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CONTENTS DESIGN STUDIO >

1

> B r is t ol Te m ple G at ew ay

2

> H e al t hy Wor k pl ace

3

> O p t ion s Proje c t

4

> I nt e r ve nt ion

5

> L i t e r at ure review

6

> T ime line

7

> B e r lin /B r is t ol pos t e r

8

> G rou p Proje c t

C U LT U R A L CO N T E X T >


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TE M PL E M E A DS G ATE WAY


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TE M PL E M E A DS G ATE WAY

TEMPLE MEADS GATEWAY MODEL


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Top floor (Flat One) Flat Two Flat Three Office Rentable space

N


Section BB


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

HEALTHY WORKPLACE – ELEVATION E L E VATI O N A

E L E VATI O N B

A

➔B


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

5M CUBE FROM JOINT BETWEEN GABIONS AND CONCRETE CLADDING

Internal Elevation

External Elevation


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

5M CUBE FROM JOINT BETWEEN GABIONS AND CONCRETE CLADDING

Axonometric

Axo Sketch


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

5M CUBE FROM JOINT BETWEEN GABIONS AND CONCRETE CLADDING

Roof Detail

Section Plan


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

HEALTHY WORKPLACE RENDERING

Initial images of ямВoor plate layout and relationship between spaces and context


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H E A LTH Y WO R K PL AC E

HEALTHY WORKPLACE – CONTEXTUALISATION


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INTERVENTION – CUBE ONE

INTERVENTION

CUBE ONE • •

• • • •

• •

Architecture takes time to knit itself into the fabric of a city. Bristol is a unique thriving metropolis which is rich in history and cultural diversity. It has adapted and grown and portrays the values around architecture that is organic. Everyone sees thing differently. This first cube is a polycarbonate, lightweight structure. The floor plan is design to lead you to the VIEWPOINT. At this point, a picture is to be taken of what captivates you through the 400mm x 300mm aperture. A rapid developing camera will reveal the photograph. It is intended that the next step would proceed to CUBE TWO where a series of photographs will be projected onto the walls and floors. Finally, the CORK CUBE is where the photograph taken will be ‘knitted’ into the wall. The photographer will seek out an appropriate spot in which to pin their photo. After the ten days of exhibition there should be a beautifully organic panoramic image incorporating all the different VIEWS from the people and visitors of Bristol.


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INTERVENTION – CUBE TWO

INTERVENTION

CUBE TWO •

• •

• •

Overhead projectors are to project photographs taken by the people of Bristol life. Timber panels at 50mm thickness. Strapped together with aluminium frame and pinned into the ground Weight of each panel is 24.77 kg. The door has a simple lock and frame. “Joy in looking and comprehending is nature’s most beautiful gift.” Albert Einstein

• •

Panels interlock and are bolted Adjustable feet as seen previously will allow for desired elevation Plastic sheeting stapled to roof for water proofing.

RISK

Each of the three cubes hold a unique element to the particular journey being expressed through the instillation. The ‘Black Cube’ is a dark room projecting a very real side of Bristol - by it’s people. Without people in a city, it cannot function and would fall to ruin; just as architecture needs people in order to succeed.


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INTERVENTION – CUBE THREE

INTERVENTION

CUBE THREE •

• •

• •

• • •

The materiality of this structure consists of TIMBER PANELS at 5mm x 5mm thickness Within the panels are loosely positioned, glued CORKS which could be recycled. The panels are covered in a waterproofing WAX Each corked panel is then assembled using THREADED SCREWS for quick assembly. At each corner are ANGLED BRACKETS that enhance stability Attached to these brackets are ADJUSTABLE FEET to allow for the unevenness of the ground surface. The roof has a 500mm lip so that when placed on the top of the structure it increases stability. Each Panel contains 600 corks. Each Panel weighs 24.77kg. The roof weighs 13.27kg.

The holes in the cork walls capture glimpses of Bristol Harbourside in themselves. Daylight filters through the openings and creates shadows


PRoJ ec t

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inteRVention RenDeRS & conteXt

inteRVention

Model in context

FLÂneUR – “STROLLER” “LOUNGER” “SAUNTERER” “LOAFER”


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L ITE R AT U R E REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW Collage City; Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter

COLIN ROWE >

This book refers widely to urban planning and the ideologies of modern architecture. The language used in the book has been referred to as performing ‘grammatical acrobats’ by Donald Appleyard, APA Journal, and to an extent I would agree. I found the book a difficult read but once passed ‘Utopia: Decline and Fall?’ I begin to unearth the true purpose of the book. Despite this I found ‘Collage City’ to be extremely interesting, philosophical and enlightening. This book explores a large variety of architects and master plans for forward thinking cities such as Le Corbusier and his master plan for Paris (Pg 72). The interesting aspect of social and cultural contribution to the ‘urbanistic collage’ involved in forming a city accentuated my intrigue. Rowe looks at the most accomplished architects to redefine the utopian ideals for the perfect city. He suggests the need for an amalgamation of idealisms, in order to create an organic and archetypal city.

It sets out various analyses of urban form in a number of existing cities known to be aesthetically successful, ‘examining their actually existing urban structure as found, revealing it to be the end product of a ceaseless process of fragmentation, the collision/ superimposition/contamination’ of many diverse ideas imposed on it by successive generations, says D. Appleyard. This book investigates the theory behind these examples within modern architecture and suggests whether their flaws only emphasise their inherent progressive qualities. Taking the utopian views of these ‘ideal cities’ from each example, Rowe aims to reinterpret the architects’ conceptions in order to create a more inclusive and complex multi layered understanding of urban design. This book suggests the intimate role the architectplanner plays in producing a character filled, culturally rich urban environment which rejects the utopian

view of ‘total planning’ but instead highlighting the significant successes of knitting together small areas to generate an urban setting. The aspect I most enjoyed about reading this book was unsurprisingly the use of pertinent imagery representing a rough timeline of significant architectural influence on the ultimate urban settlements by celebrated architects. The final thought that all future development within cities will ultimately be based upon the history of urbanised ideology and theory is surely thought provoking. ‘Ambiguous and composite buildings’ gives a useful account of comparisons between urban megastructures and demonstrative Nolli style plans. In conclusion, I would recommend this book if not at least for its varied and pertinent selection of maps and images, aswell as its insight into the history of urban planning and its forward thinking theories for future city design.

FRED KOETTER > Pxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx < Pxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx < Pxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


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TIMELINE

TI M E LI N E

WO R LD TI M E LI N E (A RC H ITEC T U R E ) A F TE R 19 9 0 - 1992 - 1994 - 1996 - 1998 - 2000 - 2002 - 2004 - 2006 - 2008

- 2010

Bank of America Corporate Centre, Uptown Charlotte North Carolina • 90th tallest building in the world at 264m high with 60 floors Kansai International Airport, Osaka Japan The Eden Project Cornwall • Architect Nicholas Grimshaw Lucerne Culture and Congress Centre • Architect Jean Nouvel Tate Modern, London • The building was converted by architects Herzog & de Meuron and contractors Carillion Imperial War Museum North, Manchester • The museum explores the impact of modern conflicts on people and society Seattle Central Library, Seattle • Architect Rem Koolhaas Maggie’s Centre, Glasgow • The buildings that house the centres have been designed by leading architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid and Richard Rogers Beijing National Stadium, also known officially as the National Stadium or colloquially ), is a stadium in Beijing, China. The stadium was designed as the Bird’s Nest ( for use throughout the 2008 Summer Olympics and Paralympics • Architect Herzog & de Meuron Burj Khalifa, Downtown Dubai • Tallest building in the world at 828m high

WO R LD TI M E LI N E A F TE R 19 9 0 - 1990 -

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

-

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

- 2007 - 2008 - 2009

The World Wide Web and Internet protocol (HTTP) and WWW language (HTML) created by Tim Berners-Lee The digital answering machine invented The smart pill invented The pentium processor invented HIV protease inhibitor invented The Java computer language invented Web TV invented The gas-powered fuel cell invented Viagra invented Scientists measure the fastest wind speed ever recorded on earth, 509 km/h(318 mph). Tekno Bubbles patented Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother celebrates her 100th birthday The world’s first self-contained artificial heart is implanted in Robert Tools The Mars Odyssey finds signs of large water ice deposits on the planet Mars Rugby World Cup: England defeats Australia 20–17 after extra time South Africa is awarded the 2010 FIFA World Cup Pope John Paul II dies; over 4 million people travel to the Vatican to mourn Ellen Johnson Sirleaf assumes office as President of Liberia, the first female elected head of state in Africa The Pablo Picasso painting Portrait of Suzanne Bloch, together with Candido Portinari’s O Lavrador de Café, is stolen from the São Paulo Museum of Art The British government introduces emergency legislation temporarily to nationalize Northern Rock, the 5th largest mortgage bank in the UK, due to the bank’s financial crisis Morgan Tsvangirai is sworn in as the new Prime Minister of Zimbabwe power-sharing deal with President Robert Mugabe signed in Sept, 2008 • Barck Obama becomes the 44th Preseident of America


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C R ITI C A L READING

8

CRITICAL READING (GROUP PROJECT) Walter Benjamin - Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century Walter Benjamin (1892 –1940) was a GermanJewish intellectual, who functioned as a literary critic, philosopher and sociologist. His work combined elements of Idealism, Romanticism, Historical Materialism and Jewish mysticism, and has made influential contributions to aesthetic theory and Western Marxism. Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century is one of Benjamin’s many semi-fragmentary writings about the modern city and the social-psychological changes that it brings about. He discusses architecture, commerce, and the work of a poet he saw as emblematic of the changing city, Charles Baudelaire. This essay provides an analysis of the Paris Arcades. The Paris arcades were built in the nineteenth century as shopping spaces to accommodate the significant increases in commodity production, largely within the textile industry. Sensing that the Arcades signalled a transformation that was still felt a century later, Benjamin took this space to be emblematic of the human condition since the advent of industrial capitalism. For example, the rise of high fashion (and the speed with which fashions became obsolete) speaks to an acceleration of temporal experience. The arcades were largely built of iron girders, facilitated by prefabrication technology used for rails. This essay is split into six sections. I - FOURIER OR THE ARCADES The utopian philosopher Fourier wanted society and its individuals to operate smoothly like a machine (not guided by morality or virtue). His ideas were crystallized in the new shops and the apartments inhabited by ‘flâneur’. The term flâneur comes from the French noun flâneur—which has the basic meanings of “stroller”, “lounger”, “saunterer”, “loafer”. Charles Baudelaire developed a derived meaning of flâneur, which Benjamin uses in this essay, that describes “a person who walks the city in order to experience it”. In this section Benjamin emphasises that material and social conditions make the Arcades possible.

WALTER BENJAMIN July 15 1892 - September 26 1940

< Parisien arcades

< Flaneur – a person that walks the city in order to experience it

As capitalism advances, the Arcades themselves will become obsolete, replaced by the department store. Eventually the department store will become obsolete, which is a shift that we are experiencing now. Benjamin’s idea is that the grand version of history forgets the effort that society makes to create its new inventions and forms of behavior within a universe of illusory distraction. Here the ‘flâneur’ abandons himself to the illusory distractions of the marketplace. II - DAGUERRE OR THE DIORAMAS Daguerre, and the photograph. Compared to panoramas. Role of photography in transforming art, but photo also becomes a commodity, and in fact amplifies the commodity trade in relationship to the portrait. Relationship of photography to montage. Introduction of what Benjamin would, in another context, call unconscious optics. III - GRANDVILLE OR THE WORLD EXHIBITIONS World exhibitions. Role of the culture industry (or entertainment industry). Audiences submit to being manipulated (by the seductiveness of images). Work through how alienation is working here in this essay. Note the discord between the utopian and cynical elements. “Invention” of advertising in the nineteenth century. Discuss Richard Ohmann’s analysis of the emergence of consumer culture, and the relationship to the rise of magazines. IV - LOUIS PHILIPPE, OR THE INTERIOR. Home finally separated from work. Agriculture: worked the land where you live. Separation of home and office. Spend some time working through the notion of the collector. Also discuss the concept of types of literature (detective fiction) emerging along with different working and social conditions. V - BAUDELAIRE OR THE STREETS OF PARIS Baudelaire section. Concept of the flaneur. Concept of the dialectical image. Benjamin thinks through the concept of the new, the illusion of the new.

With the emergence of the individual person (as opposed to group or class member), places of dwelling became more important as private spaces. In a city lacking privacy it was here that people could sustain some illusion of it. In charge of this space, each individual collected and used art to represent their ideal universe, assembled from traces of far off places and distant memories. Yet by the end of the nineteenth century there is nowhere left to hide, so people started personalizing their offices instead. Benjamin emphasises people’s need to stamp their individuality on their rooms. Consumerist society surrounds itself with possessions and glamour, but the Paris Community showed it was nevertheless vulnerable. This is because newness cannot really save society so long as its inhabitants are still distracted. Workers were taught to believe in exchange value by the display of luxury goods from a world marketplace. Fashion was the ritual by which ‘commodity fetishism’ demanded to be worshipped, as it made unnatural material desirable. VI - HAUSSMANN OR THE BARRICADES Benjamin reconciles these elements through Freud’s logic of the dream. All of the elements we have described thus far represent “residues (or traces) of a dream world,” thus implying a state of decline; in essence, they have passed their peak, are in a state of ruins. All that is left is the traces. This is informed by Freud’s logic of the dream, in which Freud argues that dreams are essentially designed to keep us asleep, to sustain our dream state (examples-incorporating external reality into the dream). Thus the realization of these utopian visions (such as Fourier and Grandville’s whimsical visions) in the waking world is seen by Benjamin as the culmination or completion of the dialectic. Sleeping/dreaming knowledge of our exploitation utopian elements waking/awareness a synthesis (utopia achieved in awakened world) Benjamin’s work can be considered exemplary in many ways for the way it combines criticism with explanation and moves so smoothly between real place and events, ideas and sociological phenomena.

< Fashion was a ritual

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