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11 EDWARD DUNCAN, RA, RWS (1803-1882) Harbor Scene, c. 1830 watercolor and graphite on paper, 10 3/4 x 15 inches

Although he also worked in oil, Edward Duncan excelled in watercolor in which he “could achieve a freshness and immediacy that transcend[ed] formula and imitation” with a “subtlety and crispness in the handling.” He exhibited more than 40 works at the Royal Academy and Society of Artists and more than 500 watercolors at the shows of the Royal Watercolor Society and the Old and New Watercolor Societies during the course of his career. His works are represented in most important collections of British 19th century drawings, as well as in the leading maritime museums of Britain, Europe and the United States. This harbor view of an unidentified port city or town, likely English, but possibly Channel Islands or the Continent (considering that it is a Dutch or Lowlands-built coastal boat that is the central device in the drawing). It is another fine example of Duncan’s compositional work in pencil and color, although uncompleted and is from an early Duncan sketchbook (c. 1830). On the reverse of this drawing is a graphite and color wash sketch of a rocky stream in a wooded landscape, in which Duncan has penciled notes to guide coloration had he decided to complete this work or paint a finished watercolor from said sketch.

Iron Men in Wooden Ships: 200 Years of Marine Art  

64-page, full color catalog of an important exhibition of marine artwork, featuring paintings by master artists born prior to 1910. Ship por...

Iron Men in Wooden Ships: 200 Years of Marine Art  

64-page, full color catalog of an important exhibition of marine artwork, featuring paintings by master artists born prior to 1910. Ship por...

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