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A new vision for the North Circular Road


CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 TACKLing DECADES OF BLIGHT the vision COLLABORATION TO ACHIEVE REGENERATION DELIVERABILITY, INVESTMENT, COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE & EMPLOYMENT

2 14

20

26

Executive Summary The North Circular Road area has suffered decades of blight due to uncertainty about road improvement schemes; In 2009, Transport for London, (TfL) decided to sell its surplus properties to Notting Hill Housing (NHH) after reduced scale road improvements were chosen; Enfield Council’s policy is to regenerate the North Circular Road area and it has identified it as a strategic growth area. The aim is for the delivery of residential-led regeneration and Enfield’s emerging Area Action Plan envisages 1,500 new dwellings by the year 2025; Notting Hill’s objective is to achieve comprehensive residential-led regeneration in a phased manner, delivering new homes and community facilities; P  hase 1, the refurbishment of some 258 properties started in September 2010 and has almost been completed;  Phase 2, the regeneration of smaller sites is underway with the submission of detailed planning applications;  Phase 3, the regeneration of larger sites, is still at the pre planning stage;  Phase 4, the potential for comprehensive redevelopment at Ritz Parade and Green Lanes requires detailed discussion and partnership with the Council; A ‘Regeneration Framework’ has been developed in consultation with Enfield Council to put forward a comprehensive vision for the future;

The principles underpinning the Regeneration Framework are to repair, connect, environmentally enhance and improve safety and security in the local communities along the North Circular Road. The objective is also to provide high-quality housing, new facilities and enhanced landscaping and public realm; To succeed, Notting Hill needs to collaborate closely with Enfield Council and the local community. Notting Hill is already doing this to achieve the comprehensive regeneration of the North Circular Road; This vision document sets out the cohesive approach that Notting Hill has to the regeneration of this stretch of the North Circular; This cohesive approach is founded on the principles of connecting fragmented communities, maximising the provision of affordable homes, while ensuring the c reation of balanced communities and an overall “greening” of the environment; The uniqueness of the opportunities offered by the redevelopment incorporates refurbishments, small and large and potential for comprehensive new build; Mixed use at the existing nodes of Green Lanes and Ritz Parade. This package of opportunities, which can only be achieved by working in partnership with the Council, also enables an overall improvement to the character and durability of the architecture on the North Circular; Notting Hill is proud of this vision, which has the priority aim of delivering at least part of the overwhelming need for new homes, a considerable amount of which will provide affordable homes for the existing communities of Enfield.


INTRODUCTION When we first looked at the North Circular Road opportunity we had mixed feelings. Excitement about the opportunity; a belief that we could make things better for the residents, the area and the environment; and a feeling that we could work in partnership to transform the neighbourhood. This was somewhat balanced by a recognition that some of the buildings were so far gone they would have to come down, others would need a vast amount of work; the issue of squatting, squalor and crime; and the sheer cost, scale and complexity of the scheme meant we needed to commit completely to the project.

In essence we have laid the foundations for a phased, yet cohesive, residential-led regeneration of the area. Already 250 empty, derelict homes have been improved and let to local families. Crime has gone down and the place looks so much better. We will provide high quality new homes too, filling the empty spaces and pulling fragmented areas together. We will invest in local social infrastructure and improve the local environment too. Coming soon are green edges to the main road and, through the careful design of the new homes, a shield to protect the existing homes from car and lorry fumes and noise.

In order to tackle the issues we needed a strong vision, to motivate ourselves when the going got rough, to help clarify our objectives when our plans would be challenged (inevitably), and to inspire those involved with the project or hoping to benefit from it. This document provides our vision and explains how we plan to deliver it.

Success is only possible with the input of all stakeholders, especially councillors and officers at Enfield, the police, our consultants and contractors, and most of all the local community. Working together, we will bring forward the high quality neighbourhood that will transform the North Circular Road.

Kate Davies Chief Executive Notting Hill Housing Group

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT BACKGROUND For almost 50 years, plans were under discussion to widen the North Circular Road (A406) and this led to the largescale acquisition of hundreds of properties by the public authorities. Whilst plans were being advanced, a large number of these properties were leased to Enfield Council, who used them for temporary accommodation. The tenants had no security and few rights, as full rights were reserved by the authorities to obtain vacant possession. For decades, no clear decisions were made on the plans for the A406, and the affected area suffered years of blight leading to associated problems such as fly- tipping, squatting and increased crime levels.

Master plan sites

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Eventually, far more modest improvements to the North Circular Road were chosen and this led to Transport for London (TfL) deciding to dispose of the properties that it no longer required. Notting Hill Housing was approached by TfL in early 2009 after a decision had been made to sell its surplus properties. Working closely with Enfield Council and with financial support from the Government’s Homes and Communities Agency (HCA), Notting Hill was able to agree the purchase. An important part of the purchase was that Enfield Council was able to nominate existing residents to Notting Hill, giving residents security of tenure for the first time.

The purchase was finalised in early 2010 and included a wide-ranging portfolio of existing houses and flats, vacant plots of land and commercial properties at Green Lanes and Ritz Parade.


ENFIELD COUNCIL’S POLICY Enfield Council’s adopted and emerging planning policy documents promote significant growth in the North Circular area. The area is identified in adopted planning policies for significant residential development, including the development of vacant land and redevelopment and intensification of existing sites. The North Circular is identified to be a Strategic Growth Area where future development and growth are to be focused. This is further described in Core Strategy Policy 44 which recognises the North Circular area to be a location for residential growth with the capacity to deliver up to 2,000 new homes. A North Circular Area Action Plan (AAP) is being prepared to provide further detail. The most recent draft version identifies the delivery of at least 1,500 new dwellings by 2025. The AAP identifies a number of specific Development Sites within the document. KEY BENEFITS

Both Enfield Council and Notting Hill recognise that the revitalisation of the North Circular Road poses a unique and major challenge as it involves a whole series of linear sites along two miles of one of London’s busiest transport routes. The physical location of many of the sites in close proximity to what is effectively an urban motorway presents particular problems but also offers opportunities to enhance the local environment through high quality design and landscaping as well as the provision of new community facilities.

KEY ISSUES

As with all complex regeneration schemes,the longterm aspirations for the area will take time to achieve. Notting Hill decided that it wanted to show early progress to demonstrate positive signs of change and a beginning to the end to years of neglect and degradation. At the same time, Notting Hill’s priority was to ensure that early progress was very much within the Council’s policy framework and part of a comprehensive and joined up vision for the future.

Draft North Circular Area Action Plan 2011

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT A PHASED APPROACH Notting Hill has identified four interlinked phases to achieve the comprehensive regeneration of the North Circular Road sites. The opportunity these sites present is principally for residential-led regeneration, with the potential for local infrastructure to be delivered on specific sites.

Master pHASING

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PHASING SUMMARY Phase

Proposal

Phase 1

Refurbishment of existing properties:

Status

Grant funding expiry

Completed

October 2012

Planning applications awaiting determination

March 2014

Planning applications to be submitted Autumn 2012

March 2015

Liaison and consultation required with relevant parties to develop collaborative approach

n/a

 258 existing properties brought back into use or upgraded;  Environmental and amenity improvements;  De-conversion to provide additional family units. Phase 2

Regeneration of smaller sites:  Potential to provide 60 new dwellings across five sites through infill development of underutilised land.

Phase 3

Regeneration of larger sites:  Potential to deliver 247 new dwellings across three sites;  Delivery of mixed size and tenure dwellings.

Phase 4

Comprehensive redevelopment sites:  Potential to deliver mixed use redevelopment and meet infrastructure requirements on strategic sites.

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT

Refurbishment and development sites – phasing and numbers of units

6


Phase 1 R  efurbishment of existing properties (September 2010 – September 2012) Following acquisition of properties in January and April 2010, Notting Hill commenced the main refurbishment works in September 2010. A total of 258 properties are being refurbished at a total cost in excess of £60M (including acquisition costs) supported by funding of £39M from the HCA and additional funding from Enfield Council for loft conversions to change 3 bedroom houses to 4 bedrooms. The works include: Removal of derelict lock-up garages and fly tipping from Birchwood Court; Upgrading of occupied houses, many of which had no central heating, had single glazing and had suffered from a lack of maintenance for many years;

Regeneration in action – refurbished properties, garden improvements, rubbish clearance, loft conversionS and construction training

Identifying residents in need of aids and adaptations and, where needed, arranging for re-housing in more suitable, supported, accommodation; Eviction of over 50 squatted properties and cleaning up of significant fly tipping and accumulated rubbish in the rear gardens of squats; Bringing back into use vacant properties, now let to families nominated by the Council.

before refurbishment

after refurbishment

Working with the police to tackle anti-social behaviour

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT Phase 2 Regeneration of smaller sites (Winter of 2012 – Spring 2014) Included in the purchase from TfL were 10 vacant plots, where properties had been demolished at some point in the past, probably due to their state of dereliction. A number of these were overgrown and fly tipped; others were cleared and used by TfL while working on the road improvements. In addition to the vacant sites, a limited number of sites were assessed as suitable for small-scale development as a result of a detailed assessment of the neighbouring land and rear alleyways associated with them. These sites include 1, 5, 12 and 13. Detailed planning applications for the smaller sites have already been submitted to the Council and are currently under consideration. Computer generated image of site 15

View of unkempt access rear of Telford Road properties

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Views of vacant site proposed for development at the junction of Telford Road and Bexhill Road


PerspectivE sketch site 1 – Birchwood Court/Melville Gardens

Views of site 1 at rear of properties near junction of North Circular Road/Melville Gardens

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT Phase 3 R  egeneration of larger sites (Summer 2013 – Spring 2014) These larger sites (sites 6, 11 & 14) offer an opportunity for more comprehensive redevelopment. The road works undertaken on the A406 raised issues for some locations, especially sites 11 and 14. The impact of road widening and installation of a new footbridge at the Wilmer Way/Bowes Road junction was considerably worse than expected. Some existing properties were left compromised leading to the conclusion that replacement with new build developments was a more sustainable solution. The regeneration opportunities identified on sites 6, 11 and 14 provide the enormous potential to deliver quality mixed tenure new homes, whilst at the same time improving the overall urban design and landscape quality for existing and new residents. The redevelopment at the larger sites proposed by Notting Hill has, at its heart, an opportunity to “green” large sections of the North Circular.

Perspective sketch Of site 11 – eastern side of Wilmer Way, revised scheme

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Computer generated image Of site 11 – eastern side of Wilmer Way, Revised scheme

Computer generated image Of site 14 – Bowes Road – Telford Road, Revised scheme

Site 14 – Current view


perspective sketch of site 6 – Bowes Road

perspective sketch of site 6 – Bowes Road

Bowes Road – current views of site

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TACKLING DECADES OF BLIGHT

Phase 4

 Regeneration of neighbourhood centres at Ritz Parade & Green Lanes (2013 to 2016) The blight caused by the indecision over the possible road widening, the road works finally undertaken and the presence of the busy road have all contributed to the poor provision of neighbourhood facilities, including commercial/ employment, retail, health, leisure and community uses. Ritz Parade and Green Lanes junction, comprising commercial properties with residential above and some vacant land, were identified as key locations. Rather than proceeding with the low key development or refurbishment in these areas, Notting Hill has engaged with the Council and local community to work on a positive long-term strategy. The comprehensive redevelopment opportunities presented by these sites can only be resolved and driven forward in partnership with the Council given the fractured ownership in these locations. Notting Hill has taken considerable steps in liaising with Council officers and members and engaging with the local community over and above the normal pre-planning application consultation. The setting up of the South West Enfield Partnership (SWEP) by the Council is a significant channel to bring together the different issues affecting the area and to set the combined objective for the most significant phase of the regeneration. Notting Hill is taking a proactive role, being involved directly with the community sub-group and chairing the Employment, Skills & Enterprise sub-group.

Potential layout plan for site 10 – Ritz Parade

Existing view of Ritz Parade

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Perspective SKETCH of sites 2, 3 and 4 – Green Lanes Junction

Green Lanes Junction – current views

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the vision The Regeneration Framework This southern edge of Enfield comprises distinct areas with their own character, reflecting the communities within it. For example, Green Lanes has a distinctive character; it is a busy through route, it provides a mix of local facilities and is a focal point for the local community and businesses. Other parts are very different: the area to the east (close to Arnos Grove) off Telford Road for example is relatively cut off and benefits from being a quieter, purely residential area.

Taking into account the different characteristics of the local communities and Enfield Council’s emerging North Circular Road Area Action Plan, Stock Woolstencroft Architects has prepared a Regeneration Framework. This document, presented to Enfield Council in Autumn/Winter 2010, put forward a comprehensive vision for the area along the North Circular Road between Telford Road and Eastern Approach.

The document suggested ways in which development could make significant improvements to the image of this important location within the borough as part of the proposals for its residential–led regeneration.

Model of regeneration framework

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Characteristics of the Different Sites A broad variety of regeneration opportunities exist across a range of sites and areas. The nature of these sites vary but can be broadly categorised as follows:

PHASE 2 AND 3 SITES Service road sites (site 1 and part of site 11) – rear service lanes and alleyways are a key feature of this part of the Borough. More recently they have become a problem, attracting fly tipping, crime and security issues. Notting Hill’s proposals here are for small-scale interventions providing new homes in safe and secure environments. These mews-style developments are sensitively designed to preserve and enhance the amenity of, and access for, existing properties; Infill sites (sites 5, 12, 13 & 15) – over the years piecemeal demolition has left gaps in the urban fabric. Development proposals seek to re-establish the continuity

PHASE 4 SITES of the street frontages. Where possible, design proposals aim to shield neighbouring homes from the negative environmental impacts of the North Circular Road; and  Urban sites (sites 6, 11 and 14) – generally the sites along the North Circular Road are well connected and benefit from excellent access to public transport. Each of the local centres, Arnos Grove, Bowes Road and Green Lanes provide local amenities including good transport links. The urban nature of these locations are an important characteristic of the locality and new development reflects the existing nature of the area rather than its past.

Green Lanes Junction

M  ajor regeneration sites – two of the sites – Ritz Parade and Green Lanes are key to long-term regeneration. These provide greater opportunities for a step change from the current situation but are longer term in nature and require the collaboration of the Council. Possibilities here are explored at section 4 of this document. Computer generated image OF SITE 11, Wilmer Way Junction – Revised scheme

15 4


the vision Key Principles of The Comprehensive Approach Although the scale and nature of the sites vary there are a number of key principles that link the sites. These principles were derived from the initial Area Action Plan work carried out by Enfield Council and developed further in consultation with the Borough. They include:  New housing – Providing high quality housing to suit a broad range of needs for the whole community. Proposals will respond to local context and character – for example, the more protected sites located behind existing properties fronting the North Circular are suited to providing larger family housing, whereas the frontage locations provide smaller dwellings;

Connectivity

16

Affordable housing – Maximising the amount of affordable housing that can be delivered to suit a variety of tenures and to meet housing needs in the Borough (further details of affordable housing provision are set out on page 24);  Repairing and connecting communities – development proposals seek to improve the immediate area and the wider setting through improved connections to communities, facilities and amenities;


 Environmental improvements – all development proposals aim to improve the level and quality of green spaces. New buildings are set back from the road to provide a green buffer and visual amenity for all. The larger sites will incorporate children’s play space and amenity areas;

Green Space

I mproving safety and security – many of the sites contain properties which are derelict and in a poor state of repair. This naturally attracts anti-social behaviour and crime. Well-designed developments will improve the safety and security of new and existing residents, something already achieved by the refurbishment programme;

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the vision I mproving the harsh environment of the North Circular Road – where appropriate new developments will provide a buffer between the road and the existing housing. The new housing is designed to provide the highest quality of living accommodation whilst shielding the wider community from noise and air quality issues;  Appropriate scale to the setting – some of the junctions are significant in their scale, not just the road carriageway but also the cycleways and pedestrian routes. The developments at these locations need to respond to this context and create an appropriate sense of enclosure at these key points;

Proposed uses

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 Distinctive marker buildings – the junctions should assist in way finding and define the key locations along this part of the NCR. The contrast in scale from the suburban nature of the ‘in between’ locations is a key part of this approach; I mproving the public realm – new buildings in these key locations can assist in improving the setting of the building, new landscaping/public realm improvements should be integral to the developments; and

I dentifying the provision of supporting infrastructure at the major regeneration sites – of Ritz Parade and Green Lanes. These two locations provide the ideal opportunity to consider a mix of uses to complement new housing, given they are existing nodes and centres of activity.


Landscaping, Playspace and Open Space

Transport

There is a tremendous opportunity to impact positively upon the image of the area through the use of imaginative landscaping. The current context is hostile: the setting is dominated by tarmac and the traffic. The vision for the area involves providing new green space but also, where possible, in facilitating improved pedestrian and cycle connections to the existing amenity spaces.

An overall transport planning strategy has been developed for the sites, which reflects the different local conditions experienced at individual locations along the corridor. The overarching principle is to provide a series of transport options for new residents, in order to minimise the potential traffic impact of new development.

All of the sites, along the North Circular Road will incorporate a landscape buffer along the edge of the road frontage. A minimum 5 metre setback will allow for tree planting and soft landscaping. The green edge would be similar in scale to the western edge of Telford road and it would make a significant improvement for new and existing residents. Landscape interventions will filter pollutants and reduce noise from the North Circular Road. The opportunities for this “greening” are most evident at Sites 6, 11 and 14. Enfield Council policy aims to provide all residents within the Borough with areas of formal and informal playspace for children and teenagers within 400m from their home. Currently, there is no dedicated play provision in the locality.

A number of publicly accessible open spaces, including Arnos Grove Park and Broomfield Park are defined as ‘District Parks’ and will be within 1.2km of all of the homes provided by Notting Hill, meeting Enfield Council’s requirements. Other ‘Small Open Spaces’ are located in the vicinity of the sites. Around half of the new homes will be within 0.8km of a small park and Notting Hill aims to facilitate, where possible, the enhancement of safe and green linkages to these open spaces throughout the development area. The proposals will include the provision of playable landscape within the boundaries of some of the Notting Hill sites. In addition the potential to enhance dedicated play facilities nearby through financial contributions will be explored so that playspace can be upgraded to meet the Council’s requirements. Accessibility will be enhanced through the provision of safe green routes linking properties to playspace.

The individual sites are all within easy access of a range of public transport services, including Arnos Grove and Bounds Green underground stations and Bowes Park and Palmers Green railway stations, depending on the exact location. A series of bus services are also available, with local stops upgraded as part of the recent A406 improvements. Sites are also within easy walking and cycling distance of a range of local services, further reducing the demand for car-based travel. Footways and cycleways have recently been improved as part of the A406 works. Internal design of the sites has prioritised movement with sustainable modes, including pedestrian only links to create convenient routes into / out of the sites. Cycling will be further encouraged through generous storage provision within the sites. As part of a sustainable approach to the new development, car parking demand at the sites will be minimised. Access to car club spaces will further reduce the need for residents (both new and existing) to own vehicles. Car parking provision will reflect the reduced demand, with spaces prioritised for disabled residents and families.

19


COLLABORATION TO ACHIEVE REGENERATION Phase 4 Sites – Comprehensive Regeneration Opportunities Notting Hill is very aware that successful regeneration is a collaborative exercise. Concentrating only on land and property within Notting Hill ownership would not necessarily provide the best solution for the regeneration and rebuilding of the local community. Key locations require the input of all stakeholders if comprehensive benefits are to be achieved. To be successful the wider regeneration of the area will require a long term programme of change to be implemented by all parties.

There is potential to create a strong local neighbourhood centre integrated with the school behind providing health and convenience retailing linking to community facilities within the school area in addition to providing more residential accommodation. Improvement and expansion of the school facilities could be incorporated within the short to medium term, while allowing within the proposals for possible longer term replacement of the current buildings.

A prime example here is Ritz Parade – Notting Hill has ownership of the Parade, with Jehovah’s Witness having 30+ years to go on their lease. Notting Hill also owns some, but not all, of the properties from 190 to 200 Bowes Road, which have some low quality uses. Between these two areas is a former filling station owned by Esso, but recently marketed and believed to be under offer.

The ultimate plan may be for a complete replacement of the existing buildings, or a mixture of replacement and refurbishment. To turn the parade into a successful centre we believe that the Council would need to commit to the use of Compulsory Purchase Order powers.

This parade was originally included for demolition for road widening and has suffered, like the rest of the area from blight and lack of investment. Following the road works undertaken forecourt parking has been lost, leaving only four spaces serving the shops at Ritz Parade. To the rear is Broomfield School, which has an all weather pitch and playing fields that are used only by the school. There were proposals to build a new school on the playing fields, behind Ritz Parade, however funding was withdrawn. There was previously a desire for access to the school from Bowes Road, rather than, or in addition to, Wilmer Way. This could help create a focal point at Ritz Parade, opening up the potential for more usage of the school facilities by the wider community. Notting Hill believes that piecemeal redevelopment will not necessarily address the deficiencies in the area and could limit any future use and access to Broomfield School.

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Existing view of Ritz Parade


Equally, at the other Phase 4 site, Green Lanes, Notting Hill owns a vacant plot at 1 to 7 Bowes Road, behind Green Lanes, and commercial properties, with upper floors on the west side of Green Lanes, on each side of the A406. Although not as rundown as the Ritz Parade, the retail on this part of Green Lanes, which has easy access to Palmers Green or Wood Green, is poor. Notting Hill could undertake a small development on the vacant plot, but this would not achieve any changes to the location as a neighbourhood centre, or support the introduction of health, business or community facilities. The recent AAP consultation indicated the potential of a landmark building at the Green Lanes/A406 junction. To achieve this, the Council would need to support Notting Hill with CPO powers to acquire some properties not in their ownership. A landmark building, of, say, 10 storeys would not only create a strong image for the area, but would also justify the inclusion of health, business and appropriate community facilities. This would lift the location, attracting better quality retailing and help serve the local community. These significant improvements and the housing of new residents would have a knock on effect with the benefits spreading to other parts of Green Lanes.

Green Lanes junction – Potential development

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COLLABORATION TO ACHIEVE REGENERATION

Community Involvement

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Notting Hill Housing has taken considerable steps to ensure that both its residents and members of the surrounding community are aware of the emerging regeneration plans and also that they have the opportunity to give their feedback and suggestions.

Notting Hill also take an active role as members of the South West Enfield Partnership (SWEP) and chair the Employment, Skills and Enterprise working group and play an active role in the Community Cohesion and Services Working Group.

Notting Hill started engagement with residents in 2009, prior to the purchase of the properties. This involved attendance at public meetings and a series of one to one meetings with all residents to explain the refurbishment works and deal with any issues arising. Notting Hill set up a Residents’ Group, now chaired by a resident, to encourage cohesion, welcome new residents and to engage with Notting Hill.

Various methods have been used over the past 14 months to ensure that meaningful dialogue has taken place with the local community including focus groups with residents and local stakeholder groups with local community, attendance at meetings of the Bowes, Palmers Green and Southgate Green Area Forum and two public exhibitions. Around 500 individual residents and representatives have been engaged along with local political representatives.

As a result of comments received from residents during pre-application consultation, a number of design refinements and amendments have been made to emerging plans at various sites. Reconsideration has taken place during the design process of height, density, form, car parking, amenity space and provision of community facilities. Notting Hill Housing recognises that the historic blight that has affected the North Circular Road over many decades, along with a lack of clarity over local highways schemes, has contributed to a feeling of community disempowerment. Notting Hill’s objective is to ensure that the local community not only understands the vision for a regenerated North Circular Road but also has the opportunity to be involved in realising that vision.


Housing Provision Overall provision of residential development AAP SITE No.

NHH SITE No.

SITE AREA

PTAL

PROPOSED UNIT Nos.

TARGET APPLICATION SUBMISSION

TARGET APPLICATION DETERMINATION

FUNDING REQUIREMENT – FINAL COMPLETION OF WORK

9

15

0.33

4

32

Submitted February 2012

September 2012

March 2014

10

14

0.34

4

61

Anticipated October 2012

2013

March 2015

11

11

0.39

4

56

Anticipated October 2012

2013

March 2015

13

10

0.78

4

TBC

TBC

TBC

14

6

0.995

3/4

130

Anticipated October 2012

2013

March 2015

17

4

0.12

4

TBC

TBC

TBC

19

2&3

0.15

4

TBC

TBC

TBC

22

1

0.19

2

5

Submitted February 2012

September 2012

March 2014

23

1

0.2

2

13

Submitted February 2012

September 2012

March 2014

NA

5

0.0275

3

Anticipated September 2012

November 2012

March 2014

NA

12

0.068

6

Submitted March 2012

September 2012

March 2014

NA

13

0.043

1

Submitted March 2012

August 2012

March 2014

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COLLABORATION TO ACHIEVE REGENERATION Affordable housing – proposed provision in planning applications Notting Hill Housing aim to secure the overall provision of 40% affordable housing across all sites within the planning applications to meet Enfield Council policy requirements. A breakdown of the housing tenures across Phases 1, 2 and 3 are summarised below.

Existing under-occupation – discussion with Enfield Housing to target suitable 1 and 2 bedroom Affordable Rent units at local, mostly elderly, residents who currently under occupy family accommodation.

Phases 1, 2 & 3 (Sites 1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15)

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UNITS

Affordable Rent

Shared Ownership

Private

Total

Refurbs (SR & IR)

%

1b/2p

17

16

59

92

22

20

2b/3p

10

8

20

38

2

7

2b/4p

11

15

53

79

30

20

b/5p/Flt/Dpx

16

7

31

54

0

10

3b/5p/Hse

8

2

17

27

175

36

4b/7p

10

0

1

11

29

7

Total

72

48

181

301

258

100


Potential to exceed 40% affordable housing provision Notting Hill Housing has two possible sources of funding to deliver affordable housing and is keen to utilise this to exceed the level set through planning, being at 40% of the units. The first element of funding is allocated to Notting Hill for the North Circular Regeneration under the National Affordable Housing Programme for the development of properties to be let at Housing Association social rent levels. In order to use this funding, works must be completed no later than March 2014. Notting Hill would be able to deliver 60 new affordable housing units, 24 for sale on a shared ownership basis and 36 for letting at social rent levels, as follows, subject to meeting the required March 2014 completion date for these six Phase 2 sites. 

  Site

Tenure

No of units

1

SR

18

13

SR

1

15

SR

14

5

SR

3

15

AHO

18

12

AHO

6

Total

60

The second stream of funding will come from Notting Hill’s allocation under the Affordable Housing Programme (AHP) for 2011-15. Notting Hill has an allocation to deliver 2,310 units under this programme for Affordable Home Ownership and to let through the new Affordable Rent tenure basis. For properties to be applicable for the funding under this programme they must be completed by March 2015. Our proposed tenures for sites we believe can be delivered by March 2015 are:

Site

6

11

14

Total

Affordable Rent

30

14

24

68

Affordable Home Ownership

73

0

23

96

Private Sale

21

14

0

35

Market Rent

0

28

14

42

Totals

124

56

61

241

While the new Affordable Rents can be set at up to 80% of market rents, we propose that all family units of three or more bedrooms are set at social rent levels. Flexibility will be retained for people seeking to downsize to retain their current tenancy and rent status. Due to the nature of the sites spread along circa 2 miles of the A406, we consider that the potential for an increased level of provision of affordable housing above the 40% policy compliant position that could be secured by meeting these timing requirements is sustainable and would still create a good tenure mix, adding to the wider community and assisting in meeting local housing need. The availability of the AHP funding allows Notting Hill to provide a larger number of Affordable Home Ownership (Shared Ownership) units, rather than outright private sale. It is also intended to retain ownership of a number of units to manage directly and let on Market Rents. In order to deliver this level of affordable housing, which is over and above that committed to under a section 106, it is necessary to achieve the March 2014 and March 2015 deadlines for delivery. Should planning consents not be received in sufficient time it would possibly be necessary for Notting Hill to revert to the planning commitment levels of affordable accommodation.

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DELIVERABILITY, INVESTMENT, COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE & EMPLOYMENT Deliverability The comprehensive regeneration of the North Circular area can only be achieved through a collaborative overall approach taking into account all phases of Notting Hill’s North Circular Regeneration programme. Financial viability is intimately linked to each site bringing forward a certain quantum of development; any adjustment to the proposals at any one site will have an impact on the overall viability impacting on the level of investment in infrastructure and affordable housing.

Investment Enfield Council’s Section 106 Supplementary Planning Document sets the framework for the provision of, or financial contributions towards, social, physical and green infrastructure. Valuable new investment will be forthcoming and Notting Hill are keen to respond to identified areas of need and to work with the Council to ensure appropriate enhancements are provided. The Council will receive significant contributions towards enhancement of primary and secondary education. Payments will also be required towards the Mayor’s Infrastructure Levy and the new developments will qualify for the Government’s New Homes Bonus, further increasing the financial resources available.

Employment As part of the development proposals Notting Hill are proposing the direct investment in: A new community space at site 11; New playspaces at site 6;  Enhanced affordable housing provision, creating sustainable mixed tenure housing with a substantial element of affordable home ownership homes; and  The creation of green buffers to the North Circular Road and high quality landscaping.

Community Infrastructure Notting Hill Housing’s North Circular Regeneration is residential-led, but does not ignore the need to provide appropriate facilities for existing and new residents. It will be important to ensure that any local services and facilities are actually needed and are not a duplication of existing provision or inappropriate and end up unused. Notting Hill is working closely with the South West Enfield Partnership (SWEP), who are taking the lead on assessing need and pulling together new provision across the area, including at other developments, such as Ladderswood. Taking a lead from SWEP’s work, Notting Hill will look at the direct provision of new facilities, or at contributions to improve existing. The Phase 4 sites at Ritz Parade and Green Lanes are seen as the appropriate locations for possible new facilities; not only community spaces, but also for health and businesses. It is suggested that provision for a contribution in lieu of providing new facilities is agreed to ensure the delivery of earlier phases and to protect the council and community in case comprehensive development of these Phase 4 sites does not proceed.

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Notting Hill is committed to helping improve opportunities for local residents and is supporting SWEP to ensure local people are able to take advantage of not only employment but also training and enterprise opportunities in the area. Notting Hill has been running the award-winning and Matrix-accredited Construction Training Initiative (CTI) since 1995. This highly successful programme provides training and support in construction trades to local unemployed, socially disadvantaged and persons from under-represented groups in achieving industry recognised qualifications and site experience, leading to sustainable long-term employment in the industry. During the Phase 1 refurbishment works, Notting Hill’s contractor provided 214 hours of on-site training for eight trainees in joinery, electrical, plumbing, painting and site management. One trainee achieved their NVQ level 2 qualification in gas installation, one gained full time employment and another has been kept on by the contractor in the hope of finding a full time position. A similar approach is intended with the construction of the new development phases of the regeneration programme.


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Notting Hill Contact Details: Notting Hill Housing Bruce Kenrick House 2 Killick Street London N1 9FL

T: 020 8357 5000 W: www.nottinghillhousing.org.uk E: northcircular@nhhg.org.uk


North Circular Vision Document