Page 18

B) Assume the main sail will be hoisted first (for this description). The man in the cockpit must now ease or overhaul a lot of the mainsheet, through the blocks so that the main boom is free to swing along way from side to side. Don’t hold the sheet and don’t cleat it or belay it. C) Hoist the mainsail by hauling on both halyards at the same time (one person or two). Keep the peak a little higher than the throat. As soon as the luff of the main sail becomes fairly taut, cleat the peak halyard temporarily. The main halyard is hauled upon with considerable strength to get the luff rope tight. Belay the main halyard to its own cleat, probably on the tabernacle. Now go back to the peak halyard and haul upon it and as you do so the mainsail will become a lot more lively. At the same time slacken away the topping lift and the boom will now be supported by the sail. Adjust the peak halyard so that the sail seems free of wrinkles. Raise and then lower the peak a little to find the right spot and then having found the angle which is about correct, raise the peak a few more inches as it will soon sag a little due to stretch in the cordage. The sail and the boom will be swinging about (perhaps it may seem rather menacingly) above the cockpit. Don’t try to restrain it and only touch the sheet to pay out even more rope. D) Next attach the jib halyard to the head of the joist and hoist this sail. If the halyard twists around itself or if the head of the sail is all screwed up like a towel being wrung out then lower away. Unhook the block and turn it and do this until everything goes up ‘fair’. Get the halyard tight (and after sailing it will tightening again). On a loose fitted jib there will be jib sheets leading aft, one down each side deck through fairleads. You now get under way with a helmsman at the tiller. Somebody else casts off forward and backs the jib by hand up into the wind so as to blow the bow of the craft one way or the other. While this is going on the helmsman must NOT haul the main sheet in. wait until the boat has blown well away from the bank and roughly parallel with the bank and not pointing at it. Only then, haul on the sheets and move ahead.

Lowering Sails Point the bow into the wind, and proceed to take down the jib first, but if there is much wind it is wise to lower the peak of the mainsail first, just sufficient to spill some of the wind out of the sail. This will stop alot of the flapping and prevent you craft from remaining too “lively”. Haul on the topping, lift enough to raise the booms, after a few inches and to take its full weight, then slack away both main and peak halyards together. Keep peak (end of gaff) well up, say 45 degrees, not horizontal, and this will help to drive the throat downwards. As the loose canvas comes down, it should be gathered in onto the boom by hand, and as soon as the gaff is about halfway down, the boom can start to be coaxed towards amidships. Immediately the gaff is fully lowered one or two lengths of lacing are put around the two spars and the sail to prevent any wind from getting into the sail. Only when this has been done should the crutches then be got out and set up. Slack away topping lift to drop boom etc., into fork of the crutches. The crutches are only intended to act as a static prop and should only be in position when the boom tyers are secured. Roll up the loose canvas as neatly as possible, and stow between the gaff and the boom, securing the whole with lengths of lacing. Sails however should not be permanently stowed away wet.

Profile for Ian Curtis

Japonica 5  

Boat Manual

Japonica 5  

Boat Manual

Advertisement