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MARQUETTE MAGAZINE

MARQ

ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR • BLUEPRINT FOR CAMPUS CHANGE • THIS IS ME. THIS IS US. SPRING 2017

SONG OF LIFE

JEN WATERS HOPES WE’LL SING ALONG


IN EVERY ISSUE SEEN+HEARD 2 PRESIDENT’S VIEW 5 MU/360° 6 CLASS NOTES 30

RIGHT

Historian Matt Costello nabs a plum job and a White Houserelated beat. PAGE 40 BELOW

Dr. Ainehi Edoro hopes her love for literature is contagious. PAGE 45

40

45 Student media mania — After 100 years of telling Marquette stories, they deserved a party! ONLINE @ MARQUETTE.EDU/COMM/STUDENT-MEDIA/INDEX.PHP

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“My Marquette experience taught me to always contribute, share and be willing to give back,” says Henry Kwan.

CONTENTS

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SHARE YOUR CLASS NOTES @ MARQUETTE.EDU/CLASSNOTES.

F E AT U R E S

Alumnus of the Year 16

16 ABOVE

Henry and Katherine Kwan celebrated at Alumni National Awards Weekend. PAGE 16 LEFT

Sarah Gray channels a mother’s heartbreak into a “greater good.”

Henry Kwan, Arts ’71, insists he’s Marquette’s luckiest alumnus. Who could argue?

Song of life 20 In 2014 the university community prayed for Jen Waters, Bus Ad ’17. She credits her survival to astounding medical care. She attributes her recovery to many things.

This is me. This is us. 24 The tapestry of Marquette’s student community is diverse. Differences can become barriers if we’re not careful.

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PLAYING A NEW TUNE

The carillon melody played each quarter hour was changed for only the third time in 50 years. Listen to the new tune composed by Dr. Mark Konewko, university carillonneur. ONLINE @ MARQUETTE.EDU/ CARILLON.

BIG EAST CHAMPS

*

Women’s basketball gives fans gathered for this season’s Big East Tournament at the Al McGuire Center a thrill ride before clinching the title.

“It’s WONDERFUL!”

I just read your new Marquette Magazine and

must “congratulate” everyone who had anything to do with it. It’s WONDERFUL! I’ve been away

from MU for a long time but this brings me back. Thank you!

Editor: Joni Moths Mueller Submissions by Tim Cigelske, Comm ’04; Joe DiGiovanni; Garrett Gundlach, S.J., Arts ’09; Jesse Lee; Paula Wheeler; and student-interns Ellen Neiers and Tyler Vicknair.

MARY JEANNE GUNNARE, DENT HY ’59

pgs. cover, 1, 5, 16, 18, 19, 20, 23, 46; Eileen Ryan, pgs. 1, 45; Crystal Schreiner, p. 30; UK Daily Mail, p. 11; George Washington University, p. 8; Stephen Voss, pgs. 1, 33, 40.

Design: Winge Design Studio.

Illustrations © Michael Austin, pgs. 7, 11; Matthew Cook, p. 14.

Photography © Alamy, pgs. 24– 29; Bagley Studio, p. 49; Maggie Bean, pgs. 2, 19; Jim Brozek, pgs. 18, 19; Greatstock/Alamy, p. 10; Mike Gryniewicz, pgs. 18, 19; Dan Johnson, pgs. 6, 18; Jesse Lee, pgs. 2, 13, 19; John Nienhuis,

Marquette Magazine (Spring 2017, Vol. 35, Issue No. 2), for and about alumni and friends of Marquette, is published three times a year by Marquette University, 1250 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53223.

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Postage paid at Milwaukee, WI. Address correspondence to Marquette Magazine, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881 USA. mumagazine @ marquette.edu. Phone: (414) 288-7448. Publications Agreement No. 1496964

WILD HALL! “Well, I am speechless,” Father Wild says. “That caught me completely by surprise.” See what the fuss is all about. ONLINE @ HTTP:// MARQUETTE.EDU/ NEW-RESIDENCE-HALL.


CONNECT WITH US @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

•••

+ SEEN HEARD MY MARQUETTE! What’s it like to live, study and play at Marquette University? Take a peek at marquette.edu/my-marquette. In the Winter 2017 issue you asked if you caught our eye; that you were waiting to hear from us. We have enjoyed the magazine’s articles for many years; this issue was excellent. Yes, bolder with interesting, substantive stories. We did not like the cover. The “cutesy” layout with large MARQ and tiny MARQUETTE MAGAZINE at the bottom, set vertically, did not present the magazine favorably to us. … We suggest the masthead needs to be bold, at the top, proudly proclaiming MARQUETTE MAGAZINE. ED SCHOMMER, BUS AD ’59, AND JOAN (DVORAK) SCHOMMER, MED TECH ’60

Thanks for sharing that beautiful story about Nicole Grehn in your Winter 2017 publication. While we all encounter challenges and trials, that young woman has experienced profound loss and hardship and is defying the odds. It’s encouraging to have examples of hope and determination. I wish her the best as she continues her education and works toward her nursing degree. … Her future patients will be so blessed to benefit from her nursing expertise and tremendous life experience. ANNE STANCO, PH.D., PT ’83

news online Catch up! The latest issues of the college magazines and our annual research magazine are available online. Keep up with them all at news.marquette.edu. EDUCATION ENGINEER DISCOVER COMM HEALTH SCIENCES MARQUETTE LAWYER NURSE

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Be the reason. Be the solution.

BE THE DIFFERENCE. Marquette University fosters the formation of the mind and heart so that our students graduate prepared for a life without limits. They become fearless leaders, willing servants and effective doers. They fully understand what it means to be a force that acts for good in the workplace, in the community and in the world.


PRESIDENT MIKE LOVELL AND AMY LOVELL GREET GUESTS DURING ALUMNI NATIONAL AWARDS WEEKEND.

CHALLENGE

W

hen great challenges face Marquette University, it is the individuals who were formed by and have embraced their Ignatian-inspired education who inherently understand how to respond. Then they take action. Ray, Law ’49, and Kay, Sp ’49, Eckstein, for decades, have demonstrated their love and appreciation for their Catholic, Jesuit education through their great support for Marquette. I’ve known them for just a few years. It’s easy to see their great devotion to Marquette, most prominently through their recordbreaking gift that helped create Eckstein Hall. We are again seeing their love and appreciation for Marquette through their willingness to provide us with yet another transformational gift for our urgently needed student residence development. When in conversation with them about the project, I was deeply moved both by their extraordinarily generous response and desire to recognize their dear friend, Rev. Robert Wild, S.J., by requesting that the project honor him. By making their gift a challenge — the Ecksteins have committed $10 million to match the contributions of others who will join this tribute to Father Wild by giving another $10 million — more wonderful Marquette alumni are taking action. When I asked Emeritus Trustee John Bergstrom, Bus Ad ’67, what he thought

of the Eckstein Challenge, he told me he wanted to lead it. Two days later, he told me he also wanted to make a significant donation. Mind you, John is in a continuing fight against cancer. Nonetheless, he finds time between treatments to text or email me challenge progress reports. I know it’s a great source of pride for John that his son, Tim, Bus Ad ’99, who currently serves on our Board of Trustees, is helping to manage pursuit of the challenge. Through the challenge, the Ecksteins and the Bergstroms demonstrate their gratitude and appreciation for Marquette University in their lives. They confirm for me these words spoken by Rev. Ed Mathie, S.J., “Father Eddie” as he’s often called on campus: “Ignatian spirituality is so much about gratitude and thanksgiving. Everything we have, every gift and talent, we clearly say is from God. Not only that, but we look around the world and everything around us is created for us. It’s a whole, entire sense of gratitude.” These appropriate words are even more inspiring when our alumni act on them. I know there are many more alumni who will reflect on their time at Marquette and want to join this movement. Learn more about the Eckstein Challenge online at http://marquette.edu/ new-residence-hall/ or contact Associate Vice President James Hansen at (414) 288-4588 or james.hansen @marquette.edu.

Dr. Michael R. Lovell PRESIDENT

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MOVING ON! No day feels sweeter than this one for the 3,035 students who will accept Marquette University degrees at Commencement on May 21. We can say, “We knew you when.”

WHAT’S NEW ON CAMPUS & BEYOND

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MU/360°

COMMUNITY

issues on tap

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS

let the sun shine in Next-generation solar technology is on the horizon and Dr. Jier Huang is among those at its forefront.

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B Y J O E D I G I O VA N N I

he National Science Foundation has taken notice of research done by Dr. Jier Huang, an assistant professor of chemistry, and awarded her the foundation’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty. Huang received a $555,636 CAREER grant to examine the use of novel materials called metal-organic frameworks as a catalyst for the conversion of solar energy. “Our goal is to develop new, efficient materials that can be used in solar power,” she explains. Current solar technology converts sunlight into electricity. But Huang is evaluating the process of converting sunlight into hydrogen. She wants to use the hydrogen to replace the fossil fuels typically used to power vehicles. The catalyst Huang is using for the process is a metal-organic framework material

with a technical name, photoactive zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. These materials typically contain iron, cobalt, copper or zinc. Huang’s research is focused on understanding the properties of the materials and how they could function in photocatalytic reactions that would lead to solar energy conversion. Converting solar energy into a liquid fuel will take a multistep process. Huang’s work is considered one of the early steps in the research arc that will ultimately lead to engineers working to build a device that can convert the energy into fuel. Huang, who received a Way Klingler Young Scholar Award earlier this year, is principal investigator. She is aided by four graduate students, an undergraduate student and a visiting professor. Her team will conduct its research at Marquette and also travel to the Argonne National Laboratory to use its synchrotron radiation source in measuring samples. ¤

The offices of the Provost and Community Engagement unveiled a Community Engaged Research Partnership Development Grant to expand the number of bidirectional, community engaged research partnerships. The grant provides a stipend to a faculty member and community organization to forge a new research response to a community issue in the areas of health, education, incarceration and/or poverty.

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MU/360°

LEADERSHIP

moving forward Dave Lawlor joined campus as executive vice president for operations, a position created as part of a strategic executive realignment, a move President Michael Lovell calls vital to Marquette executing its strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries. A native of Dublin, Ireland, Lawlor earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration with an emphasis in finance from California State University –Hayward. He most recently served as vice chancellor and chief financial officer at the University of California– Davis. Read the strategic plan online @ marquette.edu/ strategic-planning.

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MAKING PLANS FOR TOMORROW

blueprint for change Campus master plan’s ambitions call university family to step boldly. This is where we’re going.

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BY CHRISTOPHER STOLARSKI

t’s been more than a half-century since Marquette constructed a residence hall. Today the university is doubling down, constructing a two-tower, $108 million facility for first-year and sophomore students that will bear the name of a beloved former president. The 890–bed Rev. Robert A. Wild, S.J., Commons is the first major product of the university’s newly adopted campus master plan. For the plan’s lead architect, the student-centric facility is a fitting start. “I’m personally so proud that our first master plan project is truly for our students,” Vice President for Planning and Strategy Lora Strigens told a crowd of students, faculty and staff at the groundbreaking ceremony. More bold projects will follow in this construction and renovation plan that will change the physical appearance of campus as well as how the university educates students, conducts research, fosters community, and promotes its mission and values.

One example is called Innovation Alley, a cross-disciplinary facility that will transform the southwest campus corridor by connecting learning labs and more for the entire block between Wisconsin Avenue and Clybourn Street. “Innovation Alley will bring together engineering, business and science into an integrated facility, where students and faculty can look at things all the way from prototype and ideation to taking a product to market,” Strigens says. The facility could also include limited student housing, creating a livinglearning community. Other ideas envisioned in the campus master plan include the widely publicized athletic performance research center; a biodiscovery district that will fuse the hard and health sciences in the south-central portion of campus; a holistic recreation and wellness center on the northeast corner of 16th Street and Wisconsin Avenue; a reimagined Central Mall called the Chapel Lawn; a north commons that brings green space to the area between the Dr. E.J. O’Brien Jesuit Residence and Alumni Memorial Union; and a gateway


MU/360° pedestrian mall at 13th Street, from Wells Street to Wisconsin Avenue. President Michael Lovell says the campus master plan is a road map for capital projects during the next 15 to 20 years. A clear hallmark of the plan is its ambition and link to the university’s strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries. “To achieve our vision of being the most innovative and accomplished Catholic, Jesuit university in the world, we need to think differently and act different to be the difference,” Lovell says. Both the campus master plan and the university’s strategic plan emphasize crosscampus collaboration. The president stressed the point at a planning workshop with nearly 250 members of the campus community. “We have so many needs on our campus —  physical structures and space — to be addressed,” he says. “One of the challenges is that we have to prioritize, and we need the whole campus community to do that.” Strigens agrees the needs are great and how the university responds is important: “We’re not merely trying to keep up. We’re trying to go beyond and differentiate ourselves, to use our imaginations to get to where we want to be in the future.” In addition to the most significant and highly visible projects, such as Innovation Alley, there are dozens of smaller-scale efforts that will be just as important to transforming campus during the next two decades. Many of the smaller efforts will lay the groundwork for the big, transformational projects. Strigens calls a critical variable in the plan’s success “the domino effect” of how projects are sequenced. “Take the new residence hall facility —  it allows us to raze McCormick Hall, which is outdated and has escalating maintenance costs. That frees up space for the recreation and wellness center, which then allows us to demolish the Rec Center, making way for Innovation Alley,” Strigens explains. “Many of these projects rely on the success of others. This is a complex, long-range plan and its success relies on careful stewardship every step of the way. But it’s also a truly inspirational vision — the next 20 years for Marquette are going to be very exciting.” ¤

ON THE BOOKSHELF

arc of life Paul Salsini, Jour ’58, Grad ’85, learned about a World War II massacre at Sant’ Anna di Stazzema.

H

e visited the village in Italy and then honored his Italian roots and this piece of wartime history by writing his first book, The Cielo, A Novel of Wartime Tuscany. The novel that traces the lives of terrified villagers fleeing the Nazis won the Council for Wisconsin Writers Edna Ferber Fiction Book Award in 2006. But when you’re wrapped up in a story, your characters become family who need to survive. So Salsini shadowed their lives in second and third sequels.“Trilogy has a nice ring to it,” he remembers thinking. And he truly intended to conclude the saga at three books. Still, the progeny of those early characters called to him and became the basis for his fourth, fifth and sixth books written in 10 years, a collection of Tuscan stories leading readers through the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. Is he finished? Yes, he thinks, with publication of The Fearless Flag Thrower of Lucca, Nine Stories of 1990s Tuscany, iUniverse books. For all the alumni who wonder, yes, Salsini is still teaching students, now in his 47th year as an adjunct professor in the Diederich College of Communication. ¤

PA R T N E R S H I P S

to our health The College of Health Sciences and School of Dentistry created a community healthfocused post-baccalaureate program for students who want to strengthen their applications for dental school. The 12-month program starts in June for students with bachelor’s degrees who wish to build their resumes through a pre-dental curriculum that includes graduate-level biomedical course work and immersion in the dental field.

NURSING

reaching students The College of Nursing dedicated a new Pleasant Prairie, Wis., location, strategically placed between Milwaukee and Chicago. It offers a stateof-the-art simulation lab and lecture rooms. Students will be able to earn master’s degrees in nursing in as few as 18 months through a combination of online course work, hands-on labs and in-hospital clinical rotations.

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BEYOND BOUNDARIES GLOBAL EDUCATION

Interest in global health coaxed Wes Richerson, Eng ’17,

to attend Marquette’s South Africa Service Learning Program. One class took him to a school to fix wheelchairs for kids with disabilities, another put him in contact with graduate students. The most memorable lessons came when chatting — about global events. “Seeing how politically active everyone there is was really inspiring,” he says. “We had a driver, Pearnel, one of the coolest people ever. He was a wealth of knowledge and understanding. I’d love to go back just to talk more with him.”

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MU/360°

LIBRARIES

amazing addition C O M M U N I C AT I O N

building excitement Sports promotion students tee up marketing ideas for U.S. Open. This foursome played a winning game.

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BY JONI MOTHS MUELLER

t was a very cool opportunity for students to apply what they learned about sports promotion to helping FOX Sports, FOX Sports University and the U.S. Golf Association. Six teams of students in Dr. Jim Pokrywczynski’s Sports Promotion class in the Diederich College stood in front of a panel of sports specialists to present proposals for getting people engaged with the 2017 U.S. Open golf tournament that will be played in June at Erin Hills in Erin, Wis. “You have 15 minutes to present,” the associate professor reminded them. He held a stopwatch. They began by explaining their research into golf, its target markets and strategies to build excitement around the U.S. Open. They outlined at least two promotional concepts to increase fan engagement. Great ideas surfaced: Connect campaigns to Facebook and Instagram; build pop-up TruGolf simulation stations on campuses; host golf-viewing parties based on regional tastes and interests. After each presentation, the students fielded questions. Getting the nod and having their plan labeled the best presentation would make all of the work worthwhile. “FOX found positive things in every one of

the presentations,” Pokrywczynski said later. Communication junior Gabrielle Movalson admits it was an intimidating experience. “We were all really nervous,” she says. “We dressed according to a color scheme to show how professional and serious we were about the project.” Team Six comprised Movalson and classmates Diego Rios, Nick Thorn and Drew Albrecht. Their proposal wove in national and regional FOX Sports connections. It featured a water bottle giveaway and social media campaigns calling millennials to share their trick golf shots at #showUSyourshot and calling golf’s faithful to share photos of what’s in their golf bags and tag them #GolfBagSwag. Preparation paid off. A congratulatory email from the FOX Sports University U.S. Open project called Team Six’s work “the most complete and creative marketing campaign.” ¤

Marquette bought a first edition, first printing of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, one of only 1,500 copies of the children’s classic published in 1937. This treasure enhances the J.R.R. Tolkien Collection, which holds the original manuscripts of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The Hobbit manuscripts contain 1,586 pages, including a holograph version, corrected typesets, three sets of page proofs with the author’s corrections, a water-color rendering by Tolkien, printed maps with corrections, a watercolor of trolls and Gollum by German artist Horus Engels, and the original copy of “Thror’s Map.”

“The professionalism each team demonstrated throughout the presentation process will help them stand out in their future careers.” MALLORY STEINBERG, COMM ’08, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER FOR FOX SPORTS WISCONSIN

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MU/360°

AT H L E T I C S

dome home The university erected a $3.6 million dome over the synthetic turf field portion of Valley Fields. The dome will be up for five months of the year. “This project is a positive step forward because it will free up athletic space for both our intercollegiate athletes as well as many students who play intramural and club sports,” says Vice President and Director for Athletics Bill Scholl.

L AW

listen in In one of the latest episodes of “Illuminating Intellect,” Michael O’Hear talks with Provost Dan Myers about Wisconsin prison sentencing policy, the restorative power of yoga and his book, Wisconsin Sentencing in the Tough-on-Crime Era: How Judges Retained Power and Why Mass Incarceration Happened Anyway. Listen in @ marquette.edu/ podcasts.

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GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

medical brigades Nine days in Nicaragua provide eye-opening witness. Jesuit values definitely put to work. B Y J E S S E L E E

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lobal Brigades, the world’s largest student-led international development organization, will forever be linked primarily to Marquette alumna Dr. Shital Chauhun Vora, H Sci ’04, PT ’06, who co-founded the organization as a student in 2003 after participating in a service

trip to Honduras. Marquette’s Medical Brigade, a member of the global network, added two new admirers recently. Amy Lovell and Lindsay Wojciechowski strapped on backpacks in December and joined 68 Marquette students, including Lovell’s daughter, Marissa, and 14 other health care professionals on a nineday brigade to Nicaragua. Amy is the wife of President Mike Lovell, and Lindsay is married to Men’s Basketball Coach Wojo. They weren’t interested observers. Both contributed special skills: Amy is a former pharmacist, and Lindsay is a nurse practitioner. “I enjoyed the chance to participate

in Marquette’s long-standing history of community service in a way that allowed me to get to know students and faculty,” Lindsay says. “It was a great chance to learn from the providers, who have a wealth of experience and medical knowledge.” In a typical work day here at home, Lindsay sees approximately 20 patients. In Nicaragua, they often saw 60 or more people per day. “The trip was eye-opening, a good reminder of how fortunate we are to live in the United States,” Lindsay says. For Amy, the experience was even more special because she shared it with her daughter, who is a senior in the College of Health Sciences. “I felt like Marissa was leading me,” Amy says, “and that was a pretty cool experience. I was impressed by our students, with how hard they worked, but also the reflections they gave on their service — seeing the Jesuit values among them and the people they served. It also was thought-provoking, in what we all take for granted every day, in the access that we have to basic necessities from health care to electricity and clean running water.” ¤


MU/360°

CLASS ACT

Honors Program students stand barefoot in the Rec Center ready to practice the martial art Kuk Sool Won. Hands rotate counter clockwise then swing upward, legs jut into stretches and dips, bodies make quarter turns — each movement graceful yet strong. The physical lesson is an entrée to an ethos Dr. Michael Monahan teaches the philosophy students. They add readings and journaling, a confluence of mind and body practices. “You don’t want to read about martial arts,” he says. “You only want to do it. The repetition is central to thinking about what it’s like to work really hard at something. You encounter your limitations in a pretty profound way.”

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MU/360° C O M M U N I C AT I O N

journalistic impact The Diederich College established the new O’Brien Fellowship Award for Impact in Public Service Journalism . It will be bestowed as part of the American Society of News Editors annual awards contest and recognize an individual or team whose work helps solve a community or societal issue and leads to changes in laws, regulations or other demonstrated results. The first winner will be announced this spring. BUS AD

bank deposit A new undergraduate program in the College of Business Administration is focused on filling the pipeline of professionals in the nation’s banking industry. Classes include an entry-level course in banking, an overview of leadership functions in the banking environment, and a course focused on the risk management and risk evaluation process that banks engage in to execute duties and responsibilities.

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A REMINDER TO NOTICE

what I nearly missed I like to begin every class with roll call — not just names, but also eye contact and a smile. “Kasey, good morning. It is good to see you.” Especially after a long break, this intentionality is crucial.

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nthusiasm is the last thing I expect, let alone any real camaraderie in the classroom. We’re all still in break mode. “Summer, hello, welcome back.” “Hi, Garrett! (teachers are called by our first names at the school), tell us about your break.” Somewhat surprised, I set my pencil on the clipboard and replied, “Oh, well, it was great, thank y —” “No … in detail.” The tone was doubleunderlined. Italicized. She smiled. Every head in the classroom turned. I set down the clipboard altogether. At this point, I could brush this off as another student’s attempt at sabotage, the agesold game of sidetrack the teacher. But there was a sincerity in her follow-up, enough of an emphasis to take the risk: “Well … I got to go home to Wisconsin. It was really wonderful, especially when …” Sure enough, that did it. We started telling stories. We started listening to stories. Time with my little cousins! Absolutely nothing. A trip to Denver! Lots of basketball practice. I finally applied to Yale! And just like that,

we were back, fifth period: reunited, regrouped, restarted. We sailed to the end of the semester. I don’t think we ever need permission to share with each other or to care about one another, but sometimes it’s given anyway. I’m embarrassed at how often I just keep the roll call rolling, how often I keep the clipboard close and stick to the schedule because, let’s face it, there’s always more to do. And then some. And the bigger the workload, the bolder the interruption needs to be to break free, to shelve business-asusual for something different. I could have accused Summer of wasting our time. But this time, a winding detour somehow ended up a shortcut — not to where I thought we should be by the end of the period, but to where we really needed to be. I count on students like her. I count on invitations like that. Taken and appreciated, they’re the closest I get to prayer. ¤ ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jesuit Scholastic Garrett Gundlach, S.J., Arts ’09, teaches at Red Cloud High School on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. He also writes monthly for The Jesuit Post online newsletter.


C U R AT E D

slam dunk Since the first men’s basketball media guide debuted for the 1955–56 season, the annual delivery of facts, stats, faces and fun has tracked our favorite pastime. The complete collection is posted online at marquettebasketball.com.

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BY PAU L A W H E E L E R

ALUMNUS


HENRY KWAN INSISTS HE IS MARQUETTE’S “LUCKIEST” ALUMNUS. WHO COULD ARGUE? Kwan, whose full name is Henry King Hong Kwan, was nearly finished with school in his native Hong Kong in 1967 when Leftist riots against British colonial rule broke out, leading to violence in the streets and economic instability. His father wanted Henry in a safer environment. “I still had another year of high school but my dad said, ‘I’m hoping you can get into a college in America this September,’” Kwan recalls. The next day Kwan, Arts ’71, headed to a bookstore to buy a Barron’s college guide. “It took just five minutes to go through because, for most schools, the application deadline was up,” he remembers. Just two universities were still open. One was Marquette. Kwan admits he wasn’t a model applicant, with no SAT score, grades that were “certainly not pretty” and only a budding command of the English language. “Marquette was very kind-hearted and heard what

my father had to say in his letter that was attached to my application,” he says, “and decided to offer Henry Kwan a chance.” Kwan’s anxiety after arriving on campus as one of a handful of non-U.S. students was relieved as soon as he met Rev. John Naus, S.J., resident chaplain at Schroeder Hall. “His energy and open heart, his demeanor and friendly disposition — I felt comfortable almost immediately,” he says. By junior year, Kwan was comfortable enough with academics to make room for sports. He made the men’s varsity tennis team and is still amused that a misreading of his tryout sheet led to his opening match victories in singles and doubles matches being reported in The Marquette Tribune as wins by “King Kong Kwan.” He graduated with a degree in chemistry. After earning his doctorate at the University of Michigan, he went into pharmaceutical research and development and helped create medications such as Claritin, Claritin D-24, Intron A and Nasonex. As a scientific consultant to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies today, he enjoys taking on projects that align with his interests and what he believes. If asked to consult on patent litigation, “I’m able to follow my heart and take the position I want to take,” he says. “If it’s something I can’t defend 100 percent, I say, ‘No, thank you.’” Kwan remains committed to Marquette, catching men’s tennis matches when possible, remaining active in alumni and student send-off activities in New York/New Jersey, supporting renovations to the Todd Wehr Chemistry Building and contributing to the Father Naus Scholarship Fund. “My Marquette experience taught me to always contribute, share and be willing to give back,” he says. “It was meant to be. I am the luckiest alum ever.” ¤

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ALUMNI NATIONAL AWARDS WEEKEND WELCOMED CROWDS TO EACH COLLEGE AND EVERY CORNER OF CAMPUS BEFORE CULMINATING IN SATURDAY NIGHT’S BIG CELEBRATION. Congratulate the 2017 All-University Alumni National Awards honorees — PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Dr. Ricardo R. Fernández, Arts ’62, Grad ’65 SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY AWARD

Barbara Eannelli Klein, Bus Ad ’72 SERVICE TO MARQUETTE AWARD

James M. Meier, Bus Ad ’84 SPIRIT OF MARQUETTE AWARD

Elizabeth Villarreal Lang, Arts ’03, and Nelson C. Lang, H Sci ’04 FRIEND OF THE UNIVERSITY AWARD

Majerus Family Foundation

Meet all of our Alumni National Awards recipients online @ marquette.edu/awards.

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JEN WATERS LEARNED HOW TO DEPEND ON THE FAITH OF OTHERS.


* SONG

“YES, I AM THE GIRL WHO ALMOST DIED. BUT GOODNESS CAME FROM MY EXPERIENCE.”

OF LIFE

“We must sing for her now,” said four of Connor’s quick-to-love students when he mentioned he had a friend in the hospital. The leader of the quartet looked into Connor’s camera and explained they would sing a song to make his friend feel better, to bring healing to her heart. Connor and I met during our sophomore year at Marquette and became fast friends. We both studied abroad the fall of our junior year; he in Cape Town, South Africa, I in Madrid, Spain. Connor spent a large part of his time abroad working with students at a primary school. I spent a large part of my time abroad being treated for and recovering from a traumatic brain injury.

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*

“MY SURVIVAL IS A RESULT OF THE ASTOUNDING CARE FROM THE MEDICAL TEAM. BUT I ATTRIBUTE MY FULL RECOVERY TO MANY THINGS.”

Jen Waters and Erin Acklin, Comm ’16, share a hug on campus. A video sharing Jen’s journey is posted @ marquette.edu/ jen-waters.

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When the midpoint of my semester abroad neared, I felt a need for self-evaluation and introspection. I decided to take a trip from Madrid to Granada and spend the weekend on my own to examine my experience so far. I arrived ready to tour a new city in a fresh way. I visited La Alhambra with a girl I met in the hostel where I stayed. We took in the beauty of the gardens, the architecture and history together. After we parted ways, I explored Granada on my own. I popped into cathedrals, conversed with shop vendors to figure out what type of tea would be best for a sore throat, and picked up a Spanish novel to read during my trip back to Madrid. While I walked through the cobbled streets, I contemplated what sort of impact my next few months abroad might have on me. My relationships with my host family, my fellow exchange students and Spanish students were formed quickly — and held fast. My Spanish language was improving. I began reading the Spanish novel as I waited for the train back to Madrid. To my delight a stranger asked me, in Spanish, if I knew English. That question was a wonderful end to my weekend away. When the train pulled into a major metro stop, I had the opportunity to transfer to a train that

would take me closer to my flat. I chose to take the long route home. The route would allow me to pass through Malasaña, my favorite neighborhood in Madrid. There I walked among the crowds and smiled at friends strolling arm-in-arm. I arrived home and ate a traditionally late dinner with my host family. I told them about my trip, about what I learned, both the cultural points and my personal intentions. I explained that while my time abroad felt fulfilling, I longed to be connected with a faith community in Madrid. The next morning I reached out to someone I met a few weeks prior who mentioned a church he was helping lead in the city. The congregation would gather that Sunday night, so I decided to walk to the church to join them. That is when my experience abroad changed drastically. As I crossed the street, I was grazed by a car. The impact of my head hitting the pavement was so severe, it caused a subdural hematoma that led to a rapid swelling of my brain.

I

don’t remember riding in the ambulance to the hospital. I don’t remember the day of the accident at all. I do remember waking up in a haze a few weeks later, realizing I was in a hospital. I didn’t know why I was there. The nurses sped around the room checking on patients, speaking Spanish. Their voices comforted me, assured me that I was in Spain and the experiences I had were not dreams. My parents and brother had arrived the day following the accident. When I emerged from a coma it was difficult for me to communicate with them. I was unable to speak thoughts that formed in my mind. My parents told me what happened, when the accident occurred and what the doctors did to keep me alive. Their explanation helped. I now understood why I was in the hospital, but I struggled to understand how critical my state had been. They told me to resist the urge to get out of bed (though I tried) because my muscles were weakened from atrophy and my brain didn’t have its normal amount of protection. To prevent the swelling in my brain from reaching a fatal point, my neurosurgeon, Dr. Kita Sallabanda, had performed a bilateral craniectomy, the partial removal of the skull. The procedure left me with a “mohawk,” which is what many neurosurgeons call the inch-wide strip of bone left in place. In later surgeries, pieces of my skull were reattached to this strip of bone. Between my shaved scalp and


my “mohawk,” I received the most extreme haircut I had ever heard of. But I was alive to hear about it. I am alive! My survival is a result of the astounding care from the medical team. But I attribute my full recovery to many things. My parents and brother were enveloped with kindness. Marquette’s Office of International Education found an apartment directly across the street from the hospital where my family stayed for two months. My aunts and uncles came to Madrid throughout the weeks to comfort and care for my parents. Spanish families participating in the host program, members of the church I intended to visit, and friends of friends filled the refrigerator with food that was comforting and nourishing. When my brother returned to school, Marquette’s Campus Ministry reached out to make sure he was being tended to at Lewis University. Reflecting on this experience, I realize I was surrounded by individuals, both kin and stranger, who prayed for my complete healing and restoration. For me, it was an experience of expanded belief, of learning how to express it, of learning how to depend on the faith others live out. After I left the hospital, I had a few days when I was able to visit friends and enjoy Madrid.

I returned home Dec. 12, 2014, and was welcomed with tears of joy and countless hugs. I wasn’t able to return to Marquette right away. My parents thought it would be best for me to take time off to heal. I was frustrated, but am now thankful for their wisdom. During the months at home I had time to reflect on my experience, to think about all of the communities of people who rallied for me, and to be thankful for the chance to live a full life. I returned to Marquette in the fall of 2015. After countless times of explaining that, “Yes, I am the girl who almost died” but also making sure to explain the goodness that came from it, I settled back into the place I love deeply. I will graduate on May 21. Although I don’t know my next steps, I know this: As I go forth, I plan to live as Connor’s students and so many others did, by singing a song of healing to the world. Join me, let us sing for one another. ¤

Snapshots capture Jen Waters’ recovery and the people who helped pull her through. She and her family will make a joyful return trip to Madrid this summer.

SHARE YOUR STORIES OF HOPE @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 23


“MY PARENTS ARE IMMIGRANTS FROM AFRICA.”

M “I SERVED THREE TOURS OF DUTY IN IRAN AND AFGHANISTAN.”


US P R I VA C Y O F S T U D E N T S W H O S H A R E D P E R S O N A L D E TA I L S F O R T H I S S TO R Y I S P R O T E C T E D W I T H T H E U S E O F S TO C K P H O TO G R A P H Y.

WHO ARE TODAY’S MARQUETTE STUDENTS? INTERVIEWS BY JONI MOTHS MUELLER

WE ASKED NINE STUDENTS AND THEY ANSWERED IN THE WAY YOUNG PEOPLE DO, PLAINLY: THIS IS MY STRENGTH. THIS IS MY VULNERABILITY. THIS IS WHERE MARQUETTE COMES IN. HERE IS WHAT THEY SAID.

THIS IS ME. THIS IS US. MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 25


B

STUDENT

B wanted to go into the military since he was 6 years old, ever since his mom gave him a GI Joe toy. He served three tours in Iraq and Afghanistan before being medically retired from the Army in 2014. He endured months of medical care for a fractured spine and counseling for serious PTSD, and today credits doctors and therapists with getting him through. Their compassion set him on a path that led to Marquette, where he is double majoring in biological studies and philosophy with concentrations in ethics and values. His end goal is medical school. Taking this path isn’t easy. He is an untraditional student at what he calls a very traditional campus, the old guy at 31 studying beside 18-, 19- and 20-year-olds. To balance family and academics he made the radical choice to live in an apartment off campus during the week and go home on weekends to his wife and three kids. His wife, he says, is a rock who makes it possible. Everything he hopes to do here — and from here on — is about giving back. He founded a Veterans Association on campus and also facilitates a peer support group through the Wounded Warrior Project. “It’s hard because so many veterans are struggling,” he says. “If I just reach one that’s all that matters.”

M

B’s story is different from that of most Marquette students. But each student profiled revealed precious details about their ambitions and the hurdles they’ve had to leap to be here, to stay here or that they see looming ahead. Here are their stories:

DR. WILLIAM WELBURN

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J

As a first-generation Latina student, J made a different choice from her peers. “I never wanted a quinceañera. I was always education oriented, highly influenced by my parents’ decision to come to the U.S.,” says the senior, who is majoring in advertising and psychology. Her father’s death put that hope in peril. “That hit my family hard emotionally and financially,” she says. “I’ve learned that the hardships I’m facing are simply hurdles. I’ve been able to overcome and keep going because they remind me of my worth and my purpose.”

STUDENT

“We want to encourage people to be in dialogue, to see the benefit of being in dialogue, to strengthen their intercultural competence.”


SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

M

STUDENT

M is also the first in the family to attend a four-year college. Though her family is pleased she is advancing her education, they questioned the cost. “I’m paying for school myself,” she says. But her experiences have supported the investment. Marquette’s mission to serve others syncs with a personal priority. She tutored in a Milwaukee Public School in the 53206 zip code freshman year and realized her middle-class upbringing differed dramatically from that of her students. This year the psychology and political science major is living on the Dorothy Day floor in Straz Hall. “It’s an open space to discuss justice issues,” she says, “how we as students can change things, stand up for the elephant in the room, the thing that no one really wants to talk about but is a big topic. We try to talk as much as we can about that.”

Freedom to tangle with tough discussions also touches two students who see themselves as members of minority communities on campus.

N

STUDENT

For N, a student from Milwaukee majoring in biochemistry and minoring in Arabic, there was never a question of what was her best college option. Her mom, originally from Senegal, and her dad, originally from the Central African Republic, came to Milwaukee 22 years ago. Her mom was sponsored by a Milwaukee family to enroll in graduate school at Marquette. As a commuting student now in her junior year, N says her experience is different from that of nearly all of her classmates because she doesn’t live on campus. But she points to what she sees as an even greater challenge — a lack of inclusiveness on campus. “Marquette is making

“I’M A FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT.”

”I’M DISABLED IN AN ABLE-BODIED WORLD.”

“I GREW UP IN FOSTER CARE.”

progress, but I see a definite disconnect between students of color and students from the suburbs, who have no experience with diverse groups of people or the city setting,” she says. Instead of blending, N says, students seek familiar comfort zones, which leaves students who commute or who are untraditional in age or who have disabilities to find their way. N doesn’t wait for others to take action. She builds connections. “I joined the African American Student Association because it’s a cool way to share parts of my culture with other students in a non-threatening way,” she says. “I try to participate in events planned by other cultural organizations to show solidarity.” N feels strongly about the responsibility to step out and represent. “I feel good about what I’m learning,” she says, “and how I’ll pass it on, touch the next generation.” She takes that message to students at a refugee resettlement agency where she volunteers. The children in her class there, she says, think of Marquette as a “wow” school, but some don’t see themselves here. “I tell them with more students applying, the school will be more open to students and it will change. You have to be a part of the change.”

S

S is a graduate student studying mental health advocacy. She knows a similar isolation at Marquette. S was diagnosed with a serious eye condition at age 3 and is blind. “I’ve had really positive and really negative experiences,” she says about living on campus. “Even in class, people don’t know how to approach ‘different’ — they think they don’t know the right thing to say. But I watch the same television shows. I go to the gym just like you.” She points to three factors that make her isolation particularly acute right now. “Every day I have to think: I have a disability. I’m a woman of color. I’m from a Muslim family. Three months ago, it was just who I am. Now I have to worry,” she says, and adds, “I want to take my education into the world, but I wonder about when I graduate in 2018 — how will I be embraced?” She has no doubt that the track she’s on will put her in a position to affect the lives of other people in an important way. S plans to work in trauma advocacy, hopefully with veterans or victims of sexual assault or domestic violence.

STUDENT

J learned about the Evans Scholars program in high school and signed up to attend a Caddie Camp. “I worked my butt off,” she says, laughing. The work paid off. “I felt such a rush when I interviewed for the Evans Scholarship. Proving my worthiness in front of a banquet of 200 was an experience like no other. Less than a week later, I received the best news of my life. I won a full ride — that was a huge moment for us. My mom knew I would be OK. I will be an Evans Scholar for life.”

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 27


SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

STUDENT

KT

STUDENT

At 9 months, KT was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis, a condition that causes non-cancerous tumors to form in her nervous system. “My parents were told I wouldn’t make it to be 2 years old. I defied the doctor’s expectation. I’m not gonna be that statistic,” she says. KT is a sophomore majoring in business economics and marketing. She came to Marquette from the East Coast and admits it was a struggle at first. “But I found my own group, found my way and have excelled since then,” she says. She participated in an International Marquette Action Program trip to South Africa and learned about reconciliation and cultural immersion. “The lessons I learned there help me to be the difference,” she says. “My mom is still nervous because I’m so far away. But I’m the happiest I’ve ever been.”

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STUDENT

K

“I am a Dreamer,” says K, a junior majoring in public relations and political science. “My parents came to live with family here when I was three and a half. They sacrificed everything to come. They told me, ‘Your job is to go to school, get an education.’ That’s my inspiration.” K says the election has caused her sleepless nights. She decided to learn about why some people support deportation by attending an event on campus featuring guest lecturer Ben Shapiro. “I was hesitant,” she admits, “and it’s one of the best things I’ve ever done. I needed to be there, to expose myself to other narratives. “I’m living under a cloud,” K adds, knowing that her permit could be withdrawn. “My dad worries, asks me if I feel safe, if I want to come home. I say no, I worked too hard to get here. My struggle is something many students could never relate to.”

T

T has found happiness, too, and even more important to her, faith. “To understand me you have to understand my dad’s life,” says the junior majoring in psychology. “When I was a child, my dad left the church and that caused a lot of questions for me, big questions.” T applied to Marquette to make her family happy. But when her father died and the Marquette community turned out to support her, T realized she had a second family. “After my dad died, questions of faith began popping into my head. I had my first experience of 10 p.m. Mass and felt this pool of love. I jumped head first into the ocean of Catholic faith. I bought a Bible and a rosary. I attended Salt & Light nights. Next I was teaching catechism. Faith became a habit.” Then T felt a puffiness in her neck that turned out to be cancer. The experience “led me to figure out what I want to do with my life,” she says. She decided to use her education to work with individuals who suffer brain injuries. “Marquette changed me faith-wise,” she says. “Every time I think about it, I think back to my first theology class. The professor talked about the difference between making and being the difference, that it’s about your everyday life embodying it. That stuck with me and it’s what I’m moving toward.”

D

D may offer the simplest definition of the impact of education on a life — his. As a child, his family was broken up and the three brothers were split among foster homes. “Growing up, it was difficult to make friends,” he says. His second foster mother pushed him to think about going to college; she thought Marquette would be a good fit. Now D is a junior, majoring in business IT and supply chain management. He is an RA and member of the Cheer Team. “It’s weird to think I got this opportunity,” he says. “The biggest thing I’m learning is I can overcome hardship. Being the difference doesn’t only mean Marquette to me. It means being different from my past, having a family that’s different. Coming here has pulled me up in terms of what I want, what I have the potential to be.” ¤

“I’M NOT GONNA BE THAT STATISTIC.”

STUDENT

Uncertainty in this moment is a shared experience for too many students.

”I’M A DREAMER.”

“FAITH BECAME A HABIT.”


Q

Is Marquette more diverse today?

If you think about it, Marquette was founded on a principle of diversity in educating students from European immigrant families. What has changed is that perhaps, since the early 1970s, more students from culturally diverse communities across Milwaukee, the region and from other countries as well make up our student body.

M

Q

IN DIALOGUE

Marquette’s student body comes from 63 countries and nearly every state in the union. They have different faiths, cultures and life experience. The number of students self-identifying in need of accommodations for disabilities has more than tripled since 2007. This tapestry brings a nearly indescribable richness to campus — and also some new challenges. Dr. William Welburn, executive director of institutional diversity and inclusion, talks about some of the challenges. >>>

How is that having an impact on campus?

One of the real challenges for us now is to make the phrase “We Are Marquette” meaningful to everyone. From the climate study we did two years ago, we learned that as many as one in five students, faculty and staff members struggle with the sense of belonging. Finding yourself, your interests and your communities becomes important. One of the challenges I hear from students is that often a sense of not belonging comes from how other students are treating them. We have to be very frank about that, whether we’re talking about micro-aggressions or even more aggressive behavior, so that everyone feels not simply welcomed but that this is their campus. Students who engage in practices that make other students feel as though they don’t belong are the students that we will need to work with in future years.

Q

How do you help students reach that understanding? We want to do more outof-class education. The educational experience that goes on in the res halls, libraries, union, in clubs and organizations, in student government, just walking down the street, at athletic events — wherever. Those are places where people converge and can have honest conversations. We want to encourage people to be in dialogue, to see the benefit of being in dialogue, to strengthen their intercultural competence so that our thoughts, comments and actions affirm one another and show that we care about one another.

Q

Does our Catholic, Jesuit mission help?

I think we actually underappreciate things we can get from our Catholic, Jesuit heritage and from Ignatian spirituality. I’ll use the example of standing in solidarity. The Jesuits actually go out in the world and live the experience and grow to become interculturally connected. One of our basic statements on human dignity and diversity is grounded in the way the Jesuits have worked for centuries on justice and acknowledging remarkable cultural differences. If we’re going to find common ground as a community, it will be through using that Jesuit wisdom to build our awareness and understanding of the differences we all possess.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 29


CLASS NOTES

SOUND BARRIER BREAKER

OFF&RUNNING Ivy Awino, Comm ’13, came to Marquette with a dream of becoming the National Basketball Association’s first female commissioner. She’s breaking barriers in the NBA already as the first female DJ for the Dallas Mavericks — and one of the first female DJs in the league. BY TI M CI GELSKE, COMM ’04

“My biggest advice is to dream and dream big,” she says. “The bigger, the scarier, the wilder, the better.” Awino, who goes by the stage name Poizon Ivy, learned her musical art as a student from friends on campus, including a DJ who brought turntables, a mixer and a speaker to her apartment for a tutorial. Her first show was opening for a WMUR-sponsored concert on campus. Outside of her musical education, Awino appreciated classes in theology and the diverse cultures requirements

to help engage in conversation that may be difficult but prove essential in communicating in the world. She credits Sheena Carey, internship coordinator in the Diederich College, with helping land internships and serving as her mentor in the Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program. Today she directs the sound of games, from promotions to chants and all arena audio in between. “I have such a fervent love for music, and being a DJ gives me the ultimate power to share my passion with the masses,” she says.

LOVE TO HEAR ABOUT YOUNG GRADS ON THE GO! KNOW ONE?

Tell us a little about one @ magazine.marquette.edu/share. We may share the story in an upcoming issue.

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MEET OUR FACULTY INNOVATORS @ MARQUETTE.EDU/PODCASTS.

Marquette Magazine and the Alumni Association accept submissions of news of personal and professional achievements and celebrations for inclusion in “Class Notes.” Alumni news may be submitted electronically or by mail for publication in print and online. The editorial staff reserves the right to edit for content, accuracy and length. Publication of the achievements of our alumni does not constitute endorsement by Marquette University. REUNIONS!

Alumni from years ending in 2 or 7, this is your reunion year. Learn about Reunion Weekend at marquette.edu/alumni.

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James Kolata, Arts ’64, emeritus professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame, wrote Elementary Cosmology: From Aristotle’s Universe to the Big Bang and Beyond, published by the Institute of Physics Publishing.

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Collins Fitzpatrick, Arts ’66, received the Professionalism Award from the American Inns of Court on Nov. 5, 2016.

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♥ Timothy Frisby, Bus Ad ’68, and Gael Frisby, wed June 18, 2016 at historic St. James at Sag Bridge, Lemont, Ill. A celebration followed at the Arlington Park International Race Track.

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John Nuhn, Jour ’69, was named president of the North American Nature Photography Association Foundation for the second time, having served previously from 2004–09. He has also been elected to the board of the

73

Rev. L. John Topel, S.J., Grad ’73, is Jesuit assistant to the law school dean at Seattle University. He previously served for 13 years as a pastor in the Seattle Archdiocese.

International League of Conservation Photographers, a group dedicated to advancing environmental and cultural conservation through photography. He and his wife Shirley (Namjestnik) Nuhn, Sp ’72, live in Oakton, Va.

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Richard Rakita, Law ’70, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as counsel in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on real estate transactions and litigation, and business law.

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Rhaoul Guillaume, Eng ’71, received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Louisiana Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers. R E U N I O N

Y E A R

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Ronald Hofer, Arts ’72, Law ’81, was named a distinguished professor by the National Judicial College in Reno, Nev. He is the first distinguished professor in the college’s 53-year history and has taught there since 1994. Edward Pontacoloni, Arts ’72, Ed ’72, received a bronze medal in the Reader’s Favorite 2016 International Book Award Contest. He received the award in the animal fiction category for his work, Rooster. He is an attorney, outdoorsman and general counsel to the Dr. John E. Flaherty Field Trial Clubs Association Inc. Dennis Sell, Bus Ad ’72, published a 400-page coffee table-sized book with nearly 300 pictures titled The Glory Days of Algoma High School Boys’ Basketball, 1948–1968, and a Fond Look Back at Algoma’s “Good Old Days.”

SO TELL US ...

HOW CAN NEWBIE GRADS FIND THEIR WORKPLACE PASSION? Marquette Magazine asked staff in the Career Services Center to weigh in. Best thing about hindsight: Learn from your mistakes by reflecting on what you could have done differently — and better. Keep polishing: With each new project or undertaking, be sure to update your LinkedIn profile. People won’t know if you don’t tell them. Be a source: Share relevant articles with co-workers; consider posting them on your social media sites. Be that go-to person.

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Larry Conner, Arts ’75, Grad ’78, was awarded the Distinguished Public Advocate Award by the Oregon Counseling Association in honor of 10 years of successful political work on behalf of the counseling profession in Oregon. He has been instrumental in writing and passing five statutes on behalf of Oregon counselors and has been a licensed professional counselor in Portland for 30 years. Tim Cowen, Eng ’75, retired from his position as senior combat systems analyst with GP Strategies Corp. He retired from the Navy in 1994. R E U N I O N

Y E A R

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Randy Nelson, Law ’77, was selected to be in the 2017 edition of The Best Lawyers in America for his work with trusts and estates at Weiss Berzowski LLP. He joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as a shareholder in the Milwaukee office.

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Col. Michael M. Walker, Bus Ad ’78, published The 1929 Sino-Soviet War: The War Nobody Knew, published by the University Press of Kansas, giving the first clear and complete account of a little-known but consequential clash of great powers between the World Wars.

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John Biskaduros, Eng ’79, was hired by Organizational

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 31


CLASS NOTES

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? HA! YOU TELL US.

This photo came from Dave Jorling, Arts ’68, Law ’71. The cheerleader at front right is his wife, Ann (Hemrick) Jorling, PT ’74. Share a photo you saved and it may appear in an upcoming issue. SHARE YOUR VINTAGE PHOTOS @ MAGAZINE. MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

Strategies Inc. to support the MQ-9 Predator Program for Customs and Border Protection in Washington, D.C. He will provide acquisition and logistics expertise for the drones that will guard the borders. He lives with his wife Elizabeth (Konrath) Biskaduros, Dent Hy ’81, who is a dental hygienist in Fairfax, Va. John Clemens, Jour ’79, retired in August 2016 from the U.S. Geological Survey after a 25year career as a federal science communicator. He was the media spokesperson and congressional liaison for USGS Washington Water Science Center. He also served as a public information officer during the 2014 Oso landslide, the 2009 floods in western Washington, and the 2004 eruptive phase of Mt. St. Helens. During his career, he received several awards from the USGS, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the National Association of Government Communicators. He lives in Tacoma, Wash.

Â

John Hager, Bus Ad ’79, Law ’82, was selected for the 2017

SHARE YOUR PHOTOS @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

edition of The Best Lawyers in America. His practice focuses on estate and business planning. David Roettgers, Bus Ad ’79, Law ’82, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as a shareholder in the Milwaukee office.

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Barrett Breuckman, Arts ’81, is sales director and account general manager at HewlettPackard Enterprise. Based in Cupertino, Calif., he is responsible for the business relationship between HPE and Apple. M. Judith (Haworth) Nortman, Nurs ’81, was awarded special acknowledgment of remarkable contribution to the VA mission from U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert McDonald in August 2016. She also received the I-Care Award from VA Milwaukee Regional Office Director Duane Honeycutt in August 2016 and the Starfish Award from Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Benefits Allison Hickey in July 2014. Therese Sankovitz, Sp ’81, earned a doctorate in audiology at A.T. Stills University in August 2016. She is director of audiology services at a clinic in Albuquerque, N.M. Ralph Tease, Law ’81, was named one of the top-50 lawyers in Wisconsin by the Wisconsin Super Lawyer organization. He is a senior managing partner at Habush Habush & Rottier S.C., and has dedicated his practice to representing people who are injured in accidents. He has been honored as a Wisconsin Super Lawyer every year since 2005.

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R E U N I O N

Y E A R

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Mary (Sullivan) Josephs, Arts ’82, was named one of the 2017 Most Influential Women in Mid-Market M&A by Mergers & Acquisitions magazine. This is the second year she was selected. Robert Larkin, Bus Ad ’82, was ordained a permanent deacon in the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Joliet, Ill., on Aug. 27, 2016 at the Cathedral of St. Raymond Nonnatus. He maintains a full-time position as senior financial adviser with Merrill Lynch in Lisle, Ill., and also makes an annual mission trip to Haiti. Jill Nadeau, Sp ’82, is a producer and fill-in host for the Larry Meiller Show on Wisconsin Public Radio. Corinne Pagel, Bus Ad ’82, retired from Ernst & Young LLP in Grand Rapids, Mich., in December 2016. John Treseler, Eng ’82, was named 2016 Catholic Business Person of the Year at the 23rd Annual CBN Foundation Gala in Bethesda, Md., on Nov. 18, 2016.

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Ann Chandler, Arts ’84, Law ’87, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as a shareholder in the Milwaukee office. She focuses her practice on representing shopping centers, office parks and residential developers in the acquisition, financing, development and leasing of real estate property. Karen (Meyers) Holzer, Jour ’84, is president of The Deciding Factor, a digital marketing agency in Cincinnati. Her agency just celebrated its 15-year anniversary in business.


A MOTHER’S CAMPAIGN SARAH GRAY

THE GREATER GOOD

COMM ’95

Sarah and Ross Gray and their son, Callum, rallied in their heartbreak to honor Callum’s identical twin, Thomas. For though Thomas’ life on earth was short, its impact reached far, a journey Sarah followed to three universities and a biotechnology firm, each place a recipient of an organ or cell donation. She wrote about the impact of these gifts in helping advance medical science — particularly for conditions affecting babies — in her book, A Life Everlasting: The Extraordinary Story of One Boy’s Gift to Medical Science. Sarah sought a way to help Thomas’ life have a positive impact and found it: “I was grieving a lot and it helped me to lose the grief but keep the love.” Her book recently made the Washington Post bestsellers list. ¤

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 33


CLASS NOTES

SHARE YOUR CLASS NOTES @ MARQUETTE.EDU/CLASSNOTES.

Steve Voyak, Jour ’84, recorded his 200th victory as a volleyball coach at Southwest High School in Washburn, Mo. He has been an English teacher and coach at the school for 14 years.

WHAT MU STUDENT EVENT DO YOU MISS MOST? “Tuesday night Mass with Fr. Naus!” CAITLIN

“Breakfast club! Sophomore year there was this diehard group of us who always ate together before heading for class.” MICHAEL

“Friday afternoon Grill Concerts in Brooks Union.” TIM

“The Senior Week campfire that’s held off campus.” ALEX TELL US MORE!

What event do you miss most? Answer our curious questions @ magazine. marquette.edu/share.

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John Gosling, Arts ’85, joined New Wellness Associates as a clinical psychotherapist and practices mental health counseling. He enjoys the challenges in this worthwhile, helpful and empowering opportunity. Pieter van Lier, Jour ’85, was named executive director of the Cleveland Transformation Alliance, a public-private partnership dedicated to reinventing public education in Cleveland.

Jennifer Roethe, Comm ’89, became the franchise paralegal at Quarles & Brady LLP, in the firm’s Milwaukee office. She was previously director of franchise administration at the corporate headquarters of Verlo Mattress in Milwaukee.

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Damian Hill, Jour ’86, was promoted to president and CEO of the Associated General Contractors of Michigan.

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Trish Dulka, Comm ’88, was promoted to vice president, communications/advertising at Hal Leonard Corp., the world’s largest print music publisher. She is responsible for overseeing all PR and advertising, including the company’s websites, social media, trade shows, catalogs, print advertising and other marketing activities. She also oversees the expansion of digital marketing. Timothy Lester, Bus Ad ’88, was appointed CEO of Bridgelux, a leading developer and manufacturer of solid-state lighting technologies and solutions in Livermore, Calif.

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Mike Baxendale, Comm ’89, completed the annual Bax & O’Brien Mayflower Marathon

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food drive at the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., on Nov. 23, 2016. For the last 22 years Bax & O’Brien has conducted a 52-hour-long annual broadcast on radio station WAQY on behalf of the Springfield Open Pantry emergency food kitchen. The effort has raised more than $2 million for the food kitchen. This year’s marathon set a single-year record with $127,000 raised.

Meghan Kennedy, Arts ’90, was named Woman of the Year in the 5th District of Riverside County, Calif. The award was presented by the Riverside Commission for Women at the Riverside County Board of Supervisors meeting. Jerry Larson, Eng ’90, was promoted to managing director at Crowe Horwath LLP, one of the largest public accounting, consulting and technology firms in the United States, where he works in advisory services. He has been with the firm for five years and leads the delivery side of the merger and integration group. He is a member of APICS and has CPIM and CSCP certification. Chris McGrath, Bus Ad ’90, was named the head boys soccer coach at Guerin Catholic High School in Noblesville, Ind. Timothy Trecek, Arts ’90, Law ’93, was named 2017 Lawyer of the Year for product liability liti-

gation plaintiffs in Milwaukee. He is a member and shareholder of Habush Habush & Rottier’s executive committee, and a managing partner of the Milwaukee and West Bend offices. He was also listed in the 2017 edition of The Best Lawyers in America for personal injury litigation plaintiffs.

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Meg Albrinck, Arts ’91, was named the first provost of Lakeland University in Sheboygan, Wis. She is a professor of literature and writing at Lakeland, where she has worked since 1999. ♥ Sharon (Marzano) Levickas, Comm ’91, and John Levickas, wed July 16, 2016 at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Watervliet, Mich. They were joined by many of their Marquette friends. The couple lives in La Grange Park, Ill. Crystal (Williams) McNeal, Comm ’91, was named director of internal communications for MGM Resorts International in Las Vegas. R E U N I O N

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Michael Lehman, Grad ’92, started his own fractional CIO consultancy, Parachute CIO, offering CIO services to SMB businesses, along with IT diligence offerings for private equity firms. Previously he was the top IT strategist with Batteries Plus Bulbs in Hartland, Wis., for nearly 17 years.

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♥ Melissa Siegel, Arts ’93, and Rori Bardwell, married in their backyard in Henderson, Nev. They are teachers in the Clark County (Nev.) School District.


THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED

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Lisa Schreihart, Eng ’94, Grad ’97, earned her law degree, magna cum laude, from Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law in December 2016. She also earned her MBA, graduating with distinction from the University of Iowa in 2007. She is an associate patent attorney with Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox in Washington, D.C.

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Aishah Alfadhala, H Sci ’13, traveled to Bolivia to study in ¤ Cochabamba, which is called the “city of eternal spring.” But after her academic program ended, independent study began when she and three new friends went off to explore the wonders of Bolivia, venturing from the Isla del Sol to Salar de Uyuni, the largest salt flat in the world. Though the three live on different continents, the experience of traveling together will join them forever. “There is something magical about movement and travel. You understand the world a little bit better, and then you get to understand yourself,” Alfadhala says. Q

Thomas Canale, Bus Ad ’95, was honored by Northwestern Mutual for his commitment to helping clients plan for and achieve financial security with membership in the company’s 2016 Forum Group. The group recognizes company leaders who eclipse specific milestones in 2016. He is a wealth management adviser with Northwestern Mutual Chicago and managing director of the Rosemont district office. This is the fifth time he has received the honor. Sarah Walpole Gray, Comm ’95, wrote a medical memoir, A Life Everlasting: The Extraordinary Story of One Boy’s Gift to Medical Science, published by HarperCollins. It is the story of her son’s organ, eye and tissue donation for scientific research.

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Matthew Donovan, Arts ’96, was selected for the 2016 New York Metro Rising Stars list for his work in business litigation. John Miller, Arts ’96, was appointed by President Barack Obama as a member of the Library of Congress Trust Fund Board. He is founder and principal of Arenberg Holdings. He was president and CEO of MillerSt. Nazianz Inc. from 2008–14,

where he also served as vice president and general counsel from 2006–08. He was deputy chief of staff to U.S. Rep. Jerry Kleczka from 1997–2003 and campaign manager for Kleczka for Congress in 1998 and 2002. He serves on the boards of the United Way of Greater Milwaukee and University of Wisconsin Law School, and received a master’s degree from Georgetown University and law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School. David Williams, Jour ’96, was promoted to director of advancement for the College of Liberal Arts at Purdue Research Foundation, which acts for the benefit of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. He is responsible for creating and implementing fundraising strategies for major gift and annual fund campaign development. R E U N I O N

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Rob Fetherston, Arts ’97, and Andrea Fetherston, Grad ’11: son Robert F. Fetherston, IV, born Sept. 24, 2016. He was 7 pounds, 7 ounces and 21 inches. Mark Ginter, Grad ’97, was appointed president of the Institute for Catholic Studies and Formation of the Diocese of Venice, Fla. Julie Michael Henn, Comm ’97, was appointed to the Baltimore County Board of Education by Gov. Larry Hogan. Michael Rivera, Comm ’97, is president and CEO of Rivera & Associates Inc., which was recognized as an outstanding business finalist at the Governor’s Marketplace Awards at Potawatomi Hotel & Casino in

WHAT ARE YOU DOING OUT IN THE WORLD? TELL US @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 35


CLASS NOTES

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AWAY WE GO Sandy Maxx (Sandy Patyk), Comm ’91, with MilwaukeePBS, was among 50 social media users invited to participate in #NASASocial at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. She talked to the International Space Station astronauts and toured Mission Control, the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility and the Neutral Buoyancy Lab.

December 2016. Rivera & Associates Inc. provides public relations and marketing services for clients. Robert Teuber, Bus Ad ’97, Law ’00, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as a shareholder in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on tax disputes and controversies for national, regional and local clients.

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♥ Kathryn Janicek, Comm ’98, and Albert Wright, wed May 2016 at Fort Myers Beach, Fla. She is a media coach and public-speaking trainer and serves on the Illinois Patriot Education Fund Board. The couple lives in Chicago.

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Margaret Daun, Bus Ad ’99, Grad ’00, was appointed corporation counsel for Milwaukee County. She brings diverse experience in public and private sectors to Milwaukee County. ♥ Kimberly Eberl Van Byssum, Comm ’99, and Grant Van Byssum, wed November 2016

at Our Lady of Mount Caramel Church in Chicago. She owns public relations firm Motion PR, and he is an iron worker. The couple lives in Lincoln Park, Ill. Amy Estlund, H Sci ’99, earned her doctorate in public health studies from St. Louis University in December 2016. She works as a research specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Her research focus is increasing access to contraception and health services and addressing social determinants of health, specifically with adolescents, young adults and LGBT populations. She earned a masters of public health from Emory University and worked for eight years in nonprofits. She, her partner and their daughter Jude, 5, live in the St. Louis area.

W Amber (Schmitz) Hearing,

Robert Pluta, Eng ’99, is a partner at Mayer Brown LLP law firm, where he practices intellectual property law. He lives with his wife Christine (Phillips), Arts ’00, and their five children in Chicago.

W Jeffrey Seybold, Eng ’03, and

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♥ Kathryn Statz, Law ’00, and Andrew Crowley, wed Oct. 16, 2016 in Oak Park, Ill.

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Nathan Dye, Bus Ad ’01, and Eneida Dye: son Ethan Chase born Oct. 1, 2016. He was 6 pounds, 12.6 ounces and 19 inches. R E U N I O N

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Anne Kalmer Cainion, Comm ’02, and Derrick Cainion: son Rylan born Sept. 26, 2016. He was 8 pounds, 10 ounces and 21 inches.

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Michael Dougherty, Grad ’03, was named the Sister Ruth Caspar Endowed Chair of Philosophy at Ohio Dominican University in Columbus.

Arts ’03, and Matthew Hearing, H Sci ’03: daughter Charlotte Paige born April 19, 2016. She joins brother Brandon. The family recently moved to Whitefish Bay, Wis.

W Amy (Bowman) Rajca, Eng

’03, and Brian Rajca: son Mark Philip born May 31, 2016. He joins sister Kate.

W Dr. Allegra Saving, Arts ’03,

and Dr. Benjamin Lerner: son Neil Everett born Aug. 30, 2016. He was 10 pounds, 5 ounces and 21.5 inches. He is the couple’s first child.

Maggi Seybold: son Lucas Bond born Sept. 25, 2016.

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Nikki (Krubsack) Claas, Comm ’04, and Brian Claas: daughter Cecelia Joy born Oct. 25, 2016.

W Kathleen Conroy, Arts ’04,

Dent ’07, and Michael Slupik, Arts ’04: daughter Eleanore Rose born Sept. 9, 2016. She was 7 pounds, 9 ounces and 21.5 inches. The family lives in Wauwatosa, Wis.

W Jamie Fetherston, Comm ’04,

and Michelle Fetherston: daughter Lila Jean born May 22, 2016. Kevin Ratay, Comm ’04, was promoted to director of sales at ZPower Battery, based in Camarillo, Calif. ZPower pioneered the commercialization of Silver-Zinc rechargeable microbatteries for use in medical


POPQUIZ

NOMINATE A STUDENT FOR OUR POP QUIZ @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

What do you love the most about Marquette?

STUDENT CHINAZA NWANERI SPEAKS IGBO FLUENTLY. Where’s home? I was born in Lagos, Nigeria. I speak Igbo, my tribe’s language, and understand it as well. I came to the U.S. when I was 2 years old with both of my parents. My family has lived in Nigeria, New Jersey, Minnesota and, now, Texas. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would it be? Nigeria. I am proud of my culture, so if I am given an opportunity to see my family and grow a deeper connection with my roots, I would take it in a heartbeat. What do you study? I study corporate communication with three minors: marketing, human resources and entrepreneurship. Through the last four years at Marquette, I have taken advantage of every opportunity that allowed me to become more involved inside and outside the Marquette community.

I truly admire the Marquette community. Spanning from students to professors to alumni, I’ve never felt so a part of something bigger than myself. Favorite snack on campus? Nothing beats Hot Cookie Night! I live for drizzling vanilla ice cream on a fresh chocolate chip cookie. After so many late-night experiences, I find it hard not to call it my favorite dessert. What shows are you binge watching on Netflix? Black Mirror, Quantico and West World. Number one most-played song on your playlist? Hard choice but Déjà Vu by J. Cole and That’s What I Like by Bruno Mars. Most Marquetters become custard converts. What’s your favorite flavor? I have never had frozen custard — I know, it’s depressing. Interview by student-intern Tyler Vicknair

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 37


CLASS NOTES

CHECK OUT YOUR LOCAL ALUMNI CLUB @ MARQUETTE.EDU/ALUMNI.

devices, portable electronics and wearables.

W Emily (Wacker) Schultz,

 DAILY DIFFERENCE Mike Baxendale, Sp ’89, closed 2016 with a food frenzy, the Bax & O’Brien radio talk show’s 23rd Mayflower Marathon food drive, held at the Basketball Hall of Fame. The 52–hour broadcast broke prior records, with $127,000 raised for the Springfield (Mass.) Open Pantry emergency food kitchen. See his class note for more. NOMINATE A SPECIAL ALUM

making a daily difference @ magazine.marquette.edu/ share.

Comm ’04, and Steve Schultz, Comm ’98, Grad ’07: twins Henry James and Anna Cecilia born March 16, 2016. Kathleen Winn, Comm ’04, earned her doctorate in educational policy and leadership studies from the University of Iowa in May 2016.

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Dan McDermott, Bus Ad ’05, Law ’07, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as an associate in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on estate planning and business law.

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Megan Kelleher Brannon, Arts ’06, and Patrick Brannon, Eng ’07: daughter Ciara Lenora born May 24, 2016. She joins brother Aidan, 2. ♥ Kyle Dlabay, Comm ’06, and Anne Jaspers, Law ’08, wed Aug. 13, 2016 at Elmbrook Church in Brookfield, Wis. The

reception took place at South Second in Milwaukee’s Walker’s Point neighborhood.

W Katherine (Gaumond)

Holiday, Arts ’06, and Armin Holiday, Arts ’06: son Jack Richard born March 8, 2016. He was 9 pounds, 2 ounces and 22 inches.

W Margaret “Meggie” (Ryan)

Kopplin, Arts ’06, Grad ’10, and Andrew (Andy) Kopplin: son Conor Daniel born July 6, 2016. He was 7 pounds, 5 ounces and 21 inches. He joins brother Ryan Andrew, 2. Aaron Sramek, Grad ’06, was promoted to manager of professional services at Elite Human Capital Group in Brookfield, Wis.

W Paul Thompson, Bus Ad ’06, Grad ’07, and Laura (Heyrman) Thompson, Nurs ’07: son Ivan James born Nov. 5, 2016. He was 6 pounds and 19.25 inches. The family lives in Cambridge, New Zealand. R E U N I O N

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Jonathan Dooley, Grad ’07, was named vice president for student life and dean of students at Elon University in Elon, N.C., where he has worked since 2014. Stefan Dostanic, Arts ’07, was appointed Milwaukee County deputy clerk. Aaron Foley, Law ’07, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as an associate in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on estate planning, probate and trust administration, business law, real estate, and adult guardianship.

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Laura (Grimm) Grebe, Arts ’07, Law ’10, developed the Experimental Play on Words series: 1000+ Still Useful Words and How to Use Them in Your Writing; 700+ Verbal Emojis; and 500+ Happenings to Prove Existence. All pieces in the series were published in 2016. ♥ Julie Jahnke, Comm ’07, and Brian Gingrass, Bus Ad ’06, wed Aug. 27, 2016, at St. Dominic’s Catholic Church in Brookfield, Wis., with Rev. Doug Leonhardt, S.J., officiating. A reception was held at the Wisconsin Club in Milwaukee.

W Michael Kelly, Bus Ad ’07,

Law ’13, and Stephanie Kelly, Arts ’07, Grad ’12: son Charles “Charlie” Kersey born Sept. 10, 2016. He joins brother Jack.

W Amy Getz Niedziela, Dent

’07, and Jeffrey Niedziela, Dent ’06: son Hugh Getz born Oct. 14, 2016. He joins siblings Stuart, 5, Elsie, 3, and Louise, 1.

W Kathryn (Costello)

Provenzano, Comm ’07, and Charles Provenzano, Arts ’07: daughter Kerry Colleen born Aug. 25, 2016 in Chicago. She was 7 pounds and 20 inches. Darren Sells, Comm ’07, was promoted to senior manager for supplier collaboration at Walgreens Co. in Northbrook, Ill. Jeffrey Wilson, Law ’07, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as an associate in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on business and intellectual property litigation, criminal defense, family law and guardianships.

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Kristin (Notaro) Allen, Comm ’08, and Ben Allen, Bus Ad ’08: son Theodore “Theo”


Stefano born Nov. 20, 2016. He joins brother Bryce, 2. A LU MN I C LU B S

WHAT’S SHAKIN’? Check out these alumni activities and more. Visit go.mu.edu/alumni-events.

DEEDS NOT WORDS

M I SS O U R I

Club of St. Louis Sixth Annual Regional Golf Tournament and Reception at Persimmon Woods Monday, June 5, 2017.

ALUMNI CLUBS IN ACTION

The Marquette Club of San Diego opened 2017 with its annual Real Chili bash. Club co-president Emilio Arechaederra, Jr., Bus Ad ’85, never cuts corners on authenticity when he hosts this event. He ships the iconic campus comfort food straight from its landmark Wells Street restaurant. More than 40 alumni, parents, students and friends turned out to watch Marquette take on Villanova, enjoy camaraderie and fill a heaping bowl — Marquette style.

W Kevin Konieczka, H Sci ’08,

Grad ’10, and Jane (Derdzinski) Konieczka, Bus Ad ’08: son Benjamin Michael born July 10, 2016. He was 7 pounds, 5 ounces. ♥ Alexander Parets, Arts ’08, and Mallory Loveridge, wed April 14, 2016 at Playa El Jobo in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The couple lives in Washington, D.C. He was named Distinguished Employee of the Year for 2016 at the U.S. Department of the Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control. He is a political economist working on economic sanctions design and implementation. Kellan Sams, Comm ’08, took command of the 173rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) Signal Company in Vicenza, Italy, in June 2016. The 173rd Airborne Brigade is the U.S. Army Contingency Response Force in Europe, capable of projecting ready forces anywhere in the United States, European, Africa or Central Commands’ areas of responsibility within 18 hours.

W Greg Schumacher-Novak,

ILLINOIS

Club of Chicago Job Shadow program with current students. Ongoing throughout the summer. VA R I O U S R E G I O N S Summer Send-offs

Welcoming local incoming freshmen and their parents to the Marquette family. Ongoing throughout the summer.

Eng ’08, Grad ’09, and Emily Schumacher-Novak, Comm ’07, Grad ’11: son Benjamin Xavier born July 27, 2016. He joins brother Jacob, 2.

W Jessica Watkins Hagen, H Sci ’08, Grad ’09, and Jesse Hagen: son Charles Henry born Jan. 23, 2016. He was 8 pounds, 4 ounces and 21 inches.

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Gina Compton, Arts ’09, and Adam Compton: son Grant James born Aug. 8, 2016. He was 8 pounds, 2 ounces and 21 inches long.

SEE ALL UPCOMING EVENTS AND MAKE THE SCENE! VISIT GO.MU.EDU/ALUMNI-EVENTS.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 39


CLASS NOTES

L E T ’ S LO O K B A C K

SECOND ACT Matthew Costello, Grad ’11, ’16, inaugurated a new career in Washington, D.C., in December — senior historian for the White House Historical Association. He was able to turn a childhood love of history into a full-time job. “I’m just someone who loves history and wants to share that passion with others,” Costello says.

Costello read any history book he could get his hands on while growing up. It was U.S. presidents like Abraham Lincoln, “a man ahead of his time,” and George Washington, “the person America needed at that time,” who drew him to the subject. These personalities of history and more motivate Costello to continue exploring and sharing that knowledge. “At the end of the day it’s about making our past more accessible to people,” he says. Though fairly new at this celebrated post, Costello says the work already “encompasses a lot of

creativity and many opportunities for learning.” He organizes a lecture series that covers a variety of topics. Focuses may range from an individual with White House connections to an anniversary or commemoration. He also responds to media requests, which can entail, “looking into what goes on during an inauguration or finding out more about presidential candies.” For an upcoming luncheon with the French Embassy, Costello is researching the favorite foods and dishes of past U.S. presidents.

BY ELLEN NEI ERS, STUDENT-I NTERN

TELL US ABOUT AN ALUM JUMP-STARTING A NEW CAREER @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

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MEET OUR FACULTY INNOVATORS @ MARQUETTE.EDU/PODCASTS.

♥ Steve Drolet, Bus Ad ’09, Grad ’10, and Caitlin (Hubick) Drolet, H Sci ’09, wed May 14, 2016 at Church of the Gesu in Milwaukee.

W Brittany (Clement) Frassetto,

Comm ’09, and Mark Frassetto, Arts ’10: son Paul Abraham born Nov. 7, 2016. He was 7 pounds, 13 ounces and 20.75 inches. He joins sister Caroline, 2.

W Abbi (Ott) French, Arts ’09,

and John French, Grad ’12: daughter Lilliana Elizabeth born May 6, 2016. She was 7 pounds, 14 ounces and 21 inches. Maria Novotny, Arts ’09, is codirector of The ART of Infertility, an art, oral history and portraiture project that hosts art exhibitions around infertility experiences. The project has been invited to travel to Switzerland to host an art exhibit for Merck Pharmaceutical Co. ♥ Kyle Oren, Bus Ad ’09, and Andrea James Oren, Nurs ’10, wed Aug. 12, 2016 at Prairie Street Brewhouse in Rockford, Ill.

W Kathleen (Marsaglia) Otzel,

Nurs ’09, and Matthew Otzel, Eng ’10: daughter Matilda Elise born Sept. 24, 2016. She was 6 pounds, 7 ounces and 20 inches long. The family lives in Naperville, Ill. Payal Patel, Comm ’09, was named to PR News’ Rising PR Stars 30 and Under list, which honors budding public relations leaders and creative practitioners worldwide who have demonstrated excellence in the industry and made a measurable impact through their work. He was honored at a special ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Lynn Sheka, Comm ’09, Grad ’15, was promoted to vice president at Reputation Partners, a strategic communications firm with offices in Milwaukee and Chicago. She helped open the firm’s Milwaukee office in January 2016.

W Russell Steinbrenner, Eng ’09,

Law ’13, and Mary Steinbrenner, Arts ’08: daughter Hannah Louise born Dec. 7, 2016. She was 7 pounds, 15 ounces and 20 inches. She joins brother Henry, 2. The family lives in Cedarburg, Wis. Daniel Wojno, Eng ’09, is director of advanced quality at Pandora in Bangkok, Thailand. He manages an international staff of 70 and oversees manufacturing and engineering practices. Prior to joining Pandora, he was director of operations for David Yurman. He and his wife Ashley Niedringhaus, Comm ’09, moved from New York City to Bangkok in March 2014. She is a freelance travel journalist and global correspondent for Travel+Leisure magazine.

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♥ Tyler Bridges, Eng ’10, Grad ’14, and Emily (Zei) Bridges, Nurs ’10, wed Sept. 16, 2016 at Rocky Mountain National Park in Estes Park, Colo. They live in Seattle, where he works as a project manager and she is an oncology nurse. ♥ LeighAnne (Schlichte) DeHaan, H Sci ’10, and Benjamin DeHaan, wed July 9, 2016 at Holy Family Catholic Church in Brentwood, Tenn. The couple lives in Franklin, Tenn. Adam Finkel, Law ’10, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as an associate in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on business disputes and commercial litigation.

IT’S KIND OF A SIMPLE QUESTION … WHAT INSPIRES YOU? “People who make me think.” TIMOTHY

“Traveling to ancient religious ruins in Turkey, Italy and Sicily.” LEONARD

“For 70 years, Marquette University and the wonderful Jesuits that taught me, and continue to teach my grandchildren.” JIM

“My mother, when I look at everything she was able to accomplish and she only had an elementary school education. I know there are no limits to what I can accomplish.” VANESSA ANN TELL US MORE!

We want to hear your voices. Share your thoughts @ magazine.marquette.edu/ share.

Andrew Frost, Law ’10, joined von Briesen & Roper S.C. as an associate in the Milwaukee office. He focuses on employment counseling, employment litigation, private-sector labor relations and employee benefits.

W Amanda Hein Siegrist,

H Sci ’10, and Tony Siegrist: son Theodore Allan born June 2016. He joins sister Adalyn Renee, 2. ♥ Matthew Kenney, Eng ’10, and Kimberley Schmitt, wed Oct. 29, 2016 at Schmitt Family Farm in Lowell, Wis. The reception was held at the Columbus Fireman’s Park Pavilion in Columbus, Wis., where they live. She is a communication specialistadvanced in the Office of Public Affairs at the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, and he received his professional engineer’s license and was promoted to CE transportation senior engineer in the Southwest Region DOT office.

W Kari (Greenlees) Majewski,

Grad ’10, and Bryan Majewski: son Myles Jordan born Sept. 29, 2016. He was 7 pounds, 6 ounces and 20 inches long. Ethan Rector, Law ’10, is an associate attorney with Spencer Fane LLP, working in Colorado Springs and Denver. He was previously with Berenbaum Weinshienk PC. He lives in Colorado Springs with his wife Heidi and their three children.

W Katie (Moss) Rice, Ed ’10,

and Mike Rice, Bus Ad ’10: daughter Ellen “Ellie” Ruth born Oct. 29, 2016. She was 8 pounds, 9 ounces and 21.5 inches.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 41


CLASS NOTES

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SEND MILESTONE PHOTOS TO MARQUETTE.EDU/CLASSNOTES.

LET’S CELEBRATE THESE ALUMNI MILESTONES Send your wedding photo of the happy couple or photo of the newest addition to your family. We’ll share as many as possible here on the “Milestones” page for everyone to enjoy. 1 Allison (Chouinard), Eng ’13,

♥ Abigail (Fox) Weihert, H Sci ’10, Grad ’11, and Andrew Weihert, Eng ’10, wed Sept. 24, 2016 at St. Jude the Apostle Church in Wauwatosa, Wis. The couple lives in Chicago, where he works as a structural engineer at Sargent & Lundy, and she is a physician assistant at University of Illinois Chicago. Many alumni attended the wedding. R E U N I O N

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♥ Kaitlyn (Mueller) Keizer, Bus Ad ’12, and Jordan Keizer, wed Oct. 22, 2016 in Milwaukee. The couple lives in Edmonton, Alberta. She is a cross-border tax manager with PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Grad ’15, and Alex, Comm ’12, Tolan; 2 Emily (Zel), Nurs ’10, and Tyler, Eng ’10, Grad ’15, Bridges; 3 Grandchildren of Lynn and John

Pfefferle, Arts ’66, with Luke Fischer; 4 Andrea (James), Nurs ’10, and Kyle, Bus Ad ’09, Oren; 5 Tessa, daughter of Elissa

(Flynn), Arts ’06, and Sean McClure, with sisters Alexa and Laila; 6 Lexi (Lozinak), Comm ’13,

♥ Lauren (Benjamin) Messier, Arts ’12, Grad ’16, and Ryan Messier, Comm ’11, wed Sept. 4, 2016 at Easton’s Beach, Newport, R.I.

13

Jason Braun, Comm ’13, is associate product manager for Power Products LLC, in Menomonee Falls, Wis.

Schlindwein; 7 Ryan, son of Matt and Sharon (Piotrowski) Murphy, Law ’99; 8 Colin, son of Kathryn, Comm ’05, and Patrick, Bus Ad ’04, Grad ’12, Brown; 9 Henry and Anna, twins of Emily (Wacker), Comm ’04, and Steve, Comm ’98, Grad ’07, Schultz; 10 Rylan, son of Anne Kalmer

Cainion, Comm ’02, and Derrick Cainion; 11 Ivan, son of Laura (Heyrman), Nurs ’07, and Paul, Bus Ad ’06, Grad ’07, Thompson; 12 Chase, son of Joanne and

Patrick, Arts ’10, Volkert. Photos must be 300 dpi at 2 x 3.”

Lydia (Dahl) Bugli, Arts ’13, was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar after graduating cum laude from Boston College Law School in May 2016 and passing the Massachusetts bar exam. She works as a private wealth adviser at Goldman Sachs in Boston.

♥ Timothy Lewis, Eng ’14, and Elyse O’Callaghan Lewis, Eng ’14, wed Sept. 10, 2016 at Church of the Gesu. Eleven of the 16 members of the bridal party attended Marquette University. Elyse and Tim grew up in Wauwatosa, Wis., attended Marquette University together, and now live in Seattle. ♥ Rebecca (Pachuta) Maag, Eng ’14, and Patrick Maag, Bus Ad ’13, wed Aug. 1, 2015 at Old St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Milwaukee. He works as a senior financial analyst at Grace Matthews in Milwaukee, and she is a math teacher at Whitnall High School in Greenfield, Wis.

A group of Marquetters from the classes of ’79, ’80 and ’82 have celebrated the Christmas holidays together for 26 years. This year they

15

Ahmad Murrar, Arts ’15, worked as a White House intern in Washington, D.C., during the fall of 2016.

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NORTH STARS

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Nicole (Frank) Dykstra, H Sci ’16, and Raymond Dykstra: daughter Aspen Rose born July 28, 2016. She was 8 pounds, 14 ounces and 21.5 inches. She joins brother Jackson.

took the celebration abroad, to the residence of Juan Alsace, Arts ’80, U.S. Consul General in Toronto, and Nancy (Happel) Alsace, Nurs ’79. SHARE YOUR PHOTOS @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE. EDU/SHARE.

Â

and Jacob, H Sci ’13, Dent ’16,

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♥ Jacob Schlindwein, H Sci ’13, Dent ’16, and Alexis (Lozinak) Schlindwein, Comm ’13, wed Nov. 5, 2016 at Old St. Mary’s Church in Milwaukee. ♥ Allison (Chouinard) Tolan, Eng ’13, Grad ’14, and Alex Tolan, Comm ’12, wed Oct. 21, 2016 at Pabst Best Place in Milwaukee.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 43


CLASS NOTES

IN MEMORIAM

George W. Jewell, Eng ’49; Daniel Joseph

Stephen Bruno, Arts ’52, Med ’56; Robert

MacDonald, Jour ’49; Mary J. Mertz Murphy,

Arthur Davies, Dent ’52; Donald Gerald Ehr,

Arts ’49; Thaddeus F. Paruzynski, Sp ’49,

Eng ’52; F. John Evert, Eng ’52; Allan Forrest,

Grad ’51; John T. Sankovitch, Eng ’49

Bus Ad ’52; Jerome Eugene Friedman, Jour

1950s

’52; George Vincent Goodin, Arts ’52; Roger Hubert H. Braun, Eng ’50; Mary

Agnes Buerger, Arts ’50; Donald B. Carney,

1940s

Arts ’50; James Edward Craft, Bus Ad ’50; Cecile H. Mack, Nurs ’41; Virginia

Kenneth John Dahms, Eng ’50; Robert

Harvey Grundmann, Arts ’52; Morris Hindin, Dent ’52; Edward J. Kowaleski, Grad ’52; James Edward Kulas, Arts ’52, Grad ’53; John Aloysius Malley, Arts ’52, Med ’55; James Clement Moffet, Grad ’52; James Raymond

M. Tierney Rogers, Jour ’41; Robert A.

Andrew Doyle, Arts ’50; Thomas J. Duffey,

Stemper, Bus Ad ’41; Evelyn Mary Doligalski,

Arts ’50, Law ’52; Charles William Foran, Arts

Arts ’42; Elroy L. Gerschke, Bus Ad ’42;

’50, Law ’52; Douglas Roland Gerber, Bus Ad

Beverly J. Molitor Rawlings, Dent Hy ’42;

’50; Harry E. Janecek, Eng ’50; Milan A.

Marie L. Ocvirk Streff, Arts ’43; Leo Richard

Mihal, Grad ’50; Albert A. Pellicori, Bus Ad

Grinney, Med ’44; Nicholas T. Knauf, Eng

’50; Robert Peter Ripp, Bus Ad ’50; Robert

’44; Lorraine V. Machan, Nurs ’44, Grad ’48;

Jack Sem, Eng ’50; Irving W. Zirbel, Arts ’50,

Rosemary A. Roettgers Smith, Bus Ad ’44;

Law ’52; David William Austin, Eng ’51; Joan

Ellen R. Rohan Bell, Jour ’45; Reve A.

Marcella Barina, Arts ’51; Essie M. Willis

Spooner Heaps, Jour ’45; Frances J. Kraus

Cannon, Arts ’51; Marilyn E. O’Dowd Cooley,

Milton, Nurs ’45; John J. Cassidy, Eng ’46;

Jour ’51; David Robert Dolan, Arts ’51; Mary

Patricia A. Costello, Arts ’46; Lillian M. Daniels

J. Buellesbach Flanagan, Jour ’51; Mary A.

Dziadulewicz, Arts ’46; David E. Fons, Arts

Magladry Goodin, Grad ’51; Robert L.

’46, Law ’48; Phoebe A. Goulet, Jour ’46;

Hoffmann, Grad ’51; Frank S. Inbusch, Eng

Louis Francis Kohn, Arts ’46; Richard F.

’51; Catherine P. Gibbons Jerge, Nurs ’51;

Minton, Med ’46; Allen Luke Pirus, Dent ’46;

Edward J. Marinik, Jour ’51; Darrel Duane

Robert John Schweitzer, Med ’46; Robert J.

McStrack, Eng ’51, Grad ’68; Damon Patrick

Vaneska, Eng ’46; Joseph Leon Favreau, Jour

Nolan, Eng ’51; Sandy E. Zilg Pavlic, Arts ’51;

Clemens A. Czapinski, Bus Ad ’54; Nan A.

’47; William Henry Zink, Dent ’47; Kathryn

Ergi John Pesiri, Med ’51; Mary Kay Carberry

Toennessen Czerniakowski, Arts ’54; Emeric

M. Emmenecker Bolton, Jour ’48; Paul C.

Smith, Nurs ’51; Josephine J. Mayhew Van

V. Dakich, Grad ’54; John J. Daly, Jour ’54;

Bruno, Eng ’48; Harry Samuel Caskey, Med

Lieshout, Nurs ’51; Helen M. Dwan Vasilius,

Rita K. Plashal Lindner, Med Tech ’54;

’48; Helen L. Tarnovits Ferderbar, Bus Ad

Arts ’51; Jean L. Kodera Amrhein, Bus Ad

Richard R. Mauthe, Arts ’54; Geraldine S.

’48; John J. Frederick, Arts ’48, Med ’51;

’52; John E. Bernbrock, Grad ’52; Domenick

Szpera Powers, Sp ’54, Grad ’56; Joan B.

Nellen, Arts ’52, Med ’55; Donald Eugene Nimtz, Eng ’52; John W. Pattno, Arts ’52; Carson C. Remington, Dent ’52; Margaret Rose Schwacher, Arts ’52; Frank Filmore Shuler, Dent ’52; Richard James Ullmer, Eng ’52; Jacquelyn E. Bray Warfield, Dent Hy ’52; Marcus Eugene Woods, Bus Ad ’52; Walter L. Gojmerac, Grad ’53; Aurelia M. Hogan Hofmann, Grad ’53; Gilbert John Krueger, Arts ’53; Donald Keith Letter, Dent ’53; Robert Henry Lewis, Bus Ad ’53; Robert John Lounsbery, Eng ’53; John J. McLario, Law ’53; Gladys H. Lee Meier, Arts ’53; Howard L. Meyers, Arts ’53; Anthony J. Nania, Grad ’53; June C. Henk Nolan, Arts ’53; James Paul O’Brien, Bus Ad ’53; Arnold C. Wegher, Eng ’53; Joan P. Prentice Collings, Arts ’54;

Carol C. Bleck Gabriel, Bus Ad ’48; Beverly

Mazanec Schaefer, Sp ’54; George Rudolf

M. Kapke Hansen, Nurs ’48; John Hayes,

Schimmel, Arts ’54, Law ’59; Richard John

Bus Ad ’48; Edward J. Kozlowski, Eng ’48;

Strohm, Bus Ad ’54; James Mathias Cerletty,

William Rupert Laidig, Eng ’48; Marilyn M.

Arts ’55, Med ’58; Kenneth J. Dunlap, Arts

Marx, Arts ’48; Robert G. Michel, Eng ’48;

’55, Law ’59; Joseph A. Janik, Dent ’55;

M. Joelise Restle, Arts ’48; Cecilia H. Janzer

Ronald J. Kozlowski, Bus Ad ’55; Wilfred L.

Sawicki, Nurs ’48; Marvin Carl Voissem, Bus

LaCroix, Jour ’55; Thomas Leo McAleese, Eng

Ad ’48; Dolores Josephine Wrzesinski, Arts

’55; John Anthony Puk, Arts ’55, Med ’58;

’48; Joan M. Gebhard D’Incecco, Sp ’49;

Mary V. Vaughan Sebastian, Arts ’55; John

Dolores G. Janonis Grunke, Sp ’49; Robert E.

L. Touchett, Arts ’55; James E. Buckley, Arts

Hecht, Law ’49; Ervin F. Janowiak, Eng ’49;

’56; Terence H. Furman, Dent ’56; Kenneth J.

44 / SP R I N G 2 01 7


NOMINATE AN EXPERT @ MAGAZINE.MARQUETTE.EDU/SHARE.

1

THE GAME OF LIFE

Why does this course excite you? I don’t teach novels that I don’t love — intellectually and emotionally and think are beautiful. My students see that passion. I tell them “I love this novel” and then guide them through the sort of close reading that we’ve lost. It’s important to read closely, think deeply and ask questions because all of that reveals what’s beautiful in the text.

2

What kind of questions? What is the text doing? Why is it brilliant? What is the author communicating? There is a kind of fidelity toward the text that goes beyond loving it, and that’s what I want to help my students see and understand.

3

Do students catch on? You have to have inquisitive students. Students at every university are unique; Marquette students are good thinkers. I’m teaching a set of ideas and techniques, but I have to let the magic happen in the classroom. That’s the only way you can think through texts in a meaningful way.

Winning strategies from our expert

Dr. Ainehi Edoro Assistant Professor of English

Do you remember an amazing teacher? The one who made you sit a little straighter, hoping to be noticed and hoping, too, you’d know the answer to every question? That’s Ainehi Edoro, a first-year faculty member in the Department of English, whose esprit should be bottled because it probably ignites something students hadn’t guessed they could summon — deep interest in literature. She was listed among the most influential Africans in 2016 by New Africa Magazine, an honor she attributes to her blog Brittle Paper. But it’s her zest for teaching a course about the theory and history of the novel — and how writers worldwide take ownership and keep changing the novel — that comes through in class. EXPERTS SHARE HOW THEY PLAY THE GAME OF LIFE.

Tell us about an expert we should interview @ magazine.marquette.edu/share.

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 45


CLASS NOTES

46 / SP R I N G 2 01 7


1960s

Jane Clark, Grad ’60; Nancy

T. Tenfelde Clasby, Arts ’60; Lawrence P.

IN MEMORIAM, CONTINUED

Crosara, Grad ’60; David Francis Kress, Eng ’60; Joan K. Martin, Nurs ’60; Barbara A. Schweiger O’Neil, Arts ’60; Boris Konstantin Radzin, Eng ’60; Laurence Disraeli Scott,

Harrington, Med ’56; Robert Leo Hulseman,

Arts ’60, Grad ’62, Law ’65; Jane Marie

Arts ’56; Edward C. Jarosz, Bus Ad ’56;

Villeneuve, Jour ’60; John A. Whelan, Bus Ad

James Francis Marzano, Bus Ad ’56; James

’60; Douglas Frederick Findling, Bus Ad ’61;

V. Petersen, Dent ’56; Donald Harry Portch,

Bert H. Green, Dent ’61, Grad ’63; William R.

Eng ’56; Raphael John Steinhoff, Eng ’56;

Jost, Eng ’61; John Paul Kampine, Med ’61,

Rose Marie Sweeney, Grad ’56; Harold

Grad ’65; Robert D. Kastelic, Med ’61; Emily

Thomas Wendler, Arts ’56; Mary J. Trecek

M. Czajkowski Morgan, Med Tech ’61;

Andres, Nurs ’57; Marie D. Steffan Berg,

Thomas L. Peltier, Bus Ad ’61; Ernest Linus

Med Tech ’57; John C. Budicin, Med ’57;

Rischar, Eng ’61; Marietta E. Budack, Nurs

David Richard Duffett, Jour ’57; Walter Bruce

’62; James A. Dorow, Dent ’62; Jerome

Kendall, Law ’57; Joseph S. Myers, Med ’57;

Daniel Hanscum, Bus Ad ’62; Clarence E.

James P. O’Neill, Arts ’57, Grad ’61; Frances

Harms, Eng ’62; James Alfred Koester, Arts

C. Seibert Quirk, Nurs ’57; Marlyn J. Theiler

’62, Law ’65; Glenn Thomas Maihofer, Dent

Reider, Nurs ’57; Carol A. Mahoney Russell,

’62; Philip Schaefer McGinn, Med ’62; Mary

Bus Ad ’57; Alvin Leon Smith, Med ’57;

Laboure Morin, Nurs ’62; Wilbert John Persch,

Frederick W. Turner, Grad ’57; Carolyn A.

Eng ’62; Kathleen E. Hilligan Sandora, Sp

Frank Victor, Bus Ad ’57; Kathryn A. Farrell

’62; Howard Whiteford Wilson, Eng ’62;

Anderson, Grad ’58; Timothy Andrew Benson,

Ronald W. Kirchenberg, Bus Ad ’63; Elizabeth

Dent ’58; Allen Donald Beuth, Bus Ad ’58;

K. Bjorkman La Du, Nurs ’63; Alexandra M.

Lu S. Skilbred Buxton, Jour ’58; Robert

Bonczkowski Marifke, Arts ’63; James

Lawrence Doman, Bus Ad ’58; Nancy A.

Boetius McCarty, Arts ’63; Anne McMahon,

Brugger Fiuzat, Med Tech ’58; Mary McAuley

Sp ’63; Richard Donald Napgezek, Dent ’63;

Gillgannon, Grad ’58; Mary S. Bisenius Hierl,

Joseph J. Spang, Eng ’63; Donald E. Tolva,

Nurs ’58; Herbert J. Irle, Eng ’58, Grad ’61;

Bus Ad ’63; Leroy James Byrd, Med ’64;

Edward L. Martineau, Sp ’58; Anton Barton

Eugene Victor Grassi, Grad ’64, Grad ’73;

Monge, Eng ’58; Emory Ronald Niven, Bus

Roger Boyd Hunter, Eng ’64; M. Shaun

O’Meara, Grad ’64; Donald J. O’Neil, Dent ’64; Mary Pat Kenehan Sage, Arts ’64; William Otto Scott, Bus Ad ’64; Robert F. Stupp, Arts ’64; Betty J. Joppa Wruck, Grad ’64; Frances A. Bureau Yoch, Sp ’64; Warren E. Littrel, Bus Ad ’65; Steven G. Meyer, Dent ’65; Gary Val Schnabl, Eng ’65; Bryant George Weber, Arts ’65; Helen I. Barnhill, Arts ’66; Joseph G. Dinmore, Eng ’66; Philip Siegfried Freund, Grad ’66; Anthony Joseph Kuzniewski, Arts ’66; Richard Dean Marasch, Eng ’66; Jay C. Mason, Med ’66; M. Joan Stanczak, Grad ’66; Katharine T. Taylor Wilkin, Arts ’66; Norman E. Bohl, Bus Ad ’67; Tod Owen Daniel, Law ’67; Peter John Holzhauer, Arts ’67; Lorraine B. Biedrzycki Krupske, Grad ’67; Charles W. Mapes, Eng ’67; David Michael Bortone, Arts ’68; Howard Albert Hohnstadt, Grad ’68; Franklyn Donald Hopp, Arts ’68; Janet M. Martz Kraegel, Grad ’68; Richard H. Lee, Med ’68; John Peter Rusnov, Arts ’68; Jeanette P. Pamperin Tierney, Nurs ’68; John Gerald Borman, Grad ’69; Linda J. Mische Diedrich, Dent Hy ’69; Stephen Francis Kelly, Bus Ad ’69; Damian Sebastian Mogilka, Bus Ad ’69; Dennis Joseph Neugent, Arts ’69; William Michael Orth, Arts ’69; Verine J. Nardini Parks-Doyle, Grad ’69

1970s

James S. Caruso, Sp ’70; Patrick

J. Fletcher, Arts ’70; Agnes M. Minihan Harrison, Arts ’70; Anthony Craig Jaspers,

Ad ’58; Eugene M. Polewski, Bus Ad ’58;

Arts ’70; Joseph Wayne Kroll, Bus Ad ’70;

Trinita J. Cross Sclafani, Arts ’58; Francis

James Carlton Livingston, Arts ’70; Ray

Howard Shannon, Eng ’58; Avedis Soghigian,

Calvin Walborn, Eng ’70; John Tapper Avery,

Eng ’58; William Harold Vander Heyden, Eng

Bus Ad ’71; Paul Jan Boruta, Arts ’71;

’58, Grad ’63; Robert Bruce Campbell, Eng ’59;

Donald Peter Keuth, Eng ’71; Margaret A.

Barbara C. Cassidy De Smet, Sp ’59; Arnold

Myers McCabe, Arts ’71; Floyd James Purdy,

Bruce Engle, Arts ’59; Leon Dale Fiedler, Dent

Arts ’71; John Michael Scibilia, Arts ’71;

’59; Dorothy A. Mayou Hartley, Nurs ’59;

Matthew Martin Stano, Arts ’71; Robert Henry

Edward J. Kleine, Eng ’59; Kenneth William

Fischer, Eng ’72; Karen Ann Glapa, Arts ’72;

Krause, Eng ’59; Vincent Antonio Megna, Arts

Michael John Krauski, Eng ’72, Grad ’74;

’59; Warren Charles Unterholzner, Arts ’59, Med

Mary Ann Hickey Renz, Jour ’72; Patrick L.

’63; Arlene D. Shimkus Vanderbilt, Arts ’59

Call, Arts ’73, Arts ’77; Dale M. De Steffen,

MARQU E T T E M A G A Z I N E / 47


CLASS NOTES 1980s

Barbara J. Boland Haladej,

1990s

Katherine J. Zehren Babbitt,

Sp ’80; Rodney L. Cubbie, Law ’81; Virginia

Grad ’91; Tanja L. Hamilton-Duffey, Grad

Jeffrey Frazier, Jour ’81; Josephine Ann

’91; Joseph Michael Wolter, Arts ’91; Alonzo

Matthews, Nurs ’81; Nancy Sue Menard,

G. Caudillo, Arts ’92; James Patrick Martin,

Sp ’81; Michael Leo Schemmer, Eng ’81;

Law ’92; David Matthew Van Camp, Eng ’92;

David McFadden Short, Bus Ad ’81; Thomas

Jennifer A. Vosburgh Waldenmeyer, Bus Ad

Dent ’73; Tucker Jones, Sp ’74; Maryann

Michael Armstead, Eng ’82; Eileen P. Sheil-

’92; Amy J. Lamerand Zott, Arts ’92, Law ’95;

S. Seuffert Soos, Bus Ad ’74; David Henry

Tokus, Grad ’82; Barbara D. Diamond Turner,

Pamela J. Misfeldt Eigenfeld, Arts ’94; Joy

Ternes, Arts ’74; Victor E. Blitz, Eng ’75; Budd

Grad ’82; Edward William Yakos, Eng ’82,

Catherine Borszowski, Dent ’95; Virginia

Cornelius Brown, Arts ’75; Loyal E. Gake,

Grad ’95; Dorothy Jean Carr, Arts ’83;

A. Sadowski Koehler, Arts ’95; Kirk Albert

Eng ’75; Thomas Joseph Honl, Dent ’75; John

Jacqueline H. Hanson Dee, Law ’83; Deanne

McDonald, Comm ’95

David Kinkel, Grad ’75; Claire D. Gavin

M. Haviland Monaghan, Jour ’83; John

Meisenheimer, Grad ’75; Lynn Ann Ottoson,

Michael Clair, Bus Ad ’84, Law ’87; Daniel

Arts ’75, Dent ’80; Paul A. Henningsen, Law

Thomas Pekarske, Grad ’84, Grad ’89; John

’76; Angela D. Tursi Sammarco, Nurs ’76;

James Petik, Jour ’84; James Patrick Kelly,

John Yung Teng, Grad ’76; Patrick Daniel

Eng ’85; Richard Thomas Suttle, Dent ’85;

Devitt, Arts ’77; Gregory Paul Boehlke, Arts

Hugo William Wandt, Law ’85; Stephen

’78; Ruth A. Seifert Caravella, Sp ’79; Robert

Thomas Gallagher, Sp ’87; Tara A. Fallaw

Michael Vavrek, Grad ’79

Kelly, Jour ’88

IN MEMORIAM, CONTINUED

2000s

James Thomas Morrison, Arts

’02; Andrew L. Papillon, Nurs ’10; Robert Clayton Albert, Eng ’13; Pierce Alan Cordle, H Sci ’16

MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR ONE.

AND YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR MANY. Marquette University graduates are ready to go forth in the spirit of St. Ignatius to “set the world on fire.” Your gift to scholarship aid makes it possible for more Marquette students to become fearless leaders, agile thinkers and effective doers. Make a gift in support of scholarship aid at marquette.edu/giveonline or call 800.344.7544.

48 / SP R I N G 2 01 7


SOCIAL CHEMISTRY Students socialize on the steps of Wehr Chemistry, circa 1970. Recognize anyone? Send a note to magazine.marquette. edu/share.


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Reunion weekend now has a plus one.

OCTOBER 5 – 8, 2017

We’ve brought together two of our most popular events for one epic celebration — Alumni Reunion Weekend plus Homecoming — and more Marquette. You’ll connect with students and thousands of Marquette alumni at the most exciting time of year on campus. Reunion-year alumni can enjoy their class parties plus more family friendly activities, more fun, more Marquette. Welcome home. It’s going to be the best year ever. marquette.edu/reunion

Marquette Magazine Spring 2017  

Marquette Magazine Spring 2017

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