Japan, Nov 29, 2014 - May 10, 2015 “Garden of Unearthly Delights: Works by Ikeda, Tenmyouya & teamLab”, Japan Society, New York, USA, Oct 10, 2014 - Jan 11, 2015 “Kunisaki Art Festival”, Kunisaki Peninsula, Oita, Japan, Oct 04 - Nov 30, 2014 “We Love Video This Summer”, Pace Beijing, Beijing, China, July 26 - Sept 5, 2014 “teamLab and Kagawa Digital Art Festa in Summer”, Sun Port Takamatsu Seto Sea Pallet / Takamatsu City Museum of Art / e-topia-kagawa, Kagawa, Japan, July 19 - Aug 13, 2014 “teamLab: Ultra Subjective Space”, Pace Gallery, New York, Jul 17 - Aug 15, 2014 “mission [SPACE×ART] - beyond cosmologies”, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan, Jun 7 – Aug 31, 2014 “teamLab and Saga Merry-go-round Exhibition”, Saga Prefectural Art Museum / The Saga Prefectural Space & Science Museum / Kyushu Ceramic Museum / Saga Prefectural Nagoya Castle Museum, Saga, Japan, Feb 28 - Mar 22, 2014

“We are the Future” teamLab exhibition, National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung, Taiwan, May 26 - Aug 12, 2012 2011 teamLab ”LIVE!”, Kaikai Kiki Gallery Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan, April 10 - May 8, 2011 PERMANENT DISPLAY 2015 teamLab Gallery Matama Beach, Oita, Japan (“Flowers and People”, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together - Kunisaki Peninsula”) 2014 CTBC Financial Park, Taipei, Taiwan (“Circulum Formosa”) HUIS TEN BOSCH, Nagasaki, Japan (“Resonating Trees”) Narita International Airport, Terminal 1 North Wing, Chiba, Japan (“Vortex of Water Particles”) 2013 Narita International Airport, Terminal 1 South Wing, Chiba, Japan (“What a Living, and Beautiful World”) PUBLIC COLLECTION Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia Boruan Contemporary, Istanbul, Turkey: “Universe of Water Particles” Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, California, USA: “Life Survives by the Power of Life” & “Cold Life” Asia Society, New York, NY, USA: “Life Survives by the Power of Life”


© Martin Browne Contemporary © All images copyright teamLab This catalogue is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. COMPILER: Dean Andersen PHOTOGRAPHER: teamLab COLOUR SEPARATIONS: Spitting Image, Sydney PRINTING: Blue Star, Sydney Cover Image: Ever Blossoming Life II - A Whole Year per Year, Dark, 2016, digital work, endless, 4 channels


Teamlab | ULTRA SUBJECTIVE SPACE | ONLINE CATALOGUE  
Teamlab | ULTRA SUBJECTIVE SPACE | ONLINE CATALOGUE  

Teamlab | ULTRA SUBJECTIVE SPACE | 17 March - 10 April 2016 | Martin Browne Contemporary