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Bradley J Scherzer

Wall & Piece Students will create a hanging piece made of 3 ceramic tiles and wire and graffiti using a stencil over top. The hanging piece consists of 3 brick size tiles with the word “Oppression” stamped into them simulating a wall. The stencil image is then a reaction to the concept of oppression representing itself as social or political graffiti. The project references the history of the Berlin Wall. GRADE LEVEL: 9-12 CLASS SIZE: 15 students TIME: 3 - 90min sessions STATE STANDARDS • Connections, Relationships and Applications o Benchmark A: Summarize and explain the impact of a historical event or movement (e.g., realism, feminism, modernism or postmodernism) on the development of visual art. • Historical, Cultural and Social Contexts o Benchmark C: Explain ways in which selected, contemporary works of art relate to the themes, issues and events of their contexts. A. GOALS • To demonstrate the ability to combine text and imagery • To demonstrate the ability to manipulate images to communicate fear, oppression, or satire • To demonstrate an understanding of symbolic representation and forms. B. OBJECTIVES • Students will create relief tiles based on the historical events and the work of the graffiti artist Banksy using clay • Students will make sketches as part of the preliminary design planning • Students will combine text and images in a coherent manner C. CONCEPTS • Oppression o the exercise of authority or power in a burdensome, cruel, or unjust manner. o the feeling of being heavily burdened, mentally or physically, by troubles, adverse conditions, anxiety, etc. • Satire o irony, or sarcasm used to expose and discredit vice or folly D. INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES • Handout (Word Web) • Handout (List of words: Antonyms and Synonyms of Oppression) • PowerPoint (Bansky and Barbara Kruger) E. SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT • Digital Projector • (20) pencils © 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


(40) pieces of sketching paper 8.5x11 (20) plastic rulers Wooden Block Printing Press Letters of various sizes (20) Needle Tools Spool of wire (for connecting and hanging tiles) Needle Nose Pliers Sheet of drywall cut into manageably sizes for carrying (this is used for clay drying)(*use duct tape to seal off all edges so that no plaster gets into the clay) • Cardstock • Exacto knives • Cutting Mattes • Black spray paint • White spray paint • Red acrylic paint • Small brushes F. TEACHING PROCEDURE • Preliminary o Make Slideshow o Prepare projector o Print handouts o Roll slabs (3 – 8x4in per student) • Day 1 o Introduction: 40 min o Show Slideshow and Video of Banksy’s work o Discuss the use of satire to poke fun at the flaws and problems with society and authority o Go through the slideshow once more and have the students stop you on their favorite image o Discuss what is affective about this image and how it uses the imagery and text to invoke satire o Pass out the Handout with antonyms and synonyms of the word oppression o Show slideshow on the Berlin wall. Discuss oppression and its effect on those who feel it strongly. o Explain that the wall has been a long-standing symbol of oppression and thus they will be creating a wall themselves, quite literally a wall of oppression, brick by brick. o Following this, and in the fashion of Banksy, students will be creating stencils that illustrate imagery and/or text that is satirical, ironic, sarcastic, opposing, or contrary to the idea of oppression. o Demonstration: 10 min o Explain each student will be making 3 clay tile “bricks” that are 8x3in. o Use wooden letter blocks in any combination of size to stamp into the clay the word “oppression” o Use a ruler and a needle tool to incise a border set a half inch from the edge of the tile • • • • • • •

© 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


o Have students poke a hole 1.5in in from left and on the bottom along the incised line then repeat this coming from the right. Do this again along the top border. On tile should only have holes along the top edge, this will be the bottom tile. (These holes will be used to thread wired through for hanging and connecting the tiles together) o Have students scratch their initials into the bottom right corner of each tile using a needle tool. o Studio: 30 min o Have students create the tiles o Clay tiles will then be placed on drywall to dry (drywall is used so that the tile dries more evenly so it will not curl) o Have students who finish early start brainstorming ideas for what that illustration might be while they begin building the wall. o Show them an example of a stencil and stress the simplified and often silhouetted forms. o Using the word-web printed on the back of the “Antonym/Synonym” handout, have the students write out or sketch their ideas. o Clean-up: 10 min •

Day 2 o Preliminary: o Once dry, fire the clay tiles o Now that the clay tiles have been fired, use black acrylic paint or black spray paint to paint the entirety of each tile. o Create teacher example of a stencil and template o Supplies: o Sketch paper o Tape o Cardstock o Exacto Knives o Cutting Mattes o Digital Projector o Black Spray Paint o Light Table o Introduction: 15 min o Explain that today they will be making a stencil. o Define a stencil: Stiff paper or plastic with a design cut into it as a template for shapes meant to be copied. Ink or paint forced through the design's openings will produce a print on a flat surface placed beneath. o In lettering stencils the centers of such letters as A, B, D, O, and P are some of the shapes most likely to have this problem. An enclosed circle is called an “island”, if you cut out and island you lose that shape but if you create a "bridge", a tab that connects the “island” back to the rest of the stencil the shape will remain. This applies to images too. o Explain that what they will be doing is the same process Banksy uses.

© 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


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o o o o o o o o o

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o

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o o o o o

1. Brainstorm a meaningful idea 2. Design an image/message 3. Cut that design and message out to make a stencil. 4. Tape the stencil tightly to the surface you wish to paint. 5. Use spray paint to coat the cutout areas of the surface exposed by the stencil openings Explain that it is time to start step one: Brainstorming Do a class word web to brainstorm ideas beginning the word “oppression” Then in the first three braches of the web place either an antonym of oppression or a more specific synonym. All branches that extend from these branches should be specific ideas of imagery or text. Have students then create their own word webs that expand upon their ideas Studio: 60 min Handout sketch paper Have students sketch and write a simple proposal of what imagery they want to use and/or what text Have students use computers to find imagery that works with their proposed idea. Encourage them to search for each component of the image instead of the exact scenario they wish to portray. (ex. If your image is a “cow jumping over a moon with boots on”. You would search for the cow or cow jumping, the moon, then the boots) They should then write down the URL of the picture and use the online program at http://strix.org.uk/stencil to simplify the picture into a stenciling design. (Not all pictures are easy or possible to stencil on the scale they will be working, this is a good way to check) Have the students copy and paste the images into Microsoft Word or another program to scale them to the correct sizes. The images used should be processed images from the STRIX site or silhouettes. These will be templates. Use a light table or hold the templates to the window to trace the designs onto cardstock, arranging them to create the described image. (Make sure the student saves the template in case they make a mistake and must redraw) On the cardstock have the students shade in the area that they will be cutting out. Before cutting out the designs have the students show the instructor the design to make sure that there are no “islands” or problem areas Give the student an exacto knife and cutting matte to begin cutting out the stencil. Students that finish early can create a small stencil for a signature or they can look through the Banksy books: Wall & Piece or Existencilism Clean-up: 10 min

© 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


Day 3 o Preliminary: o Layout materials for a teacher demonstration of all steps for assembly and stenciling o Cut pieces of wire, enough for each student with 4 connections each, to a length of 3in. Then cut a 14in. length of wire for each student. o Supplies: o Spool of wire (for connecting and hanging tiles) o (15) Needle Nose Pliers o Wire cutters o (1 can) White Spray paint o White Acrylic Paint o Red Acrylic Paint o Small Brushes o Masking Tape o Plastic sheeting or newspaper (to cover the area where the spray painting will occur) o Fan for drying the paint and ventilation o Introduction: o Explain that today they will be putting together their oppression bricks to form their wall and using their stencils to graffiti their walls of oppression. o Wire Demonstration: o STEP 1: CONNECTING THE TILES o With your three brick tiles laid face down and in order in front of you take 1 of the 4 3in. wire pieces and bend it into a “U” shape. o Lifting the bottom brick tile, thread one side of the “U” shaped wire through the hole. o Lift the middle piece and thread the other side through its corresponding hole. o With the pliers, clamp on to the extra wire that sticks out from the back of the holes and twist it together 2 or 3 times. Then bend twisted end flat to the back of the tile. o Repeat this with the other three sets of corresponding holes. o *Ensure that each tile is right side up so that it reads correctly when fully assembled. o STEP 2: THE HANGING WIRE o Now using a 14in piece of wire, thread the wire from the back of one of the top holes until it sticks up about 2in out of the hole. o Bend the wire around the top of the tile and back toward itself. o Twist the short end around the long end of the wire. o Repeat this on the other side making sure to leave enough slack in the wire to hang the piece by. o Studio: o Have the students begin but remind them that they still have the graffiti to do so not to take it too slow.

© 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


o Remind the students to make sure their text is the right end up o Stenciling Demonstration: o Have the student stop what they are doing and move from their seats to keep them from their materials as you explain the stenciling process. o STEP 1: SECURING THE STENCIL o Lay the assembled wall piece on newspaper or plastic in a well ventilated area. o Roll tape cylinders and place them on the back side of the stencil close to the edge of the cutout area. o Find a good place to position the graffiti and press the stencil onto the area making it as flush with the surface as possible. o Using newspaper cover all other exposed areas of the tile piece around the stencil and tape them down. o STEP 2: SPRAY PAINTING o After shaking the can for a bit demonstrate proper spray painting technique. o Depress the nossle away from the stencil and move across it somewhat quickly. o Repeat this until all areas of the cutout stencil area are covered. o *Be sure not to coat the area too thick or it will run and drip, ruining the design. o Studio: o *Be sure to supervise the use of the spray paint and keep the cans under close guard to prevent theft or misuse o Clean-up: o Throw away the spray paint paper o Pickup all wire scraps

Š 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


G. EVALUATION Circle the number that best represents how well you fulfilled the criteria 1) Craftsmanship – Is it neat, well made, and complete? 2) Creativity –How inventive and descriptive is the imagery? Is it interesting to look at? 3) Effort – Did you use time wisely, didn’t rush or skimp? GRADE:

Needs TEACHER’S Improvement RATING

Excellent

Good

Average

4

3

2

1

4

3

2

1

4

3

2

1

YOUR TOTAL:

TEACHER’S TOTAL:

4) How images/symbols did you use to create your stencil and what message do they illustrate.

5) Was your finished project successful (expressive of satire or oppression)? Why or Why not?

6) If you signed “Banksy” beneath your work do you think others would believe that it was a Banksy? Why or why not?

© 2010 by Bradley J Scherzer. All rights reserved


Wall & Piece