Page 1

MARQUETTE

NURSE C O L L E G E O F N U R S I N G M AG A Z I N E

2 015

We are Marquette nurses: The college embraces and supports its diversity A NEW PROGRAM FOR NURSE ANESTHETISTS: GUARDIANS OF CARE PG. 02

NURTURING DIVERSITY IN THE COLLEGE AND IN NURSING PRACTICE PG. 10

LIVES OF INFLUENCE — BEYOND THE BEDSIDE PG. 14


From the Dean

College priorities remain at forefront during time of transition The beginning of a new academic year is always accompanied by a sense of excitement for what lies ahead. This year is no exception for the College of Nursing. On behalf of College of Nursing faculty, staff, students and alumni, I want to extend our sincere gratitude to Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan for her seven years of outstanding service to the college and Marquette University. Under Dr. Callahan’s leadership, the college underwent tremendous growth, and our commitment to community engagement and partnership is stronger than ever. She laid the groundwork for what I know will be a very exciting future for the college. We wish her unparalleled success in her new role as provost for the health science division at Loyola University Chicago. The university hired a new provost, Dr. Daniel Myers, who assumed the position on July 1. Dr. Myers comes to us from Notre Dame, where he was a sociology professor and had led the university’s faculty affairs since 2011. I look forward to partnering with him as interim dean of the College of Nursing as we strengthen Marquette’s national reputation as a rigorous, values-centered institution that graduates men and women who are ready to Be The Difference. After a little more than a year on the job, President Michael R. Lovell continues to elevate Marquette’s commitment to research and innovation and challenges the campus community to find new ways to enhance the strong transformative educational experience on which we pride ourselves. The priorities of the College of Nursing play a major role in contributing to these university-wide efforts. It has been a year of exciting strides for the College of Nursing as well. The college raised more than $2.3 million during the past year for scholarships, research and academic support. The college continues to be the most selective on campus, having received 1,700 undergraduate applications for 150 available spots for fall 2015. We’ve entered into a joint venture with the Medical College of Wisconsin and Froedtert Hospital to launch a new nurse anesthesia program (see page 2). We continue to pursue innovative ways to collaborate with other colleges on campus. This past year, students from the Opus College of Engineering designed a new interactive diagnostic tool for our students to use in the Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation (see page 7). A priority of the college remains providing our undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students with a diverse, rigorous and values-based education to meet the changing needs of the health care industry. Our feature story describes strategies that have helped us promote diversity and inclusion for our students while they are on campus and prepare for a more diverse nursing workforce. The story shares the experiences of outstanding alumni such as Christian Villanueva, Nurs ’15, and Jamarrah Foster, Nurs ’13 (see pages 10–13). Our “Beyond the Bedside” feature (see pages 14–17) profiles three alumni who have used their nursing degrees in non-traditional and inspiring ways. This edition of Marquette Nurse marks the publication’s fifth year in production. I hope you enjoy reading about our students and the college’s continued growth and the many accomplishments of your fellow alumni. I look forward to getting to know many of you at alumni or professional events throughout the coming year. Please feel free to be in touch anytime through letters, phone calls or emails. Sincerely, Dr. Donna O. McCarthy, R.N., F.A.A.N. Interim Dean and Professor, Marquette University College of Nursing

Save the date: The college turns 80. Alumni Reunion Weekend 2016 will include a celebration of the college’s 80th anniversary. With commemorative activities including tours, a day-long conference and an anniversary dinner, the celebration is a wonderful opportunity for nurses from across the college’s history to renew ties and celebrate the past, present and future of Marquette nursing. Mark your calendars for July 28–31, 2016.


MARQUETTE

NURSE C O L L E G E O F N U R S I N G M AG A Z I N E

2 015

Table of Contents

2 News Preparing nurse anesthetists: the next guardians Alliance-building U College of Nursing Clark Hall, 112 414.288.3800

Wallace gift boosts faculty research Called back to Piura Post-dinner adventure

Interim dean of the college: Dr. Donna O. McCarthy, R.N., F.A.A.N. Editorial team: Stephen Filmanowicz, Clare Peterson and Andrea Petrie

Innovation in simulation renewed

6 Research & Innovation Released for recovery: a study’s growing reach

Art direction: Joan Holcomb

Collaboration for simulation

Contact: Share comments or ideas for future issues with stephen.filmanowicz@marquette.edu.

The keys to resilience?

College mission

Targeting improved care for children with life-threatening illnesses

Through a transformational Catholic, Jesuit

Recognized care champion: Dr. Christine Shaw

education, the mission of the Marquette University College of Nursing is to prepare nurse leaders to promote health, healing and social justice for all people through clinical practice and development of

10 Nurturing Diversity The college changes the narrative about who is a nurse

nursing knowledge. The faculty, students and staff of the college are committed to: • Providing high-quality, compassionate care focused on individuals, families and communities. • Advocating for social justice to eliminate health inequities. • Engaging community partners to promote health care for all. • Generating, evaluating and applying knowledge to improve health and education outcomes. • Creating a dynamic, innovative learning community. • Leading change to improve the health care environment. On the cover: Top row: Christian Villanueva, D.J. Ferrer, Nkechi Irobi, Middle row: Alex Mathew, Crissy Garcia, Steve Biondi Bottom row: Elena Caro, Tamiah McCoy, Jamarrah Foster Cover photographs by Kat Schleicher and Dan Johnson

14 Beyond the Bedside Paths less traveled lead to careers of far-ranging influence

18 Alumni Perspective A family’s caregiving bond Then and now — Class of 1965 returns to campus for Golden Jubilee Aging gracefully: an alumna’s recognized leadership Dilling gift supports student nurses

20 Notable Scholarly Accomplishments


2

News Marquette Nurse

Who are the next guardians? With nurse anesthetists set to retire in large numbers, the College of Nursing joins with a local partner to answer the call. Health care has a problem. Nurse anesthetists, those guardians of

Although the high volume of baby boomer retirees in the field is one culprit, changes

care who usher patients through some of

in the generation itself compound the

the most difficult times of their lives, are

issue. The Bureau of Labor Statistics,

dwindling in number, poised to retire in

which estimates the field will grow by an

droves as millions of baby boomers exit the

astounding 25 percent from 2012–22, says

health care workforce.

that growth will also come from increased

Fortunately, nursing schools like

health care demand from boomers as they

Marquette’s are quickly seeking answers

live longer and lead more active lives than

to a problem that’s largely the result of

previous generations.

this rapidly aging population. Projecting a fall 2017 launch, the

These trends are not news to leaders of the college. In fact, the College of Nursing

college will offer only the second certified

has been interested in a CRNA program for

registered nurse anesthetist program in

the past six years, learning several years

Wisconsin. A joint program with the Medical

ago that colleagues at MCW and Froedtert

College of Wisconsin, it will also be the

Hospital shared that interest. More recently,

state’s first at the doctoral level. “With

Callahan and Dr. David Warltier, chair of

a shortage of nurse anesthetists, this

the anesthesiology department at MCW

program will meet a clear societal need,”

and Froedtert, which employs 45 CRNAs,

says Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, former

initiated the discussions that moved the

dean of the college and herself a CRNA

idea forward.

who specializes in pain management and palliative care. Today, more than 45,000 CRNAs practice

“The greatest benefit to a program like this is a strong commitment to excellence in classroom and clinical education,”

in the United States. They administer more

Callahan emphasizes. “The challenges

than 65 percent of all anesthetics and are

for any clinical programs are related to

the sole providers of anesthesia services in

the availability of clinical sites and strong

rural areas. But, according to the American

clinical teachers. In partnering with MCW

Association of Nurse Anesthetists, approxi-

and Froedtert, we have the best of both.”

mately 30 percent of all active CRNAs are 55 years or older, at or nearing retirement age.

Seismic demographic shifts and a key partnership aside, Callahan says it was

An advanced practice nursing milestone Launching in 2017, the College of Nursing’s registered nurse anesthetist program will be just the second such program in Wisconsin. It will also round out the college’s programs to include all four advanced practice registered nurse roles: nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse-midwife and nurse anesthetist. Existing APRN offerings are: • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (Adult-Older Adult) • Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (Adult-Older Adult) • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (Pediatric) • Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (Pediatric) • Family Nurse Practitioner • Clinical Nurse Specialist (Adult-Older Adult)

Meanwhile, the AANA says that more

the encouragement of faculty, students

than 2,000 student nurse anesthetists from

and alumni that is bringing this program

114 accredited U.S. programs graduate

to life. “I would not have pursued a nurse

Additional non-APRN graduate programs

each year. Currently, only one such program

anesthesia program if there hadn’t been

include:

exists in Wisconsin at the University of

interest from the faculty and the community,”

• Clinical Nurse Leader

Wisconsin–La Crosse. It graduates 10

she says.

• Systems Leadership

students annually. The addition of Marquette’s new program will double that.

— By Christopher Stolarski

• Nurse-Midwifery

and Healthcare Quality


3

Alliance-building U “The expectation in the clinical world

Dr. Marilyn Frenn, professor of nursing, and Mary Jo Wiemiller, clinical assistant

is to function as part of a team,” says

professor and chair of physician assistant

Wiemiller, who is a certified physician

studies, received the 2015 Way Klingler

assistant. “The only way we can be

Teaching Enhancement Award for a project

successful is if the players on the team

with a lengthy title but a clear goal.

understand each other’s roles and can

Their winning project — “Developing and Implementing Interprofessional

communicate effectively in the best interest of the patient.”

Education in the Health Sciences through

Dr. Marilyn Frenn

“We also want to develop some

a Collaborative Learning Approach”— is

co-curricular activities,” Frenn says.

focused on teaching students in health-re-

“Other institutions have developed these

lated fields how to work together.

models and found that once the

“It’s important for health professionals

students get energized, there’s a

to work together,” Frenn says. “In fact,

huge demand.” At Marquette, 26

many accreditation agencies now require

additional faculty members signed

it for various health professions.”

on to the project as team and task

Their approach was to create a central resource hub to organize interprofessional

force members, a strong sign of early buy-in.

educational activities across campus

Ultimately, the model improves

and act as a resource for faculty, giving

safety, quality of care, patient

them tools to engage in these activities

outcomes and health care costs

themselves. The monetary portion of the

by teaching students to work

Way Klingler award, $20,000, will assist in

in teams and understand other

the development of learning modules in

professions, better preparing them

Desire2Learn, Marquette’s course manage-

for similar collaboration in their careers.

ment system, that faculty and students can access and use for their own collaboration.

Mary Jo Wiemiller

A new project prepares health professionals from diverse fields to work together — and deliver care more effectively than they could independently.

— Clare Peterson

Wallace gift boosts faculty research Through the generosity of the Wallace Family Foundation, a new endowed fund is supporting cutting-edge nursing research at the college. Since meeting on campus as students in the 1960s, the Wallaces — Victoria, Nurs ’70, and Michael, Eng ’69 — have remained committed to Marquette’s mission. In addition to supporting the creation of the Wheaton Franciscan Center for Clinical Simulation and Engineering Hall, they endowed a similar fund in the Opus College of Engineering. Their new gift supports research efforts of junior faculty members in nursing committed to knowledge discovery, scientific inquiry, high ethical standards and integrity. The inaugural Wallace Faculty Scholar, assistant professor Dr. Jennifer Ohlendorf, is pilot testing interventions to improve maternal nutrition and reduce postpartum weight gain. “This gift is already having a remarkable impact on research at the college,” says former dean Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, “and it will continue to impact future generations through advances in nursing care.” — Andrea Petrie Interested in what you can do to advance the college? Visit go.mu.edu/nursing-giving to learn more.


4

Marquette Nurse

News Called back to Piura Alumnae of the college’s Peruvian clinical course return for a nursing-intensive mission trip. For eight years, Dr. Darlene Weis,

When she had an opportunity to return

associate professor emerita, has taken

to Piura in January, she didn’t hesitate. This

nursing students to northwest Peru for a

time, St. John Vianney Parish in Brookfield,

unique academic clinical nursing course.

Wis., organized the collaboration with the

Each summer, two groups of 10 students

nursing and medical staff of Santisimo

spend four weeks working with under-

Sacramento, its sister parish.

served and vulnerable populations in and

Before leaving for her trip, Rosing was

around the regional capital of Piura through

thrilled to learn that three classmates from

a partnership with the nurses, midwives

the Peru program — Katherine Clark, Molly

and community health workers of the city’s

Farwell and Hope Voss, all Nurs ’13 —

Santisimo Sacramento Parish clinic.

would be returning on the same medical

Jessica Rosing, Nurs ’11, says this com-

mission. When they arrived, they discov-

munity health clinical was a true highlight

ered that the St. John Vianney effort had

of her undergraduate years.

attracted two additional college alumni: Ann

“It’s an amazing, unique experience that combines clinical practice with service learning,” says Rosing, who works in

(Wilford) Draghicchio, Nurs ’95, and Mary Jean (Kieffer) Hubert, Nurs ’79. The return trip affirmed their regard for

Milwaukee for Aurora. “It was a compo-

the respectful care provided to community

nent of my Marquette education that truly

members across their lifespans by the

shaped my current nursing practice.”

parish’s clinic visiting nurses and hospice.

It also reminded the nurses how urgently their care is needed. “In the week we were there, we performed 30 hernia surgeries, worked in the parish hospice center and made several home visits,” recounts Rosing. “It’s truly a one-of-a-kind place. I feel at home there.” — Clare Peterson

Post-dinner adventure For three students, a dinner with alumnae leads to a firsthand encounter with emergency nursing. Supper for 12 Strangers, sponsored by

Highlights included a tour of

the Association of Marquette University

the emergency room and a

Women, has brought together Marquette

presentation about Howard

alumni and staff with students since 1973.

Young’s flight transport program

Barbara Lent and Judy Russell, both Nurs ’64,

by Charlie Kotke, director of

wanted to participate and, fittingly, chose to

ground and air transport. “We

host nursing students in November 2014.

sat inside the on-site helicopter,

The event left a lasting impression.

looked at all of the equipment

Only a month after the event, three

and heard from the on-duty

seniors who attended dinner — Erin Brauer,

transport nurses,” Brauer says.

Allen Samson and Thomas Wargo — took

“While hearing about the incredible rescues

Russell up on a special offer to visit Minocqua,

they have performed, I felt yet another

Wis., where she and her husband Ted live.

nursing dream taking shape in my head.”

Russell had arranged for the students to tour the Howard Young Medical Center. “I knew there was an opportunity for

Wargo, who has dreamed of becoming

Visiting students Erin Brauer (third from left), Allen Samson (middle) and Thomas Wargo (third from right), all Nurs ’15, tour one of the Spirit helicopters Howard Young uses for emergency transport.

as they toured the center was invigorating.

a flight nurse for years, said the experience

I know they are people who are going to

at Howard Young was “life-changing.”

stay connected to the Marquette community and do wonderful things with their

the students to walk away with a greater

“Hosting Erin, Allen and Thomas was

understanding and caring for the challenges

equally special for us as it was for them,”

nursing degrees.”

and realities of rural health care,” Russell says.

says Russell. “Seeing their faces light up

— Clare Peterson

Watch a video about the Supper for 12 Strangers event at go.mu.edu/HYMCTour.


5

Innovation renewed Generous donor support helps the Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation retain its high-tech edge. Three years after its doors first opened, the college’s Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation in Clark Hall remains on the forefront of simulation education and at the center of the college’s pre-licensure and graduate curriculum. The center uses cutting-edge technology to help nursing students experience all the intensity of a hospital without leaving campus. However, like any technology, the center’s equipment and software can’t stay cutting edge for long without a little help. “Right now, our biggest expense is technology updates so we can keep the center on par with what our students experience in clinical settings,” says Andrea Petrie, director of development for the College of Nursing. Adds center Director lege. It is a living, breathing part of our students’ education. To keep that going, we certainly depend on the generosity of people who believe in what it’s bringing to our students.” Like

Dan Johnson

Mary Paquette: “Simulation is not a separate entity in the col-

Ethel Moehring, who recently left more than $150,000 to the center’s endowment fund through a bequest from her estate.

In Clark Hall’s clinical simulation center, students such as juniors Megan Masterson (left) and Emily Sigafus grow familiar with medical equipment they’ll encounter in the field.

According to daughter Pam Peters, Bus Ad ’70, Ethel and her husband, Ralph, were inspired to give by their lifelong commitment to Catholic education and health care, having also supported Xavier High School and St. Elizabeth Hospital, both in Appleton, Wis. One of Ethel’s other daughters, Marilyn Boardman, graduated from the College of Nursing in 1967. After hearing about the unique learning experience the center offers to students, Ethel made up her mind. “She jumped all over the idea — she insisted on making arrangements for the contribution, and it was finalized within a few weeks,” says Peters. Her endowment was settled in late 2012, shortly after the center opened, and will be put toward updating the wealth of technology that helps it operate. Personal experiences with the health care system kindled Ethel’s belief in the need for “progressive and conscientious health care,” a belief that fits well with the college’s mission. In fact, while receiving care at St. Elizabeth Hospital in 2014, Ethel met a doctor whose daughter is a Marquette nursing student. Although she had made up her mind to donate, Peters says: “Meeting a doctor who was also familiar with Marquette’s excellence reaffirmed her commitment.” Ethel passed away in late 2014 at age 99. She will be remembered as a generous woman who embodied the Jesuit spirit of Marquette and whose dedication to the next generation of healers will no doubt serve as an inspiration to future donors. — Kate Sheka

“A living, breathing part of our students’ education,” simulation at Marquette can’t stay cutting edge without some help.


6

Marquette Nurse

Research & Innovation Released for recovery

3

YEARS

34

HOSPITALS

Research engages dozens of partners in charting the benefits of standardized hospital discharge processes. For patients being discharged from a hospital, the wheelchair ride to the exit often is a hopeful one, full of eagerness to continue recovery at home. Too often, though, these patients are unprepared to have their care needs met, and many make a return trip within 30 days. With Medicare readmission rates approaching 17 percent and the Affordable Care Act penalizing hospitals with high rates of readmission, reducing those rates has become a major health care concern. “Studies have shown that there is a link between patients’ perceptions of their readiness for discharge and their readmission rate. When nurses assess that a patient’s readiness to go home is low, that patient is six to nine times more likely to be readmitted within 30 days,” says professor Dr. Marianne Weiss. Those findings led Weiss to study what happens if nurses assess the discharge readiness of every patient leaving the hospital. What resulted is READI, or Readiness Evaluation and Discharge Interventions, on which she is the principal investigator. Supported by a $735,000 contract from the American Nurses Credentialing Center and awarded through a competitive application process, READI tests the impact of imple-

A standard discharge readiness assessment

menting standard discharge readiness assessment by the discharging nurse to determine if it contributes to reduced readmissions and emergency department visits within 30 days. The three-year study began in July 2014, with 32 hospitals in more than a dozen states plus two in Saudi Arabia participating. Marquette faculty colleagues Dr. Kathleen Bobay

GOAL REDUCTION IN READMISSIONS

and Dr. Ronda Hughes, both associate professors of nursing, join Weiss on the project’s research team. “If we see that a patient is anxious about going home or the nurse has some concerns, that patient may need extra support at home. These assessments can be used as a trigger to implement those services and reduce the chance of having to return,” Weiss says. Part of the study analysis will track how many of these assessments actually did trigger further home services. To Weiss, the cost benefit analysis for using discharge nurse assessments is clear. “The cost of training is minimal compared with the savings if we keep just a few patients from being readmitted. Many hospitals already have readmission reduction programs, so we are looking at what nurses can contribute to readmission reduction,” she says. Weiss says that readmissions are not entirely preventable but that nurses can help mitigate the risk. “We do expect to see drops in readmission rates, and we hope that discharge readiness assessment by the nurse will become a standard of care in the future,” she says. “The ultimate goal is to find ways to improve hospital discharge for our patients.” — Guy Fiorita


Kevin Pauly

7

At a May ceremony in Clark Hall celebrating the collaboration that produced the new thermometer, members of the student design team joined then-dean of the College of Nursing Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan (second from right), Dr. Kris Ropella, Opus Dean of the Opus College of Engineering (right), and faculty and staff from both colleges and the Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Nursing Simulation. Design team members were graduating engineering students Jerome Kolf (front row, center) and (back row, starting second from left) Joseph Ebel, Daniel Tournoux, Matthew Mesko and Thomas Fandel.

Collaboration for simulation A device developed by engineering students heightens the realism of the simulation experience. College of Nursing, and Dr. Kristina Ropella, Opus Dean of the

High-tech mannequins in the college’s Wheaton Franciscan

Opus College of Engineering.

Healthcare Center for Nursing Simulation in Clark Hall routinely

Dr. Jay Goldberg, director of the Opus College’s healthcare

talk, perspire, breathe and even give birth. It’s all part of the realistic

technologies management program, says the collaboration

clinical experience students receive in the $4 million center.

reminds students on the design team of the real-world partnership

But one thing the mannequins can’t do is project a body

between engineers and medical professionals.

temperature readable by an ordinary thermometer. Until recently,

“They’re the ones applying the technology. You’re the ones

when it came time for students to check for a fever, they read numbers scribbled on a sticky note and placed on a mannequin’s

developing it,” he tells them. “You can’t do your jobs without

forehead by instructors.

each other.” In the center, grateful staff members are putting the device to

Center Director Mary Paquette began speaking with Opus College of Engineering faculty members, including Dr. John LaDisa,

use to help ensure an unparalleled learning experience for students.

about technology needs engineering students could address with

“We started using this device in our center this summer, and it

one of their senior projects, and they soon settled on an improved

has been a great improvement in adding realism to our simulations,”

thermometer that could display the desired temperature digitally.

says Paquette.

Work on the project began early in the fall 2014 semester.

— Jonathan McHugh

“We had meetings, we toured the facilities and we found out how simulation instructors can run simulations from a control room,” says Thomas Fandel, Eng ’15, a member of the design team. Because the temperatures of mannequins remain constant, the students settled on a system that allows an instructor to beam a pre-determined temperature value from his or her computer to a Bluetooth-enabled thermometer when the nursing student places it in a mannequin’s mouth. After 3D printing an initial prototype, students made modifithe casing and adding ridges to give the product an ergonomic feel. They debuted it during a late spring ceremony in the Sim Lab attended by Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, former dean of the

Kevin Pauly

cations based on Paquette’s feedback, which included slimming

Using a bluetooth signal to connect to the new thermometer, clinical instructors are able to send student nurses body temperature readings.


8

Marquette Nurse

Research & Innovation The keys to resilience? Award-winning research seeks insights from R.N.s to help prevent adolescent suicides. In Denise Matel-Anderson’s words,

resilience from the perspective of the nurses

her specialty, mental health, suffers from

working with these patients. According to

a “lack of exposure” in the medical field.

Matel-Anderson, “These nurses are in a

So it seems fitting that Matel-Anderson,

unique position to establish a relationship

a College of Nursing doctoral student and

with adolescent patients and provide

clinical instructor, was able to bring aware-

effective interventions.”

ness to this topic with a research project

By revealing interventions likely to

that received a 2014 Marquette Forward

work best with adolescents based on their

Thinking Award.

unique risk and protective factors, this

Co-presented with associate professor

innovative approach could yield promising

of nursing Dr. Abir Bekhet, the project

new ways to foster resilience, which can

was one of three awardees selected from

increase the adolescents’ quality of life

34 presenters at an annual poster session

and decrease mortality rates. Matel-

sponsored by Marquette’s Office of

Anderson and Bekhet completed focus

Research and Sponsored Programs. With a boost from a $1,000 research grant included with the award, as well as a matching $1,000 gift from the College of Nursing, Matel-Anderson and Bekhet are well into “Resilience in Adolescents who Survived a Suicide Attempt from the Perspective of the Registered Nurse in a Psychiatric Facility.” Ultimately, they hope to identify key risk and protective factors in adolescents to

“These nurses are in a unique position to establish a relationship with adolescent patients and provide effective interventions.”

lower mortality rates in adolescents with previous suicide attempts.

— Denise Matel-Anderson

If not for Marquette’s role in igniting a passion for mental health nursing in Matel-Anderson, this research

group research with nine mental health

may never have been started. As a master’s

professionals in early 2015 and planned to

student in 2009, she was assigned as

submit the research for publication before

Bekhet’s teaching assistant for a mental

the start of the fall semester.

health nursing course — an experience

Through this research, Matel-Anderson

and mentoring relationship that ultimately

gained a new professional perspective:

shaped the rest of her career. “It took me

to treat each patient as a person, not just

getting assigned to this course and getting

a set of symptoms, in keeping with the

this exposure to find that mental health

college’s Jesuit nursing traditions.

nursing is truly what I love to do,” says Matel-Anderson, Grad ’12. The pair’s research is one of a kind. No previous study of adolescents who attempted suicide has explored

“Now, when I’m working in the field, I’m always thinking: ‘How can I help these patients in a different way?’” ­— Kate Sheka


9

Recognized care champion Marquette practitioner-educator honored for work on free care in the heart of Milwaukee. Eighteen years ago, Dr. Christine Shaw, Nurs ’72, co-founded the Marquette Clinic for Women and Children as a free nurse-run clinic in the basement of Cross Lutheran Church, a mile north of campus. The clinic continues to provide needed primary care for uninsured

and are supported in their efforts to take control of their health,” Shaw says. Complementing her practice, Shaw’s teaching in the college

and underinsured women and children and helps them choose

extends back 40 years and earned

healthier lifestyles, too. In May, to recognize her work at the clinic

her a Marquette teaching excellence

and as an educator, Shaw received a Champion in Women’s Health

award in 2007.

Award from the Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation. Whenever the health care — and health coverage — landscape

“To have the real stories of all these women allows me to explain

has changed since 1997, the clinic has responded. “Our clientele

to students not just the pathology

has shifted since BadgerCare and the Affordable Care Act came

of the disease but also the impact

into the picture. We serve many people who don’t qualify for

of the condition on their lives,” says

BadgerCare, can’t afford health insurance or can’t afford the

Shaw, who emphasizes she is accepting the award on behalf of

high deductibles of their insurance plans,” says Shaw, a clinical

the entire clinic and its volunteers.

associate professor. One of 20 free clinics in southeastern Wisconsin, MCWC takes

“Seeing a need in her community, Christine Shaw committed her life to filling it,” says Tommi Thompson, WWHF’s executive di-

a holistic approach to diagnosing and treating acute and chronic

rector. “What’s more, she acts as an advocate and example for her

conditions and educating patients to reduce health risks and

nursing students, providing them with the skills and experience

prevent diseases. Last year, the clinic saw about 200 patients for

needed to provide the highest-quality health care to those who are

600 to 700 total patient visits.

in the greatest need.”

“We diagnose and treat their conditions, but, more important, we make sure women understand their strengths and self-worth

— Marlo Marisie

Targeting improved care for children with life-threatening illnesses Two doctoral students have attracted extramural funding for research projects that pursue innovative approaches to the care needs of children with serious illnesses and to prognosisrelated communication with their families. THE RESEARCHER: Amy Newman, Grad ’02, a pediatric nurse practitioner and doctoral candidate THE CARE CHALLENGE: The pediatric oncology nurse is poised

THE RESEARCHER: Cheryl Petersen, Nurs ’93, an R.N. and doctoral candidate THE CARE CHALLENGE: Children with terminal illnesses are

to play a critical role in sharing news of a cancer diagnosis or

identified as having spiritual needs, but nurses receive minimal

progression with parents of a child patient, but the nurse’s role

preparation for recognizing these needs and responding with

in this difficult process has not been clearly articulated.

appropriate spiritual care.

THE APPROACH: Newman is surveying pediatric oncology nurses

THE APPROACH: Petersen is piloting an online educational program

nationally to explore their experiences with prognosis-related

incorporating videos, interviews, real-life examples and a

communication, the factors that influence such communication

discussion board.

and the impact of such discussions on the nurse. THE PROMISE: Greater clarity about the nurse’s role in this type

THE PROMISE: The online discussions and other resources aim to help nurses assess the child’s spiritual needs, guiding the child

of communication may contribute to the development of

to strengthen relationships and find hope and meaning and

interdisciplinary interventions. Improved communication will

helping the child express feelings and be remembered.

aid familial decision-making, and participation in care and could help provide hope during the cancer experience.

— Clare Peterson


11

NURTURING

DIVERSITY Helping diverse students thrive at Marquette and beyond, the college changes the narrative about who is a nurse today. By Nicole Sweeney Etter

Kat Schleicher

As Christian Villanueva prepared to become the first in his family to go to college, he applied to Marquette but figured a community college near his Chicago-area home was his more likely path. He was intrigued by nursing but hadn’t made up his mind. Then, Juanita “Terrie” Garcia called. Garcia is coordinator of Project BEYOND, a College of Nursing program designed to increase diversity in the nursing workforce. She invited him to see Marquette for himself, and that simple invite changed his life. “She took the time to reassure my parents and show them around and speak to them in their language,” says Villanueva, a second-generation Mexican-American who graduated in May. “That really threw me ... It was instrumental in getting me to come

Prepared to deliver sensitive care to an increasingly diverse patient population are Marquette nurses (front row) Alex Mathew, Nurs ’15; Tamiah McCoy, Nurs ’14; Crissy Garcia, Nurs ’14; and (back row) Steve Biondi, Grad ’10; and junior D.J. Ferrer.


12

Dan Johnson

to Marquette because having made a connection with her and having that sense of trust were very important.” A warm welcome was just the beginning. Project BEYOND — which stands for Building Ethnic Youth Opportunities for Nursing Diversity — kicks off with an intensive four-day summer program to introduce incoming freshmen to campus. That’s followed by workshops and networking events throughout the year; mentorship by upperclassmen and working professionals; customized assessments and plans; field trips to local hospitals; and access to resources such as iPads and laptops. The 15–18 freshmen who join the program each year soon became a tight-knit family. Although the expiration of its federal funding in 2014 dealt the program a setback — forcing a one-year suspension of most of its activities, even as peer tutoring and mentorship offerings continued as volunteer efforts — this summer brought good news. The federal Health Resources and Services Administration notified elated faculty and staff in

Choosing Marquette over a community college, Christian Villanueva traveled to Peru and Nicaragua for clinical experiences and earned the Berens Award for the outstanding senior in nursing.

the college that a new grant in excess of $600,000 would be on its way. As a result, Project BEYOND is not only up and running again, but expanding in significant ways. A new partnership with the Carmen Schools of Science & Technology in Milwaukee introduces middle- and high-school students to the life-saving roles nurses play and aims to develop a “pipeline” of diverse future nurses to study at Marquette. It also targets the social determinants of health

engaging in rigorous research projects through a federally funded program that prepares them for graduate school. Diversity is a priority of the college for good reason: Only 6.4 percent of the state’s registered nurses are racial/ethnic minorities, according to a 2013 report from the Wisconsin Center for Nursing. “We know that patients and families want to be taken care of by people like them, and we have a pretty non-diverse nursing workforce in this country,” says

“One of the most powerful things I’ve learned in nursing school is the variety of roles that a nurse can do.” — Christian Villanueva directly through work on solutions to a key community health issue identified through listening sessions with students and their families. Back on campus, Project BEYOND 2, as it’s now officially called, has been bolstered by new funds for stipends and scholarships, providing a limited number of students up to $10,000 annually to help defray college costs. “That’s huge for our students and could play a role in students’ success,” says Garcia, who is also a doctoral student in the college. The funds will offset some of the costs that can loom as hurdles to students from underrepresented and diverse backgrounds, easing financial strains that make it hard to continue. Retention of minority nursing students already climbed from just 15 to 25 percent previously to nearly 100 percent after the program began in 2007. Many of these students also became McNair Scholars,

the college’s former dean Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, whose support was key to the program’s growth. In a highly diverse community like Milwaukee, addressing that mismatch is important from a workforce diversity standpoint. “But equally important is our Jesuit tradition, which is to provide educational opportunities to students from underserved backgrounds so they can live meaningful lives.” The college is also becoming more diverse in other ways. About one-quarter of the incoming class for the generalist master’s program is male, a new record for the college. “I think more and more men are seeing that nursing is a highly valued profession in ways that weren’t apparent 10, 15 or 20 years ago,” Callahan says. “There’s still a stigma there, and I give our guys so much credit because they overcome that. We have to continue to keep changing the narrative of who is a nurse.”


Jamarrah Foster’s participation in Project BEYOND and the McNair Scholars program led to her current career as an OB nurse in Milwaukee, with plans to pursue graduate study.

Villanueva’s initial visit hosted by Garcia was the first of many memorable Marquette moments. He soon fell in love with nursing and joined the McNair Scholars; researched lifetime trauma exposure for recently deported women with professor Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap; and presented his research at several conferences, including one in Mexico. He also won a national Gilman Scholarship that funded a summer clinical experience in Peru and volunteered in Nicaragua with the Global Medical Brigades. One of his proudest accomplishments was being named Marquette’s Outstanding Sophomore of the Year, and he was recently selected by nursing faculty for the Berens Award, which recognizes a senior for outstanding academic achievement, clinical performance, moral conduct and commitment to professional development.

Now he’s looking forward to working in a critical-care setting before starting his doctoral degree. Eventually, he hopes to do policy work. “One of the most powerful things I’ve learned in nursing school is the variety of roles that a nurse can do,” Villanueva says. “I really enjoy the social activism role, and I want to be an advocate for the community’s health.” Foster, who plans to return to school to become a certified nurse midwife or women’s health nurse practitioner, is also grateful for her Marquette nursing experience. “I’m really proud of graduating. I know it sounds simple, but it’s true,” she says. “I tried my hardest. Going to Marquette forced me to become a better person and a better nurse.”

Kat Schleicher

A recently created college committee on diversity and inclusivity will start meeting this fall. All signs point to that group of students, faculty and staff welcoming efforts like Project BEYOND and seeking ways to learn from them. The college has long worked to prepare students of all backgrounds to better serve an increasingly diverse patient population. The college’s Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation includes Hispanic and African-American models, and all undergraduate nursing students are required to take a Culture and Health course. Cultural sensitivity is key to being an effective nurse, says Dr. Leona VandeVusse, an associate professor and director of Project BEYOND. “It’s about being culturally humble and being an excellent listener,” she says. Those lessons were helpful to Jamarrah Foster, Nurs ’13, who participated in Project BEYOND and the McNair Scholars program while on campus. “Culture was always brought up when we had our clinicals,” Foster says. “I remember working with Hispanic patients and Jehovah’s Witnesses during my clinical rotations.” Now an OB nurse at the Wheaton Franciscan–St. Joseph Campus in Milwaukee, Foster works with a wide range of patients, including some who are Orthodox Jewish, Muslim and Somali. “You have to be able to understand where the patients are coming from and things that are affecting their health. Being able to speak to them in their own native language and being able to help them feel comfortable can make a big difference,” Villanueva says. “If we have nurses who can relate to a variety of patients, then we’re going to be able to grow stronger as a profession. Diversity is a beautiful thing.”

Kat Schleicher

13

Project BEYOND coordinator Juanita “Terrie” Garcia and director Dr. Leona VandeVusse.


15

BEYOND THE

BEDSIDE For these alumni, paths less traveled led to careers of far-ranging influence. By Ann Christenson

There is certainly no more vital place for nursing than the bedside, where nurses assess medical needs, direct care, and protect and guide their patients. It is perhaps the essence of nursing. But nurses also use their Marquette educations to carve different career paths. Reflecting the evolving nature of the field, alumni may find their calling fighting infectious diseases in foreign countries, shaping the places around us to better accommodate people of differing physical abilities or improving the care of individuals struggling with mental illness. Marquette’s nursing program “helps you build the confidence” to take risks, says Derek Ehrhardt, Nurs ’96. “What we are as nurses are advocates.” He and two fellow alumni have used their nursing educations to build innovative platforms of care.


Marquette Nurse

Photo courtesy of Derek Ehrhardt

16

During a 2008 CDC trip to Nepal, Derek Ehrhardt checks in with a Nepalese family to confirm the status of their vaccinations.

Derek Ehrhardt recalls a trip to Uganda that he took with colleagues from the Centers for Disease Control. At one point, he was visiting villagers to see how paralysis was progressing in individuals stricken with polio. “I was a bit of an anomaly, a white man,” says Ehrhardt, an epidemiologist who leads the CDC’s polio team for the eastern Mediterranean region. Hoping that day to catch up with a young woman and observe if polio was affecting her ability to walk, he says his distinctive appearance helped him get the information he was seeking. Even before he had a chance to approach her, he observed the woman quickly moving away from him. “She was scared to death of me,” he explains. Although vaccination eradicated this infectious viral disease in the United States in 1979, polio still has its grip on populations in Pakistan and Afghanistan. But thanks to an international public health effort he helps lead, Ehrhardt can see the day when polio no longer cripples or kills.

Fittingly enough, international travel — a trip to Thailand, Nepal and western Europe in 1999 — helped initiate Ehrhardt’s transition from more traditional nursing to his current vocation. He quit his job as an emergency room nurse, explaining that he wanted to find a health care field where he was less “replaceable.” While hiking through one of “many poor, underresourced villages” in Nepal, Ehrhardt happened upon a man who’d injured himself. Ehrhardt administered first aid. A vision of his future in public health emerged as he traveled. “I didn’t want to be redundant and wanted to impact those whom others weren’t focusing on,” he says. Arriving home from that trip, Ehrhardt, encouraged by College of Nursing mentor Terry Tobin, Nurs ’60, started researching graduate schools for public health and took a traveling nurse job at Johns Hopkins University. During his time in Baltimore, a job with an international and refugee group out of Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health took him to assignments building emergency departments in Palestine. When he returned to the States in the mid-2000s, he landed in Jackson, Miss., leading the development of a system to provide early detection of diseases in shelters, starting with those serving victims of Hurricane Katrina. His decision to become involved in global immunization at the CDC stemmed from another trip to Nepal, in 2008, when his work was to train doctors and nurses on polio surveillance measures in rural outposts. Ehrhardt, who received the College of Nursing’s 2014 Young Alumnus of the Year Award, says his main focus in fighting polio in affected countries is finding every last child in the most difficult-to-reach areas to ensure he or she is vaccinated and protected from this disease. When polio is no longer a destructive force in the world, he says

he will turn his work to fighting other infectious diseases, keeping his focus on disenfranchised people. Elizabeth “Bettyann” Diercks Hall, Nurs ’51, carved out her life’s work at the same time she was battling a life-changing disease. Young, married to George Russell Hall, Arts ’51, and expecting her first child, Hall was diagnosed with polio, which left her partially paralyzed. That Hall went on to deliver a healthy baby but also find ways to thrive, in ways that reverberated in the post-polio community, is a tribute to her unwavering tenacity. “Sixty years ago, the stigma attached to a disability still existed. Due to the lack of correct medical diagnosis, the disabled were mistakenly perceived to be weak or incapable of a meaningful life,” says Hall, who learned to walk again with leg braces and crutches and had three more children. With the support of her devoted husband and family, the Chicagoan devised ways to work around her disability that were essential to functioning as a stay-at-home mother. She found someone to retrofit her Oldsmobile with a handbrake and accelerator that enabled her to drive. “I taught my kids to walk in front of me, open doors and push the elevator buttons,” she says. Since those early days, Hall, who received the college’s 2015 Distinguished Alumna of the Year Award, has been anything but shy. When parking in a downtown Chicago alley for her son’s pediatrician visits got her in hot water with a city police officer — there was no designated handicap parking — she complained to then-mayor Richard J. Daley, who gave her a “hand-written, signed” parking card, a precursor to what hangs now on rearview mirrors. From restaurants to churches to airlines and theaters, Hall’s advocacy has


In receiving her Alumni National Award, Bettyann Hall was proud to be joined by fellow Marquette nursing pin recipient, granddaughter Jennifer Hall, Nurs ’15.

spanned decades. In the Florida community where she and her late husband vacationed, the couple not only took on the owner of a cinema, disputing claims that the problem lay with federal disabilities regulations, but successfully sued the entire city, which had to retrofit more than 400 public facilities. Of particular importance to her was building an ADA-compliant restroom in her church. “I can read professional architectural plans” and know if a restroom will be ADA compliant, she says. Taking to heart advice — “always be ready to improvise” — that she picked up from a Marquette nursing instructor, Hall has felt “inspired in some small way to become a voice for the disabled and make the public aware of the necessity for acceptance and accessibility for the disabled.” The news in May 2014 that former Alverno School of Nursing Dean Patricia Schroeder, Nurs ’75, Grad ’78, ’97, was named to head Milwaukee County’s Mental Health Complex came as relief to locals familiar with

Schroeder’s leadership experience and her mantra, a “passion for improving care.” Before she was named administrator, problems in the Behavioral Health Division led to the appointment of a new Mental Health Board to provide needed oversight. For Schroeder, 40 years of nursing and administrative training have brought her to this moment and this role to which she feels deeply committed, even if she could not have predicted this path years ago. As an undergraduate, she says her goal was “to be an excellent nurse at the bedside.” After earning her undergraduate nursing degree and a master of science in nursing from Marquette a few years later, she worked as a clinical nurse specialist in surgical nursing and oncology. Then, Schroeder’s critical thinking about how to measure and improve bedside care led to her editing, for 19 years, The Journal Of Nursing Care Quality and publishing six texts, which helped fuel 10 years of professional consulting. From there, she took leadership positions at Covenant, now Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare, and Oconomowoc Memorial Hospital before spending four years as dean and a professor at Alverno.

At Alverno, she launched a program for working registered nurses to earn a bachelor of science, a response to the growing emphasis nationally on B.S.N. degrees. She is particularly proud of expanding Alverno’s graduate and advanced practice nursing offerings, including one that responds to the critical shortage in psychiatric mental health practitioners. “With 40 students, that program” could dramatically change the community, she says. Among her ideas for improving the county’s mental health system is to phase out the outdated, mammoth complex — moving “community-based services to community-based settings,” she says. Her focus is to “protect people who are vulnerable and disadvantaged.” Early in her career, when Schroeder was “presented with the opportunity to write, publish and consult, it was not something I thought I would do,” she says. But they were risks she was willing to take. That brings Schroeder to her present position, in which she is clearly engaged. “I don’t think I’d want to work in a place where I don’t learn every day,” she says.

Jesse Lee

Dan Johnson

17

Originally aspiring to a bedside role, Patricia Schroeder now feels called to address the challenges of the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division.


Marquette Nurse

Alumni Perspective A caregiving bond: Nursing unites family that overcame illness together. A mother and a nurse — they’re all Kate Jurgens has ever wanted to be. And a Marquette nurse at that. Her parents met at and eventually worked for the university, “planting the seed early” for her and her four siblings to attend. Here, Kate, Nurs ’88, met her husband Brian, Arts ’88, when they were undergraduates. As a senior, Kate worked in the emergency department of Children’s Hospital when it was located at 17th Street and Wisconsin Avenue. What she didn’t know then was that the institution she called her professional home would become frighteningly familiar to her for a different reason. After a relatively uneventful pregnancy, Kate’s second child, a daughter named Maureen, or Mo, was born in 1995 with Loeys-Dietz Syndrome, which at the time didn’t have a name. The rare connective tissue disease affects the entire body, and patients experience joint and soft tissue problems and have the potential to develop aneurysms throughout the body. Seeing her daughter struggle in heartbreaking, mysterious ways from infancy, Kate plunged into clinical mode as the family spent hours upon hours at the hospital. “My registered nurse license is a great shield to protect my mothering wounds in times of high stress,” says Kate, who works as a prenatal care coordinator/nurse case manager for high-risk mothers in Milwaukee County. “It is such a blessing that I received a great nursing education at Marquette, but there are times I wish I could be the parent who has no understanding of a medical situation.” Up until only a few years ago, Mo could certainly relate to that impulse. Initially, she wanted no part of the field — no surprise

Jesse Lee

18

Kate Jurgens, Nurs ’88, and junior Maureen (Mo) Jurgens.

given the 27 surgeries she has had. Instead, she passionately pursued theatre at Dominican High School in Whitefish Bay, Wis. One particularly scary supraventricular tachycardia incident almost kept her off the stage for a three-show event, but she was released from the PICU and appeared in two of them. “I told my mom I was going to be in it no matter what. There was no other option for me,” she says. Mo eventually had the same realization about her professional path and made the decision junior year of high school that there wasn’t anything she’d rather do. She knew being close to her parents and medical team was important, as was following her heart to the campus dear to her family. “My mom was jumping for joy that I was going to be a Marquette nurse. People said to me: ‘Of course

you’re going to be a nurse. That’s a perfect fit.’ ” A third-year nursing student in the fall, Mo envisions specializing in pediatrics. But, for now, she and Kate work to share their story in a graduate-level course taught by Dr. Norah Johnson. Mo: A Loeys Dietz Syndrome Memoir, which evolved from a journal Kate kept about her dual role as a nurse and mother of a chronically, critically ill child while caring for three other children, is used as a case study for the course. “As a Marquette nurse, you ask yourself: ‘Where do I see Christ?’ ” Kate says. “That’s what I try to keep in mind when I’m with patients and when something happens in our household. Faith underpins everything for me.” — Becky Dubin Jenkins

Read more about Kate and Mo at katehjurgens.blogspot.com. Mo: A Loeys Dietz Syndrome Memoir is available on amazon.com.


19

THEN AND NOW Class of 1965 returns to campus for Golden Jubilee. In 1965 … Sister Mary Thomas Kolba, OSF, was dean of the College of Nursing. It was the first year that nursing students lived on campus after the dormitory at St. Joseph’s Hospital campus was torn down. “In the fall of our junior year, I remember being in an OB class the day President Kennedy was shot,” recalls Christine Moore Comeford, Nurs ’65. “It was shortly before Thanksgiving break, and everything ground to a halt. Sister Thomas came into our classroom, made the announcement and then sent us all home.”

Now … Although the people, buildings and technology have changed, the core of Marquette’s nursing education remains the same, preparing students with rigorous, experiential curriculum focusing on ethical responsibility. Students become nurses who are advocates for individuals and communities, who are poised for leadership, and who provide compassionate care.

Aging gracefully: How one alumna is changing expectations in the field of geriatrics and women’s health. After Leslie Saltzstein Wooldridge joined a pilot geriatric nursing program at Marquette and received her geriatric nurse practitioner certificate, she dove into taking the care of urinary incontinence “to a different level,” committing to the philosophy that incontinence need not be viewed as normal at any age. This spring, Wooldridge, Grad ’81, ’95, was named Medical Activist of the Year by the Chicago-based Women’s Health Foundation, honored for work breaking down barriers or changing science in women’s pelvic health. As director of the Mercy Health Bladder Control Center near Muskegon, Mich., Wooldridge helped make the clinic the first in the state to offer percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder and pioneered the use of Total Control, an exercise program that helps participants improve bladder control. “Our clinical approach is not always to cure people with urinary incontinence but to give them their life back by helping them feel more confident and more able to enjoy activities of daily living,” she says. This is the first time the activist award has gone to a nurse practitioner, a fitting honor for an alumna who found her calling through preparation and mentorship received at Marquette. “I have been a nurse practitioner for more than 20 years and have loved every minute of it,” Wooldridge says. “I thank Marquette for giving me the opportunity to be an advocate for women’s geriatric health.”

Top: Sister Mary Thomas Kolba, OSF Bottom: Nursing Class of 1965 nurses at their capping ceremony

NOMINATE A CLASSMATE Do you know a college alumnus or alumna who is an exemplary Marquette nurse and embodies

— Katharine Miller

the university’s mission personally

Dilling gift supports student nurses

and professionally? If so, please

June Dilling, Nurs ’63, was well-known in the medical community of Rockford, Ill., as a kind-hearted and dedicated nurse who touched many lives. Dilling will continue to impact lives positively for generations — specifically the lives of Marquette nursing students — through a generous $200,000 gift she left to the college. This remarkable gift, made through her estate, will support undergraduate and graduate students, a reminder of her belief in the college’s mission of developing nurse leaders for tomorrow.

National Award at marquette.edu/

nominate him or her for an Alumni awards. And save the date for the college’s awards ceremony: Friday, April 29, 2016.


20

Marquette Nurse

Notable Scholarly Accomplishments Prominent honors, grants, publications and presentations from the 2014–15 academic year

AWARDS/MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS Diane Dressler, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., clinical assistant professor Awarded the 2015 Teaching Excellence Award, Marquette University, April 2015. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., professor Awarded the 2015 Way Klingler Teaching Enhancement Award, Marquette University, April 2015. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., A.P.N.P., assistant professor Awarded the Julie Lathrop Nursing Research Award, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, May 2015.

Awarded the Semifinalist Nurse Faculty Scholar, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, May 2014. Judy Kintner, M.S.N., R.N., clinical instructor Inducted into Marquette University’s Sigma Theta Tau International Chapter, April 2014. Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor Awarded the Distinguished Service Award, Midwest Nursing Research Society, April 2015.

Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., professor and associate dean for research Received the Service Excellence Award, Wayne State University, Detroit, 2014. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor Awarded the 2015 Summer Faculty Fellowship, Marquette University, December 2014. Awarded the Sabbatical Travel Award, Marquette University, December 2014.

GRANTS Stacey Barnes, M.G.S., Director, Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center $389,389, “Alzheimer’s Disease & Related Dementias,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor $10,800, “Linking Biological and Social Pathways to Adolescent Health and Wellbeing,” National Institutes of Health.

$79,432, “Alzheimer’s Disease & Related Dementias,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

$27,000, “Muscle Function and Depression-like Behavior in a Mouse Model of Cancer Fatigue,” National Institutes of Health.

Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., professor $9,104, “Mother-daughter Joint Decisionmaking to Obtain the HPV Vaccine,” National Institutes of Health.

Mallory O’Brien, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor $63,440, “National Homicide Review Training and Technical Assistance Project,” U.S. Department of Justice.

Margaret J. Bull, Ph.D., R.N., professor $100,000, “Preparing Faculty Scholars in Nursing,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

$34,722, “Wisconsin Partnership Program: Community Safety Data Repository Project,” City of Milwaukee.

Marianne Weiss, D.N.Sc., R.N., professor $675,000, “READI (Readiness Evaluation and Discharge Interventions): Implementation as a Standard Nursing Practice for Hospital Discharge,” American Nurse Credentialing Center, with Dr. Kathleen Bobay and Dr. Ronda Hughes.

$23,180, “Factors Promoting Positive Outcomes for Veterans using Home Telehealth,” Veterans Administration, with Dr. Ronda Hughes.

Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor $10,000, “2015–2016 Jonas Scholar Matching Funds,” Faye McBeath Foundation.

$9,883, “Pediatric Oncology Nurses’ Experiences with Prognostic-related Communication,” Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, with doctoral student Amy Newman, R.N., M.S.N.

Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus $16,500, “Internet-based Natural Family Planning and Service Program,” Our Sunday Visitor Institute, with Mary Schneider. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., M.H.S., R.N., C.L.N.C., F.A.A.N., associate professor See entry for Dr. Margaret Bull. Dr. Mary Ann Lough, R.N., Ph.D., assistant professor (retired) See entry for Dr. Robert Topp.

$50,000, “New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program at Marquette University,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Mary Schneider, assistant to the director of the Institute of Natural Family Planning See entry for Dr. Richard Fehring. Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., professor and associate dean for research $92,060, “Promoting Healthy Body Weight among African American Women through Peer Motivational Interviewing,” Medical College of Wisconsin, with Dr. Mary Ann Lough.

Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor $237,299, “Marquette University — Nurses Supporting Families to Improve Maternal and Infant Outcomes,” Health Resources and Services Administration. $320,299, “Marquette: Increasing Diversity & Innovations with Next-generation Nurses,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

Aimee Woda, Ph.D., R.N., B.C., assistant professor $4,965, “Evaluating Clinical Decision-making among Nursing Students Enrolled in a Simulation Practicum,” Sigma Theta Tau.


21

PUBLICATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor “Indicators of Resilience in Family Members of Adults with Serious Mental Illness,” Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 38, No. 1, (March 2015), pp 131–146, with Jaclene Zauszniewski and Jane Suresky. “Chronic Conditions in Elders in Assisted Living Facilities: Associations with Daily Functioning, Self-assessed Health, and Depressive Symptoms,” Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 6, (December 2014), pp 399–404, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Resourcefulness in African American and Caucasian American Caregivers of Persons With Dementia: Associations with Perceived Burden, Depression, Anxiety, Positive Cognitions, and Psychological Well-being,” Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, (December 2014). “Factors Affecting Disruption in Families of Adults with Mental Illness,” Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, Vol. 50, No. 4, (October 2014), pp 235–42, with Jane Suresky and Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Self-assessed Health in Caregivers of Persons with Autism: Associations with Depressive Symptoms, Positive Cognitions, Resourcefulness, and Well-being,” Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, Vol. 50, No. 3, (July 2014), 50(3):210–217. “Psychometric Properties of the Index of Relocation Adjustment,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 33, No. 4, (June 2014), pp 437–455, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. Lesley Boaz, Ph.D, A.P.N.P., clinical assistant professor “Public Health Model Identifies Recruitment Barriers Among Older Adults with Delirium and Dementia,” Public Health Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 1, (2014), pp 79–87, with Dr. Margaret Bull, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Sjostedt. “Family Caregivers’ Knowledge of Delirium and Preferred Modalities for Receipt of Information,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, (June 2014), with Dr. Margaret Bull, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Sjostedt. See entry for Dr. Margaret Bull. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., associate professor See entry for Dr. Marianne Weiss. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “A Comparison of Quality of Care in Acute Care in Critical Access Hospitals and Other Rural Hospitals,” Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care, Vol. 14, No. 2, (June 2014), pp 29, with Pamela Stewart Fahs; Marianne Baernholdt; Jessica Keim-Malpass; Ivora Hinton; and Guofen Yan.

Margaret J. Bull, Ph.D., R.N., professor “A Quantitative Description of Uncertainty with Mild Cognitive Impairment,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, (2014), with Jennifer Sjostedt; and Malgorzata Franczak.

“Social Script iPad Application Versus Usual Care Before Undergoing Medical Imaging: Two Case Studies of Children with Autism,” Journal of Radiology Nursing, (April 2014), with Octavia Bree.

“Family Caregivers’ Knowledge of Delirium and Preferred Modalities for Receipt of Information,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, (June 2014), with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Sjostedt.

Stacee Lerret, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.N.P., clinical instructor “Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Transition to Home and Chronic Illness Care,” Pediatric Transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 1, (January 2015), pp 118–129, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; G. Stendahl; S. Chapman; J. Menendez; L. Williams; M. Nadler; K. Neighbors; K. Amsden; Y. Cao; M. Nugent; E. Alonzo; and P. Simpson.

Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus “Comparison of Abstinence and Coital Frequency between Two Natural Methods of Family Planning,” Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Vol. 59, (November 2014), pp 528–532, with Mary Schneider, College of Nursing. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., professor “Authoritative Feeding Behaviors to Reduce Child BMI through Online Interventions,” Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 18, No. 1, (2013), pp 65–77, with Holly Felzer, College of Nursing; Jessica Pruszynski; and Jianan Zhang. Jill Guttormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “‘Releasing a Lot of Poisons From My Mind’ Patients’ Delusional Memories of Intensive Care,” Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care, (2014), Vol. 43, No. 5, pp 427–31. Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M. “Health Education During Pregnancy,” Prenatal and Postnatal Care: A Woman-centered Approach, Chapter 17, pp 312–324, with Dr. Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing; and Dr. Kathryn Harrod, College of Nursing. See entry for Dr. Leona VandeVusse. Teresa Jerofke-Owen, Ph.D., A.P.N.P.-B.C., R.N., assistant professor “Patient Perceptions of Patient-empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation and Functional Health Status in Postsurgical Patients with Life-threatening Long-term Illnesses,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 70, No. 6, (2014), pp 1310–1322, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and Olga Yakusheva. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Neural Correlates of Goal-directed Reaching Movements in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Conference Proceeding at International Meeting For Autism Research, Salt Lake City, Utah, (May 2015), with Dr. Amy Van Hecke, Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences; Dr. Robert Scheidt, Opus College of Engineering; and Nicole Salowitz.

“Transition from Hospital to Home Following Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant: Qualitative Findings of the Parent Experience,” Pediatric Transplantation, Vol. 18, (2014), pp 527–537, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; G. Stendahl; S. Chapman; K. Neighbors; K. Amsden; J. Lokar; A. Voit; J. Menendez; and E. Alonzo. Jennifer Ohlendorf, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Predictors of Engagement in Postpartum Weight Self-management Behaviors in the First 12 Weeks after the Birth of a Baby,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, (2015), with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and Dr. Debra Oswald, Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences. Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor “Bidirectional Psychoneuroimmune Interactions in the Early Postpartum Period Influence Risk of Postpartum Depression,” Brain, Behavior, & Immunity, (May 2015), with Elizabeth Corwin; Kathleen Pajer; Sudeshna Paul; Nancy Lowe; and Mary Weber. “Losartan Treatment Attenuates Tumor-induced Myocardial Dysfunction,” Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 85, (May 2015), pp 37–47, with Sarah Stevens; Markus Velten; Dane Youtz; Yvonne Clark; Runfeng Jing; Peter Reiser; Sabahattin Bicer; and Loren Wold. “Storage Conditions and Passages Alter IL-6 Secretion in C26 Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines,” MethodsX, Vol. 2, (February 2015), pp 53–58, with Diana Norden; Raymond Devine; and Loren Wold. “Ubiquinol Reduces Muscle Wasting but not Fatigue in Tumor-bearing mice,” Biological Research for Nursing, Vol. 17, No. 3, (May 2015), pp 321–329, with Yvonne Clark; Laura Szalacha; and Loren Wold.


22

Marquette Nurse

PUBLICATIONS continued “Fluoxetine Prevents Development of Depressive-like Behavior in a Mouse Model of Cancer-related Fatigue,” Physiology & Behavior, (December 2014), with Diana Norden; Raymond Devine; Sabahattin Bicer; Runfeng Jing; Peter Reiser; Loren Wold; and Jonathan Godbout. “Ubiquinol Reduces Muscle Wasting but not Fatigue in Tumor-bearing Mice,” Biological Research for Nursing, (September 2014), with Yvonne Clark; Laura Szalacha; and Loren Wold. “Effect of Perceived Stress on Cytokine Production in Healthy College Students,” Western Journal of Nursing Research,” (August 2014), with Vorachai Sribanditmongkol; Jeremy Neal; and Laura Szalacha. “Tumor Growth Increases Neuroinflammation and Depressive-like Behavior Prior to Alterations in Muscle Function,” Brain, Behavior, & Immunity, (August 2014), with Diana Norden; Sabahattin Bicer; Yvonne Clark; Runfeng Jing; Christopher Henry; Peter Reiser; Loren Wold; and Jonathan Godbout. “Differences in Inflammatory Markers Between Nulliparous Women Admitted to Hospitals in Pre-active Versus Active Labor,“ American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, (July 2014), with Jeremy Neal; Jane Lamp; Nancy Lowe; Shannon Gillespie; and Loraine Sinnott. “Ph.D. Preparation of Nurse Faculty and Nurse Scientists: Do They Have to be the Same?” Nursing Research, Vol. 63, (May 2014), pp 156–157. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.N.R.N., assistant professor “Surgery-chemotherapy-radiation, Followed by a Different Kind of Triathlon: Medically Directed Group Exercise Program is Unique and Effective Among Overweight and Obese Breast Cancer Survivors,” Journal of PatientCentered Research and Reviews, Vol. 1, No. 3, (Summer 2014), pp 150–151, with Dr. Karen Robinson, College of Nursing; Dr. Paula Papanek, College of Health Sciences; Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; Dennis Baumgardner; Judy Tjoe; Leslie Waltke; Ashley Engel; and Alyson Cybulski.

Christine Schindler, Ph.D., A.P.N.P., assistant professor “An Emerging Population: The Chronically Critically Ill,” Journal of Pediatric Healthcare, Vol. 28, No. 6, (2014), pp 550–554, with Philip Jurasinski. “Under Pressure: Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Critically Ill Infants,” Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 18, No. 4, (2013), pp 329–341, with Dr. Christine Shaw, College of Nursing; Theresa Mikhailov; Susan Cashin; Shelly Malin; Melissa Christensen; and Jill Winters. Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., professor and associate dean for research “We Need a New Normal: Sociocultural Constructions of Obesity and Overweight Among African American Women,” Black Sociology: Contemporary Issues and Future Trends, 2015, with Dr. Angelique Harris, Klingler College of Arts and Sciences; D. Nelson; K. Salas Harris; B. Horner-Ibler; and E. Burns. “Prehabilitation Influences Exercise-related Psychological Constructs Such as Self-efficacy and Outcome Expectations to Exercise,” Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, Vol. 28, (2014), pp 201–209, with K. Brown; P. Loprinzi; and J. Brosky. “Acute Effects of Massage or Active Exercise in Relieving Muscle Soreness: Randomized Controlled Trial,” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 27, No. 12, (February 2014), pp 3352–9, with L. Andersen; C. Andersen; M. Jakobsen; E. Sundstrup; and D.G. Behm. “Prehabilitation Influences Exercise-related Psychological Constructs Such as Self-efficacy and Outcome Expectations to Exercise,” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 28, No. 1, (February 2014), pp 201–209, with K. Brown; P. Loprinzi; and J. Brosky. “The Effect of Either Topical Menthol or a Placebo on Functioning and Knee Pain among Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis,” Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Vol. 36, No. 2, (2013), pp 92–9, with J. Brosky; and D. Pieschel.

“The Effects of Combined Topical Menthol and Ice on Peripheral Blood Flow,” Journal of Athletic Training, Vol. 48, No. 2, (2013), pp 220–225, with E. Ledford; and D. Jacks. “Time Management Strategies for Research Productivity,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 35, No. 2, (2013), pp 155–176, with D. Jo-Ana; J. Chase; C. Smith; M. Cohen; N. Fahrenwald; J. Zerwic; L. Benefield; C. Anderson; and V. Conn. “Verbal Abuse of Pediatric Nurses by Patients and Families,” Kentucky Nurse, Vol. 61, No. 1, 2013, with M. Goldman; A. Truman; J. Berger; and C. Lehna. Marianne Weiss, D.N.Sc., R.N., professor “Validation of Patient and Nurse Short Forms of the Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale and Their Relationship to Return to the Hospital,” Health Services Research, Vol. 49, No. 1, (January 2014), pp 304–317, with Dr. Kathleen Bobay, College of Nursing; Linda Costa; and Olga Yakusheva. “Measuring Nurses’ Impact on Health Care Quality: Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions,” Vol. 51, (2013), pp S15–S22, with S. Beck; N. Ryan-Wenger; N. Donaldson; C. Ayden; G. Towsley; and W. Gardner. “Nurse Value-added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care,” Health Services Research, Vol. 49, No. 6, (2014), pp 1767–1786, with Olga Yakusheva; and Richard Lindrooth. “Economic Evaluation of the 8 Percent Baccalaureate Nurse Workforce Recommendation: A Patient Level Analysis,” Medical Care, Vol. 52, No. 10, (October 2014), pp 864–869, with Olga Yakusheva; and Richard Lindrooth. See entry for Dr. Teresa Jerofke-Owen. See entry for Stacee Lerret. See entry for Dr. Jennifer Ohlendorf. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Supporting Labor Progress toward Physiologic Birth,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 2, (2014), pp 101–107, with Dr. Lisa Hanson, College of Nursing.


23

PRESENTATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor “Older Adults’ Relocation Adjustment: Is There a Cultural Difference?” The 28th American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference, Indianapolis, October 2014, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Psychometric Analysis of the Positive Thinking Skills Scale in Caregivers of Persons with Dementia,” Forward Thinking Poster Session/ Colloquy Presentation, Marquette University, Milwaukee, December 2014, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing; and Karie Kobiske. “Psychometric Properties of the Resourcefulness Scale among Caregivers of Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” The 28th American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference, Indianapolis, October 2014, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Resilience in Adolescents Who Survived a Suicide Attempt from the Perspective of the Registered Nurse in a Psychiatric Facility,” the Thinking Poster Session/Colloquy Presentation, Marquette University, Milwaukee, December 2014, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing. “Risk and Resistance Factors in the Lives of Dementia Caregivers: A Focus Group of Caregivers Caring for Persons with Dementia as Informants to Develop Cognitive Intervention Program,” Forward Thinking Poster Session/Colloquy Presentation, Marquette University, Milwaukee, December 2014, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing; and Karie Kobiske. “Chronic Conditions in Elders in Assisted Living Facilities: Associations with Daily Functioning, Self-assessed Health, and Depressed Symptoms,” the 17th Annual Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference, Milwaukee, May 2015, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Psychometric Properties of the Resourcefulness Scale among Caregivers of Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” the 17th Annual Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference, Milwaukee, May 2015, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Resilience in Adolescents Who Survived a Suicide Attempt,” Celebration of Ph.D. Student Progress, Marquette University, Milwaukee, 2015, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing.

“Resilience in Adolescents Who Survived a Suicide Attempt,” the 2015 International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference: Looking to the Future: Interprofessional Relationships and Collaborations in Mental Health, Seattle, March 2015, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing. “Resilience in Caregivers of Partners with Young Onset Dementia: A Concept Analysis,” Celebration of Ph.D. Student Progress, Marquette University, Milwaukee, 2015, with Karie Kobiske. “Risk and Resistance Factors: Caregivers’ Adaptation,” the 2015 International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference: Looking to the Future: Interprofessional Relationships and Collaborations in Mental Health, Seattle, March 2015, with Jaclene Zauszniewski; and Qiyan Mu. “The Lived Experience of Being a Caregiver of a Person with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Application of Resilience Theory,” the 2015 International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse, Psychopharmacology Institute and Annual Conference, Seattle, March 2015, with Denise Matel-Anderson, College of Nursing. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., associate professor “Discharge Models of Care in Magnet Hospitals,” ANCC Magnet Conference, Oct. 7, 2014, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing. “Validation of the Nurse Assessment of Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale,” Midwest Nursing Research Society, St. Louis, April 2014, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; Dr. Debra Oswald, Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences; and O. Yakusheva. Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., professor “The Development of a Targeted Website for an Online Intervention to Prevent Teen Dating Violence Among Latino/a Youth,” MNRS 2015 Student Poster Annual Research Conference, 2014, with Dr. Kristin Haglund, College of Nursing; and undergraduate students Elena Caro and Christian Villaneuva. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “Predictors of Newly Licensed Registered Nurses’ Perception of Orientation,” Building Bridges Annual Conference, Milwaukee, May 2014.

“Nursing Practice Environments and Patient Safety Cultures in Critical Access Versus Non-critical Access Hospitals,” International Rural Health and Rural Nursing Research Conference, Bozeman, Mont., July 2014, with graduate student Holly Perez. “Soar-RN Rural Nurse Residency Program,” International Rural Health and Rural Nursing Research Confernce, Bozeman, Mont., July 2014. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.-B.C., clinical associate professor “Palliative Care in African American Communities Focus Group Study: Discussion of Key Findings,” Milwaukee Region Cancer Care Network Monthly Program & Meeting, Milwaukee, Feb. 5, 2014. “Palliative Care in African American Communities: Focus Group Study,” Milwaukee, Dec. 5, 2013, with Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing; Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing; and Lorraine Lathen. “Module: Interprofessional Teams: Promoting Excellent Cancer Care,” Integrating Palliative Oncology Care into DNP Education and Clinical Practice, Los Angeles, Feb. 27, 2014. “African Americans’ Perceptions and Recommendations for Palliative Care in an Urban Community,” International Home Care Nurses Organization Second Annual Conference, Singapore, Sept. 25, 2014, with Dr. Margaret Callahan, College of Nursing; and Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing. “Module: Interprofessional Teams: Promoting Excellent Cancer Care,” Integrating Palliative Oncology Care into DNP Education & Clinical Practice, Washington, D.C., June 27, 2014. Margaret J. Bull, Ph.D., R.N., professor “Family Caregivers’ Knowledge of Delirium and Preferred Modalities for Receipt of Information,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, St. Louis, March 29, 2014, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Sjostedt. “Delirium and Family Caregivers,” MCW Division of Geriatrics/Gerontology Research seminar, Milwaukee, Aug. 1, 2014. “Family Caregiver Knowledger of Delirium,” GSA Hospital Elder Life Interest Group, Nov. 7, 2014. “Psychometric Properties of the Family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire,” Gerontological Society of America, Washington D.C., Nov. 6, 2014, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Avery.


24

Marquette Nurse

PRESENTATIONS continued “Psychometric Properties of the Family Caregiver Delirium Knolwedge Questionnaire,” Gerontological Society of America, Washington, D.C., Nov. 6, 2014, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Avery. “Exploring Factors That Promote Veterans,” MNRS, Indianapolis, April 2015, with Josephine Mancuso, College of Nursing; Dr. Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing; Mary Hagle; and Bonnie Wakefield. “Preparing Family Carers to Partner with Health Care Professionals in Early Recognition of Delirium,” MNRS, Indianapolis, April 17, 2015, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; Mary Hagle; Lynn Gettrust; Maureen Greene; Susan Holmes; and Jane Sacynski. “Using Vignettes to Teach Family Caregivers about Delirium,” MNRS, Indianapolis, April 17, 2015, with Dr. Lesley Boaz, College of Nursing; and Jennifer Avery. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor emeritus “Comparison of Abstinence and Coital Frequency between Two Natural Methods of Family,” 2014 Annual Research Conference, St. Louis, March 28, 2014. “The Marquette Method of NFP and Evidencebased Application to Women’s Health Care,” Family Medicine Residency Grand Rounds, La Crosse, Wis., May 12, 2014. “The Marquette Method of Natural Family Planning and Applications to Women’s Health Care,” Selective Course for First-year Medical Students, Washington D.C., May 7, 2014. “The Influence of Contraception, Abortion and Natural Family Planning on Divorce Rates as Found in the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth,” 24th Annual Life and Learning Conference, New York, June 7, 2014. “Extended-use Effectiveness of a Nursemanaged Natural Family Planning Service Program,” State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research, Washington D.C., Sept. 20, 2014. “Extended-use Effectiveness of an Online NFP Service,” 83rd Annual Education Conference, Orlando, Fla., Oct. 7, 2014. “Self-paced Online NFP Teacher Training,” 83rd Annual Education Conference, Orlando, Fla., Oct. 7, 2014. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., F.T.O.S., professor “The Wee Beasties within Us: AKA FUN with Fiber,” Doctoral Forum, Milwaukee, October 2014. “Hispanic Views on Parent Authoritative Parenting Survey and FUN Teaching Modules,” Building Bridges, Milwaukee, May 2014, with undergraduate student Maritza Contreras.

“Participation, Completion and Outcomes of Online Programs for Parents and Children to Reduce Childhood Obesity,” International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting, San Diego, May 2014, with Dr. Astrida Kaugars, Department of Psychology; graduate students Laura Tudor, Nina Nosavan and Abigail Mertz; and undergraduate students Elizabeth Jaruseski, Sarah Burkel, J. Snethan, J. Kotchen and J. McMahon. “Recruiting Parents and Children through Schools and Employers: Which Works Best for Online Obesity Prevention or Amelioration?” Midwest Nursing Research Association, St. Louis, March 2014, with Dr. Astrida Kaugars, Klingler College of Arts and Sciences; Jane Kotchen; Janet McMahon; Julia Snethan; graduate students Nina Nosavan and Ana Kisin; and undergraduate students Ellen Flaherty and Caroline Grinde. “The National League for Nursing Certified Nurse Educator Exam,” Doctoral Forum, Milwaukee, January 2015. Jill Guttormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Evaluation of Alternative Communication Aids for Mechanically Ventilated Patients,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Research: State of the Science, Washington, D.C., September 2014. “Evaluation of Alternative Communication Aids for Mechanically Ventilated Patients,” St. Louis, 2014. Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor “Hispanic Women’s Adherence to U.S. Providers’ Recommendations,” National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Lexington, Ky., 2014, with undergraduate student Maritza Contreras. “Listening to Families of Children with Solid Organ Transplant,” 2015 MNRS Family Research Section Competitive Symposium, 2014, with Dr. Norah Johnson, College of Nursing; and Stacee Lerret, College of Nursing. “The Development of a Targeted Website for an Online Intervention to Prevent Teen Dating Violence Among Latino/a Youth,” MNRS 2015 Student Poster Annual Research Conference, 2014, with Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap, College of Nursing; and undergraduate students Elena Caro and Christian Villaneuva. “Hispanic Women’s Adherence to U.S. Providers’ Recommendations,” MNRS Student Poster Session, St. Louis, March 2014, with undergraduate student Maritza Contreras.

“Perspectives of Youth Workers on Alcohol Use and Sexual Involvement among Adolescents in the UK,” MNRS Annual Research Conference, St. Louis, March 2014, with Mark Hayter; Sharron Hinchliff; and Penny Curtis. Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M. “Gynecology meets Microbiology: The Application of Probiotics to Women’s Healthcare,” American College of Nurse-Midwives, Denver, June 2014, with Dr. Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Impact of Autism Spectrum Disorder on the Family System,” Wisconsin School Nurse Conference, Waukesha, Wis., October 2014. See entry for Dr. Kristin Haglund, College of Nursing. “Social Story Procedure Preparation for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Developmental Disabilities,” 19th Annual Midwest Child Life Conference, Milwaukee, November 2014. “The Parenting Stress Scale for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): An Analysis of Two Studies of Parents of Children with ASD,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research: Optimizing Health by Addressing Complexity, Washington, D.C., September 2014, with M. Miles; P. Simpson; and S. Phetrusuwan. “Behavior Challenges and Strategies for Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Healthcare Settings,” Nursing Grand Rounds, Hartford, Conn., January 2015. “A Creative Approach to Fostering Ambulation for a Pre-school Child with Rett Syndrome,” American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting, Indianapolis, February 2015, with C. Schaefer Campion. “Outreach and Awareness through Faith-based Communities,” Autism Society of Wisconsin, 26th Annual Conference, Wisconsin Dells, Wis., May 2015, with Dr. Amy Van Hecke, Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences. “Translating Research to Practice for Children with Autism: From Primary Care to Acute Care,” 2015 Conference on Pediatric Health Care, Las Vegas, March 2015, with M. Bultas; K. Burkett; and J. Reinhold. Judy Kintner, M.S.N., R.N. clinical instructor “Veteran Culture — What I Need to Know,” WLN Fall Conference, Milwaukee, November 2014.


25

Teresa Jerofke-Owen, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.N.P.-B.C., assistant professor “Patient Perceptions of Patient-empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation, and Functional Health Status After Surgery,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science 2014 State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research, Washington D.C., September 2014, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and O. Yakusheva. “Patient Perceptions of Patient-empowering Nurse Behaviors, Patient Activation, and Functional Health Status After Surgery,” MNRS 2014 Annual Research Conference, St. Louis, March 2014, with Dr. Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing; and O. Yakusheva. Roschelle Manigold, R.M., R.N., M.S.N., C.H.S.E., clinical instructor “IPE Scenario Development,” International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare 2015, New Orleans, Jan. 12, 2015.

“Prehabilitation in Breast Cancer Patients: A Feasibility Study,” 39th Annual Research Conference: Innovations for Person-centered Care, Midwest Nursing Research Society, St. Louis, April 18, 2015, with Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; S. Gambon; T. Gregory; L. Kalita; L. Waltke; and J. Tjoe. “Psychosocial and Physiological Effects of Goal-oriented Team Training in Breast Cancer Survivors,” 39th Annual Research Conference: Innovations for Person-centered Care, Midwest Nursing Research Society, St. Louis, April 17, 2015, with Dr. Karen Robinson, College of Nursing; Dr. Paula Papanek, College of Health Sciences; Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; graduate student Ashley Engel; A. Cybulski; J. Tjoe; and L. Waltke. “Reflective Living and the Ignatian Examen, Freedom and Choices in Academic Life,” Marquette University Faber Center for Ignatian Spirtuality, Milwaukee, Feb. 19, 2015.

“TeamSTEPPS Introduction,” Building Bridges, Milwaukee, May 8, 2015, with Amber YoungBrice, College of Nursing.

“Team Phoenix Talks and Focus Groups,” Marquette University College of Nursing Doctoral Forum, Milwaukee, Feb. 17, 2015

Donna McCarthy, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., interim dean and professor “Neuroinflammation is Associated with Decreased Activity and Weakness in a Mouse Model of Cancer-related Fatigue,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, Washington, D.C., September 2014.

Karen Robinson, P.h.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor “Team Phoenix Talks: Motivational Effects of Triathlon Training among Breast Cancer Survivors,” 38th Annual MNRS Conference: Building Value-based Partnerships Through Nursing Science, St. Louis, March 2014, with Dr. Linda Piacentine, College of Nursing; Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; and J. Tjoe.

“Preconference Workshop: Models for Ph.D. Programs with Different Areas of Emphasis,” American Association of Colleges of Nursing, San Diego, Jan. 28, 2015. “CANS Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education,” American Association of Colleges of Nursing Doctoral Education Conference, San Diego, Jan. 30, 2015, with S. Henly. “Current and Emerging Ideas for Ph.D. Education in Nursing,” 38th Annual Meeting Midwest Nursing Research Society,” St. Louis, March 2014. “Current and Emerging Ideas for Ph.D. Education in Nursing, Doctoral Education Conference, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Naples, Fla., January 2014. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.N.R.N., assistant professor “Team Phoenix Talks: Triathlon Training Experiences of Breast Cancer Survivors,” 2014 Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research: Optimizing Health by Addressing Complexity, Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, Washington D.C., Sept. 19, 2014, with Dr. Karen Robinson, College of Nursing; and Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences.

“Team Phoenix Talks: Motivational Effects of Triathlon Training among Breast Cancer Survivors,” Building Bridges to Research-based Nursing Practice — Annual Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference, Marquette University, May 9, 2014, with Dr. Linda Piacentine, College of Nursing; Dr. Alexander Ng, College of Health Sciences; and J. Tjoe. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor “Shared Care Partners Intervention for Heart Failure Patients and Family Caregivers,” Gerontological Society of American Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., Nov. 9, 2014, with M. Sebern; and C. Whitlatch. “Contributions of Shared Care to Depressive Symptoms and Self-care in Heart Failure Patients,” Midwest Nursing Research Society 39th Annual Research Conference, Indianapolis, April 17, 2015, with graduate student Susan Cole.

Christine Schindler, Ph.D., A.P.N.P., assistant professor “Skin Care for Hospitalized Children,” National Association on Pediatric Nurse Practitioners’ Annual Conference, Boston, March 2014. Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., professor “The Role of Nurse Education for Patient Outcomes and Costs of Hospitalization, MNRS Annual Conference, St. Louis, March 2014. See entries for Dr. Kathleen Bobay. See entries for Dr. Teresa Jerofke-Owen. Aimee Woda, Ph.D., R.N., B.C., assistant professor “Clinical Instructors’ Perception of the Nursing Students’ Clinical Decision-making Skills Based on the Sequencing of Simulation Experiences within a Clinical Practicum,” 2014 Forward Thinking Poster Session and Colloquy, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Dec. 2, 2014, with Theresa Gruenke, College of Nursing; and graduate student Jenna Kahne. “Evaluating Clinical Decision-making Among Nursing Students Enrolled in a Simulation Practicum,” 2014 Forward Thinking Poster Session, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Dec. 2, 2014, with Mary Paquette, College of Nursing; and graduate students Jamie Hansen and Jenna Kahne. “Self-care Behaviors of African Americans with Heart Failure: How Can Discharge Teaching be Effective?” The Nuts and Bolts of Nursing, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, Oct. 30, 2014.


Marquette University College of Nursing, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 USA

ADVANCES IN HEALTH CARE BEGIN HERE.

Innovative programs and advanced degrees from the Marquette University College of Nursing prepare nurses to lead and advance care in a rapidly changing health care environment. Our doctor of nursing practice program will teach you to think critically and act decisively while you hone your skills in a specialized area. Or further develop your research skills in our Ph.D. program. Here, you will understand what it means to lead with compassionate care. Because what you learn will not only change your career — it will advance health care. Doctor of nursing practice | Ph.D. marquette.edu/nursing

Marquette Nurse 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you