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Kayla Jane Frances Martin 39 Sea Olive Road Hilton Head Island, South Carolina 29928 kaylam@g.clemson.edu

I believe that people, culture, and the surroundings are what make architecture so prominent, not just the physical buildings. The simplicity of interaction and communication within a space are what makes the process of architecture even possible. Without the individuals and the societies, there would be no need for buildings, communities, and architecture. The study of architecture has given me the opportunity to interact with some of the most diverse people and cultures in the word. From the third-world villages in Guatemala and Belize to the reďŹ ned and exquisite neighborhoods of Paris, culture has aided my development as a person and as a designer.


defining the greek village

4

residential planning | rethinking the average clemson university. clemson. south carolina. fall 2010.

rising connections

12

community design | conceptualizing the city spartanburg. south carolina. spring 2010.

integration into an urban fabric planning and development| materialization 22@ district. barcelona. spain. fall 2009.

20 regenerating the rail

30

structure and connections | creating an identity anderson. south carolina. spring 2009.

spatially conjoining

38

hierarchy and circulation | discovering through identities clemson. south carolina. spring 2009.

urban mapping contrasting two renovated city blocks. fort pienc and jardins de lina odena. barcelona. spain.

46

propellers activate a photography study. selected cities. europe. central america. north america.

52 personal information

58

kayla. jane. frances. martin clemson university. (b.a.) architecture may 2011.


4


DEFINING THE GREEK VILLAGE.

residential planning. clemson university. clemson. south carolina. h. harritos. fall 2010.


residential planning. clemson university. clemson. south carolina. h. harritos. fall 2010.

DEFINING THE GREEK VILLAGE.


define

DEFINING THE GREEK VILLAGE Clemson University is one of the few large public universities in the south that does not have offcampus housing for all of its Greek Organizations. With 23% of the student population being a member of a fraternity or sorority, the need for more organizational housing has become a priority for the University. The Master Plan for campus proposes that the existing housing in Thornhill Village be reconstructed to be houses for each of its chapters. The location of the site is at the “front door� to the campus and stands as a beacon to all who visit and attend Clemson University. It is proposed that the three current roads inside the site, Eaton Circle, Donovan Road, and Mills Road be reconstructed to reflect the terrain changes. The exterior roads will remain as they currently are.

FOCUS ON SITE


ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTS OF THE TYPICAL FRATERNITY OR SORORITY HOUSE

The standard American sorority or fraternity house is the classical revival style, typically with a simple structure and columns on the front facade.

Through basic steps of pulling and pushing geometric elements to reflect the terrain of the site, the stereotypical view of a fraternity house can be avoided.


define

The focus within the site is a plot of land located off Eaton Circle that experiences over 12 feet of grade change from one end to the other, allowing for a terraced-design of different floor levels to occur. This creates ample exterior space for chapter meetings or to simply study and relax.

The 40 organizations would need different size housing to meet the needs of their respective chapters, with houses ranging from sleeping only six members to up to thirty six members.


study area

house mom suite

kitchen/dining room study room

common area

The sorority house can be accessed from the “front� facade, located on the current Eaton Circle, and the back facades, which connect to a green trail that runs through the center of the site. The ground floor focuses on two axes of connectivity in common spaces. With the exception of the House Mom Suite, the entire ground floor serves as a more public space. This is one of the larger houses, containing double-occupancy bedrooms for up to 26 sorority members.

partially covered patio laundry

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

b.r.

suite

suite

b.r. suite suite suite

suite

open to below

b.r.

suite

suite

b.r.

suite b.r.

common area

suite

b.r. suite b.r.

suite

open to below

common area

suite

b.r.

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR


define

WEST SIDE ELEVATION


12


RISING CONNECTIONS.

community design. spartanburg. south carolina. y. kishimoto. spring 2010.


RISING CONNECTIONS In the last decade, the city of Spartanburg has made a conscious effort to revitalize the downtown area and make it more accessible and useable for the community. In a continuation of these efforts, the city is currently building a new YMCA and is attempting to develop a two-mile tract of land that was once the site of a Norfolk Southern railroad connector. The site now is known as the Mary Black Rail Trail and is simply a pedestrian pathway from Country Club Road to East Henry Street. The purpose of this project was to develop the two-mile Rail Trail, with the surrounding plots of land, into a community space. The site is a major crossing connection from two state roads, Pine Street and Union Street, which fall on either side.

FERNDALE Converse College

CONVERSE HEIGHTS

community design. spartanburg. south carolina. y. kishimoto. spring 2010.

rising connections.

YMCA

CHURCH ST. & HENRY ST.

GLENDALE

Pine Street Elementary

Ingles

LITTLE VISTA HEIGHTS CAMP CROFT Duncan Park


connect

union square

the crosspoint

the village the commons


proposed light rail stops proposed pedestrian bridge proposed city bus stops existing city bus stops

Transportation was proposed that adds bus stops along the two-mile site, bringing more people into the area. In addition, simple safety measures, such as adding lighting and call boxes, were proposed to make the area friendly to visitors at all times.

A study of small electric cable car lines was done to add in a transportation feature directly on the site.


Central Crosspoint

T WIN

CRYS TAL R

OAD

DRIV ES

PINE STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

PINE STREET

1- outdoor classroom and play area 2- learning pavilion 3- early childhood learning center 4- parking 5- central plaza with train stop 6- Rail Trail facility 7- sensory gardens 8- parking

PINE STREET 2

1 3

5

6 7

4

8

UNION STREET UNION STREET

DUNCAN PARK

union square

the crosspoint

the village the commons

connect

After site analysis, it was determined that the placement of programming and buildings could be split up into four hubs. The four hubs chosen each had a staple feature and many supplemental ones that connected to the existing surroundings. The central hub, denoted Central Crosspoint, serves as a connection to both Duncan Park and the Pine Street Elementary School.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CENTER The early childhood education center is located between the outdoor classroom and the bridges connecting to Union and Pine Streets. The center would be used as a daycare and school for children up to prekindergarden, as well as an after school center for students at the elementary school. Its direct connectivity to the gardens would allow for children to have a different learning experience than the average child. Its central location creates a short walking distance between it and Pine Street Elementary School so that parents and teachers have easy access to both.

office

classroom #1 kitchen

multipurpose room

outdoor play area

open to below

media room conference room

art room

classroom #5

classroom #2

classroom #3

BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN PRODUCED AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

office

classroom #4


SENSORY GARDENS connect

A series of gardens was proposed throughout the entire site. The sensory garden, would allow for members of the community to visit and explore their senses through plants and materials. In addition, Spartanburg is home to South Carolina’s School for the Deaf and Blind. Students at the school could interact with other members of the community.

pavilion taste pavilion sight smell touch

VARYING HEIGHTS OF ELEMENTS IN GARDENS

sound


20


INTEGRATION INTO AN URBAN FABRIC.

planning and development. 22@ district. barcelona. spain. s. ibarra. & t. montes. fall 2009.


planning and development. 22@ district. Barcelona. Spain. s. ibarra & t. montes. fall 2009.

integration into an urban fabric.


INTEGRATION INTO AN URBAN FABRIC

integrate

Barcelona’s dense urban fabric has long been intensified and redeveloped. The purpose of this project was to study the existing fabric in the 22@ District and to design a two-block space that would continue the current trend to revitalize the once industrial area. Through a study of Barcelona’s Vila Olimpica neighborhood, a linear scheme of open areas and major connections was determined to be beneficial for developing the 22@ site. The location of the 22@ site in the heart of the Eixample is critical in the planning of the space.

el mar mediterrano


EXISTING PEDESTRIAN AND VEHICULAR TRAFFIC THROUGH SITE

11 m

7.3 m

3.6 m

CURRENT BUILDING HEIGHT DISTRIBUTION 10:30:60

18.2 m

14.6 m

11 m

7.3 m

3.6 m

PROPOSED BUILDING HEIGHT DISTRIBUTION 20:20:20:20:20

Carrer del Doctor Trueta

Avinguda d’Icaria

Avinguda d’Icaria

Carrer de l’Arquitecte Sert

Carrer de Rosa Sensat

Carrer de Joan Miro

Carrer del Doctor Trueta

Carrer de l’Arquitecte Sert

Carrer de Rosa Sensat

Carrer de Joan Miro

VILA OLIMPICA STUDY: A LACK OF SPACE AND MOVEMENT


SUNLIGHT ANALYSIS ON PROPOSED EIXAMPLE BLOCK integrate

morning

multiple times

afternoon

The current Eixample blocks are closed in, allowing little sunlight into the interior of the block. A study on which areas of the proposed block would receive ample light at all times of day was done to determine placement of buildings and roof top terraces for green living.


STANDARD EIXAMPLE BLOCK MOVEMENT AND GREEN SPCAES

CONNECTION OF GREEN TERRACES

EXISTING AND PROPOSED ENTRANCES AND MOVEMENT

CENTRAL OPEN SPACES


integrate

The spatial quality of the two 22@ blocks was determined by the relationship to the street and open spaces. The buildings on both blocks connect through a series of passageways, both inside buildings and on the ground, creating a more unified feel. They also increase in height and size, starting from the lower half of the first block. This allows for housing in the upper levels of the larger block, retail on the exterior perimeters, private spaces on the middle levels of the larger block, and warehouse spaces for the ground level of the larger block. A system of rooftop terraces, gardens, and green roofs was put in place to allow all residents and visitors to experience a less urban atmosphere.


PROGRAMMING BY LEVEL

PRIVATE OFFICE- 15.000

sq. m.

HOUSING- 12.500 sq. m. WAREHOUSE- 7.800 sq. m.

FIFTH LEVEL

EDUCATIONAL- 7.400 sq. m. integrate

PUBLIC OFFICE- 6.200 sq. m. RETAIL- 5.600 sq. m. FOURTH LEVEL

THIRD LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

UPPER NORTHWEST CORNER WITH WAREHOUSE SPACE AND RESIDENTIAL

GROUND LEVEL


30


REGENERATING THE RAIL.

structure and connections. anderson. south carolina. l. mitchell. spring 2009.


REGENERATING THE RAIL

structure and connections. anderson. south carolina. l. mitchell. spring 2009.

regenerating the rail.

Clemson, SC 20 miles

The Electric City of Anderson, South Carolina has a rich and long history involving industry and the railroad. Beginning in the late 19th century, Southern Railway used the town as a connection between Columbia, South Carolina and Atlanta, Georgia because of the large number of textile mills in the area. In the 1990’s, the city began to revitalize its’ aging downtown. This project takes a once forgotten location parallel to the rail lines and creates a space that can serve as a convergence from old to new.

Atlanta, GA 125 miles

Savannah, GA 218 miles

Co lu 11 mb 5 m ia, ile SC s


street level facade- Clemson Blvd. regenerate

The facade of the building runs along Clemson Boulevard, between West Earle Street and West Whitner Street, in downtown Anderson. Throughout many times during the day, the street is filled with cars and pedestrians, forcing it to be one of the major passageways through town. A major issue with the space is the lack of light that is carried through from the ground track level to the street level. The multiple facades of the building must take into consideration the need for ample light on both avenues. Because the sun sets behind the site, the angle of the roof structure will allow light to be carried into the interior of the building at all times of day.


The proposed building will serve as a multipurpose train station that will encourage rail users to stay in the city of Anderson while traveling. At track level, there will be a large platform covered by the street-level glass canopy, as well as a waiting area. The second level will consist of the basic functions of a train station and will be very much open to the level below. The street level allows for an important connection to the city, as well as the top level, which will serve as a cafe and market place for outside vendors and travelers.

MATERIAL STUDY OF SAVANNAH, GA


regenerate

Baggage Area

Rear Entrance

Lounge Area Platform

Canopy

Cafe Ticket Counter

Restrooms

Canopy

Front Entrance Lobby


The layering of panels on the glass canopy allows for different angles and intensities of light to pass through.

The structure and height of both the front and back facades requires that light is brought into what would be considered a dark space at all times of the day. The overlaying canopy on the side facade captures light and energy for a possible solar paneling system. Because its solely made of layers, the view from the track level to the street is in no way obstructed.

The roof structure consists of steel beams and both glass and solar panels. It allows for the angle of the building to work with the street and track levels.


regenerate

The major focus of the rail station model was a study in materiality and connectivity to the site. Integration of space and light is captured in the roof top structure of the facility, by allowing different textures and levels of glass to interact with columns and planes. By mimicking the angles of light and shadows created by the roofing system, a facade and canopy featuring light from the street level was designed.


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conjoin

SPATIALLY CONJOINING.

hierarchy and circulation. clemson university. clemson. south carolina. l. mitchell. spring 2009.


SPATIALLY CONJOINING

SPATIALLY CONJOINING.

hierarchy and circulation. clemson university. clemson. south carolina. l. mitchell. spring 2009.

Clemson University has experienced a significant push to revisit the campus master plan and to renovate many existing buildings on campus. In an area that was once considered the “edge of campus”, a move towards extending this edge and designing new buildings is currently underway. This project analyzes a current dead space between the brand new Harris A. Smith Building and Lee Hall and aims to create a common space that can be enjoyed by students, faculty, and visitors alike.

An identity was chosen to further analyze the spatial qualities of the campus. The “wanderer’s” path is different than most; he is one who appreciates the small spaces and details around him, yet is aware of the larger picture.

A WANDERER’S PATHWAY RELATING TO LEE HALL AND THE HARRIS A. SMITH BUILDING


CLEMSON UNIVERSITY conjoin

RENOVATIONS NEW BUILDINGS CURRENT BUILDINGS PROPOSED CAFE PROPSED GREENSPACE

EXISITING SITE


An internet cafe was proposed to attract all members of the community. It can be used as an outdoor study area or a place to meet with colleagues, all while serving as a coffee chop and small bakery.

In addition to the cafe, the existing street that separates Lee Hall and Harris Smith would be converted into an outdoor pavilion. Natural pavers and water features would be used to reintroduce the local landscape of the Upstate onto Clemson’s campus. The courtyard between Lee Hall and Lowry Hall will also be renovated to improve functionality to students, instead of simply serving as a pass-through.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION FACING HARRIS SMITH BUILDING AND FLOUR DANIEL BUILDING


LOWRY HALL

LEE HALL

conjoin

HARRIS A. SMITH BUILDING

FLOUR DANIEL BUILDING

AN ANALYSIS OF CIRCULATION AND CONNECTIVITY


46


URBAN MAPPING: CONTRASTING TWO RENOVATED CITY BLOCKS fort pienc and jardins de lina odena. l’ eixample district. barcelona. spain.


PLAZA DE FORT PIENC Fort Pienc is a very public space which has contributed to its success. The area has become a recgonized meeting space and is used by those of all ages. The space is multi-functional as it currently houses a market, primary school, library, civic center, senior residences and cafes. The constant movement and flow of people through this space, as well as the multi functional use mimics the city of Barcelona. This observation can suggest that Fort Pienc will continue to grow and stay successful, just as the city has.

SHADOWS CREATED BY BUILDING SPACE

JARDINS DE LINA ODENA When entering into the interior block of Jardins de Lina Odena, the spaces seems to be much more open than they actually are. If you come into the block though Carrer de Sardenya, one of two gated entrances, you will walk through a corridortype space surrounded by the brick walls of the surrounding buildings. Once you actually approach the gardens, the avid sunlight enters quickly and creates the open feeling of the area.

Carrer de Ausias Marc

playground

playground

DIAGONAL ANALYSIS FROM SHADOWS AND SUN ANGLES

Carrer de Ali Bei

Carrer de Marina

Carrer de Sardenya

green space


URBAN MAPPING: CONTRASTING TWO RENOVATED CITY BLOCKS fort pienc and jardins de lina odena. l’ eixample district. barcelona. spain.

The two blocks, Fort Pienc and Jardins de Linda Odena, were completed as part of a project by the city of Barcelona to create enough green space so that every resident of the city can live within 200 meters of one. When the ProEixample Project was started in 1996, there was only 26,000 square meters of green space in the district. By 2010, it is projected that this number will quadruple, with there being over 100,000 square meters of open space for the public to enjoy. Plaza del Fort Pienc was the thirteenth block to be recovered and Jardins de Lina Odena was the twenty-second, both being completed by 2003. As of 2007, 38 interior blocks had been restored. The city’s projected goal for 2010 is to have one in nine blocks have an interior space.

26m OF EXISITING BUILDING DEPTH 13m OF BUILDING DEPTH (first floor only)

1225m2 OPEN SPACES

STANDARD L’EIXAMPLE BLOCK AFTER JOSEPH LLINEA’S PLAN


eR

rd rre Ca

s

ibe

Carrer de Ausias Marc

es

d

Carrer de Sardenya

r rre Ca

ib eR

In Fort Pienc, the angle of Carrer de Ribes creates an interesting layout for the trees and plants in the space. Lining the north side of the block are trees that follow the diagonal of the street. In the interior of the block, though, the trees and plants begin to work more against the diagonal. In the Jardins de Lina Odena, the landscape is created from the sun angles and the diagonals of the playground equipment and surrounding buildings. The surrounding buildings that are located on the ground floor only are geometrical and create the paths where the landscape exists. A.M SUN P. M. SUN

LANDSCAPING IN BOTH BLOCKS

ias

r Ca

r re

us eA

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c ar

d

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rd

rre Ca a ny de ar

ge

on

a Us

o rn

Carre rd

e Ribes

te Af

r Ca r re de ia cil

The blue circles indicate public bus stops in the area; yellow represents the BICING bicylce rental locations; green represents metro stops.

Si

SURROUNDING PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

ge

n

g in

a Us

or SUN ANGLES AND DIAGONALS M


URBAN MAPPING: CONTRASTING TWO RENOVATED CITY BLOCKS

ar c sM Au sia de re r Ca r

r Ca r re de Sa B

es

ED

C

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a ny

PR

e rd N

A A

de

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Al iB

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U K

L

A

TI O N

A

C

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Ca r

ED

re r

Carre r

Y

Once you arrive in the block interior at the Jardins de Linda Odena, it may seem as if this is an open public space but the lack of mass amounts of people contradicts that idea. The walkway and sitting areas in the main area of Fort Pienc are completely open to the public, although the sidewalk area in front of the three restaurants is reserved for customers. This space is much more open than the entire block of Jardins de Lina Odena. This is most likely because of the connection that this block creates from the metro and bus stations and the surround residential areas.

de Rib

JARDINS DE LINA ODENA

There is a sharp contrast in the block of Fort Pienc and the interior block Lina Odena, although both were designed to be used constantly by residents of the area. Fort Pienc is much more public and inviting to the community than Lina Odena. The traffic patterns of each space contributed to the analysis of how public or private each block is.

PR T

C

U

D

O

PLAZA DE FORT PIENC

PUBLIC VS. PRIVATE


52

TO GET AWAY FROM ONE’S WORKING ENVIRONMENT IS, IN A SENSE, TO GET AWAY FROM ONE’S SELF; AND THIS IS OFTEN THE CHIEF ADVANTAGE OF TRAVEL AND CHANGE. -CHARLES HORTON COOLEY


ACTIVATE

south carolina. belize. united kingdom. germany.


A GOOD TRAVELER


HAS NO FIXED PLANS, AND IS NOT INTENT ON ARRIVING. -LAO TZU


Exploration has always been a central theme in my life. From the experiences of traveling around the world to the sim-

plicity of rediscovering what is important in your own community, exploration has allowed me to interact and communicate with the surrounding environment. Architecture has given me the opportunity to begin this exploration at a much deeper level, through a distinct understanding and interpretation of all aspects of the world. I believe that people, culture, and the surroundings are what make architecture so prominent, not just the physical buildings. The simplicity of interaction and communication within a space are what makes the process of architecture even possible. Without the individuals and the societies, there would be no need for buildings, communities, and architecture. The study of architecture has given me the opportunity to interact with some of the most diverse people and cultures in the word. From the third-world villages in Guatemala and Belize to the refined and exquisite neighborhoods of Paris, culture has aided my development as a person and as a designer. Throughout the past five years, I have spent my summers volunteering for a non-profit organization called ROWKIDS. This has given me the opportunity to go into third-world countries in Central America and interact with the people by designing and constructing schools in some of the underprivileged villages. Here, people view architecture as a necessity to enhance their lives and possibly improve their struggling nation. It is a simple vocabulary that relates them to their surroundings and to the rest of the world. ROWKIDS has not only allowed me to learn construction and drafting skills, but has taught me that learning is through action, not what simply happens in studio. My exploration in Central America has allowed me to see the need for a better understanding in how we move in urban environments. The majority of cities and towns I have visited were not only run down because of poverty, but also because lack of infrastructure and destruction from natural disasters. This heavily contrasts with my experiences in a study abroad semester in Europe. Living in Barcelona allowed me to recognize the strengths in a dense urban fabric that has stood the test of time. Even the cities I visited that were destroyed in either World War have been redeveloped and restructured to maximize the functionality of the urban system. The stark differences between the two worlds in Europe and Central America demonstrate the importance of preserving that urban environment and its historical features. My intent on continuing my studies in the field of urban design arises from the desire to produce work for the greater good of cultures across the globe in a field that will continue to grow and affect the lives of communities for decades to come. The University of Texas will allow me to be successful in that desire, by presenting me with the opportunity to experience an expanding urban atmosphere in both Austin and the school’s international programs.

58

KAYLA JANE FRANCES MARTIN

39 SEA OLIVE ROAD, HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC 29928 KAYLAM@G.CLEMSON.EDU


EDUCATION

SCHOLARSHIPS

August 2007- May 2011 B. Architecture, Political Science (minor) Clemson University, School of Architecture Clemson, South Carolina

2007-present Architectural and Construction Administrators Scholarship Recipient 2009 Homer Curtis Mickel and Leola Carter Mickel Endowment Recipient 2007-2009 Jocko Roberts Scholarship Recipient 2007-2009 Trustees Scholarship Recipient 2007 International Baccalaureate Diploma Recipient

August- December 2009 Fluid Campus: Study Abroad Clemson School of Architecture Barcelona, Spain August 2003- June 2007 Hilton Head High School International Baccalaureate Program Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

EXPERIENCE August 2010- October 2010 Clemson University Housing Department Clemson, South Carolina -completed a design proposal with ten other students to develop new ideas for the future Greek Village on Clemson’s campus -presented drawings, designs, and models to board members and Greek organizations May 2010- August 2010 House of Design Hilton Head Island, South Carolina -worked independently on several design and remodeling projects for local property owners -involved in working interior design documents, client meetings and relations, project schedules, construction documents, placing work orders. July 2006- present ROWKIDS, Inc. Hilton Head Island, South Carolina; Flores, Guatemala; San Ignacio, Belize -prepared construction and planning documents for school buildings and housing. -constructed additional classrooms and facilities for Billy White SDA School. -relations between contractors and mission trip groups in the United States, Guatemala, and Belize. -involved in fundraising and marketing for continuing nonprofit projects in other countries.

MEMBERSHIPS 2010 Cofounder and Fundraising Chair, Freedom by Design, Clemson University 2008-present Member of Gamma Phi Beta International Sorority 2007-2009 Member of Colleges Against Cancer 2007-present Member of AIAS, Clemson University 2006-present Volunteer and Mission Trip Leader, ROWKIDS, Inc. and SC United Methodist Church 2006-present Volunteer for Habitat for Humanity; Beaufort County, SC

SKILLS Adobe Illustrator. Adobe InDesign. Adobe Photoshop. Apple iMovie. AutoCAD. Microsoft Office Programs (Certified). Rhinoceros. SketchUp. Vray. 1996-present Spanish; fluent in conversation & writing

INTERESTS Fishing. Painting. Photography. Running. Scuba Diving. Traveling.

PERSONAL INFORMATION



Architecture Portfolio