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M A R Q U E T T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

C O L L E G E

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E N G I N E E R I N G

Working together to solve today’s global challenges.


M A R Q U E T T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

C O L L E G E

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ENGINEERING Building a workforce of professional engineers for the 21st century — men and women who will provide world leadership in a new era of engineering. DEGREE PROGRAMS AND MAJORS Biomedical engineering Biocomputing Bioelectronics Biomechanics Civil engineering Civil engineering Environmental engineering Computer engineering Construction engineering and management Electrical engineering Mechanical engineering


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WHY MARQUETTE? Midsized. World-renowned. Challenging. Innovative. Exciting. Metropolitan. Welcoming. There are a lot of ways to describe Marquette. But the four words below — the heart of Marquette’s mission — might be the most important.

You’ll graduate with a well-rounded education, whether you plan to design medical devices or build skyscrapers.

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Our undergraduates can participate in engineering research, joining faculty in advancing the field. That’s not available to undergraduates at all universities.

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You’ll be busy. We have 19 engineeringrelated student organizations and about 230 others.

Excellence Our students and faculty strive to do and be more. And it pays off: Our students exceed the national average when it comes to career placement and getting into graduate school, and our alumni go on to become Fortune 500 leaders, Pulitzer Prize winners, inventors, community leaders and more.

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Our residence halls offer specialty living options, including floors for engineers.

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You’ll have fun when you’re not studying. Our 14 men’s and women’s Division I teams play in the prestigious Big East Conference. Go Marquette!

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Want to play? We have 22 club and recreational sports teams, the most among Jesuit universities.

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 ur urban campus puts you minutes O from a great lakefront, unique shops and restaurants, and major league sports. Having Marquette on your resume looks really good. U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks us among its top 100 universities.

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Faith We’re a Catholic and Jesuit university, but we welcome and attract people of all faiths. We offer a number of ways to explore and enrich your spirituality. Almost half of our students participate in faith-based activities. Whatever your faith, it’s part of the conversation. Leadership Marquette students learn to challenge the status quo as ethical leaders. They also get plenty of leadership practice on campus, and more than half of graduating seniors report holding a leadership position in student groups. Service You’ll contribute to our community. Eighty-five percent of our students participate in service before leaving Marquette, and the university was named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service.


Go and set the world on fire. St. Ignatius of Loyola 03


WHY MARQUETTE ENGINEERING We’re on a mission. The mission of Marquette’s College of Engineering is to prepare students for successful careers based on strong ethical and moral foundations, advance the state of the art in engineering, serve the professional and technical communities, and contribute to our global society.

Today’s engineers for tomorrow’s challenges. Today’s engineers can’t be just trained. They have to be creative thinkers, problem-solvers, communicators, designers and innovators. Let us show you what we mean.

Visit go.mu.edu/reimagined.

Start on day one. The College of Engineering is a direct-entry program. There’s no pre-engineering here! Undecided about an engineering discipline? No problem. Explore our majors during your freshman year, and then decide which one you want to pursue. Don’t delay. Graduate in four years. We guarantee the availability of required courses. Or you can get your bachelor’s and master’s degrees in our five-year program. Learn from the best. Our courses are taught by regular faculty who do real research. Learn in the best. Engineering Hall opened its doors in fall 2011. The 115,000-square-foot facility is an educational instrument tuned to the needs of the 21st century. (Turn the page to learn more.) Be urban. We’re in the heart of the city, which means you’ll learn about the real world in real time. Go beyond the classroom. Our renowned Co-op Program allows you to get professional experience working for a real company — and get paid — while you’re still in school.

Engineering Hall’s walk-out green roof allows students to see the first-hand effects of solar panels and water retention storage.

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Career potential. The starting salaries of our graduates are consistently higher than the national average, and more than 99 percent of our graduates receive job offers within six months of graduation. Financial aid and scholarships. About 86 percent of Marquette students receive some sort of financial aid, including scholarships, grants, loans and on-campus jobs. To learn more visit marquette.edu/explore/financialaid.


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A L I V I N G L A B O R AT O R Y “It’s more than a building. It’s a platform for innovation.”

Dr. Robert H. Bishop, OPUS Dean of the College of Engineering

As a Marquette engineer, you’ll spend much of your time in newly constructed Engineering Hall, a living laboratory designed by a guiding vision of engineering on display. From the cool gloss of stained and polished concrete to the warm accents of reclaimed wood to the rough fireproofed exterior — all is revealed by the interior and exterior glass walls. An array of 130 sensors takes a constant pulse of the building’s systems, measuring water usage, temperatures, energy consumption and vibration. All of this data is available to students via a 65-inch LCD touch-screen monitor on the building’s first floor. The building itself is a teaching tool, a place where faculty and students work together to find solutions to today’s biggest challenges: clean water, reusable energy, safe roads, healthy bodies and more. You’ll be a member of teams that take hold of new ideas, collaborate day and night, and work in a progressive environment to develop knowledge and products that enhance the quality of life for people around the world. Labs are right next to classrooms, putting you in the middle of the action, and projects can be driven by market research and prototyped within weeks.

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Lower level. Energy. A series of labs gives students and faculty the tools they need to explore energy solutions for a world seeking to reduce its carbon footprint. Areas of focus include smart power systems, thermal fluids, thermodynamics and shock physics. Floor one. State of the art. Students have access to cutting-edge technical resources, including advanced computer technology and the Jaskolski Discovery Learning Laboratory. This hands-on space is where students turn ideas into prototypes and designs and volunteer to introduce children and teens to the field of engineering through education and outreach. Floor two. Sensors, sensor controls and nanoscale devices. Sensors are crucial to the design and maintenance of all engineering systems — everything from the check engine light in a car to blood sugar monitors to potential new uses as early warning devices to protect against terrorist threats. Floor three. Human performance and health care. Laboratories devoted to areas such as medical imaging, bioinstrumentation and embedded system designs allow teams of investigators from multiple disciplines to study form and function of the human body using stateof-the art technologies and design diagnostic, therapeutic and assistive technologies. Floor four. Water and water quality. Water is an enormous worldwide challenge in the 21st century. Solutions involve water engineering, allocation of scarce water resources and other issues vital to sustaining life. It’s the new home for the college’s Center for Water Quality.


We’re training a new generation of innovative problem-solvers and entrepreneurs at the forefront of modern engineering.


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To solve today’s complex problems, engineers need more than scientific concepts and skills. That’s why Marquette emphasizes the big picture, understanding complex problems from a broader perspective. Your experience here will help you synthesize information from many fields to find optimal solutions. And Marquette supports you in your unique needs and goals. When it’s all put together, just see where we can go!

Where do our grads go?

University Core of Common Studies You’ll spend much of your time at Marquette studying engineering and applying those principles to real-world projects, but you’ll also complete the 36-credit University Core of Common Studies. This core curriculum is based on our Jesuit tradition of educating well-rounded individuals, and it consists of nine knowledge areas: rhetoric; mathematical reasoning; theology; human nature and ethics; science and nature; individual and social behavior; literature and performing arts; diverse cultures; and histories of cultures and societies. Visit marquette.edu/core for more information.

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A.O. Smith Corp.

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Abbott Laboratories

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Boeing Co.

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Boston Scientific Corp.

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Briggs and Stratton Corp.

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Caterpillar Inc.

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Eaton Corp.

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Ford Motor Co.

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GE Healthcare

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Harley-Davidson

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Hewlett-Packard

Round out your major with a minor

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IBM Corp.

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Johnson Controls Inc.

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Kimberly-Clark Corp.

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Motorola

Many students extend their engineering expertise by minoring in another engineering discipline. Others minor in areas such as biological sciences, business administration, chemistry, mathematics, physics and foreign languages.

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NASA

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Rockwell Automation

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SBC Communications

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Siemens Medical Systems

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Texas Instruments

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U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration And many more

We also offer a 22-credit minor in engineering ethics and values. Learn about the impact of Catholic and Jesuit values on engineering practice, recognize current ethical issues within the field and strengthen your moral resolve to act courageously on these issues once you enter the profession. Degree accreditation The College of Engineering is a member of the American Society of Engineering Education. Five of the college’s six degree programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission ABET, the organization that sanctions college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering and technology. The construction engineering and management program is eligible for accreditation after its first graduating class.

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Engineers Without Borders

Co-op Program

We educate socially and globally responsible engineers. So it’s no surprise that many students are active in the Marquette chapter of Engineers Without Borders. The national organization helps people in underserved areas and countries improve their standard of living. Our students have ongoing projects in Mississippi to help people rebuild from Hurricane Katrina; in Guatemala to help communities build solarpowered water-pumping systems; and in the Dominican Republic to help locals build water filtration systems.

Want to practice what you’re learning and get paid for it? Apply to our Co-op Program, a learning and training experience that combines full-time engineering work with full-time engineering study. You will be matched with a company that is willing to help you apply what you’re learning in the classroom to real-world work in your field. Students in all six of our degree programs can participate and are eligible to start a co-op after their sophomore year.

Our students also get involved with the Health, Environment and Infrastructure in Latin America initiative — HEILA, for short — and go to El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras.

You can earn up to $3,400 per month during your first co-op term, and many companies hire their co-op students after graduation. The program adds a calendar year to your studies, but you only pay tuition for four academic years.

To read about a trip our engineers took to Guatemala, go to the Marquette Magazine website: marquette.edu/ magazine/lagarrucha.

Find out more at marquette.edu/engineering/coop_eng.

Find out more at marquette.edu/ewb.

Engineering Outreach Marquette’s outreach programs are designed to encourage K-12 students to pursue an education in science, technology, engineering or math, as well as stimulate critical thinking for problem solving. It’s an amazing learning experience — I’ve

Alternate a semester of classes with a semester of work. Each semester of co-op is worth one credit, and you must work a minimum of three alternating work terms.

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Argonne National Laboratory

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Kimberly-Clark Corp.

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Lockheed Martin Corp.

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Baxter Healthcare

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Marquette University

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Boeing Co.

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McShane Construction

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Briggs & Stratton

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Medtronic

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City of Waukesha (Wis.)

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Opus Corp.

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DePuy Orthopaedics

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Rockwell Automation

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GE Healthcare

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Sargent & Lundy

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Hamilton Sundstrand

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We Energies

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Harley-Davidson

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Johnson Controls

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

learned how vital outreach education is for our younger generations. Rebecca Genualdi Civil engineering

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STUDENT PROJECTS Student organizations are a great forum for discussing ideas from your classes and projects, networking, and meeting engineering alumni.

Harbinger of hope: The challenge? Help 11-year-old Kailyn (pictured left) eat without needing to use her feet. You see, she was born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, a congenital disorder characterized by stiffness and muscle weakness, and has limited use of her arms. A team of six biomedical engineering students was determined to develop an assistive feeding device to help her do something we all take for granted: using silverware. The process included research, mock-ups, prototypes and numerous whiteboard sessions and included collaboration with students from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Now, thanks to the device she nicknamed Justin Bieber, Kailyn is enjoying everything from yogurt to pizza, one spoonful at a time. Electric endeavor: It started with a simple premise. Turn a gas-powered van from the university’s student transportation fleet into an all-electric vehicle. Nearly four years and thousands of hours later — powered by the creativity and hard work of 41 different students, two faculty advisers from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and dozens of faculty and industry mentors — Marquette’s eLIMO is now a licensed Wisconsin vehicle, part of a fleet providing safe nightly rides for students. In its off hours, the eLIMO recharges at a station in a university parking structure. Costly corrosion: Sentry Equipment, a local manufacturer of sampling equipment, had a corrosion problem. Their pressure-reducing devices, used in power plants to regulate system pressure, were susceptible to magnetite build-up. So the company was losing time —and money — cleaning them or replacing them altogether. Sentry challenged a group of senior mechanical engineering students to create a magnetic filter that would remove the magnetite from sampling lines. After months of hard work, the students produced a filter constructed out of stainless steel that used rare earth magnets. Problem solved.

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Alpha Eta Mu, the biomedical engineering honor society

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Engineering Student Council

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Engineers Without Borders

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Society of Women Engineers

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Solar Energy Society

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Alpha Omega Epsilon, an engineering sorority founded at Marquette American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Association for Computing Machinery  iomedical B Engineering Society  ngineering Knights of E St. Patrick, an organization that honors engineering students for extracurricular and service activities

 ta Kappa Nu, an honor society E for electrical engineers Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Institute of Transportation Engineers  ational Society of N Black Engineers  igma Phi Delta, S an engineering fraternity  ociety of S Automotive Engineers  ociety of S Hispanic Engineers

T  au Beta Pi, an engineering honor society T  riangle Fraternity, a fraternity for engineers, architects and scientists


BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 14

Biomedical engineers combine engineering, biology and medicine to improve human health. They design things like prostheses, lasers that perform corrective eye surgery, implantable defibrillators, and artificial organs and tissues. Choose from three majors: biocomputing to study computer engineering and life sciences; bioelectronics to study electric circuits and biomedical instrumentation design; and biomechanics to study materials and thermodynamics. In your senior year capstone course, you and your classmates will be members of a design team commissioned to solve real biomedical problems. You also can complete two degrees in five years through Marquette’s combined bachelor’s and master’s degree program or join the 15 percent of our graduates who enter medical school after graduation. Real-world experience Marquette biomedical engineers helped establish several physiology research labs at the Zablocki VA Medical Center in Milwaukee, and faculty mentors guide students in contributing to research projects there. Learn about biomedical research and regulatory issues at the Food and Drug Administration through internships at our Washington, D.C.based Les Aspin Center for Government. To learn more, visit marquette.edu/aspin.


It’s an engineer’s dream come true to see all of the fascinating research projects taking place at Marquette. I had the opportunity to spend a summer helping Dr. Jeffrey Berry with his ongoing work in the area of speech motor control. He needed a biocomputing student to help make his speech synthesizer software operate on a real-time basis. The goal was to give individuals with speech disorders a secondary means of vocal communication and a tool to help them regain some of their speech. It felt good to contribute so directly to a research project that might change people’s lives.

Cassandra North Biocomputer engineering

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My Co-op experience experience with Marquette’s Office of the Architect gave me the chance to help with the construction of Engineering Hall. I attended subcontractor meetings with project managers and was tasked with writing field reports to ensure the project was on track. The building itself presents tremendous opportunities to students. From the sensors under the foundations and on the structural steel to the interactive display that allows people to track energy savings, Engineering Hall allows for an opportunity to connect with Marquette on an entirely different level. Patrick Barnhouse Civil and environmental engineering

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design and build the infrastructure of civilization: highway systems, airports, water treatment systems, waste treatment systems, buildings, bridges and cities themselves. Real-world experience The Engineering Materials and Structures Testing Laboratory, Engineering Hall’s most dramatic space, features 30-foot ceilings, a 10-ton crane, reinforced floors and walls that allow teams to apply between 175,000 and 350,000 pounds of force to an object and observe the results. This high-bay lab is where the action is. Students work with Dr. Dan Zitomer at the Water Quality Center, a 3,700-square-foot, on-campus lab focused on the physical, chemical and biological analyses of water, wastewater, soil and sludge. Students, engineers and faculty experts from fields such as biology, economics, law and nursing study problems related to lake, river and groundwater quality. The center also has expertise in international drinking water, sanitation and public health with ongoing projects in Kenya, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Civil and environmental engineers

Civil engineers can also specialize in transportation engineering and planning, helping them learn to identify critical problems in transportation systems, urban planning, traffic control and roadway design and how to solve these modern problems.

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CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT 18

Construction engineers plan, design and help build everything from skyscrapers to power plants. They love to use their problemsolving and practical business management skills, as well as understanding of the law, to plan and manage major construction engineering projects. Construction engineers are similar to civil engineers. In other words, the people who do these jobs are good at many of the same things. Civil engineers design structures, and construction engineers take it one step further and use math, science and engineering to convert those plans into realities. Construction engineers are versatile and do a lot of behind-the-scenes work to ensure that all aspects of a project are on track. It’s up to the construction engineer to keep workers safe, meet the client’s budget and schedule, and maintain the quality requirements of the project. To do all of that, they need excellent oral and written communication skills. Real-world experience Civil and environmental engineering students enrolled in the Construction Planning, Scheduling and Control course are responsible for completing a site and logistics plan and developing a detailed construction schedule for an ongoing project in the greater Milwaukee area. Students meet with and work with the contractor overseeing the project to ensure the schedule is realistic and being followed according to its deadlines.


A highlight of my engineering experience was the opportunity to participate in the Co-op Program. I worked with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewarage District, interacting closely with a residential engineer who happened to be a Marquette alumnus. I attended progress meetings, inspected projects and assisted with engineering estimates. I also worked with local and national contracting companies and made connections that will help me throughout my career. It was the perfect supplement to my classroom education. Christina Szews Construction engineering and management

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At Marquette, the educational experience doesn’t end in the classroom. I spent a summer at Microsoft, where I worked on a piece of Windows software and wrote more than 8,000 lines of code. I worked with the fifth-largest super computer in the world during a stint at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. My Saturdays were often spent mentoring young girls interested in engineering, and I even had a chance to present at highly recognized conferences. All of these experiences helped shape me personally and professionally. Christine Matheney Comptuer engineering

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manufacture and program computers to solve problems for society and industry. Computers and microprocessors are found in most modern consumer appliances — TVs, DVD players, microwave ovens, stereo systems — and in huge multinational telecommunications networks. Computer engineers build the hardware and software systems that run the Internet and the global marketplace. Computer engineers must be on the cutting edge of trends because hardware and software systems change all the time. Computer software engineering is one of the occupations projected to grow the fastest in the next decade, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. So you’ll be in demand. And you can customize your major by studying software engineering, computer system design or knowledge-based systems. Real-world experience Marquette computer engineering students work with Dr. Ron Brown on GASDAY, a research facility that develops and refines forecasting models of natural gas demand for energy utilities across the country based on weather and other data. GASDAY currently serves 14 of the nation’s largest utilities.

COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Computer engineers design,

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 22

Electrical engineers work on the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity and how we use it. Think about the gadgets you plug into on a daily basis. How many of them are powered by electricity? Electrical engineering includes everything from large-scale power distribution to wireless communication to bleeding-edge nanoelectronic devices. Within the electrical engineering program, you can take courses in electric energy systems, industrial sensors and controls, computer hardware, telecommunication, and even nanoelectronic device formation. And with our specially tailored, five-year dualdegree program, you can even combine this major with a major in computer engineering and have room for a minor in another area, such as philosophy, business, physics or math. Real-world experience Marquette electrical engineering students can work on the Dr. Dolittle Project in the Speech and Signal Processing Lab, where Dr. Mike Johnson studies animal communication. This is your chance to learn how elephants, tigers, rhinoceroses, whales and chickens talk to each other. Out of that understanding will come better ideas for creating animal habitats and species survival programs and better technologies for monitoring animals in their natural habitats. “Making a difference, our mantra on campus, shouldn’t be confined to a difference for humans — but what we can do for all of God’s creatures,” Johnson says.


I chose Marquette because I started in classes relating to my major right away and because I got to work directly with department professors. One of the college’s research programs, GasDay, allowed me to get real experience with customers before ever leaving the classroom. I processed customer data, tested their in-house development application and contributed to the application’s development. This experience landed me an internship with a local company that will evolve into a full-time job as soon as I graduate. Matt Plank Electrical engineering

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A Marquette engineering education doesn’t stop inside the classroom. I’ve conducted research in India, studied abroad in Italy and attended conferences. I’ve learned that today’s engineers must be able to cross disciplines — and I worked with electrical, mechanical and biomedical engineers on a major design project. I’ve mentored children, volunteered at Habitat for Humanity, worked for the university’s service learning office and served as president of the National Society of Black Engineers. All of these experiences were made possible by Marquette. Marquette develops its students into leaders. Warren Raglund Mechanical engineering

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design and direct the manufacture, distribution and operation of things ranging from medical devices to kitchen appliances to robots. They work on energy conversion, environmental control, materials processing and handling, and transportation. This diverse field of engineering offers loads of interdisciplinary studies and professional options. You can specialize in energy systems, manufacturing systems or mechanical systems and work in our computer-aided design, stress analysis, engine, flexible manufacturing/robotics, materials and ergonomics laboratories. Our students design and build solar-powered boats and mini-Formula and Baja cars that race against collegiate and corporate competitors around the world. Real-world experience Marquette mechanical engineers work with Dr. Mark Nagurka, associate professor of mechanical engineering, on mechatronics, the integration of physical systems, electronics, controls and computers during the engineering design process. Nagurka says mechatronics is key to the future because the world’s problems are multidisciplinary. Solving them requires engineers who can work with counterparts in all fields. “We incorporate sensors, actuators, control systems and microprocessors into mechanical systems — not as an afterthought or an add-on — but as part of the design,” he says.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mechanical engineers conceive, plan,

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Marquette University College of Engineering P.O. Box 1881 Milwaukee, Wis. 53201-1881 414.288.6720 marquette.edu/engineering


Engineering Viewbook 2012