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3.) Both vessels running free with the wind on the same side, the windward (Upwind) vessel keeps out of the way of leeward (downwind) vessel. As a cautionary note the windward sailboats downwind vision is likely to be impaired by its sails. Even though you maybe the downwind sail boat never assume that the windward boat can see you. 4.) Two vessels with the wind on the same side the vessel windward gives way. 5.) Steam and motor craft must give way to sailing craft except :Where it is too difficult for a large power boat to navigate in small channel. Where the sailing vessel is overtaking. 6.) Every vessel overtaking another shall keep out of the way of the one overtaken. 7.) Vessels engaged in towing have the right of way. Learn these rules thoroughly and abide by them.

Summary and Reminders The essence of yachtsmanship is to keep everything shipshape. See that rope and cable is carefully coiled, and all unwanted gear stowed away. See that the sails set well. A yacht not only looks tidier but will actually sail much better when this is done. Do not hesitate to take in one or more reefs when necessary. There is nothing clever in overpowering the hull with too much sail. Remember that the only “braking power” on a sailing boat is the resistance of the wind and the friction of the water when the boat is turned dead into the eye of the wind. Never make the mainsheet fast when there is any sort of a breeze blowing. See that all ropes and tackles lead freely and that there are no knots and entanglements. A small flag or “burgee” at the mast head is often of great assistance in giving the direction of the wind. Take care to hoist the boom high enough to give sufficient clearance. ‘Ware boom always. Many a man has been knocked overboard by it and many more have received a nasty crack on the head. When tacking or sailing close hauled, don’t make sheer “gain” your objective – in other words, don’t sail close to the wind. Once a yacht gets “weather cocked” or “in stays”, much good time and ground is lost in getting her back into sailing trim again. As a matter of courtesy give way wherever possible to all tugs, freighters, and other commercial craft. It is their livelihood against your pleasure. Avoid steering erratically. It is a waste of time and conducive to unnecessary gybing. Sailing in very rough weather can be, and generally is, rather an alarming experience for the amateur. He can easily overcome any fears or doubts that may assail him by remembering that when the principles of sailing are correctly followed very little harm can result. Do not allow any sailing vessel to heel over too far. A boat will not sail fast on its beam ends. Ease away the mainsheet until the correct angle has been attained. When shaking out a reef take care to untie all the points. No two sailing boats are exactly alike. Get to know the characteristics and peculiarities of your own particular craft. Be alert and prepared. Develop a sense of anticipation ready to deal with emergencies as they arise. Remember the good yachtsman is never caught “off guard”. Let caution be the watch word. It never pays to take unnecessary risks. Avoid all “gybing” as far as possible, but when this is necessary then be the master. When tacking, or for that matter at any time, do not sail in too close to the river banks for danger of going aground. Much valuable time is lost in getting free, and in a high wind it is frequently necessary to lower the sails and put in a lot of hard labour in poling or quanting to get clear. This reminder of course more especially concerns the larger vessels of deeper draught. On river and Broads when racing is in progress, it is an act of courtesy for all yachts not racing to give way to those competing.

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Japonica 5  

Boat Manual

Japonica 5  

Boat Manual

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