Page 1

MARQUETTE

NURSE C O L L E G E O F N U R S I N G M AG A Z I N E

2 016

Making Connections The college is forging ties between the campus and community

HISTORICAL TIMELINE: THE COLLEGE OF NURSING TURNS 80 PG. 4

AN INNOVATIVE WAY TO TACKLE HEALTH ISSUES WITH CITY YOUTH PG. 14

GROOMING MINORITY STUDENTS FOR A NURSING CAREER PG. 16


From the Dean

What a year! The College of Nursing made great strides under Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan’s leadership. When I stepped in as interim dean in August 2015, I was determined to maintain the college’s great momentum toward expanding our academic programs and enhancing our national reputation in research, teaching and professional practice. A key initiative this past year was to hire a new dean. I am pleased to announce that Dr. Janet Krejci, vice president for academic affairs and provost at Illinois State University, will join the College of Nursing as dean in January 2017. She spent 21 years in Marquette’s College of Nursing, in roles ranging from research assistant to associate dean for undergraduate programs, a role she held from 2004–07. Prior to her role as provost at Illinois State University, Krejci was dean and professor of nursing at Illinois State’s Mennonite College of Nursing from 2009–14. Her demonstrated leadership and passion for nursing education will benefit both the college and Marquette University immensely. I speak on behalf of my colleagues when I say we are fortunate to welcome her back to Marquette. This academic year marks the 80th anniversary of our college. I am so proud of how far the college has come and how much we have accomplished these past eight decades (see pages 4 –7). To date, the college has conferred 7,197 undergraduate degrees and 1,998 graduate degrees. The college’s number one priority has always been to provide our students with a diverse, rigorous and values-based education to meet the changing needs of the patients they will care for within the ever-changing health care industry. This statement is as true now as it was in 1936. While this issue of Marquette Nurse emphasizes where we’ve been, it also brings to light many of the college’s current community partnerships (see pages 10 –17). There is nothing more rewarding than watching our students, faculty and staff members positively impact the lives of Milwaukee’s most vulnerable populations. I want to take a moment to sincerely thank the faculty, staff and students for their unwavering support during this transition. I have the utmost confidence that under Krejci’s leadership the college will continue to prosper. Sincerely, Dr. Donna O. McCarthy, R.N., F.A.A.N. Interim Dean and Professor, Marquette University College of Nursing

College mission Through a transformational Catholic, Jesuit

• Providing high-quality, compassionate

• Generating, evaluating and applying

education, the mission of the Marquette University

care focused on individuals, families and

knowledge to improve health and

College of Nursing is to prepare nurse leaders to

communities.

education outcomes.

promote health, healing and social justice for all people through clinical practice and development of nursing knowledge. The faculty, students and staff of the college are committed to:

• Advocating for social justice to eliminate health inequities. • Engaging community partners to promote health care for all.

• Creating a dynamic, innovative learning community. • Leading change to improve the health care environment.


MARQUETTE

NURSE C O L L E G E O F N U R S I N G M AG A Z I N E

2 016

10 Community Allies Banding together with neighboring health centers is a top priority

Contents 2 News, Research & Innovation Pushing the Envelope Faith in Nursing Associate Dean Maureen O’Brien Says Goodbye Front-line Perspectives Double Shifts Overcoming Patient Barriers Through the Years: College of Nursing Turns 80 Hola, España!

14 Good Vibrations

Handle with Care Cultural Practices

Partnership uses music, dance to address youth issues

Fast Forward Changing Course

16 All Inclusive College builds pipeline to workplace for minority students

18 Alumni Perspective Legacy Gift The Business of Caring

1940

Alumna Wins TEMPO Award NightinGala Benefits College’s Community Initiatives

20 Notable Scholarly Accomplishments

Interim dean of the college: Dr. Donna O. McCarthy, R.N., F.A.A.N. Editorial team: Kurt Chandler, Stephen Filmanowicz, Clare Peterson, Andrea Petrie and Jennifer Russell Art direction: Joan Holcomb On the cover: Illustration by Stephanie Dalton Cowan Contact: Share comments or ideas for future issues with clare.peterson@marquette.edu. Clark Hall, 112 | 414.288.3800


2

Marquette Nurse

News, Research & Innovation Pushing the Envelope ROTC nursing students compete at West Point in championship skills tournament. By Sara Rae Lancaster Endurance athletes have the Iron Man. NCAA basketball has March Madness. And the Army ROTC has the Sandhurst Military Skills Competition. In April, an ROTC team from Marquette made university history

“First aid evaluation tasks are easier after being a nursing student for four years,” says Brune, who graduated in May. “The injuries you evaluate become more straightforward and your reaction time quicker.” Adds Schultz, also a 2016 graduate, “As nurses, we usually just

when it debuted in the national competition that puts the skills,

see the aftermath. Competitions like this give us a perspective of

strength and smarts of military service academy teams to a grueling

what happens before the patient comes through the hospital doors.”

two-day test.

Given that Marquette was only one of three teams that had not

Among the nine teammates on the “Ranger Challenge” team

participated before at Sandhurst, Gibson says he and the team are

were three seniors and a junior from the college. The four nursing

extremely pleased at finishing sixth out of eight ROTC teams, and

students scored high in previous competitions earlier in the school

48th out of 60 international teams overall. “There are 275 ROTC

year to advance to the Sandhurst competition.

teams in the United States,” Gibson says. “Only eight make it to

Hosted by the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Sandhurst is considered the championship round for ROTC teams, says Lt. Col. Michael Gibson, former professor and chair of Marquette’s Department of Military Sciences. The round starts on a Friday morning, when teams receive the coordinates to their first task, and stretches into Saturday. By the end of the competition the following day, teams have traveled 30 to 40 miles on foot carrying full gear, and have completed eight to 10 military tasks, such as obstacle course navigation, ruck marching, rifle marksmanship, weapons assembly and first aid evaluation. “It’s not just physical, but mental events,” Gibson says. “Military officers need to be able to operate in an environment where you never know what is going to happen.” So do nurses. Competing from the college in April were seniors Matthew Brune, Alannah Schultz and Rachael DeMeulenaere (female alternate), and junior Brad Kempka. Though they credit the squad’s success to a team effort, that doesn’t mean their skills as nursing students weren’t helpful.

Watch a video on the rigor involved in the Sandhurst Military Skills Competition at go.mu.edu/sandhurst-skills.

Sandhurst, so this is like making the Elite Eight.” Although they won’t be competing next year, the cadets hope this year marked the first of many Marquette appearances. “Now that we know we can compete at Sandhurst, the bar’s set at a new level,” says DeMeulenaere, Nurs ’16. “It’s a big goal,” says Brune, “but I think we can achieve that.”


3

Faith in Nursing Students take part in spirituality retreats led by college faculty. By Clare Peterson

During the course of two mornings in February, 400 undergraduate

“As nurses, we encounter situations on a daily basis where

and first-year master’s nursing students gathered in the Alumni

difficult decisions need to be made,” says Kosmoski-Goepfert.

Memorial Union’s Monaghan Ballroom to participate in half-day

“When our students have a better understanding of their own

spirituality retreats. While some students came and went as their

spirituality, they gain insight into how they can incorporate

schedules allowed, most of them spent the morning seated at

spirituality into the nursing care they provideto others.”

circular tables, engaging in earnest, thoughtful discussions. Thomas Kiely, director of Marquette’s Institute for Catholic Leadership, guided the students through the Daily Examen, a self-reflective daily prayer created by St. Ignatius, which allowed

The retreats not only address spirituality but the challenges undergraduates and generalist master’s students face as they progress through each year of their programs. “By introducing students to the connections between the

them to reflect on their challenges as students and their likely

personal and professional choices they are making through their

challenges as Marquette nurses. For further inspiration, Kiely read

studies — and will make as professionals — we provide spiritual

from Robert Frost’s famous poem The Road Not Taken, and asked

tools that can serve them throughout their lives,” says Kiely.

the students to visualize two different paths their careers may

“Students reflect on Scripture, poetry and the testimonials of

lead them.

practicing nurses, in the context of St. Ignatius’ life story, to build

The hope is that these reflective practices will become a long-lasting part of the students’ daily lives.

their abilities to discern, to become aware of themselves and their patients, and to foster deeper connections in their work

Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean for undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor, and Dr. Linda Piacentine,

and relationships.” College of Nursing alumni are also welcome to participate

Grad ’97, ’10, assistant professor, developed the retreats three

in retreats. For information, contact Kosmoski-Goepfert at

years ago as one way to directly incorporate Ignatian philosophy

kerry.goepfert@marquette.edu.

and pedagogy into the nursing curriculum. College faculty members maintain that a better understanding of spirituality can aid and impact student nurses’ future practice as Marquette nurses.

Associate Dean Maureen O’Brien Says Goodbye to Marquette By Clare Peterson

She was involved in the development and

University, Dr. Maureen O’Brien has

launch of the college’s partnership with

resigned as the College of Nursing’s

Orbis Education to provide distance offer-

associate dean to take the role of dean of

ings of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

Loretto Heights School of Nursing at Regis

and Generalist Master’s Degree programs.

University in Denver. She began her new

She also directed the launch of the Doctor

position in July.

of Nursing Practice program, and has been

“I am looking forward to the opportunity

John Nienhuis

After 32 years of service at Marquette

instrumental in planning the launch of the

to advance nursing education in the Jesuit

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

role,” O’Brien says. “I will carry Marquette

tradition at Regis University,” says O’Brien.

program for fall 2017. O’Brien was highly

in my heart forever as a proud alumna and

successful in obtaining Robert Wood Johnson

member of the Marquette community.”

O’Brien, during her years as a clinical associate professor at Marquette, was

Foundation and Jonas Foundation funds to

appointed associate dean for graduate

support the college’s graduate students.

programs in 2010 and oversaw the growth

“My 30-plus years of experience at

A 1977 alumna of Marquette’s bachelor’s program and 1984 graduate of the master’s program, O’Brien joined the

of the direct-entry program from an enroll-

Marquette as a faculty member and admin-

faculty in 1984. She received her doctorate

ment of 92 in 2010–11 to 261 in 2015–16.

istrator have prepared me well for this new

at the University of Texas at Austin in 1996.


4

Marquette Nurse

News, Research & Innovation Front-line Perspectives College hosts a listening session to gauge the nursing needs of health care providers. By Guy Fiorita

Months before stepping down as interim

Care providers also emphasized the growing

Dr. Mary Ouimet, Nurs ’85, Grad ’15,

dean, Dr. Donna McCarthy reached out

need to prepare nurses to manage care

senior vice president and chief nursing

to chief nursing officers and primary care

outside of the traditional hospital setting.

officer at Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare in

providers in the community to pick their

The biggest takeaway from the session,

Racine, was one of the participants in the

brains about emerging roles for nurses in

says McCarthy, was learning of the

session. “Partnerships like this are critical

delivery of patient care services.

importance of preparing graduates for the

to elevate the educational preparation of nurses who will serve and lead our com-

Following the lead of past dean Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, McCarthy organized the first in a possible series of annual listening sessions on campus as a way to gain insight into how well the college’s nursing graduates are meeting the needs of their organizations. “These dialogues help us prepare our

“These dialogues help us prepare our graduates for the future.”

munities into the future,” she says. Mike Repka, Arts ’85, executive director and CEO of Independent Physicians Network, who was also at the meeting, agrees. “For universities to keep up with the ever-changing needs in the health care field, these

graduates for the future,” says McCarthy,

dialogues are essential, especially now

a professor in the college, whose term as interim dean ends Jan. 1, 2017. “In academia,

big picture on care transitions needed by

with how the Affordable Care Act is changing

it’s easy to get caught up in our endeavors,

persons with complex illnesses. “Whether

things at such a fast pace,” he says.

but if our job is to prepare our students to be

we call the role ‘case manager’ or ‘care

excellent in their positions, we need to go into

coordinator,’ we heard that there is a

the listening sessions become at least

the community to hear from our stakeholders.”

growing need for nurses who are prepared

a yearly event. “Time will tell,” she says.

to step in and apply their understanding

“But the college would love for this to

on the complexity of the present health

of complex comorbidities and patient

evolve into an external advisory board

care system, the need for management of

self-management so that they achieve the

that can provide needed feedback on our

care transitions, and a better integration of

best care outcomes, and resources are

graduates and changes in the health care

mental health and acute and chronic care.

used efficiently.”

system in which they will practice.”

At the May session, discussion centered

McCarthy says she would like to see

THROUGH THE YEARS A look back at the highlights and achievements, as the College of Nursing turns 80.

By Kate Sheka

Aug. 1, 1936: Marquette University College of Nursing is formed as a four-year Bachelor of Science program (the first in the state), with Sister Berenice Beck as inaugural dean. Twenty-three students register the following month.

1938: Marquette University Nurses Alumni Association is formed to encourage camaraderie among graduates.

1939: The college establishes a Master of Science in Nursing Education program, the third nursing school in the country to offer a graduate degree.

1940: The college’s graduating class becomes the first in Wisconsin to complete a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

1941: Leola Frank enrolls as the College of Nursing’s first African-American student.

1943: Sister Augusta Woelfel is appointed dean.

1943: The college develops a 30-month basic program for cadet nurses in response to World War II demand.

1947: The first male student enrolls.


5

Double Shifts Nurse, businessman, doctoral candidate in the college. Next role: advocate of quality care. By Ann Christenson

Steve Biondi calls himself the consummate learner. He’s not content with staying on the business side of health care — he’s done that for decades, as a licensed nursing home administrator, a liaison with state and federal government on quality measures for long-term care, and in high-level administrative roles with the nursing home chain Extendicare Health Services, formerly based in Milwaukee. Rather, he continues to be an advocate for quality of care. Biondi, Grad ’10, is currently completing a doctorate in nursing at Marquette, with plans to complete his dissertation in the area of palliative care for heart failure patients by spring 2017. The son of a nurse, the Miami native felt the pull to medicine early on and replaced an interest in being a doctor with the goal of becoming an acute care nurse practitioner, although he didn’t become a registered nurse until after turning 50, a fact he says was useful when he worked as a staff nurse at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in 2005 and 2006. His experience and demeanor put his patients at ease. During his 12-hour shifts, his goal seemed simple but was actually monumental to the very ill patients he treated: doing what would “make their day special, even if it was just talking to their daughter,” he says. Biondi, who continues to work as a Milwaukee-based consultant and as an appointed chair to the survey and regulatory committee of the American Health Care Association, recently added another feather to his cap: He was appointed chairman to the Nursing Care

Overcoming Patient Barriers College of Nursing receives U.S. Department of Education grant for graduate studies.

$442,917 Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need

3 Years 3 Fellows The fellows will examine how Spanish-speaking immigrants navigate the health care system, the barriers they encounter, and how these barriers affect their ability to self-manage chronic health problems. Another area of research will focus on the tension and distress that occurs in intensive care units when the

Center Professional and Technical Advisory Council of the Joint Commission, an indepen-

wishes of older-adult patients who do not

dent nonprofit watchdog committed to improving the public’s health care.

have advance directives conflict with the

Of the post, Biondi says it allows him to have “a voice on performance standards and to address issues within quality care.”

health care providers.

1949: Sister M. Thomas

1967: Special curriculum for registered nursing

Kolba is appointed dean.

students is phased out; registered nurses admitted to basic curriculum.

1952: College installs

beliefs and values of nurses and/or

mandatory entry exams for existing registered nurses.

1970: Sister Rosalie Klein is

1961: The annual Berens Award for outstanding senior

1971: College undergoes major

nursing student is established in memory of Anthony Berens, former regent who helped found the College of Nursing.

reorganization; graduate and undergraduate programs move to one dean’s leadership, and Marquette assumes full fiscal management of college.

appointed dean.

1963: College moves to 3029 N. 49th St., near St. Joseph’s Hospital.

1972: Continuing Nursing Education program is established.

1978: College becomes the first university nursing school to join the Midwest Alliance in Nursing.

1981: College participates in Père Marquette Discovery Award, presented to Mother Teresa of Calcutta.


6

Marquette Nurse

News, Research & Innovation

Hola, España! New program in Madrid gives nursing students opportunities to study abroad. By Clare Peterson

Marquette University will be partnering

Kates, a junior in the College of Nursing

with Saint Louis University to send eight

who will be in the first Madrid cohort. “At

students to Madrid this fall for a unique

the same time I desperately wanted to

program that will broaden their qualifica-

go somewhere where I could grow my

tions as they enter the nursing profession.

Spanish skills. With this new program, I will

During the past five years, nursing

be able to perfect my Spanish through an

students have traveled to Dublin and Piura,

immersion experience while still working

Peru, to study abroad. But the Madrid

toward earning my bachelor’s.”

program is different — students have the

Some nursing students are hesitant

opportunity to complete courses and their

to study abroad, worried that the rigorous

is invaluable,” says Kosmoski-Goepfert, a

clinical work in Spanish.

course work will set them behind. But,

clinical associate professor. “The course

All courses will be taught in English,

mirroring the Dublin program, the Madrid

coordinators in Madrid have been working

but students can choose to take electives

course work ensures that students remain

very closely with Marquette to ensure the

in Spanish. Additionally, if they prove to

on track to graduate within four years, says

courses there are similar to the courses

be conversationally proficient in Spanish,

Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate

offered here.”

they can take their Family and Community

dean of undergraduate programs.

Centered Nursing clinical while abroad. “I had never considered studying abroad for a full semester,” says Maggie

“We acknowledge how critical it is for

For Kates, Madrid is a dream come true. “I am delighted to have this experience,

students to graduate in four years, and

and I know a world of adventure awaits me

the experience gained by studying abroad

in Spain.”

THROUGH THE YEARS

1993: Dr. Madeline Wake is appointed dean.

1993: Nurse Practitioner and 1986: College featured on ABC’s Good Morning America to commemorate its 50th anniversary.

1986: Sister Berenice Beck, the college’s first dean, 1982: College officially moves to Marquette’s main campus and into its present-day home of Emory T. Clark Hall.

inducted into the Nursing Hall of Fame by the American Nurses Association.

1988: Dr. Phyllis Beck Kritek is appointed dean. 1991: Multicultural Advisory Council is created to address multicultural issues in nursing and health care.

Nurse-Midwifery programs established at college.

1997: Marquette Clinic for Women and Children is formed.

1998: College starts the Institute for Natural Family Planning.

1999: Bachelor’s and master’s programs are accredited by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

2002: Institute for End of Life Care Education is formed.


7

Handle with Care Federal grant will expand outreach and education for elder care. By Sarah Butler

Alzheimer’s and dementia education is the focus of a new

Along with the WGEC’s newest member organization, the

$2.55 million federal grant awarded to the Marquette-led Wisconsin

Southeastern Wisconsin chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association,

Geriatric Education Center. The grant will support the center’s

the grant allows the center to work with the academic and

continuing efforts to build a health care workforce with expertise

health care organizations Marquette has partnered with for

in caring for Wisconsin’s burgeoning population of older adults.

decades, such as the Medical College of Wisconsin, University of

The College of Nursing is working with the WGEC to develop a geriatric curriculum to include in a new academic program that prepares advanced practice nurses to diagnose and treat aging adults with dementia, one of the grant’s primary objectives. The center also has projects that educate families, emergency responders and caregivers about dementia and geriatric health.

Wisconsin–Madison and Aurora Health Care. Dr. Ed Duthie, professor and chief of the division of geriatrics and gerontology at MCW, has been on the WGEC Governance

“We can support outreach to family caregivers and the general public.”

Council since 1986. The center, he says, is still essential in educating health care professionals so they can best treat Wisconsin residents — 24 percent of whom will be 65 and older by 2040. “The big struggle, still, is that a lot of learners don’t go into geriatrics,” Duthie

Now in its 30th year, the

says. “But the fact is they are going to

center has a legacy of proactively educating health care professionals. But WGEC Director Dr. Stacy

be caring for older people. There’s no way around that. If we’re

Barnes, Grad ’14, says this new three-year grant allows for a more

all working together to provide care, why wouldn’t we also

comprehensive approach to geriatrics and gerontology.

provide education?”

“Now we can support outreach to family caregivers and the general public,” Barnes says. “In the past, these were audiences we could not target with our federal dollars.”

2002: College develops the AIDS Care in Kenya Training Program.

2003: Dr. Lea Acord is appointed dean. 2003: Doctorate in Nursing program is established with a $794,000 federal grant.

2008: Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan is

2012: Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for

appointed dean.

Clinical Simulation opens in Emory T. Clark Hall.

2008: Doctor of Nursing Practice program

2014: College joins the VA Nursing Academic Partnership

established.

Program — one of 18 schools in the country.

2009: College’s accreditation renewed by

2015: Dr. Donna McCarthy is appointed interim dean. 2016: Dr. Janet Krejci is appointed dean, effective

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Jan. 1, 2017. Photos courtesy of Special Collections and University Archives and the Office of Marketing and Communication


Marquette Nurse

News, Research & Innovation

Cultural Practices Ignace Indian Health Center is real-world experience for future nurses. By Sara Rae Lancaster

physical therapy and vision services.

undergraduate student’s experience.” The

the College of Nursing can put what they

Ignace’s vision for a more comprehensive,

Ignace Indian Health Center is named after

are learning in the classroom into practice,

culturally appropriate center wasn’t

his father, a 1972 graduate of Marquette

thanks to a new partnership with the

completely self-serving. He also wanted to

Medical School, now the Medical College

Gerald L. Ignace Indian Health Center.

provide Marquette undergraduate students

of Wisconsin.

This fall, undergraduate students from

“The students are hungry for experience and interested in giving holistic care to all people,” says Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean of undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor. Holistic care is exactly what patients receive at the Ignace Center, Milwaukee’s only American Indian health center. But prior to the center’s move to the former Goldmann’s Department Store building on

with a unique learning opportunity.

Nurse practitioners at the graduate level

“ People come here because they want care that has native cultural practices with Western medicine.”

were involved with the health center at its previous location. Adding undergraduates from the college seemed like the logical next step. “There is such mutual benefit,” says Kosmoski-Goepfert

Mitchell Street in late 2015, that wasn’t “I’ve always believed in Marquette,

of the partnership. “You can learn about

care. Lack of space and staff at the former

not just as a school but as an educator in

customs and cultures, but until you work

location (about a block away on 11th

shaping young people’s hearts and minds,”

with the people it’s difficult to truly know.

Street) meant the center had to refer some

says Lyle Ignace, Arts ’92. “I wanted to

Having that understanding as nurses leads

patients to other providers.

supply an opportunity to broaden the

to better care.”

always possible in all areas of primary

That didn’t sit well with physician and executive director Dr. Lyle Ignace when he arrived in 2013. Although the health center sees patients of all races, about 65 percent are American Indian. “People come here because they want care that has native cultural practices with Western medicine,” he says. The new 33,000-square-foot space, decorated with American Indian art, features an expansive menu of primary care and behavioral/mental health services, a fitness center, and several wellness, social and cultural programs. Staff includes a family practice physician, obstetrician/ gynecologist, pediatric nurse practitioner and two family practice nurse practitioners. Ben Smidt

8

There are plans, and space, to add dental, For more information, visit www.gliihc.net.


9

Changing Course

Fast Forward College launches new and expanded programs and collaborations. By Aleina McGettrick

• A post-master’s Psychiatric Nursing certificate will be offered in fall 2016. With 18 credits required, applicants can expect to complete the program within two years. Course work will be related to psychopathology, psychopharmacology, psychiatric mental health treatment modalities and interventions, and clinical practice experiences with clients across the life span.

• To provide additional options to obtain a Marquette nursing education, the college has partnered with St. Vincent Health System in Indianapolis. Students in Indiana will have the opportunity to enroll in the Adult-Older Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner MSN program for online theory courses and clinical practicum experiences in St. Vincent facilities. To serve students in southeast Wisconsin and northeast Illinois, the college this fall will expand its direct-entry MSN program for non-nursing graduates at a site in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, where a skills lab and simulation center will be located.

• A master’s degree in Healthcare Data Analytics is being planned

Four exemplary faculty members bid farewell to the College of Nursing. By Clare Peterson

Dr. Leona VandeVusse, associate professor emerita, R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.M. In her 26 years at Marquette, VandeVusse taught several nursing classes with a specific interest in women’s health and nurse-midwifery education and practice. She has written multiple publications and received more than $3 million in grants and awards. VandeVusse was also program director of Project Beyond 2, a group helping ethnic and minority youth realize opportunities and careers in nursing. (See related story on page 16.) Diane Dressler, clinical assistant professor, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N. Dressler, Grad ’80, an early adopter of simulation technology, is well known for using innovative hands-on teaching strategies. In her 18 years at the college, Dressler taught classes on critical care, pathophysiology, nursing care of the acutely ill and pharmacology. Dr. Margaret Bull, professor, R.N. Bull, a specialist in older adult and community health, retired from Marquette after 20 years. Bull focused her efforts on continuity of care and health

for fall 2017. The program will be “directed at people using data to

care transitions for elders and family caregivers,

solve problems,” specifically, nursing graduates with degrees in

the health of older adults and family caregivers, and

health sciences and business, says Dr. Kathleen Bobay, former

delirium in elders. She taught courses that focused on

associate professor in the college. The program will require 36

research for nurses, and was instrumental in winning a three-

credits and combines nursing and computer science programs

year grant from the U.S. Department of Education to fund

with an internship class and a final project. “At a national level,

doctoral studies in the college.

there is a movement in health organizations obtaining huge

Mary Paquette, director of the Wheaton Franciscan

amounts of data with a need to organize it in meaningful ways,” says Bobay.

• An anesthesia DNP program is also under development for fall

Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation, M.S.N., R.N. During her 11 years at Marquette, Paquette, Nurs ’82, Grad ’03, was instrumental in the development of the

2017, pending approval by the Council of Accreditation of Nurse

College of Nursing’s Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare

Anesthesia Educational Programs.

Center for Clinical Simulation. The simulation center provides a realistic health care environment where students can strengthen essential clinical competencies, develop sound clinical reasoning and prepare for high-risk situations.


Banding together with

west side health centers is a top priority for the college. By Rich Rovito

Stephanie Dalton Cowan

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY ALLIES


11

Sojourner Family Peace Center

w

Ben Smidt

hen Sojourner Family Peace Center made a commitment to build a state-of-the-art facility a few blocks from Marquette’s campus to house a wide array of services for domestic-violence victims, a unique partnership with the College of Nursing began to blossom. Marquette’s roots run deep on Milwaukee’s west side, and the college has been firmly entrenched in the neighborhood through partnerships and programs of its own. The collaboration with Sojourner deepens the commitment to the community. “The missions of Sojourner and the College of Nursing really integrate well,” says Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean of undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor. “It’s about taking care of the most vulnerable in our society.” Kosmoski-Goepfert and others within the college took part in a strategic visioning session in May 2015 for Sojourner’s new $22 million, 70,000-square-foot center, one of the few facilities of its kind in the country that integrates a variety of services under one roof to provide seamless delivery of care. “We wanted the right partner, and we looked to the college because of its long-standing commitment to the community,”

explains Carmen Pitre, Sojourner’s president and CEO. “We really needed a partner to build a bridge to the health care system.” Sojourner had offered service learning opportunities for Marquette nursing students in the past, but the burgeoning partnership is leading to a much more formal connection. The college plans to offer, beginning in spring or fall 2017, midwifery services for a half day per week to provide a level of

primary care for women in the shelter. It also will help educate center residents about general health matters. Kosmoski-Goepfert also sees an opportunity for Marquette to place undergraduate community health nursing students at the facility. Madeline (Nagle) Schmidt, Nurs ’01, Grad ’03, a clinical assistant professor with a background as a sexual assault treatment nurse, also is looking into conducting her Doctor of Nursing Practice research project at Sojourner. Beginning in the fall, she expects to work at least once a week from the Sojourner facility, located million north of campus. “With the Jesuit tradition, Marquette students can bring square feet a holistic way to what they do at Sojourner, including looking at the spiritual background of the patient,” Schmidt says. “We are taught in the Ignatian pedagogy about the whole person. That spiritual and ethical piece of it makes Marquette somewhat unique in what it can bring to Sojourner.” A section of the new building, which opened to the public in February, houses Sojourner’s partner agencies — the College of Nursing, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, the Milwaukee Police Department, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office and Milwaukee Public Schools, among others. The college, which also has donated examination beds and other equipment to Sojourner, will look for other ways to bolster its relationship with Sojourner over time. “What it could grow into, the possibilities are endless,” says Kosmoski-Goepfert.

$22 70,000

T

he formal partnership with Sojourner reflects Marquette’s commitment to surrounding communities. It’s driven by the same spirit as the newly launched Near West Side Partners, a first-of-its-kind collaboration involving Marquette, Aurora Health Care, Potawatomi Business Development Corp., Harley-Davidson and MillerCoors as anchor institutions. The aim is to promote economic development, improve housing, increase safety and create a unified Near West Side neighborhood. Continues on page 12


12

Clinic for Women and Children

A

Dr. Christine Shaw, clinical associate professor, works with patients and graduate students at the Clinic for Women and Children.

“Our philosophy involves looking at the whole person and the whole environment.” Dr. Christine Shaw, Nurs ’72

lthough it’s a new collaboration, the Sojourner partnership is only one component in the College of Nursing’s commitment to serve its neighboring communities. On a cool, rainy spring morning, Dr. Christine Shaw, Nurs ’72, a clinical associate professor at the college, arrives shortly after sunrise at Cross Lutheran Church, an oasis in a disadvantaged neighborhood about a mile north of campus, where the Clinic for Women and Children operates out of the church’s basement. The free, nurse-run clinic, which began in 1997, operates for six hours nearly every Thursday through the efforts of College of Nursing faculty, including Shaw, Patricia Salentine, a clinical instructor, and Dr. Mary Ann Lough, former assistant professor and director of graduate operations, the driving force behind the creation of the clinic. “Our relationship with our patients is quite unique,” Shaw says. “Our philosophy involves looking at the whole person and the whole environment. There is a huge element of prevention included.” Because the clinic is free and not dependent on billing, the setup allows Shaw and her cohorts to spend more time with patients. “It’s not unusual to have them there for a half-hour or 45 minutes,” Shaw says. Nurse practitioner students, who are working on their master’s or doctorate of nursing practice degrees, often work side by side with Marquette faculty. “We’ve always been really dedicated to making sure our students have this exposure to people who are vulnerable and may not have the opportunities that they have had and, perhaps more important, to understand what it is to care,” Shaw says. “And it’s not just through the College of Nursing. Marquette has always been deeply involved in the community. The Near West Side Partners agreement is an important addition to what we are doing, but it’s not the beginning of something new. It’s part of an ongoing process.”


13

Aurora Sinai Medical Center, Milwaukee Center for Independence, Penfield Children’s Center

O

MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR ONE.

n the eastern edge of Marquette’s campus sits Aurora Sinai Medical Center, which provides health care, in large part, to a poor and underserved population on Milwaukee’s west side, as well as the Marquette campus community and downtown residents. “We really feel a need to serve the community we are in,” says Ania Horner, Nurs ’95, Grad ’12, vice president of nursing and chief nursing officer at Aurora Sinai. An element of that service has involved the College of Nursing. After a brief hiatus, nursing students returned to the hospital for clinical work for the 2015 fall semester. Now, 10 Marquette nursing students perform clinical rotations at Aurora Sinai two days per week each semester. Horner says her clinical rotations at Aurora Sinai while she was a student allowed her to “learn how to act like a professional nurse and respectfully interact with patients and health care providers.”

N

ursing students have been placed with the Milwaukee Center for Independence, a nonprofit organization a block from campus that provides job training and skilled nursing services for children and adults with special needs and other profound challenges. They’ve worked with the center’s nurses, often observing treatments and working on nursing assessments of clients.

T

he College of Nursing also has a long-standing relationship with Penfield Children’s Center, which provides programs focused on early development of children with and without disabilities. The opportunities for nursing students range from field placements to observing children at the center to practical experience for those pursuing pediatric nursing careers. Started in 1995, the partnership was one of the college’s first west side alliances. “It has been a mutually beneficial relationship,” says Jason Parry, Penfield’s vice president of development and communications. “Penfield is a training facility for nursing students and Penfield benefits from partnering with a tremendous community and academic partner in Marquette.”

To learn more about these Near West Side health care partners, visit familypeacecenter.org, marquette.edu/nursing/clinic-for-women-and-children/, penfieldchildren.org or mcfi.net.

AND YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR MANY. At Marquette University, students learn how to become fearless leaders, agile thinkers and effective doers. Your gift to scholarship aid will help provide a Marquette education for students who desire to Be The Difference for others, ready in the spirit of St. Ignatius to “go forth and set the world on fire.” Make a gift in support of scholarship aid at marquette.edu/giveonline or call 800.344.7544.


2015 INNO AWAR

COMMUNITY

2015 STRATEGIC INNOVATION FUND AWARDEE

GOOD VIBRATIONS

2015 STRATEGIC INNOVATION FUND AWARDEE

A new college partnership uses music and dance to address social and health issues with city youth. By Georgia Pabst

It’s all part of Proyecto Bembe, an Afro-Latino percussion-based performing group at the Bruce-Guadalupe Community School on Milwaukee’s predominately Hispanic south side. It was started this school year by Negrón, an area percussionist, and Johanna de los Santos, a school parent and arts administrator, who has used art programs with homeless and incarcerated youth in New York. The project soon developed into a collaboration with the College of Nursing, the Milwaukee Public Theatre and others. As one of 38 recipients of a grant from Marquette’s first-ever Strategic Innovation Fund last year, College of Nursing faculty members Drs. Ruth Ann Belknap and Kristin Haglund, Proyecto Bembe students from Bruce-Guadalupe Community School practice Bomba Nurs ’92, wanted to increase Yuba rhythms from Puerto Rico. (Left to right: Jai Berrios-Schroeder, Luis Delgado, community involvement and Angelina Reyes, Gabriel Perez). Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap Dr. Kristin Haglund partnerships to work on youth development and interpersonal relationships, while addressing pressing social and health issues. n cue, the beating of drums explodes on stage, Proyecto Bembe was an ideal project reverberating through the auditorium, filling the air with waves for their community engagement and research efforts, Haglund and Belknap say. of Afro-Latino rhythms. Standing poised at a bank of percussion “Community engagement is hard, instruments of all sizes and shapes, 10 boys and girls, ages 9 but interacting with the community on to 12, thump and bang with conviction and pride under issues of health disparities is huge,” says Haglund, an associate professor. The the direction of their instructor and lead drummer, Cecilio Milwaukee Public Theatre has been Negrón, Jr. working on community arts-based projects with youth for years and Bruce-Guadalupe But the students learn more than just how to keep the beat. Community School made the collaboration By playing together, they also have studied the history, geography, easier and more workable, says Haglund. language, movement and rhythms of the African, South American So the two nurses joined their $5,000 seed grant to a $30,000 grant MPT and Caribbean people who brought their musical cultures to received from the Milwaukee Public this country. They’ve examined issues of race, ethnic culture, Schools Partnership for the Arts and skin color and prejudice. And they’ve looked at their own Humanities. The collaboration included Proyecto Bembe and Xalaat Africa Drum family histories. and Dance for Life from Milwaukee High

O


15

“Music can help people get their anger out, and you learn patience and focus.” — Emily Cortez, 11

School of the Arts. “We hoped that this combo of African and Latino musical groups will also help to connect the north and south sides of the city,” says Belknap. The students in Proyecto (or project) Bembe (a Caribbean term that means party with drums) practiced twice a week after school. Haglund attended every rehearsal and performance, supplying after-school snacks. De los Santos praises the involvement of the Marquette nurses. “They have been so enthusiastic and invested, and learned side by side with the students,” she says. The students shared their music with younger students at Bruce-Guadalupe, and played at the United Community Center’s senior center. They also learned about the effect of drum vibrations on the body from a music therapist. As part of the Marquette grant and research, Haglund surveyed the students on their attitudes and feelings before and after participating in the group. The results were very positive. She’s now seeking additional grants to continue her research. Students told her drumming taught them lessons that help them inside and outside the classroom. They learned

discipline and ways to reduce stress to live healthier, happier lives. “Music can help people get their anger out, and you learn patience and focus,” says drummer Emily Cortez, 11, a fifth-grader at Bruce-Guadalupe. “I didn’t have patience with my homework, especially math, but now it’s better. This has helped me deal with frustrations.” Learning more about how slaves were treated made an impression on David Valdez, 11, also a fifth-grader. “A lot of the songs we play came from Africa,” he says. “I learned that from something bad can come something beautiful.” At first, 10-year-old Elizabeth Bacera says she was “scared” because she thought drumming was “a boy thing.” But she found out it’s not. “I love the music,” she says with confidence. “We’re concerned about a lot of factors that put health at risk, like poverty, racism and stress — the social determinants of health,” says Belknap, who worked with the dance group at Milwaukee High School of the Arts. “When you’re young, you don’t have a lot of control over these issues. This is a low-cost intervention that can help lower stress, and students can find ways to focus on their own.”

Top left: Xalaat Africa Drum and Dance for Life, under the direction of Roxanne Kess and YaYa Kambaye at Milwaukee High School of the Arts, perform with Proyecto Bembe at their Spring Showcase and Celebration. Top right: Capoeira, a Brazilian art form which combines dance, martial arts, percussion rhythms and song, is integrated into Bruce-Guadalupe Community School’s Fit Kids program, led by instructor Dexter Doxtator from Capoeira Batuque Academy. Above: Students from Bruce-Guadalupe and Milwaukee High School of the Arts share a meal before rehearsal for the Spring Showcase. Photography courtesy of Proyecto Bembe

For more information, visit proyectobembe.com.


COMMUNITY Isaiah Ware, Jr., 16, speaks to Project BEYOND-2 classmates at Carmen High School, while Dr. Josie Veal (right), Grad ’12, works one-on-one with a student.

ALL INCLUSIVE In collaboration with Milwaukee schools, the college is building a pipeline to the workplace. By Georgia Pabst

The five juniors at Carmen High School of Science and Technology grab a snack of fruit and popcorn as they gather round the conference table for Project BEYOND-2, a monthly exploration into the world of nursing. Today they’re going to review the “social determinants of health” they discussed last week and listed on flip charts. As the students soon found out, these determinants can affect a person’s health — things like the lack of a job, drugs, violence, teen pregnancy, cigarettes, junk food and stress. These conditions, they learned, can lead to health problems, like asthma, obesity, heart disease, hypertension and diabetes. “It’s important to understand the socioeconomic factors that affect health,” says Terrie Garcia, the project coordinator and a registered nurse. “When a patient walks in with a fracture, it’s not just about fixing the arm. You need to know: Does that person work or drive, have the mediations they need, etc.? It’s important to understand the factors that impact health.” Garcia and others from the College of Nursing have been working with students at Carmen Northwest and South

campuses this year as part of Project BEYOND-2, funded by a two-year $668,737 federal grant to the nursing school to reach out and attract more minorities into nursing. It’s a critical need. In Wisconsin, only 6.4 percent of nurses are minorities, according to the Wisconsin Center for Nursing. Men make up only 6.9 percent of nurses in the state, so there’s also a push to attract more men to the field. For a number of years, Marquette has been working to increase diversity through outreach and with other Project BEYOND grants. (BEYOND stands for Building Ethnic Youth Opportunities for Nursing Diversity.) As a result, minority undergraduate nursing student enrollment increased from 11 percent in 2006 to 16 percent in 2015. The number of minority students in the graduating class also increased from 8 to 17 percent. Diversity is important because of changing demographics and the need for cultural sensitivity in working with patients. Carmen Northwest’s campus predominately consists of African-American students, while Carmen South’s campus is largely Latino. More than 80 percent of the students are low income.


Kevin Pauly

17

In My Own Words

I

By Angie Melchor, Nurs ’10

f you would have told me 10 years ago, when I was a high school senior, that by 2016 I would be a nurse who graduated from a prestigious university, excel as a new

grad nurse in the ICU, become responsible for securing a

hospital’s Joint Commission Stroke Certification, and go back to school for a doctorate in nursing, I would have thought you were

Dan Johnson

Five students participate at Carmen South; several middle school students take a class at Carmen Northwest that deals with basic health and life skills. Carmen students have visited the Marquette campus and its clinical simulation lab. They’ve heard from nurses in various specialties and talked with Marquette nursing students. The grant also provides funds for scholarships for nursing students already enrolled at Marquette; mentoring; tutoring; and other services. Laura Nigh, a mentor and adviser specialist, helps students navigate college. College is costly, but minorities face other barriers. Many are like project coordinator Garcia, the daughter of Mexican migrant farm workers who was the first in her family to go to college. There’s a lack of awareness about financial aid and where to get help, she says. Students need good grades in math and science for nursing. And often the academic preparation is lacking. Often students don’t realize what’s involved in a career, but this program gives them a realistic idea, says Bevin Christie, the director of internships and career readiness at Carmen. Isaiah Waid, Jr., 16, the only male in the group, says he’s interested in nursing. He sees teen pregnancy as a critical problem. “There’s no way teens know how to treat kids because they’re kids themselves.” Marissa Gigger, 17, says at first she couldn’t see how the lack of a job could harm health, but now realizes it’s hard to buy quality food with little money. She sees the proliferation of fast food restaurants, corner stores and gas stations as culprits that peddle unhealthy food. For Tatiana Black, 17, it’s stress. “It can lead to violence, mental health issues and drug addiction,” she says. With a few minutes left in the class, the students ask Nigh if they can do a relaxation exercise they’ve done before. “OK. Get comfortable,” says Nigh, a registered nurse. “Close your eyes. Relax and breathe,” she coaches. The students slowly inhale, exhale and wash away their own stresses of the day.

crazy. At 17, all I knew was that I needed to go to college. I didn’t know what possibilities existed afterward; my goal was to make my parents proud. So in the fall of 2006, I embarked on this blind journey at Marquette, the first in my family to go to college. I felt alone and isolated. No matter how much I studied, I still felt like a failure, like an outsider. People in my class didn’t look like me, didn’t understand why I struggled so much being away from mi familia, mi cultura. In the midst of a breakdown, I wondered if maybe nursing just wasn’t for me. Then, I received my first email from Project BEYOND. I am a firm believer that God puts the right people in your life at just the right time. That email came like a ray of hope that someone out there would understand. It offered programming, financial support and opportunities for underrepresented students like me. Shy and insecure, I attended my first Project BEYOND meeting and met Terrie Garcia and Dr. Karen Robinson, Grad ’01, ’10. These two women became my “college moms.” They were there to encourage me, to remind me that sticking through nursing school would be worth it; because it wasn’t just about me, it was about our communities, and the thousands of future nursing students who needed someone to look up to. The Project BEYOND leaders helped to empower the leader in me to find my voice. Through Project BEYOND I was able to mentor underrepresented and disadvantaged kids from middle school through college age. The scholarship allowed me to focus on my academics and relieved a huge financial strain on my parents. As a junior, six Latina nursing students from Marquette and I attended the National Association of Hispanic Nurses conference where an entire segment was dedicated to challenges in diversity in nursing schools. Project BEYOND prepared us for life after graduation and encouraged us to discover our potential. It is a family with which I’ve never lost touch. Recently, Terrie let me know about an amazing opportunity — a fellowship for underrepresented groups that would provide assistance toward obtaining a doctorate in nursing. My first instinct told me it was too far-fetched a dream for a Latina born of Mexican immigrants, a young mom, the first in her family to graduate college. But Terrie reminded me that those were the very reasons I should apply. I took a giant leap of faith, applied, and here I am, 27 years old, a proud graduate of the College of Nursing, a Project BEYOND alumna, once again embarking on a seldom-traveled journey. This fall I will go back to Marquette, the place where my mind, my body and my spirit were nurtured. I can’t tell you how excited I am to be back.


18

Marquette Nurse

Alumni Perspective Legacy Gift Resisting retirement, she opened the eyes of dozens to a unique view of the world. Tony Guzzardo didn’t think studying abroad would fit with his plan to graduate with a nursing degree in four years. Dr. Darlene Thier Weis changed all that, for Guzzardo and dozens of other Marquette nursing students. Three years into her so-called retirement, Weis, associate professor emerita, Nurs ’59, Grad ’64, founded the College of Nursing’s first study abroad program, serving a parish in Piura, Peru, and led the program for eight years. Guzzardo was among the first students to study in Peru, in the summer of 2008. Even today, he says, the one-month practicum still colors his career and everyday life. “I was lucky to have done something that reinforced and reinstilled my passion for community health,” he says. After graduating in May 2009, Guzzardo spent nearly four years overseas, first in Ethiopia with the Peace Corps and then with a public health nonprofit in Honduras. He now is back in Milwaukee, serving as organ procurement coordinator with the Wisconsin Donor Network. Weis’ pioneering effort to create the study abroad program is akin to a legacy gift that continues to flourish, says Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean of undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor. In 2015, Weis spent her final summer in Peru mentoring the program’s new leaders, Dr. Christine Schindler, Nurs ’96, Grad ’10, clinical assistant professor, and Theresa Gruenke, clinical instructor. The college has since added full-semester, nursing-specific programs in Dublin and Madrid, and is exploring the possibility of a program in Australia.

“The students are truly transformed. It lights a fire within them.”

But the Peru program remains hugely popular, Kosmoski-Goepfert says, “because the cultures are so different, and the poverty is so striking, and [because of] the religious zeal. … It’s one of our gems.” Weis, 79, petite and soft-spoken, says developing the program came about as “I was running out of things to do.” She had served the Sacramento Santisimo parish in northwestern Peru on mission trips as a member of her Pewaukee, Wisconsin, parish, and realized the Peru parish’s community health initiatives were perfect as a practicum for nursing students. “Most of them have never seen poverty like this,” she says. The Piuranos “are so poor, they can barely live day to day.” The parish serves those in the capital city of nearly 360,000 as well as those in outlying mountain villages in simple bamboo huts with dirt floors. Yet the community health issues, Weis says, are the same everywhere — from basic health care to battling drug addiction, violence and abuse. After students’ time in Peru, Weis says, “I usually get a big hug.” In thank you notes, students tell her their values have shifted, that relationships are more important than material things. “The students … are truly transformed,” KosmoskiGoepfert says. “It lights a fire within them.” Guzzardo agrees. “Weis has a very genuine, unadulterated way of investing in people … and really wants to be a guide in their development as students, nurses and human beings.” Weis says she “loved every minute” of fostering the Peru program and still has a lot of living — and giving — to do. More than a decade into retirement, she says, “I’m looking for a new project to keep me out of trouble, probably in Africa. The true joy for me is working with the unserved and teaching them to do the best they can with their few resources.” — Laura Merisalo


19

The Business of Caring A graduate draws on her nursing skills in her role as entrepreneur. Cheri McEssy was born into a Marquette family. Even today, living in Illinois 31 years after graduating from the College of Nursing, she stays closely connected to the university. McEssy is a third-generation alumna. Her grandfather, Hazen McEssy, graduated from Marquette Law School in 1936. Her parents, William McEssy, Arts ’61, Law ’64, and Lois La Mantia, met on campus and married, and after Cheri was born, her father finished his law degree. Her uncle and cousin also graduated from Marquette. McEssy’s family moved to Lake Forest, Illinois, when she was a teen, but she returned to Milwaukee to enroll in the college. After completing a bachelor of science, McEssy, Nurs ’85, worked as a traveling nurse — “I had a little bit of gypsy blood in me” — before settling in Chicago, where she continued her career as a pediatric intensive care nurse. She also volunteered for medical mission work in Bolivia for Illinois dioceses. In 2007, she caught the “entrepreneurial bug,” she says, and used her skills as a nurse to start a small business. She bought a franchise in BrightStar Care, a private-duty, home nursing care and medical staffing company with 300 locations nationwide. In any given week, her Chicago franchise has about 130 caregivers in the field. “There’s such a need for helping people get through life with dignity,” says McEssy, chief nursing officer and owner. “I’m not out there doing hands-on nursing, but I wouldn’t have the passion for the business if I wasn’t doing what I value as quality nursing.” In late 2014, McEssy became a partner in a firm that invests in startups in the health-and-wellness technology sector. One of the projects is a voicecontrolled watch that reminds wearers when to take medications, assists them in returning home, and contacts emergency services if they fall or need medical assistance. The device — called UnaliWear — has been compared to “an Onstar for seniors,” similar to the safety system in automobiles. Inspired by Marquette President Michael R. Lovell’s initiatives on research and innovation, McEssy expresses interest in joining campus discussions about entrepreneurship. She currently sits on the college’s Alumni Engagement Committee and recently made a “legacy promise” to create a scholarship for students in the college. “I am completely dedicated to the ‘Marquette nurse,’ ” she says. “I love the program. And I love being a nurse.” — Kurt Chandler

Peggy Troy wins TEMPO Award Peggy Troy, president and CEO of Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and a 1974 graduate of Marquette’s College of Nursing, received the TEMPO Milwaukee Mentor Award in February 2016. Created to recognize community leaders who are dedicated to mentoring, TEMPO presents a $5,000 scholarship in the winner’s name to a woman at a four-year institution of higher education in Wisconsin. Troy, who sits on Marquette’s Board of Trustees, designated her award to the nursing school. – Andrea Petrie

Nightingala FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4 6:00 p.m. Wisconsin Club Hosted by The College of Nursing Dinner and auction benefiting care for Milwaukee’s most vulnerable For information and registration: go.mu.edu/nightingala2016.


20

Marquette Nurse

Notable Scholarly Accomplishments Prominent honors, grants, publications and presentations from the 2015–16 academic year

AWARDS/MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., adjunct associate professor Awarded the 2015 Research Award, Delta Gamma and Sigma Theta Tau, October 2015, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor Selected to serve as academic program evaluator, Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.-B.C., clinical associate professor Selected to develop “Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students” document, American Association of Colleges of Nursing/ End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium and Cambia Health Foundation, October 2015. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus and NFP director Inducted as honorary member of Alpha Sigma Nu, the honor society of Jesuit colleges and universities, November 2015.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., F.A.A.N., professor and interim director of the doctoral program Selected as a fellow, American Academy of Nursing, October 2015.

Jennifer Ohlendorf, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor Selected as a fellow, AACN Faculty Policy, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, January 2016.

Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M., professor Awarded the Excellence in Teaching Award, A.C.N.M. Foundation, July 2015.

Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., C.N.O.R., clinical associate professor Awarded the University of Wisconsin– Milwaukee 50 Distinguished Faculty Award, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee College of Nursing, December 2015.

Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., M.H.S., R.N., C.L.N.C., F.A.A.N., associate professor Selected as a David C. Jowers Endowed Lecturer, Emory University, October 2015. See entry for Dr. Kathleen Bobay. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., associate professor Awarded the Developmental Behavioral Mental Health SIG Advocacy Award, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, March 2016. Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor Selected as an ambassador, Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research, July 2015.

Christine Schindler, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., W.C.C., clinical assistant professor Selected as a representative, National Quality Forum — Pulmonary and Critical Care Standing Committee, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, March 2016. Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., professor Awarded the Julie Lathrop Nursing Research Award, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, 2015. See entry for Dr. Kathleen Bobay.

GRANTS Stacy Barnes, M.G.S., director, Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center $850,000, “Wisconsin Geriatric Workforce Center,” Health Resources and Services Administration. Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor $5,000, “Escalation: Raising the College Students’ Awareness of Warning Signs of Abusive Relationships,” Strategic Innovation Fund Award 2016.

Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor $4,145, “Comparing Competency among Nursing Students Participating in Two Different Sequenced Simulation/Clinical Practicum Experiences,” with doctoral student Jamie Hansen, R.N., C.N.E., Sigma Theta Tau International. $1,500, “Toward High Quality Preceptorship: A Dyad Study,” with graduate student Laurie Kunkel-Jordan, R.N., A.N.P.-B.C., C.C.R.N., C.N.E., Nurses Foundation of Wisconsin.

Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., professor See entry for Dr. Kristin Haglund.

Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., professor $147,639, “Graduate Assistance in Nursing,” U.S. Department of Education.

Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., adjunct associate professor See entry for Dr. Marianne Weiss.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., F.A.A.N., professor and interim director of the doctoral program $17,327, “BENEO GmgH,” Microbiome Sequencing.

Jill Gottormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor $4,771, research grant, Marquette University. Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor $5,000, “Frenn Research Award,” College of Nursing, with Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap, College of Nursing. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., M.H.S., R.N., C.L.N.C., F.A.A.N., associate professor See entry for Dr. Marianne Weiss. Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor $5,000, “Chronic Stress and Reproductive Function in Female Cancer Survivors,” with graduate student Theresa Hardy, R.N., Oncology Nursing Society Foundation. $29,764, “Muscle Function and Depression — Like Behavior in a Mouse Model of Cancer Fatigue,” National Institutes of Health.


21

Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor $5,000, “New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program at Marquette University,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor $5,500, research grant, Marquette University.

$20,000, “2016–18 Ph.D., Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholars and DNP Jonas Veterans Healthcare Scholars,” Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare.

Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor $5,000, “Regner Research Award,” College of Nursing.

Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.-B.C., R.N., assistant professor $24,909, “Team Phoenix 2015 Longitudinal Research Study,” Vince Lombardi Cancer Foundation, with Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences.

Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor emerita $320,299, “Increasing Diversity and Innovations with Next Generation Nurses,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

$5,000, “Wallace Faculty Scholar Grant,” College of Nursing.

Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., professor $2,500, “Health Care Provider Influence on Health Behavior Modifications in Gestational Diabetics,” Southeast Wisconsin Nursing Research Consortium, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, with Denise Fryzelka. $245,000, “Readiness Evaluation and Discharge Interventions: Implementation as a Standard Nursing Practice for Hospital Discharge,” American Nurses Credentialing Center, with Dr. Kathleen Bobay, College of Nursing; and Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing. Aimee Woda, Ph.D., R.N., B.C., assistant professor $4,070, research grant, Marquette University.

PUBLICATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D.,R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor “Risk and Protective Factors in the Lives of Caregivers of Persons with Autism: Caregivers’ Perspectives,” Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, (June 2016), with Denise Matel-Anderson.

Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., professor See entries for Dr. Kristin Haglund and Dr. Aimee Woda.

“The Mediating Effects of Positive Cognitions on Autism Caregivers’ Depression and Their Children’s Challenging Behaviors,” Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 30, (February 2016), pp 13–18.

Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., adjunct associate professor “A Model for Hospital Discharge Preparation,” Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 45, No. 12, (December 2016), pp 606–614, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing; Sarah Bahr; Linda Costa; Olga Yakusheva; and Diane Holland.

“Resilience in Adolescents Who Survived a Suicide Attempt from the Perspective of Registered Nurses in a Psychiatric Facility,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, (June 2016), with Denise Matel-Anderson. “The Effect of a Resourcefulness Training Intervention on Relocation Adjustment and Adaptive Functioning Among Older Adults in Retirement Communities,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 15, (March 2016), pp 1–8, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Music Therapy: A Concept Analysis,” Research and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International Journal, Vol. 30, No. 1, (January 2016), pp 44–59, with C. Murrock. “Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 37, (March 2016), pp 1–8, with C. Murrock and Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Resourcefulness in African American and Caucasian Caregivers of Persons with Dementia: Associations with Perceived Burden, Depression, Anxiety, Positive Cognitions and Psychological Well-being,” Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, Vol. 51, No. 4, (October 2015).

Leslie Boaz, Ph.D., A.P.N.P. See entry for Dr. Margaret Bull.

“Models of Discharge Care in Magnet Hospitals,” Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 45, No. 10, (October 2015), pp 485–491, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing; Sarah Bahr; and Linda Costa. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “Simulated Competence in Pre-licensure Nursing Students: A Concept Analysis,” Nursing Education Perspectives, Vol. 36, No. 2, (March/April 2015), pp 102–107, with graduate student Jamie Hansen. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.-B.C., clinical associate professor “Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty,” Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 3, (2015), pp 24376, with Peter Kallio, Jenea Nolan, Richard Topp and Paul Pagel.

Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., professor “Facilitating Undergraduate Nursing Students’ Appraisal of Evidence,” National League for Nursing: Innovations in Nursing Education, Vol. 3, (2015) pp 73–78. “Psychometric Properties of the Family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire,” Research in Gerontological Nursing, Vol. 8, No. 4, (August 2015), pp 198–207, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; S. Avery; and Debra Oswald. “Strategies for Managing Delirium in Hospitalized Older Adults,” American Nurse, Vol. 10, No.10, (October 2015), pp 12. “Educating Family Caregivers for Older Adults about Delirium: A Systematic Review,” Worldviews on Evidence-based Nursing, Vol. 13, No. 3, (June 2016), pp 232-–40, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Martha Jerme. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus “Couple Beads: An Integrative Method of Natural Family Planning,” The Linacre Quarterly: Journal of the Catholic Medical Association, Vol. 83, No. 1, (February 2016), pp 69–82, with G. Mulcaire-Jones. “Influence of Contraception, Abortion and Natural Family Planning on Divorce Rates,” The Linacre Quarterly: Journal of the Catholic Medical Association, Vol. 82, No. 3, (August 2015), pp 273–282. “Current Medical Research Summer/Fall 2015,” Philadelphia: The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 2, (May 2016), pp 203–216. “Current Medical Research Winter/Spring 2015,” Philadelphia: The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 1, (February 2016), pp 97–114.


22

Marquette Nurse

PUBLICATIONS continued Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor “Spirituality and Religiosity in Adolescents Living with Sickle Cell Disease,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 38, No. 6, (June 2016), pp 686–703, with Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap, College of Nursing; and Doris Clayton.

“Translating Research to Practice for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Part 2: Behavior Management,” Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Special Issue on Behavior Management, Vol. 30, No. 1, (January 2016), pp 27–37, with Margaret Bultas, Karen Burkett and Judy Reinhold.

“Weight Loss Intervention Efficacy Among African American Women,” Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Vol. 11, No. 7, (July 2015), pp 717–722, with Dr. Callie Schlicht, College of Nursing.

See entry for Dr. Kristin Haglund.

“Parents’ Perspectives on Shared Decisionmaking for Children with Solid Organ Transplants,” Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Vol. 30, No. 4, (July 2015), pp 374–80, with Dr. Norah Johnson, College of Nursing; and Stacee Lerret. “Role of Spirituality and Religiosity in Persons Living with Sickle Cell Disease: A Review of the Literature,” Journal of Holistic Nursing, (November 2015), with D. Clayton-Jones. “Engaging in Culturally Informed Nursing Care with Hmong Children and Their Families,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 1, (January 2015), pp 102–6, with Shoua Xiong, Nora Degroote, Hayley Byington, Jamie Harder and Krystal Kaminski. See entry for Dr. Aimee Woda. Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M., professor “Probiotics for Treatment and Prevention of Urogenital Infections in Women: A Systematic Review,” Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Vol. 61, (2016), pp 339–355, with Dr. Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing; Martha Jerme; Cybele Abad; and Nasia Safdar. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., M.H.S., R.N., C.L.N.C., F.A.A.N., associate professor See entry for Dr. Kathleen Bobay. Teresa Jerofke-Owen, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.N.P.-B.C., assistant professor “Development and Psychometric Analysis of the Patient Perceptions of Patientempowering Nurse Behaviors Scale,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, (July 2016), with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., associate professor “Translating Research to Practice for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Part I: Definition, Associated Behaviors, Prevalence, Diagnostic Process and Interventions,” Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Special Issue on Behavior Management, Vol. 30, No. 1, (2016), pp 15–26, with Margaret Bultas, Karen Burkett and Judy Reinhold.

Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor “An Online Educational Program Improves Pediatric Oncology Nurses’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Spiritual Care Competence,” Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, (May 2016), with Dr. Margaret Callahan, former dean of College of Nursing; Cheryl Petersen; and Rosemary White-Traut. “Educating Future Nursing Scientists,” Nursing Outlook, Vol. 63, No. 4, (July 2015), pp 417–27, with Yvette Conley and Margaret Heitkemper. “Emerging Areas of Nursing Science and Ph.D. Education for the 21st Century: Response to Commentaries,” Nursing Outlook, Vol. 63, No. 4, (July 2015), pp 439–45, with Susan Henly and Jean Wyman. “Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education: Part 1,” Nursing Outlook, Vol. 63, No. 4, (July 2015), pp 408–16, with Susan Henly and Jean Wyman. “Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education: Part 2,” Nursing Outlook, Vol. 63, No. 4, (July 2015), pp 398–407, with Susan Henly and Jean Wyman. “Feasibility of Hair Collection for Cortisol Measurement in Population Research on Adolescent Health,” Nursing Research, Vol. 65, No. 3, (May 2016), pp 249–255, with Jodi Ford and Samantha Boch. “Ibuprofen Ameliorates Fatigue and Depressivelike Behavior in Tumor-bearing Mice,” Life Sciences, Vol. 143, (Dec. 2015), pp 65–70, with Diana Norden, Sabahattin Bicer, Raymond Devine, Peter Reiser, Jonathan Godbout and Loren Wold. Jennifer Ohlendorf, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Predictors of Engagement in Postpartum Weight Self-management Behaviors in the First 12 Weeks After the Birth of a Baby,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 71, No. 8,

(August 2015), pp 1833–46, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and Debra Oswald. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.-B.C., R.N., assistant professor “Perceived Cognitive Changes with Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study,” Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 29, (February 2016), pp 9–11, with Judith Fitzgerald Miller, Sara Haberlein and Alan Bloom. See entry for Dr. Karen Robinson. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor “Perinatal Nurses: Key to Increasing African American Breastfeeding Rates,” Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 30, No. 1, (January 2016), pp 3–5. “Reaction of African American women to Breastfeeding Peer-counseling,” Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 45, No. 1, (January 2016), pp 62–70, with Dr. Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing; and J. Foster. “Survivors Speak: A Qualitative Analysis of Motivational Factors Influencing Breast Cancer Survivors’ Participation in a Sprint Distance Triathlon,” Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 1–2, (January 2015), pp 247–256, with Dr. Linda Piacentine, College of Nursing; Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; Leslia Waltke; and Judy Tjoe. Christine Schindler, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., W.C.C., clinical assistant professor “Pediatric Kennedy Terminal Ulcer,” Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Vol. 30, No. 3, pp 274–78 (May 2016), with Megan Reitz. Callie Schlicht, D.N.P. See entry for Dr. Kristin Haglund. Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., C.N.O.R., clinical associate professor “Bridges and Barriers: Patients’ Perceptions of the Discharge Process Including Multidisciplinary Rounds on a Trauma Unit,” Journal of Trauma Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 5, (September 2015), pp 232–239. “Trauma Nurses Making a Difference,” Journal of Trauma Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 3, (May 2015), pp 120–121. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor See entry for Dr. Aimee Woda.


23

Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor emerita See entries for Dr. Lisa Hanson and Dr. Karen Robinson.

Haugen; R.A. Herring; M.C. Hooke; M. Martin; K. Murphy; A.R. Newman; C.C. Rodgers; K.S. Ruccione; J., Sullivan; J. Withycombe; L. Yasui; and M. Hockenberry.

Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., professor “Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale for Older People: Development and Psychometric Testing from Three Countries,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 71, No. 11, (November 2015), pp 2686–96, with Cedric Mabire and Alice Coffey.

“Describing Pediatric Hospital Discharge Planning Care Processes Using the Omaha System,” Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 30, (May 2016), pp 24– 28, with D.E. Holland; C.E. Vanderboom; A.M. Delgado; and K.A. Monsen.

“Patient/Family Education in Pediatric Oncology: Consensus Recommendations from a Children’s Oncology Group Expert Panel” Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, (July 2016), with W. Landier; J. Ahern; L.P. Barakat; S. Bhatia; K.M. Bingen; P.G. Bondurant; S.L. Cohn; S.K. Dobrozsi; M.

Community Health Nursing, Vol. 32, (2015), pp 173–186, with Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap, College of Nursing; Dr. Kristin Haglund, College of Nursing; and Dr. Margaret Sebern, College of Nursing.

See entries for Dr. Kathleen Bobay, Dr. Teresa Jerofke-Owen and Dr. Jennifer Ohlendorf. Aimee Woda, Ph.D., R.N., B.C., assistant professor “Self-care Behaviors of African Americans Living with Heart Failure,” Journal of

PRESENTATIONS Abir Behket, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor “The Effect of a Resourcefulness Training Intervention on Relocation Adjustment and Adaptive Functioning Among Older Adults in Retirement Communities,” Midwest Nursing Research Society 40th Annual Scientific Conference, Milwaukee, March 2016.

“Resilience in Adolescents Who Survived a Suicide Attempt,” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference, Seattle, October 2015, with Denise Matel-Anderson

“Nursing Students’ Perception of Mental Illness: A Qualitative Study,” Midwest Nursing Research Society 40th Annual Scientific Conference, Milwaukee, March 2016, with C. Murrock.

“The Lived Experience of Being a Caregiver of a Person with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Application of Resilience Theory,” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference, Seattle, October 2015, with Denise Matel-Anderson.

“The Impact of a Resourcefulness Training Intervention on Relocated Older Adults’ Adjustment,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2016, with J. Zauszniewski.

Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., professor “Desert, Detention and Deportation,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016.

“Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2016, with C. Murrock. “Nursing Students’ Perception of the Stigma of Mental Illness,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2016, with C. Murrock. “Risk and Resistance Factors: Autism Caregivers’ Adaptation,” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference, Seattle, October 2015, with J. Zauszniewski, and Q. Mu.

Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., adjunct associate professor “Assessing Discharge Readiness as a Nurse Sensitive Indicator,” Implementation Science Research Network Webinar, July 2015, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; Dr. Rhonda Hughes, College of Nursing; L. Costa; and O. Yakusheva. See entry for Dr. Marianne Weiss. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “Answering Wicked Questions: Dealing with Opposing Truths as an Associate Professor,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016.

“Use of the Relationship Based Care Model as a Framework for Preceptor Program Development,” Veterans Administration Nurse Academic Partnership Conference, Chicago, April 2016. “Relationships Among Rural Hospital and Nurse Characteristics, Practice Environment and Safety Culture,” International Rural Nursing Conference, Rapid City, South Dakota, July 2016. See entry for Dr. Aimee Woda. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.-B.C., clinical associate professor “Panel Presentation: Palliative Care Interprofessional Education and Simulation: ‘Live’ and Online Simulation Experiences in an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Course,” WIACNS, Pewaukee, Wisconsin, October 2015. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus “Extended Use Effectiveness of a Nurse Managed Natural Family Planning Service Program,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016. “An Evidenced-based Electronic Hormonal Fertility Monitor Aided Method of Family Planning,” Centro Della Famiglia, Trevsio, Italy, October 2015. “State of Scientific Evidence for Natural Family Planning,” Catholic Medical Association, Philadelphia, September 2015.


24

Marquette Nurse

PRESENTATIONS continued “Spiritual Care of Fertility Among Couples using Natural Family Planning,” Canadian Federation of Catholic Physicians’ Societies, Calgary, Alberta, June 2015.

Laura Hale, M.S.N., clinical instructor “PIER — Peripheral IV Evaluation and Replacement,” Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, June 2015.

“Rape, Acute Stress and Pregnancy: Was Jack Willke Right?,” St. Thomas University Law School, Minneapolis, June 2015.

Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., M.H.S., R.N., C.L.N.C., F.A.A.N., associate professor See entry for Dr. Karen Bobay.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., professor “Improving Health Outcomes and Reducing Costs Through Interprofessional Education,” Wisconsin Council on Medical Education and Workforce, Appleton, Wisconsin, November 2015.

Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., associate professor “Using an iPad Application to Prepare Children with ASD for Research MRI,” International Society for Autism Research, Baltimore, May 2016, with Dr. Sheikh Ahamed, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Amy Van Hecke, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Robert Scheidt, College of Engineering; N. Salowitz; and M. Van Abel.

“Improving Health Outcomes and Reducing Costs Through Interprofessional Education,” Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeastern Wisconsin, Milwaukee, October 2015. “E-intervention Reduces Body Fat in Obese Parents’ Kids,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, Washington, D.C., October 2015, with J. Kotchen; J. McMahon; A. S. Kaugars; J. Snethan; J. Gacia; S. Burkel; A. Kort; C. Villanueva; and E. Caro. “WNA Task Force on Interprofessional Education Leading to Team Based Care,” Wisconsin Nurses Association, Madison, Wisconsin, October 2015. “Interprofessional Education and Practice,” Wisconsin Center for Nursing, Milwaukee, July 2015. Jill Gottormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Patients’ Descriptions and Interpretations of Delusional Memories of Intensive Care,” Annual Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Consortium Conference, Milwaukee, May 2016. “Usability Testing of an iPad Communication Application for Mechanically Ventilated Patients,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Milwaukee, March 2015. Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor “Parents’ Perspectives on Caring for Their Child Long-term Following Solid Organ Transplant,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016, with Dr. Norah Johnson, College of Nursing; and Stacee Lerret. “Use of the Spiritual Development Framework in Conducting Spirituality and Health Research with Adolescents,” 26th International Nursing Research Congress, San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 2015, with D. Clayton-Jones.

“Parent and Child Experience of a Research Study MRI and iPad Social Script App for Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016, with Dr. Sheikh Ahamed, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Amy Van Hecke, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Robert Scheidt, College of Engineering; N. Salowitz; and M. Van Abel. “Relationships of Resources and Health of Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Inner City Milwaukee,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016, with P. Sangasay. “Parent and Child Experience of an Innovative iPad Social Script App for Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder Undergoing a Research Study MRI,” Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, November 2015, with Dr. Sheikh Ahamed, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Amy Van Hecke, College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Robert Scheidt, College of Engineering; N. Salowitz; and M. Van Abel. “Parent Experience Accessing Diagnosis in Milwaukee Public Schools,” Community of Practice for Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Developmental Disabilities, Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, Milwaukee, October 2015, with P. Sangasy. “Breakout Session: Transitions Resources for Adults on the Autism Spectrum,” Milwaukee Urban Autism Coalition, Milwaukee College Prep School, Lola Rowe campus, Milwaukee, June 2015, with M. Klung and P. Mueller. See entries for Dr. Kristin Haglund and Dr. Marianne Weiss.

Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor “Ibuprofen Reduces Fatigue and Depressivelike Behavior in Tumor-bearing Mice,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, March 2016. “Untangling the Symptoms of Depression and Fatigue in a Mouse Model of Cancerrelated Fatigue,” University of Illinois–Chicago, January 2016. Jennifer Ohlendorf, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Effect of Breastfeeding Intent on Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation Among African American Women in a Nursemanaged Midwifery Practice,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Milwaukee, March 2016, with Dr. Karen Robinson, College of Nursing. “No Problem — I’ll Lose It After the Pregnancy,” Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care, Milwaukee, November 2015. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.-B.C., R.N., assistant professor “Goal-oriented Team Triathlon Training Can Promote Weight Loss, Endurance and Strength in Women Breast Cancer Survivors,” Power of PT: WPTA Spring Conference, Middleton, Wisconsin, April 2016, with Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; K. Banting; J.L. Waltke; A. J. Tjoe; and A.A. Sinner. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor See entry for Dr. Jennifer Ohlendorf. Christine Schindler, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., W.C.C., clinical assistant professor “Keeping Skin in the Game: Bringing Awareness to Neonatal Skin Injuries,” Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Conference, Las Vegas, November 2015, with M. Esser. “Skin Failure in Pediatric Patients,” University of Chicago Medical Center’s Annual Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice Symposium, Chicago, October 2015. “Pediatric Skin Failure,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, March 2016. “Are All Pressure Ulcers Preventable? The Emerging Phenomenon of Pediatric Skin Failure,” Pediatric Academic Society, Baltimore, May 2016, with K. Cohen and M. Scanlon. “The Financial Impact of Nurse Practitioners on Complex Care Teams,” Pediatric Academic Society, Baltimore, May 2016, with S. Petre; J. Gordon; S. Johaningsmeir; T. Bartlet; and J. Grevenow.


25

Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., C.N.O.R., clinical associate professor “Patients as Subjects in Research: Saying ‘Yes’ but Meaning ‘No,’ ” Froedtert Hospital Nursing Research Conference, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, October 2015. “The Pros and Cons of Themed Issues in Journal Publications,” International Academy of Nurse Editors Annual Conference, Las Vegas, August 2015. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “Shared Care Intervention for Heart Failure Partners,” Special Topics Conference: Emerging Areas of Family Health Research Across the Lifespan, Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, Washington, D.C., October 2015. “Family Caregiving and Quality of Life,” Marquette University, Milwaukee, June 2015. Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., professor “Health Team Contributions to Discharge Preparation,” Mount Sinai Hospital Research Conference, New York, December 2015, with Dr. Kathleen Bobay, College of Nursing.

“Readiness for Discharge in Pediatric Acute Care,” Children’s Oncology Group, Dallas, October 2015. “Using the Individual and Family Selfmanagement Theory to Develop and Test a Discharge Intervention for Parents,” National Institute of Nursing Research Anniversary Symposium, Washington, D. C., October 2015, with Dr. Norah Johnson, College of Nursing; K. Sawin; M. Frederick; K. Gralton; E. Gricunas; K. Junemann; C. Klingbeil; S. Lerret; M. Miklosh; M. Ming; H. Orlowski; R. Schiffman; J. Thompson; and S. Malin. “Magnet® Research Infrastructure: Best Practices in Structure, Process and Outcomes,” ANCC Magnet Conference, Atlanta, October 2015, with R. Newhouse. “Nurses Clinical Decision-making for Discharge Preparation of Parents of Hospitalized Children,” 12th International Family Nursing Conference, Odense, Denmark, August 2015, with Dr. Norah Johnson, College of Nursing; S. Lerrett; R. Schiffman; and S. Kathy. See entry for Dr. Kathleen Bobay.

Aimee Woda, Ph.D., R.N., B.C., assistant professor “The Impact of Simulation Learning Experience Sequencing on Clinical Decisionmaking,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice, Milwaukee, May 2016, with Dr. Marilyn Bratt, College of Nursing; J. Hansen; and M. Paquette. “The Impact of Simulation Learning Experience Sequencing on Clinical Decisionmaking,” ATI National Nurse Educator Summit, Nashville, April 2016, with Dr. Marilyn Bratt, College of Nursing; R. Topp; J. Hansen; and M. Paquette. “The Impact of Simulation Learning Experience Sequencing on Clinical Decisionmaking,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Milwaukee, March 2016, with Dr. Marilyn Bratt, College of Nursing; R. Topp; J. Hansen; and M. Paquette. Amber Young-Brice, M.S.N., R.N., clinical instructor “Team STEPPS,” American Assembly for Men in Nursing Annual Conference, Minneapolis, September 2015, with R. Manigold.

John Nienhuis

“Do Nurses Make a Difference? A Journey of Discovery about Discharge Readiness,” Mount Sinai Hospital Research Conference, New York, December 2015.


Marquette University

P.O. Box 1881

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

53201-1881

A CLINICAL MIND. A CARING HEART. A Marquette Nurse stands out as highly skilled and clinically talented. And though patients need sound treatment, they deserve even more. In the College of Nursing, we prepare students through a rigorous, experiential curriculum and a focus on ethical responsibility. They become nurses who can think critically and act decisively at a clinical level. Nurses who are advocates for individuals and communities. Nurses who provide both care and a caring heart and who are ready to Be The Difference. marquette.edu/nursing

Marquette Nurse 2016  

Marquette Nurse 2016

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you