Page 1

Zine-Age Dream story by Martha pierce photo by ari curtis

Sarah Morean spreads DIY magazines across Minneapolis.

Years,

Photo courtesy of Sarah Jordet Photo courtesy of Sarah Jordet

Tell your mitten-knitting

Albums

story by Emily Carl photos by KElsie sherman album covers courtesy of rhymesayers entertainment

These seminal albums put the record label Rhymesayers on the hip-hop map. see the slideshow

»

grandma to kindly step aside, and grab your home printing press. Crafts just got cool. Sarah Morean, a library assistant from Minneapolis, is a three-time coordinator of the Twin Cities’ annual Zinefest, a 10-yearold craft fair dedicated to the production and display of creative, wacky comics and self-published magazines, commonly known as zines. These handmade books got their start as offshoots of comics made by graphic artists and cartoonists. Now the trend has exploded into a culture that’s all about DIY.

Morean first became interested in zines through reading comics and graphic art. She picked up an artsy teen novel in college and fell in love with its quirky, independent style. At age 27, Morean’s taste in zines has matured. Now she’s a fan of autobiographies. “I think the personal element attracts a lot of female readers my age to zines,” Morean says. Political, comedic, and non-fiction zines are just a few of the creations that have young enthusiasts flocking to Zinefest each year. “I do think our generation wants to matter in a way that others before them haven’t,” Morean says. “We want to feel like

(Left) Zinester Sarah Morean chews over a few of her latest ideas. (Top right) A collection of zines is on display at Zinefest. (Bottom right) A home printing press is used to make Zinefest promotional materials.

we’re part of the conversation, so we take in a lot and give back a lot.” Plus, there’s the community. Zinesters have the chance to meet with more than 50 cartoonists, art and graphic designers, and zine producers during the day-long event. “Zinefest just has this buzz of people being happy and enjoying each other’s company through art,” Morean says. “You can’t help but walk out inspired.” And for some, that inspiration has led to opportunity. Morean knows a collection of creative minds that began making zines as

pastimes | Authentic adventures + dark and twisted + 15 years, 15 albums + zine-age dream + the adventures of everyman + knitter gone rogue + hot wheels + corn-fed and kick-ass

a part-time job and then grew. “If you can expand your zine enough, a lot of times it can open into a publishing deal or creative job elsewhere,” Morean says. Morean and a friend, Lacey Hedtke, 29, photography professor and fellow zinester, plan to debut their own creative endeavor later this year: a zine library. Before making it official, the duo will host a zine swap and DIY festival. “It’s nice to have something to do to bring the people at Zinefest together again,” Hedtke says. “Yeah, we make zines, and it’s fun—now let’s party.” urbanplainsmag.com 7


Throwback Happy Hour

story by Martha Pierce and Alysse Gear photos by jeff Kwiatek

Cure your common cocktail with these retro recipes.

Don’t nurse the same old Stella Artois every weekend. Instead, kick back with a highball, and leave your boring, modern cocktails behind. Try one of our oldschool picks. These sophisticated classics will make you think twice about your next Captain and Coke.

RASPBeRRY Side Car 1 lemon wedge 1 ½ ounces cognac 1 ounce Chambord raspberry liqueur ½ ounce fresh lemon juice 1 raspberry Sugar Slide the fruit of the lemon wedge around the edge of a martini glass. Dip rim in sugar. Shake cognac, Chambord, and lemon juice together. Strain into the martini glass, and drop the raspberry in.

CLASSiC Martini ½ to 1 ounce dry vermouth 1 ½ to 2 ounces gin 1 olive Pour vermouth then gin into a cocktail shaker with or without ice. Strain into a classic martini glass. Garnish with an olive.

ToM Collins

GRaSShopper

¾ ounce green crème de menthe 2 ounces gin ¾ ounce crème de cacao 1 ounce lemon juice ¾ ounce light cream 1 teaspoon superfine sugar or simple syrup 1 sprig of mint 3 ½ ounces cold club soda 1 orange slice Pour the liquid ingredients over ice into a 1 maraschino cherry cocktail shaker, and shake vigorously. Strain Combine gin, lemon juice, and sugar in a into your glass of choice. Garnish with a shaker half-filled with ice. Shake well and sprig of mint. strain into an ice-filled Collins glass. Top with club soda. Garnish with a slice of orange and a maraschino cherry.

pleasures | beef it up + elbow grease + local flavor + bottoms up + throwback happy hour + diy date night + vintage vixens + let’s talk sex + sex shops in the city

MAKeR'S MaRK Manhattan 2 ½ ounces Maker's Mark whisky ¾ ounce sweet vermouth liqueur 1 dash Angostura aromatic bitters 1 maraschino cherry Rind from 1 slice of orange Gently swirl whisky, vermouth, and bitters with two or three ice cubes in shaker. Strain into a cocktail glass over the maraschino cherry. Rub the edge of the orange peel over the rim of the glass. Twist to release its oils, but don’t drop in. urbanplainsmag.com 17


9 Quick Tips for an At-Home Workout

Standing Calf Raises The chore: washing dishes Your fitness move: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Raise yourself high on your tippy toes, then slowly return to a flat-foot position. Lift and lower your heels 20-40 times, or until you feel too tired to continue. What you're working: calves and thighs


Wide Plies The chore: rinsing dishes Your fitness move: Spread your legs as wide as you can with your toes pointing slightly out. Lower your hips and bend your knees at a 90-degree angle. Pulse up and down 20 times, but try to push yourself all the way to 40 if you can! What you're working: inner thighs and legs

Tree Pose The chore: Drying dishes Your fitness move: Stand with your feet close together so that they're almost touching each other. Slowly bring your left foot up so the sole of your foot touches the inside of your right thigh. Hold this move, pressing your foot against your leg, for 30-60 seconds. After you lower your left foot, switch legs so that your right sole rests against your inner left thigh. Repeat twice with each leg. What you're working: improving your balance and flexibility


Standing Push-Ups The chore: loading laundry Your fitness move: Stand a few feet from the washer and place your hands shoulder-width apart on the machine. Bend your arms slowly, bringing your chest toward the edge of the washer. Slowly push back out to a full-arm extension. Repeat 20 times. What you're working: chest, arms, and back

Standing Leg Lifts The chore: drying laundry


Your fitness move: Balance on your left leg and slowly kick your right leg out to your right side 20 times, to the front of the room 20 times, and to the back of the room 20 times each. Next, balance your right leg and repeat with kicks with your left foot, making sure to control your leg movements the whole time. What you're working: butt, thighs, and abs

Bent-Over Stretches The chore: emptying the dryer Your fitness move: Stand 3 feet away from the dryer and place your hands about shoulder-width apart on its top. With your legs about hip-width apart, bend forward at the waist until your torso is parallel to the floor. Hold for one minute, while breathing deeply. What you're working: back muscles

Giant Steps The chore: Vacuuming the family room Your fitness move: While pushing the vacuum across the room, lunge deeply with your right leg, bending your knee at a 90-degree angle, then with your left leg. Alternate between your right and left legs until you've completed 20 lunges. Take a short break, then repeat. If you reach a dusty corner, hold your lunge and pulse up and down 20 times on each leg. What you're working: legs and thighs


Ballet Jump-Outs The chore: decluttering a room Your fitness move: Once you've finished putting toys and knickknacks away, stand with your heels together and toes pointed out. Do a quick jump, landing with your legs shoulder-distance apart and knees slightly bent. Jump back to your start position quickly. Repeat this move nonstop for two minutes. What you're working: inner thighs, lower legs, and hips

Belly Squeezes The chore: vacuuming a large room


Your fitness move: Contract your abs by pulling your navel in and breathing deeply, making sure to keep your shoulders back and your torso straight. Try to hold your stomach without resting in for five minutes -- or as long as it takes you to dust one room. What you're working: abdominal muscles Originally published in the September 2010 issue of Parents magazine. All content on this Web site, including medical opinion and any other health-related information, is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Use of this site and the information contained herein does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Always seek the direct advice of your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others. www.parents.com Bringing together the power of respected magazine brands including American Baby and Parents, the Parents Network is your go-to destination for parenting information. From first kicks to first steps and on to the first day of school, we are here to help you celebrate the joys and navigate the challenges of parenthood. Š Copyright 2011 Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


42


born-again

VIRGINS Women want their V-card reissued after the fact. WRITTEN BY MARTHA PIERCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICK SELLERS

43


S

Susan Anthony isn’t your typical 30-year-old. She’s British, but lives in Chicago; enjoys social drinking, but won’t bar hop; and likes kissing, but not on a first date. Oh, and she gave up sex.

LIKE A VIRGIN

Anthony was born in England and moved to the U.S. at age 19—she knows she’s different than most women her age. “I’ve been called the born-again virgin, or the renewed virgin, many times, and it doesn’t really bother me,” she says. “I don’t think of myself as a virgin.” Anthony’s first sexual encounter was at age 16 with her first boyfriend who was four years her senior. The pair dated for a year and a half before breaking up. “I went through a bit of a rebellious stage with everyone at 16,” Anthony says. “I didn’t really like anybody at the time, and I hung out with an older crowd. I grew up pretty quick.” According to Mary Jo Rapini, an intimacy, sex, and relationship psychotherapist from Houston, an increasing number of girls are finding themselves in Anthony’s situation. “Teenagers are definitely becoming more sexually active than in past years,” she says. “And these same early teens are not mentally able to really handle the consequences of sex in the first place. It’s a double whammy.” People who had sex when they were younger are realizing they weren’t prepared and have since made the decision to go without it. Even in a culture that bases self-worth on sex appeal, Anthony is staying strong. She’s currently on her third— and longest—hiatus from sexual activity. “In the past three years, it has gotten easier to remain abstinent because I’m growing in my own understanding of myself,” Anthony says. “I don’t feel guilty about entering into past sexual relationships. Sex is more like a thing that I tried for a while.” THE WAITING GAME

Lau r ie Lin ha r t is a n intimate relationsh ip and socia l psycholog y ex per t and professor at Dra ke Un iversit y in Des Moines, Iowa . “For some women, waiting until they are married is impractical because many people will be 30—or close to it—when they get married,” she says. “The marriage age is getting pushed back. For many young adults, thinking about abstaining until they’re 30 is too difficult.”

44

Anthony first thought about abstaining from sex when a former yoga pal in Chicago suggested it shortly after Anthony’s divorce from her husband. “I was in a lot of grief, and on top of that, I didn’t really get to experience an adolescent childhood,” she says. Anthony started on her path to abstinence and casually dated for two years before meeting her next boyfriend, Tony. “Four months into our relationship, one thing led to another, and we had sex,” Anthony says. “We were both very active in church, and one weekend we were at a church service, and I just broke down. I knew I couldn’t be intimate anymore.” Anthony soon realized her decision to remain abstinent was too difficult for her boyfriend. “He tried, I think, but our relationship started to disintegrate,” she says. “He started to look at me more like a sister.” Since the breakup, Anthony says she has continued to casually date. However, she’s always upfront about telling the men she dates that she won’t be having sex. “I’ve made a commitment to myself and to my church that I will remain abstinent,” she says. “This is something I value.” OLD-FASHIONED VALUES

Values like Anthony’s are becoming less prevalent. Since 1945, chastity has become increasingly less important than in past decades. In the 1980s, chastity went from being ranked No. 10 of 18 in desirable qualities to dead last by men and second to last by women in a study conducted by scholars Reuben Hill, John W. Hudson, and Les Leanne Hoyt. Because of this lessening desire to date—or marry—a virgin, Linhart thinks the concept of born-again virginity is completely realistic. “I think it indicates that we as


“I’ve made a commitment to myself and to my church that I would remain abstinent. This is something I value.” —SUSAN ANTHONY

women have more power over our sexuality than in the past,” she says. “We can select renewed virginity as a way we want to conduct ourselves, instead of feeling like we have to be sexually active.” Anthony isn’t the only one feeling this way. Rebecca*, 22, a Drake student, also made the decision to give up sex nearly two years ago. “After my first time hav ing sex w ith my boyfriend, it just kept happening, and I let it happen,” she says. “I guess I thought, ‘It’s not that big of a deal. I’ve done it already, so why not keep doing it?’” Anthony felt the same way. “I know I fell to a lot of pressure when it came to sex,” she says. “Because of my own family issues with having an alcoholic father and divorced parents, I had the desire to constantly please men. I know that many young women will develop tendencies I had. I thought I was in love at age 16.” Love is a common reason young women make these decisions. “I was definitely in love with Mike before we had sex and I felt very confused after,” says Rebecca, who was also 16 when she first had sex. “The sex continued almost to the end before I told him I didn’t want to do it anymore.” STOP IN THE NAME OF LOVE

Rebecca and Anthony’s decisions may inspire other women to reclaim their virginity. “Girls who renew their vows to be a virgin are empowering other women to do the same,” Rapini says. She thinks more young women who are finally able to say no after first having sex may be stronger than they were before. This renewed willpower couldn’t be truer for Anthony. “More recently now than ever before, I have a very clear stance on abstinence,” she says. “I know my boundaries.” Anthony and Rebecca both know that giving up sex comes with its share of sacrifices. Anthony, a former

salsa and jazz dancer, doesn’t dance at nightclubs like she used to. Rebecca also steers clear of situations that may lead to sexual encounters. Anthony admits, however, that if she’s going to commit to a relationship with someone, they also have to practice abstinence. “Men who aren’t practicing abstinence who I’ve dated think, ‘Maybe she’ll be different with me,’ or they think I’ll change my mind,” she says. “If I’m thinking about someone romantically, though, they have to be on the same page sexually.” Linhart says excessive sexuality pervades our society. She says it’s hard to turn on the TV without being exposed to subliminal sexual messages. “We’re kind of torn; on one hand, we’re kind of afraid of sex, and on the other hand, it’s everywhere,” Linhart says. RENEWING THEIR VOWS

Mark Regnerus, author of “Forbidden Fruit: Sex & Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers,” explored a two-part study that looked at youth in 2006. Individuals who engaged in sex during the first study and then reported renewed virginity vows during the second were more likely to identify themselves as born-again Christians. Anthony and Rebecca are Christians and use their faith to ground them when the decision to abstain gets tough. Anthony also leads a faith-based group called Solutions at Willow Creek Church in Chicago. Disclaimer: Giving up sex doesn’t mean that Anthony is giving men the cold shoulder. “I’m a very touchy, nurturing person,” Anthony says. “Just because I’m abstinent doesn’t mean I’m not affectionate. There are many activities I don’t do now that I would love to explore with a man that I have a strong commitment with. I just would rather wait until I’m in a committed relationship.” Rebecca agrees. “I’ve been there, I’ve done that, and I don’t anymore because I feel like there is an expectation,” she says. “I’m happy I’ve given it up.” Maybe abstinence makes the heart grow fonder. *Last name has been removed.

45


Your Guide to Baby's Weight Gain

Newborn (1 to 4 Weeks Old) Right now, your baby is more delicate than ever. According to Michelle LaRowe, author of Mom's Ultimate Book of Lists, don't be too concerned if Baby loses a few ounces just after birth -- most babies do. A healthy baby regains weight within 10-12 days and will be back to his birth weight. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula. Consult your doctor if Baby seems to have allergic or sensitive reactions to your breastmilk because he might be reacting to something you are eating or is sensitive to the formula. Learn more about breastfeeding.

1 Month Old From now until Baby is 6 months old, she will likely grow an inch a month and gain 5-7 ounces a week. If feeding is successful, your baby will be steadily gaining weight. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula. Feeding times aren't exact, and it's impossible to determine how much milk babies have at each feeding for nursing mothers. Babies at this age should be fed eight to 12 times a day or about every two to three hours.


2 Months Old Baby should be steadily gaining weight each week. If you're afraid he's hit a plateau, look closer at the amount of breast milk he is taking at feeding times by pumping and giving him bottles. In some cases, babies may not be suckling correctly, or you may not be giving enough milk, according to Michelle LaRowe, a professional nanny and author of Nanny to the Rescue. If you continue to have problems meet with a lactation consultant or your pediatrician to find out how to help make sure baby is eating. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula. Don't begin to introduce single grain food or baby food until he is at least 4 months old. Doing so too soon can cause digestive problems for your child, says Dr. Joanna Dolgoff, a childhood obesity specialist.

3 months old At this stage, your baby will start to move away from a steady gain of about 6 ounces per week to a little less than 4 ounces. This means that she will gain roughly 2 pounds this month, and every month following until seven months old. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula. This is likely the last month that your baby will use your breast milk or formula as a primary source of food as the American Adademy of Pediatrics recommends introducing solids (like baby cereal) around 4 to 6 months.


4 months old Around 4 months your baby will start showing signs that he is ready for solids. Some indicators are: he can hold his head up stead, he can sit while supported, and he'll start showing an interest in what you are eating. The transition from liquid to solids is a delicate one, so don't force Baby to eat if he isn't ready. Don't confuse spitting with Baby's distaste for cereal, though. Baby's spitting will reach its peak at 4 months, and end by 7 months. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula, plus fruit and then veggies. Babies who enjoy fruit typically don't have an aversion to veggies. Also start introducing different kinds of baby food, including single grain foods. Be prepared for teething to follow these newer, thicker foods; A baby should begin teething by 6 months. The two bottom front teeth, followed by his two top front teeth, appear first, giving Baby that adorable grin

5 Months Old By 5 to 6 months of age, Baby should double her newborn weight. Your baby should have a check-up around this age, so ask your doctor if Baby is at risk for being underweight and find out what you can to help her gain weight. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula, plus fruit and then veggies. (Only introduce fruit and veggies now, though, if she's happily eating baby cereal.) Babies who enjoy fruit don't typically have an aversion to veggies, so if you give baby banana slices, she might not turn her nose at cooked carrots.


6 Months Old Starting at six months, a baby will grow about half an inch a month and gain 3-5 ounces a week. Baby Should Eat: Vegetables, fruits, then add pureed meat. Diarrhea or rashes are indicators of food sensitivity. (Note that a baby often needs exposure to a food up to seven times before she will acquire a taste for it.) You will still want to give him breast milk and/or formula.

7 Months Old Baby's weight will steadily increase by 2 pounds a month. Consult your doctor if Baby doesn't gain at least 2-3 pounds this month or in later months. If he gains more than 6 pounds in a month, see your pediatrician, says Dr. Dolgoff. Baby Should Eat: Adding to their menu of breast milk and formula try blended meat, vegetables, and fruits. Baby should now be able to handle a thicker consistency of foods, so leave some small dices in the fruits and vegetables for him to chomp on.


8 Months Old Baby should be gaining additional weight to triple his birth weight by age 1. Baby Should Eat: Breast milk or formula along with branching into some finger foods. If he appears to be having trouble, though, stick to blending veggies and fruits with a little cut-up meat. See Baby's First Finger Foods

9 Months Old To maintain weight gain, feed your child a light snack such as scrambled eggs, cut-up steamed veggies, or small pieces of bread every two to four hours. Babies who snack more tend to have a better nutrient intake and healthier weight than babies who don't. Baby Should Eat: She should be eating baby cereal, diced fruit such as kiwi or bananas, along with softened (or pureed) veggies and meat. Check out these great baby food recipes.


10 Months Old As your baby becomes mobile, his weight might plateau, Dr. Dolgoff says. Baby likely will be crawling all over your kitchen floor and trying to stand up with the aid of tables, chairs, or your leg. Crawling burns a lot of calories, so don't expect him to gain more than a pound or two this month because he is starting to plateau. Baby Should Eat: Finger foods he's already comfortable with. Also try to introduce green vegetables, tougher fruits such as apples cut small dices and small noodles, Dr. Dolgoff says.Your baby is still drinking breast milk or formula at this stage.

11-12 Months Old Baby soon will take her first steps. These two months hold the biggest rewards for all your hard work. Your baby's nighttime feedings will not fully disappear, but they will lessen. By your baby's first birthday, he will likely have tripled his birth weight www.parents.com Bringing together the power of respected magazine brands including American Baby and Parents, the Parents Network is your go-to destination for parenting information. From first kicks to first steps and on to the first day of school, we are here to help you celebrate the joys and navigate the challenges of parenthood. Š Copyright 2011 Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


twice

think

Pair your child with a friend, a sibling, or even yourself this Halloween. These couples costumes are super-easy to pull together and will make trick-or-treating double the fun.

Shirt and pants on both, basic brilliance.

By Jocelyn Worrall • Photographs by Jenny Risher

He’s alive! A monster is born with a milk-jug head and shredded duds. His crazy creator, dressed in a potion-stained lab coat, shows off his invention with pride.

frankenstein mad scientist

&

Parents October 2010 151


milk

A calcium-fortified refreshment can’t live without his cookie loaded with felt chocolate chips. Don’t forget his white mustache!

& cookies

set design by karen schaupeter. grooming by noelle marinelli for artists by next. on milk: shirt and pants, basic brilliance. on cookie: shirt, pants, and hat: american apparel.

Turn to Resources, page 230, for detailed costume instructions.

152 October 2010 Parents


the princess

& the frog

on princess: dress, basic brilliance. tights, we love colors. on frog: shirt, pants, and hat, basic brilliance.

Robe your little royal in a magenta dress with ribbons and pom-poms; adorn her frog prince with a gold crown and oversize googly eyes.


&

Trade places with your little one for a day—dress up for a playdate while you deck her out in business attire.

on daughter: shirt and pants, basic brilliance. on daddy: pants, american apparel.

daughter daddy


on painting: shirt, basic brilliance. leggings, american apparel. gold clogs, sven.

the artist

&

his work

VoilĂ ! A beret and a ruffled collar is all this painter needs to get his creative juices flowing. Dress his masterpiece in a gold doily frame for a museum-worthy look. Parents October 2010 155


the fisherman his catch

&

on fisherman: pants, basic brilliance.

This rough-andtumble seafarer reels in a super-cute baby bluefish!


the tortoise

on Tortoise: shirt, basic brilliance. tights, we love colors. Leg warmers, babylegs.com. on hare: shirt, basic brilliance. tights, we love colors.

Make one of Aesop’s memorable stories come to life—give your tortoise a felt-covered-backpack shell, and dress her opponent in bunny ears and a cotton tail.

&

the hare

Go to parents.com/halloween2010 to submit the cutest pictures of your kid in costume for a chance to win cash prizes. For contest rules, turn to page 235.

Parents October 2010 157


& fall

Spring has sprung in a flirty ensemble adorned with daisies and daffodils. Style your dapper fellow in all brown, and glue leaves to his jacket for flair.

on spring: gloves and tights, we love colors.

spring

158 October 2010 Parents


Count Dracula Halloween Party for Kids

Party Invitations Help your child get excited for his Count Dracula party by making delightfully spooky invitations! Just download some colorful images of bats and Dracula from your favorite websites (or Google), trim, and glue to the front of a blank party card.

Count Dracula Table Make a Count Dracula table filled with candy, numbered balloons -- for the Count, of course! -- and friendly creatures! Pick a plain table in your house, and set it off to the side of the party, so kids can munch on treats like oranges, grapes, or M&M's when they're hungry.


Creepy Candy Use clear glass candy jars as a way to display your favorite ghouls! Make a container into Count Dracula or another creepy creature using a foam ball as a head, construction paper for a cape, fangs, and vest, and a bow for his bow tie! Fill the jar with candy and have kids guess how many candies are inside!

Tricks that Come in "Hand-y" Make a pair of hands to sit on the table using aluminum! Simply mold the aluminum until you achieve the appearance of a hand, cover with garden gloves, and set on the table. You can even stick party favors between the fingers for a kooky touch!


Count on Cookies Turn these cookies into a fun lesson for your little ones! Cut out circles and numbers from refrigerated cookie dough using cookie cutters; then bake, cool, and frost them! Finally, place the number cookies on top of the frosted circle cookies and enjoy a Count-inspired treat!

Not-So-Itsy-Bitsy Spider Make this oversize foam spider in a few simple steps! Use three different sizes of foam balls to create the body, head, and feet of the spider, painting the feet purple and the body black. Then, attach googly eyes and use black pipe cleaners to create long, spindly legs. Use these crawlers as a lid for candy jars or as hanging mobiles to surprise kids! Make Spooky Spiders for Halloween


Popcorn Balls Popcorn balls are always a hit with kids, especially when they're made to look green, blue, and purple using foodcoloring dye! Use this recipe to make these treats!

Get Crafty with the Count Set up a craft station in the corner of a room with kid-size tables and chairs. To keep in line with the Count Dracula theme, cut large numbers out of cardboard, paint them, and prop them up in the craft area.


Count Dracula Crafting Station Fill your crafting station with colorful plastic plates, crafts foam (maybe some left over from the spooky spiders), colored crafts paper, kids' scissors, glue, googly eyes, puffy paint, and other materials from nearby crafts stores.

Vampires! Ghouls! Shrieks! Oh Yes! Kids will love to craft their own ghoulish friends out of paper plates and craft paper! And at the end of the party, your little artists can take home a spooky character to decorate their rooms. Make Plastic-Plate Ghoulies for Halloween


Extra Assistance If younger children are having difficulty completing the crafts, enlist the help of a few adult friends to make their creations a little less complicated.

Count-the-Faces-Wreath Make a circle of Halloween friends -- and frights! Cut a wreath out of a foam paper plate, and then use colorful craft paper to make spooky faces. Glue the ghouls onto the wreath. Once the project is complete, have kids try to count all the faces on the wreath -- it's harder than it looks! Make a Frightful Wreath for Halloween


Dracula Favors Make these Dracula-inspired party favors in a few easy steps! Cover the lids of glass containers with colorful felt and secure with hot glue. Then decorate a foam ball as the face of your desired Halloween creature. Glue the ball to the lid and top off the project with felt accessories like a Dracula cape. Fill each jar with Halloween candy and give to guests. Kids will love leaving with a special treat. Make Creepy Candy Jars for Halloween

Say "Dracula"! Have kids pose for pictures with different party favors or decorations like the oversize numbers, and snap a few


pictures. After the party, mail the photos to party guests or their parents to thank them for coming -- they'll love it! Copyright Š 2010 Meredith Corporation. www.parents.com Bringing together the power of respected magazine brands including American Baby and Parents, the Parents Network is your go-to destination for parenting information. From first kicks to first steps and on to the first day of school, we are here to help you celebrate the joys and navigate the challenges of parenthood. Š Copyright 2011 Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


goodybag m u s t s ee

Must dO

m u s t h av E t h i s m o n t h

Aussie Invasion Move over, Wiggles! These awesome imports from Down Under are making a splash in the U.S.

baby: Heather Weston. styling by elysha lenkin for ennis inc. grooming by noelle marinelli for artists by next. books and bag: bryan mccay.

Outback Tales

The Waussies book series teaches children how to be considerate of others, and its narrated CDs bring the message to life. $15; waussieproductions.com

Family Flick

Hoot and holler at the movies, when the Australian 3-D film Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole swoops into theaters. (rated PG)

Wrap Artistry

These breathable, Aussie animal-themed swaddling blankets get softer with every wash. $33 for three; koalakuddles.com

Beautiful Bag

While this diaper bag may be a splurge, it has three bonus items inside: a changing pad, a storage satchel, and a cooler for bottles. $200; isokiusa.com

Parents October 2010 21


goody bag

Online Book Report

Three fun ways to share a high-tech story with your kids

1

iStorytime apps Download kids’ classics (Little Red Riding Hood) and newer titles, and the app will read to your child using different voices and visual effects. (Starts at $1 for iPad and iPhone; itunes.com)

2

Read for the Record Day On October 7, the early-literacy campaign is challenging kids and adults across the country to read this year’s book, The Snowy Day. It’s available for free at wegivebooks.org. BookChat Read your kid to sleep when you’re not together with Readeo’s video-chat book service (think a storytime Skype). You both can see the book and videos of each other. ($7 a month; readeo.com)

Your child can access a whole library at the touch of her fingers.

Foot Notes

Trendsetting kids can show off their literary loves on their shoes.

sneakers Dr. Seuss’s One Fish Two Fish … ($40; converse.com)

Boots Paul Frank’s Julius! collection ($17; amazon.com)

Flats Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar ($35; striderite.com)

22 October 2010 Parents

Holiday Help from We’re celebrating the season of giving with 100 Days of Holidays for our readers. From now through New Year’s, you can receive daily e-mail newsletters that are loaded with our top Halloween-costume tips, favorite Thanksgiving recipes, awesome Christmas gift picks, and tons of other ideas for festive fun. Sign up at parents.com/holiday.

girl: thayer allyson gowdy. styling by karen schaupeter. grooming by diane da silva. shoes: bryan mccay.

3


goody bag

young to sit through the World Series? They can still get in on the fun with these ideas for little fans.

Customized Caps Let kids

personalize their own baseball hat with fast-drying paint pens.

Sporty Song During the seventh-inning stretch, teach them the words to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” Get lyrics at lyricsdownload.com.

Genevieve Says …

Go Cartoon Chic

When your kid begs for a room decked out in her favorite character, you can give in—without suffocating the style of the rest of your house. Sound impossible? Not if you go the DIY route.

Home-Run Snack Whip

up a batch of homemade caramel popcorn before the game. Visit parents.com for our simple and delicious recipe.

Cool Craft Show off your

team spirit by making paper pennants to wave during the game. Just glue a wooden chopstick to a cardstock triangle.

Lunch Letters

Show your fave student that you’re thinking of him with a sweet message sticker on his lunch sack or a handwritten card tucked under his sandwich. There are enough notes for the whole school year. 24 October 2010 Parents

Create rooms with real character.

Sassy Cinderella

Look beyond Disney to a world of luxury. Ask your daughter what kind of room a princess would have, and she will no doubt picture a majestic bed. Create a royal feel with a gauzy canopy that hangs securely from the ceiling. Dress it up with pink satin pillows.

Dora Delirium

Mini Lunch Notes ($10; chroniclebooks.com)

Create a subtle sense of the jungle with tropical greens, oranges, and yellows. Involve your kid so she gets what you’re doing and can help imagine Dora’s world, whether it’s jungle-animal wall decals or a tropical plant in the corner. This way, you can capture Dora without her face plastered everywhere.

Superman Mania

It’s all about the outfit when it comes to superheroes—bold reds, blues, and yellows. A red “S” cape can easily double as a throw at the foot of your child’s bed. Stock bookshelves with Superman comics, and then top the room off with light-blue walls painted with fluffy white clouds.

Catch Genevieve on HGTV’s Dear Genevieve (Saturdays, 8:30 p.m. EST).

boy: heather weston. Styling by elysha lenkin for ennis inc. grooming by Noelle marinelli for artists by next. Genevieve and daughter: sarah kehoe. styling by Kristen petliski. hair and makeup by randall tang. room: Red Cover/Alun Callender. bag: bryan mccay.

Have a Ball Are your kids too


time for fun

T R AV EL

Your Guide to Stress-Free Family Travel

S

BY KATHLEEN REILLY

Get all smiles, from airport security to hotel check-in.

for eating on the go...

Suzanne Farrell, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association and mom of two in Denver

Don’t go overboard. When you’re traveling, you’re going to run into some temptations, such as chocolate-chip cookies on the plane or at the hotel. Stick to your kids’ normal eating habits when you can, but it’s okay to give them a treat, especially if you balance it out with healthy choices. Pack smart snacks. Food keeps the kids’ energy up and helps prevent meltdowns in stressful travel situations. But you want the snacks to be as substantial as possible—this means keeping sweets to a minimum. I like to offer goodies such as pretzels, cheese sticks, peanut-butter wraps, and a homemade snack mix made from whole-grain cereal. My 4-year-old loves helping me make it too.

226 October 2010 Parents

for healthy travels...

Bertie Bregman, M.D., chief of Family Medicine Service, Allen Pavilion of New York Presbyterian Hospital and father of four in New York City

Boost immunity beforehand. It’s definitely scary to have a sick child in an unfamiliar place. The best thing to do is make sure everyone’s immune system is strong weeks before any travel. You can help do this by having your kids eat well, take vitamins, and get plenty of sleep. It won’t prevent every type of illness, but it’s a good start. And carry contact information for local doctors and hospitals just in case. Bring the basics. We always pack

medications, including a fever and pain reliever (acetaminophen, ibuprofen), a stomach med, a thermometer, and, of course, plenty of bandages. Also, a bottle of hand sanitizer or wipes can be a lifesaver when you’re traveling.

A big help that’s easy to pack

From top: Raygun/ getty images; David Hamsley.

o you’ve gone online to research a destination, find a flight, or book a room, and now you’re ready to hit the road with the kids, right? Not so fast! Even a well-planned family trip can have bumps along the way—your toddler has a meltdown on the plane or your hotel turns out to be not so kid-friendly. Don’t wait until you’re caught up in a stressful situation to find a fix. Check out these smart, commonsense tricks of the trade from seasoned travel experts, who’ve been there and done that with their kids.


time for fun

T R AV EL

on the plane... Veda Shook, flight attendant for Alaska Airlines and mom of two in Washington, D.C.

Keep the kids happy.

I try to hide a little surprise for the kids, so if they’re getting restless on the plane they can pull out a new toy, book, or game. That usually buys us more time. You should also bring an empty sippy cup to fill up at the water fountain once you’ve passed through security. Kids often can’t wait until service comes through the plane to get something to drink. Having your own can prevent a midair meltdown.

Go nonstop. I’d rather pay extra—or even drive an hour more to a different airport—to get a nonstop flight than risk delays and the other hassles of taking a connecting flight with kids. But if you can’t avoid connections, be sure to allow enough time between flights for your children to stretch, go to the bathroom, eat, and unwind without having to rush to the next gate.

Drinking helps with in-flight ear pain. Cut down on bags. With all the baggage fees, sometimes it’s easier to buy bulky things, like diapers, when you get there. You can also ship a box to your destination, which is often cheaper than the $25 to $35 second-bag fee. If you stay with friends or family, ask to borrow their car seat, crib, and other gear.

on the road...

Jennifer Huebner, spokesperson for American Automobile Association (AAA) and a mother of two in Orlando

Research routes. For long drives with kids, I plan the route in advance, keeping in mind back roads and timing to avoid rush hour. If you’re in the heart of a big city during gridlock traffic, it’s not just stressful for you—it can make the kids tense too!

Be prepared. I always make a few different to-do

lists, including a mini menu of snacks or a reminder to check that the car seat’s installed properly. I also have a master list that tries to anticipate the kids’ needs along the way, from baby wipes to games to keep them entertained during the drive.

Remember to list everyday essentials. 228

from top: bryan mccay; Peter ardito.

Take breaks. Build in travel time to stop every couple of hours. That gives kids a chance to move around and play. I’ll even add in a quick trip to a children’s museum or a big play area for them to blow off steam. Experts suggest you take a rest every two hours or 100 miles—for kids, you should do it more often than that (after 90 minutes or less).


when booking a room...

Kammy Shuman, travel agent at Encompass the World Travel and a mother of two in Parma, Ohio

Consider all-inclusives. These resorts are particularly nice for families because everything is right there. You don’t have to worry about renting a car and car seat and driving everywhere. The cost of most food, drinks, and entertainment is already built in, so you don’t have to pay every time. (See parents.com/resorts for ideas.)

istockphoto.

Think location, location, location. When choosing your room, try to be as close to the pool, the beach, or the main attraction as possible. If you have a kid who’s potty training or has to go to the bathroom a lot, you don’t want to have to keep running over the sand and up ten flights to your room. Pick a kid-friendly place. The first thing I consider when planning a family trip is whether that hotel has kids’ programs and babysitting services. Some resorts are amazing if you’ve got a baby. They have things like bottle warmers, extra diapers, and even a nursery so certified staff can watch your little one while you hit the spa. Shop around hotel Get insider Websites in your ideal area to tips at the see what’s available for kids. front desk.

for a safe stay...

Colleen Driscoll, executive director for the International Association for Child Safety and mom of three in Baltimore, Maryland

Childproof your room.

Make sure there’s nothing a cruising toddler or a sleeping baby can get harmed by. I always pack a little kit that includes things like a nightlight, outlet covers, latches, and a travel safety gate. FYI: Some hotels will provide proofing kits or even do it for you if you ask in advance.

Have a backup plan.

Don’t be afraid to change rooms or even hotels if you’re worried about your child’s safety. We did it after discovering our room had a tile floor. Our daughter was starting to crawl, and we felt like we couldn’t safely put her down.


Your Guide to Stress-Free Family Travel Experts (parents themselves!) give you their best advice for wiggling out of the inevitable problems you encounter when traveling with kids. By Kathleen Reilly

So you've gone online to research a destination, find a flight, or book a room, and now you're ready to hit the road with the kids, right? Not so fast! Even a well-planned family trip can have bumps along the way -- your toddler has a meltdown on the plane or your hotel turns out to be not so kid-friendly. Don't wait until you're caught up in a stressful situation to find a fix. Check out these smart, commonsense tricks of the trade from seasoned travels who've been there and done that with their kids.

For eating on the go ... Suzanne Farrell, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association and mom of two in Denver. Don't go overboard. When you're traveling, you're going to run into some temptations, such as chocolate chip cookies on the plane or at the hotel. Stick to your kids' normal eating habits when you can, but it's okay to give them a treat, especially if you balance it out with healthy choices. Pack smart snacks. Food keeps the kids' energy up and helps prevent meltdowns in stressful travel situations. But you want the snacks to be as substantial as possible -- this means keeping sweets to a minimum. I like to offer goodies such as pretzels, cheese sticks, peanut-butter wraps, and a homemade snack mix made from whole-grain cereal. My 4-year-old loves helping me make it, too.

For healthy travels ... Bertie Bregman, M.D., chief of Family Medicine Service, Allen Pavilion of New York Presbyterian Hospital, and father of four in New York City. Boost immunity beforehand. It's definitely scary to have a sick child in an unfamiliar place. The best thing to do is make sure everyone's immune system is strong weeks before any travel. You can help do this by having your kids eat well, take vitamins, and get plenty of sleep. It won't prevent every type of illness, but it's a good start. And carry contact information for local doctors and hospitals just in case. Bring the basics. We always pack medications, including a fever and pain reliever (acetaminophen, ibuprofen), a stomach med, a thermometer, and, of course, plenty of bandages. Also, a bottle of hand sanitizer or wipes can be a lifesaver when you're traveling. Know local hospitals. If your child does get sick, the first place to go is the front desk at the hotel. They should have information for the local medical professionals. But it?s also a good idea to make a list of the ERs in the area (and how you can get there) before you leave home.

On the plane ... Veda Shook, flight attendant for Alaska Airlines and mom of two in Washington, D.C. Keep the kids happy. I try to hide a little surprise for the kids, so if they're getting restless on the plane they can pull out a new toy, book, or game. That usually buys us more time. You should also bring an empty sippy cup to fill up at the water fountain once you've passed through security. Kids often can't wait until service comes through the plane to get


something to drink. Having your own can prevent a midair meltdown. Go nonstop. I'd rather pay extra -- or even drive an hour more to a different airport -- to get a nonstop flight than risk delays and the other hassles of taking a connecting flight with kids. But if you can't avoid connections, be sure to allow enough time between flights for your children to stretch, go to the bathroom, eat, and unwind without having to rush to the next gate. Cut down on bags. With all the baggage fees, sometimes it's easier to buy bulky things, such as diapers, when you get there. You can also ship a box to your destination, which is often cheaper than the $25-$35 second-bag fee. If you stay with friends or family, ask to borrow their car seat, crib, and other gear.

On the road ... Jennifer Huebner, spokesperson for American Automobile Association (AAA) and a mother of two in Orlando. Research routes. For long drives with kids, I plan the route in advance, keeping in mind back roads and timing to avoid rush hour. If you're in the heart of a big city during gridlock traffic, it's not just stressful for you -- it can make the kids tense, too! Take breaks. Build in travel time to stop every couple of hours. That gives kids a chance to move around and play. I'll even add in a quick trip to a children's museum or a big play area for them to blow off steam. Experts suggest you take a rest every two hours or 100 miles -- for kids, you should do it more often than that (after 90 minutes or less). Be prepared. I always make a few different to-do lists, including a mini menu of snacks or a reminder to check that the car seat's installed properly. I also have a master list that tries to anticipate the kids' needs along the way, from baby wipes to games to keep them entertained during the drive.

When booking a room ... Kammy Shuman, travel agent at Encompass the World Travel and a mother of two in Parma, Ohio. Consider all-inclusives. These resorts are particularly nice for families because everything is right there. You don't have to worry about renting a car and car seat and driving everywhere. The cost of most food, drinks, and entertainment is already built in, so you don't have to pay every time. (See parents.com/resorts for ideas.) Think location, location, location. When choosing your room, try to be as close to the pool, the beach, or the main attraction as possible. If you have a kid who's potty training or has to go to the bathroom a lot, you don't want to have to keep running over the sand and up 10 flights to your room. Pick a kid-friendly place. The first thing I consider when planning a family trip is whether that hotel has kids' programs and babysitting services. Some resorts are amazing if you've got a baby. They have things such as bottle warmers, extra diapers, and even a nursery so certified staff can watch your little one while you hit the spa. Shop around hotel Websites in your ideal area to see what's available for kids. Check into overseas options. If I'm traveling out of the country, I make sure there's food I know my kids will eat close to the hotel. It's also good to find one that offers room service, which isn't as common abroad. If you have a jet-lagged child, you don't want to have to go out in the middle of the night to find food or snacks.

For a safe stay ... Colleen Driscoll, executive director for the International Association for Child Safety and mom of three in Baltimore. Childproof your room. Make sure there's nothing that can harm a cruising toddler or a sleeping baby. I always pack a little kit that includes things such as a night-light, outlet covers, latches, and a travel safety gate. FYI: Some hotels will provide proofing kits or even do it for you if you ask in advance. Have a backup plan. Don't be afraid to change rooms or even hotels if you?re worried about your child's safety. We did it after discovering our room had a tile floor. Our daughter was starting to crawl, and we felt like we couldn't safely


put her down. Originally published in the October 2010 issue of Parents magazine.

www.parents.com Bringing together the power of respected magazine brands including American Baby and Parents, the Parents Network is your go-to destination for parenting information. From first kicks to first steps and on to the first day of school, we are here to help you celebrate the joys and navigate the challenges of parenthood. Š Copyright 2011 Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


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