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Marketing

Nursing

Since he was last covered in Discover 2013, Dr. Craig Andrews, professor and Charles H. Kellstadt Chair in Marketing and recipient of the 2013– 14 Way Klingler Fellowship Sabbatical award, spent a year as a senior scholar and social scientist at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Washington, D.C. At the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, he served on the evaluation team for the $115 million “The Real Cost” Campaign, which focused on tobacco prevention and cessation among at-risk youth in the United States.

Drs. Marianne Weiss, Kathleen Bobay and Ronda Hughes, associate professors of nursing, received an award from the American Nurse Credentialing Center for their “Readiness Evaluation and Discharge Interventions” project. This multisite study will determine how a standard discharge readiness assessment by a registered nurse impacts postdischarge outcomes. The team will also determine the costs of implementing these assessments as a standard nursing practice for adult medical-surgical patients discharged to home.

Andrews also presented the “Effects of Plain Package Branding and Graphic Visual Health Warnings on Adolescent Smokers in the U.S. and the European Union” at the Marketing and Public Policy Conference in Boston. Findings show that more graphic cigarette health warnings result in increased thoughts of quitting in adolescent smokers in the United States, France and Spain, whereas plain pack and graphicness impact shorter-term measures such as craving and fear/emotion. Andrews’ work with colleagues on nutrition claims, graphic tobacco health warnings, and public health issues has appeared this past year in the Journal of Marketing Research and Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, among others. His FDA experiences and research have benefited his students and a recent textbook on integrated marketing communications.

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Here is what faculty have been up to since being featured in previous issues of Discover.

updates

Problems with hospital discharges are well-documented, according to Weiss, who, along with Bobay, was last covered in Discover 2012. Perceived inadequacies in discharge planning, teaching and coordination are associated with a greater likelihood of post-discharge problems, emergency room use and readmission. Most readmissions within 30 days are viewed as preventable, and hospitals no longer receive reimbursement for many of their readmissions. Reducing readmission rates has been central to health care improvement and reform efforts. “We have 34 Magnet-designated hospitals from the United States and abroad participating in the study, which provides these hospitals with an opportunity to engage their professional nursing staff in research about an important component of everyday hospital nursing practice, the discharge process,” Weiss says. “Hospitals will gain valuable information about the contributions nurses can make to patient outcomes after discharge and reduce avoidable expenses incurred when patients are readmitted.”

Biomedical Engineering Dr. Gerald Harris, P.E., professor of biomedical engineering, and his co-investigator, Dr. Peter Smith of Chicago’s Shriners Hospital for Children, received $500,000 in funding from the National Institutes of Health as part of a $6.25 million grant awarded to the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium of the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network. This fiveyear, multicenter initiative will focus on understanding and providing better therapeutic options for brittle bone disorder, also known as osteogenesis imperfecta, a congenital disorder that results in fragile bones that break easily and an array of associated nonskeletal symptoms including dental, respiratory and cardiac conditions. The consortium comprises eight sites in the United States and Canada and involves two clinical projects. Harris, last covered in Discover 2013 for his efforts to improve the quality of life for children with OI, will be involved in the study focused on correlating genotype to phenotype; the natural history of vertebral fractures in OI type I; pregnancy in OI; and scoliosis and craniofacial/dental features in severe OI. He will contribute to mobility assessments of participating children living with the disorder. Harris and Smith will also be involved in training graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

 


Discover Research 2015