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MAARRTA TA LLLO LORR.. M P E N N D E S I G N | PA R S O N S


ABOUT

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H E L LO. I’m Marta and I’m an architect in the making. Architecture has shaped my outlook of the world from a young age. Barcelona taught me to admire the complexity of urban systems interwoven through architectural wonders. In Chicago I fell in love with skyscrapers and realized the importance of resilience. New York taught me that history shapes the built environments of the future. I believe architecture is the truest reflection of our values as a society, the mirage of what we strive to become. My designs stem from a relentless curiosity about geometric explorations and narratives about space, time and agency.


INDEX

/02

01/

02/

RAW+SYNTHETIC

ERU NEXUS

2019

2018

03/

04///

RE-KNOW

POLYMORPHIC ID

2017

2017

05/

06/

MIND THE GAP

HEALING LATTICE

2016

2017

07/

08/

POPDROP

INTERSTITIALITY

2018

2016

09/

10/

APOMECHANES

VOIDED EDGE

2018

2018


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/03

RAW+SYNTHETIC 01/ Re-imagining urban nature production in Industry City, Brooklyn. RAW+SYNTHETIC is an exploration of the boundaries between nature, urbanity and food production. The project interrogates what food production and manufacturing mean in a urban setting and aims to challenge the notions of what is natural (raw) and built (synthetic). The juxtapositions of these dualities is provoked with every decision, allowing its inhabitants to question what they know. The building acts as a large-scale apiary in which honey bees take the primary actor role. The structure is created for honey bees to inhabit, pollinate, produce and live with crevices carved out for human ephemeral occupancy. Trees, plants and herbs that facilitate honey bee pollination blur the thresholds between interior and exterior, allowing the bees to freely circulate. The auxiliary human spaces aid the production, manufacturing and nurturing of the raw elements as well as provide a learning environment where New Yorkers may learn to keep their private apiaries thus replenishing the declining honey bee population of New York.

In Progress || SPRING 2019 Critic: Nate HUME Collaboration with Catherine SHIH


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/04


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/05

05CENTER/ materiality, texture and color studies 06TOP/ section blurring thresholds between systems 06BOTTOM/ elevation showing structure and greenery interaction


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/06


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/07

07LEFT/ interior + exterior partial model 07RIGHT/ wall + structure assembly 08LEFT/ production life cycle diagram 08RIGHT/ wall + structure detail drawing


RAW+SYNTHETIC

The building acts as the nurturer, host and producer of honey production, consumption and distribution. The building intends to nurture honey bees and local vegetation in a symbiotic feedback loop. Pockets of beehives throughout the building are displayed or hidden in interior cavities and poche, which then bees are released to pollinate internally and externally. The extraction process becomes part of the architecture and at times is showcased within the geometry. The series of linear buildings that characterize industry city form interstitial spaces, or sliver spaces, that the community appropriates as cultural meeting places. The building incorporates the idea of the sliver spaces as nodes of engagement and interaction, where the three systems at play, humans, bees and plants, intertwine

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RAW+SYNTHETIC

/09

09TOP/ herb garden, kitchen and accelerator vignette 09LEFT/ market vignette 09CENTER/ beekeeping vignette 09RIGHT/ interior garden vignette 10LEFT/ rockite and resin study 10RIGHT/ plaster and resin study


RAW+SYNTHETIC

/10


ERU NEXUS

/11

ERU NEXUS 02/ Parkside’s Living Room. ERU NEXUS is a community center for the neighborhood of Parkside in Philadelphia. Although it was a thriving area in the 1920s, Parkside suffered a rapid decline and is now beginning to rebuild itself from abandonment and negligence from the city of Philadelphia. The exploration began as an inquisition into the residents’ hacking or re-purposing of the abandoned lots throughout the neighborhood. These lots serve as a distilled, site-specific version of a community center where people gather and share meals, stories, and activities. Eru nexus provides a formal infrastructure for these community events to occur, allowing for the lots to be used for construction of new housing, thus expanding the neighborhood and broadening the existing community. Through the process of abstracting and synthesizing profiles of the city these everyday patterns become defamilirized from their context.

SPRING 2018 Critic: Josh FREESE


ERU NEXUS

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ERU NEXUS

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13TOP/ profiles from Philadelphia de-familiarized + re-configured 13BOTTOM/ re-contextualization of profiles on the site 14TOP/ programmatic plan 14BOTTOM/ programmatic section perspective


ERU NEXUS

/14


ERU NEXUS

/15


ERU NEXUS

/16 MAP- community development multi-generational kitchen market interior program

library daycare

outdoor seating

amphitheater garden market exterior program

massing pattern

15TOP/ perspective render of the main entrance 15BOTTOM/ elevation of the east facade 16RIGHT/ programmatic exploded axonometric

playground


RE-KNOW

/17

RE-KNOW 03/ Colonizing the colonizer. PAVILION is a pavilion for the protest and rebuttal to the treatment of non-Western objects by museums and institutions that decontextualize them to be presented in a removed backdrop. The project takes the actor away from the setting of the museum to provide breaking point in the progression of the museum in which a perspective of oppression is portrayed along the objects of the museum recontextualizing their existence. The project colonizes the colonizer - the Penn Museum- interrupting the circulation and forcing visitors into the pavilion to gain a different perspective. Inside the pavilion, pages of Native American ‘boarding schools’ books are for the public to read while a projection reflects the struggles of Native Americans to free themselves from the grasp of colonial powers in the United States. The pavilion was constructed at half scale with re-usable plastic and felt for a M.Arch first year display.

FALL 2017 Critic: Eduardo REGA CALVO Collaboration with Joonsung LEE, Shen MO, Li YUJIE, Tynx TANEJA


RE-KNOW

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RE-KNOW

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19TOP/ aggregation of modules 19BOTTOM/ aggregation into a self-standing structure 20LEFT/ plan cut at seating level 20RIGHT/ 1:1/2 scale prototype model


RE-KNOW

/20


POLYMORPHIC ID

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POLYMORPHIC ID 04/ Anthropology redefined. PPOLYMORPHIC ID aims to further the conversation about Native American colonization and endurance through the exploration of cartography, storytelling and the re-introduction of native species of flora to the Penn Museum. The project engages in thoughtful critique of colonial practices, particularly the impact they have had on Native American peoples. Through a variety of programs ranging from the reintegration of Native American Species to storytelling, Polymorphic ID aims to bring awareness to the injustices perpetrated by colonial powers and their legacy in educational institutions. Polymorphic ID engages the public in a critique of the static practices of representation Western institutions exhibit, while educating the users about Native American stories. The project intersects through the museum’s façade, blurring the threshold from interior to exterior spaces, and museum and polymorphic spaces.

FALL 2017 Critic: Eduardo REGA CALVO Nominated for First Year Design Award


POLYMORPHIC ID

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POLYMORPHIC ID

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23TOP/ precedent studies of non-directional systems 23MIDDLE/ precedent studies of non-directional circulation 23BOTTOM/ precedent study of volume aggregation 24RIGHT/ intuitive proto-drawings based on site research 24BOTTOM/ longitudinal section blurring thresholds of museum and exhibit


POLYMORPHIC ID

Through the consistent programmatic alteration, an ecology of dynamic, hybrid programs emerges which can be shifted and rearranged. The absence of permanence creates a stark contrast to the museum, which reinforces the ideology that histories are everchanging. Through the spatial tactic of nondirectional space the building takes shape. Various surfaces create confounding circulation paths without the need for corridors allowing for inter-programmatic influence. These paths are changing, chaotic within their own parametrized order.

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POLYMORPHIC ID

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25TOPLEFT/ basement plan 25TOPRIGHT/ second floor plan 25CENTER/ ground floor plan 26CENTER/ experiential axonometric


POLYMORPHIC ID

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MIND THE GAP

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MIND THE GAP 05/ Rethinking NYC’s tenements. MIND THE GAP The history of housing in New York City is intricately intertwined with the city’s history of health. Access to affordability, light and ventilation have been central components to shaping the city’s architecture. Through the analysis of housing typologies opportunities arise to develop modern solutions in order to preserve existing typologies, through the addition of housing. Mind the Gap proposes an alternative to destruction; establishing a methodology of preservation and addition of housing to the existing typologies. Form follows a rigorous sequence of adaptation through light and air studies. The sequence can be applied to each individual typological object as a methodology of design. Each apartment is comprised of two floors, each situated in a different face of the building in order to maximize space, light and ventilation to promote healthy living.

SPRING 2016 Critic: Nicholas CHELKO Collaboration with Sunjam KAUR Parsons School of Design Archived Project


MIND THE GAP

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HISTORY OF EVENTS IN MANHATTAN

MIND THE GAP

POPULATION RISE

1800

YELLOW FEVER EPIDEMIC

1810

HISTORY OF HOUSING IN MANHATTAN

1811

GRIDIRON TYPOLOGY YARD

1833

IMMIGRATION INFLUX

1840

CHOLERA EPIDEMIC

1849

1836

NO HOUSING PAST 14TH ST

25'

30,000 HOMELESS KIDS

1870

DIPHTERIA EPIDEMIC

1875

PERPETUAL FEVERS 27% CHILD MORTALITY

1883

NO HOUSING PAST 42TH ST

1867

25'

1879

100'

YARD

SETTLEMENT HOUSING 53'

1901

2/3 OF NEW YORKERS LIVE IN TENEMENTS

POLIO EPIDEMIC WORLD WAR I

TUBERCULOSIS WARDS OPEN

1916

1919

SYPHILLIS OUTBREAK

1934

53'

NEW YORK STATE TENEMENT ACT

1907

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC

25'

OLD LAW TENEMENT

1890

TYPHOID EPIDEMIC

100'

YARD

PRE-OLD LAW

1886 TUBERCULOSIS EPIDEMIC

25'

OUTHOUSES

1862 1863

100'

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE POOR

1857

DRAFT RIOTS

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YARD

1929 1938

FIRST ZONING RESOLUTION

100'

50'

MULTIPLE DWELLING LAW

FIRST BUILDING CODE 100'

WORLD WAR II SMALL POX

1940

POOR STREET SANITATION

1946

INFECTUOUS DISEASES MOSTLY CONTROLLED

200,000 HOUSING UNITS DESTROYED

1960

1965

AIDS EPIDEMIC.

1980

ASTHMA ON THE RISE

1990

5X MORE HOMELESS FAMILIES THAN 1900

YARD

YARD

1950 1961

LOW INCOME MEDIAN $10,000/YR HIGH INCOME MEDIAN $200,000/YR

50'

NEW ZONING RESOLUTION

1968

BUILDING CODE

1976

WINDOWGUARDS

2000 SMOKE-FREE NYC

100'

SLUM CLEARANCE

GENTRIFICATION

2003 2008

BUILDING CODE

2014

BUILDING CODE

2010

2016

ZONING FOR QUALITY AND AFFORDABILITY

29CENTER/ timeline comparing health and building codes in NYC 30CENTER/ section of new structure atop existing building


MIND THE GAP

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MIND THE GAP

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31TOP/ eight floor plan 31BOTTOM/ seventh floor plan 32CENTER/ model with structural lattice and building addition


MIND THE GAP

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HEALING LATTICE

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HEALING LATTICE 06/ New York City’s Maggie’s Centre. HEALING LATTICE takes the typology of the Maggie’s Centre and brings it to New York City. The center is a supplemental cancer treatment facility where patients and families alike can form a support network and find resources for their treatment. Centered around the powerful medicinal properties of plants, particularly herbs, the center offers a holistic approach to healing the patients, families, and its immediate the urban context . Healing Lattice is composed of a medicinal garden at the base, a meandering walk up and the center. The center features an herb garden, a kitchen, library, medical staff, counseling rooms and a soothing roof garden. The plants aid in the filtration of urban pollution thus helping to heal the city. The center aims to ameliorate the effects of cancer on patients and their families through forming a community around the building which allows them to being their emotional and physiological healing process.

SPRING 2017 Critic: Michael MORRIS Parsons School of Design Thesis Project


HEALING LATTICE

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HEALING LATTICE

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COMMUNITY GARDEN

N ROOF PLAN SCALE: 1/16” = 1’-0”

COUNSELING 10’-0”

N 7TH FL PLAN SCALE: 1/16” = 1’-0”

35TOPLEFT/ interior herb garden perspective 35ROPRIGHT/ interior library perspective 35MIDDLELEFT/ roof plan 36BOTTOM/ main floor plan of the Centre 36BOTTOM/ model with abstracted context


HEALING LATTICE

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POPDROP

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POPDROP 07/ Bringing little libraries to Parkside, Philadelphia. POPDROP is a community-sustained initiative of little libraries that pop up in the neighborhood of Parkside. The project aims to reclaim the neighborhood’s agency through education and the betterment of public property. The project grows as a communal effort to restore the streets of the neighborhood through replacing broken sidewalk tiles with interactive little libraries. As public spaces have been neglected by the city, the project harnesses the community to rebuild their own surroundings. Popdrop is installable and operable by everyone in the community. The modular book drop is composed of standardized parts and materials readily available to the public. The initiative is led by residents of East Parkside. Through the installation of little libraries in broken sidewalk tiles the program provides self-sustainability, engages the community authoring the public environment, and regain agency of the neighborhood.

SPRING 2018 Schenk-Woodman Competition HONORABLE MENTION Collaboration with David FORERO, Siyi LI


POPDROP

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POPDROP

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39CENTER/ street perspective 39LEFT/ popdrop being used 40CENTER/ popdrop location map


POPDROP

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INTERSTITIALITY

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INTERSTITIALITY 08/ Bridging Manhattan and the Bronx. INTERSTITIALITY interprets thresholds as sensory barriers that produce connections. These thresholds evolve to become sequences defined by their in-between. The ephemerally detached nature of the site prompts the evolution of space that creates new dynamic relationships of program, context, materiality and circulation. In Interstitiality, thresholds act as facilitators of sequential transitions that create a new reality of built environments. The neighborhood becomes a threshold itself that is reclaimed by its inhabitants through a sequence of singular spaces that capture and connect the site to its context. The relationship between threshold typology and its urban morphology create a new urban fabric. Through the isolation, analysis and superimposition of intersections, density nuclei, adjacencies, visuals and disjunctions of each threshold, a taxonomy of thresholds is created to introduce program.

FALL 2016 Critic: Carlo ENZO FRUGUIELE Parsons School of Design Archived Project


INTERSTITIALITY

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INTERSTITIALITY

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+

+

-

-

TRAFFIC

DENSITY

DENSITY

POPULATION

SUBSIDIZED HOUSING RESIDENTIAL PUBLIC SPACE COMMERCIAL

WORSHIP EDUCATION HEALTH

SPATIAL USES

+

+

-

-

ISOLATION

TOPOGRAPHY

LINGUISTIC

43TOPLEFT/ population and traffic density diagrams 43CENTER/ spatial uses diagram 43BOTTOM/ linguistic isolation and topography diagrams 44TOP/ plans of the second and third floors 44BOTTOM/ section showing relationship of site, transportation and building


INTERSTITIALITY

Thresholds are disjunctions in society, stemming from use, shape and values. Disjunction is a threshold, a fracture, a gap, interval, moment. Conjunctions are events that bridge these disjunctions, strengthening the urban fabric. Conjunctions are concurrences, coexisting, hybridity of programs, simultaneity, synchronicity. Collecting and finding micro-thresholds within the site allows for Interstitiality to mold to the neighborhood’s culture, topography, necessities, interactions. Commuters then become part of the new synergy of Marble Hill.

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INTERSTITIALITY

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45TOP/ extraction of thresholds 45BOTTOM/ spatial materialization of thresholds 46CENTER/ site analysis


INTERSTITIALITY

>100

500

1,000

5,000

40,000

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<10

100

300

500

circulation density - people per day

1,000

40,000

1.0

2.0

3.0

area average f.a.r.

4.0

-15ft topography

195ft

<100

10,000

75,000

people per square mile

100,000


APOMECHANES

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APOMECHANES 09/ Celebrating the Hadrian Aqueduct in Dexameni, Athens. APOMECHANES is a computational design exhibition that frames the history of a Roman aqueduct that brought water to Athens for centuries and culminates in a cistern in Dexameni Square. The exhibit drew in onlookers into the cistern which is primarily closed to the public and immerse the participants in an audiovisual experience inspired by the ancient geometries. The exhibit took place over the course of three hours in which a series of parametric videos were projected onto the waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface which allowed the light to bounce onto the walls. Disturbances in the water altered the perception of the videos, creating a dynamic movement timed to music. Apomechanes stemmed from a computational study of platonic solids and was developed through grasshopper scripts into a series of videos. These projections showcased, exaggerated and mimiqued the ancient geometries inside the Hadrian cistern with the finality of celebrating the space. In collaboration with the water company of Athens (EYDAP).

SUMMER 2018 Critics: Danielle WILLEMS, Ezio BLASETTI Collaboration with Gary POLK, Andrew MATIA, Andrew HOMICK, Keven BLOOMFIELD, Charles ZHAO, Bowen QUIN


APOMECHANES

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APOMECHANES

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49TOPLEFT/ fog sequence 49TOPRIGHT/ section of exhibit 49BOTTOMLEFT/ arch decomposition sequence 50CENTER/ arch decomposition sequence


APOMECHANES

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VOIDED EDGE

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VOIDED EDGE 10/ Inhabiting the Gowanus Bay Terminal. VOIDED EDGE carves out spaces for a tech-oriented incubator and residency inside the silos of the abandoned grain terminal in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Contrasting frameworks of operation and materiality, the project links the history of artist communities in New York with the revitalization of the iconic Red Hook structure. The unoccupied silos host beer tanks and a rainwater collection system that powers a micro brewery on the ground floor. The nostalgia of the brewery satisfies the passerbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curiosity about the imposing, monolithic terminal and allows them to learn about its history, bringing in the broader Brooklyn community. The existing structure is deliberately carved out and filled in with floor slabs to support habitability. The dichotomy of the old and new systems aims to challenge the inherent anachronism of the terminal through the insertion and adaptation of new architecture.

FALL 2018 Critic: Ben KRONE


VOIDED EDGE

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VOIDED EDGE

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53CENTER/ grid extraction and re-adaptation process diagram 54TOP/ partial model diagram of relationship of existing and infill 54BOTTOM/ section of inhabitable + habitable spaces


VOIDED EDGE

The incubator creates a symbiotic relationship between the participants, each learning from one another and collaborating, furthering their careers and strengthening the existing community of designers in Red Hook. The industrial past of the building is weaved in through the introduction of a brewery at the bottom floor. The beer tanks are nested within the uninhabited silos and are connected to the rainwater collection system. The ground floor is divided between the processing and bottling part of the brewery and a public beer garden. The building becomes a hub for the people of Brooklyn where they can live, design, and socialize.

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VOIDED EDGE

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55TOPLEFT/ facade perspective 55TOPRIGHT/ interior perspective of an apartment 55CENTERRIGHT/ interior view from facade 55BOTTOMRIGHT/ perspective of interior of an apartment 55BOTTOM/ plan showing residency + incubator 56CENTER/ ground-level perspective


VOIDED EDGE

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