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U N I V E R S I T Y

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2012

D E N T I S T R Y

GR A D UAT IO N 2 01 2

Far Ahead of the Curve


DEAN’s Message

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o far, 2012 has been a good year for the Marquette School of Dentistry. Months ago, the dedicated faculty members who serve as our representatives on ADEA’s Commission on Change and Innovation committee decided to share more broadly with our colleagues in dental education our approach to educating dentists. The perspective they had gained from attending national conferences on dental education translated to a clear understanding that Marquette was quite innovative on a number of curricular fronts. So they set out to let people know about it. Their submission to the American Dental Education Association led to an award that I maintain belongs not to one person, but to all in the dental school who have worked hard to collectively implement and advance Marquette’s integrated, patient-centered, comprehensive care model of dental education. I share the William J. Gies Award for Vision, Innovation and Achievement with my colleagues, without whom it would not be possible to provide the forward-thinking educational experience that defines Marquette. (As I said in my remarks at the Geis Award reception, I’ve been quite overwhelmed by any personal attention from this award, but I’m very pleased with the attention it has brought to Marquette and our program!) It’s one thing to have a vision for a curriculum that will produce accomplished dentists,

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Dean William K. Lobb, D.D.S., M.S., M.P.H.

Powerful momentum able to adapt to the rapid changes that continue to keep the profession interesting and challenging. It’s quite another to implement it. When we laid out our plans in the late 1990s to move dental education forward in a manner to benefit both students and patients, I knew that the only way we could achieve such monumental change would be to work together. And together, we have advanced Marquette to the forefront of dental curriculum reform. This gives me great confidence that we can continue this collaboration to innovate, adapt and evolve in a way that sustains our leadership into the future. Sometimes, however, even welllaid plans don’t evolve as one expects. That was the case with the dental rounds aspect of our curriculum—until a smart, creative and committed group of faculty here took a good, hard look at how we could make rounds a vital foundation of the student experience. They developed, and Marquette faculty has implemented, a dental rounds program that we feel is unparalleled. It addresses key areas of student development, brings students of all skill levels to work together, teaches the vital aspect of turning to the scientific evidence to help solve a problem, and places the highest priority on the best possible patient care. I’m extremely pleased with this year’s

inaugural implementation of the new dental rounds program. You can read all about how we got there on pages 6-7. Also, because so much of what we accomplish here at the Dental School is made possible by the generous support of our alumni and friends, I want to update you on a recent exciting development in our Building for the Future campaign. Dr. Rick Kushner, D ’77, along with his wife Cindy and his company, Comfort Dental, have pledged $1 million toward the campaign, with the hope that other alumni would make a pledge as soon as possible. Equally worthy of note, Dr. Jeff Moos, D’ 83, and his wife Beth, PT ’79, increased their personal giving to the $1 million mark, as well. We are grateful for their overwhelming generosity and hope you’ll join them in supporting the campaign. For more important information and an update on our progress, see page 10. I have to say the momentum here at Marquette is truly palpable, and it’s an exciting time for the school. As you read about our curricular leadership and campaign advancements, remember that we welcome your ideas and feedback as we provide the best possible education to the next generation of dentists.


Dental

From left, Spencer Morgan, Jonathan Kelley and Bradley DeGroot celebrate their graduation.

MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY SUMMER 2012 Editor Carol Trecek, Director, Continuing Education and Alumni Relations

F E AT U R E

4 Far Ahead of the Curve

Committee William K. Lobb, Dean James Brozek, Photographer

Kate Bruns Gibson, D ’99 Donald D. Kynaston, University Advancement Dave O’Neill, Director, Development Programs John L. Sadowski, D ’68 Nicolas J. Shane, D ’71 Kristi Strode, Managing Editor Paula K. Wheeler, Contributing Writer Marquette University Dental Alumni Association Board of Directors 2011–12

With Dean Lobb’s vision and a faculty willing to embrace change, Marquette leads the nation in curricular innovation

10 Campaign Update

News from the Marquette University School of Dentistry Development Office

inside 8 ALUMNI AWARDS 9 ALUMNI PROFILE 10 DEVELOPMENT 12 CLASS NOTES 13 COMMUNITY SERVICE 14 GRADUATION

President Nick Nelson, D ’84

18 FACULTY and STAFF ACCOLADES

Vice President Michael S. Kopecky, D ’89

21 student SPOTLIGHT

Treasurer Michael L. Hanneman, D ’82

22 IN MEMORIAM

Immediate Past President Dennis Connor, D ’73 Directors Tom Albiero, D ’82 M. Scott Connor, D ’00 London Cooper, D ’02 Lance Hashimoto, D ’88, Grad ’04 Susan Meinerz, D ’84 Dan Ross, D ’07 Ronald Santilli, D ’70 Marquette University Alumni Association Board Member M. Sandra Casper, Nurs ’71, D ’86

23 CALENDAR Submissions to Dental Images may be sent to dentalimages@marquette.edu. C O R R E C T I O N In the last issue of Dental Images, it was reported that the Dental School distributed 967 toothbrushes and completed 16,200 root canals in 2011. Those figures were inadvertently switched. Dental Images regrets the error.

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Far Ahead of the Curve With Dean Lobb’s vision and a faculty willing to embrace change, Marquette leads the nation in curricular innovation

D

r. Gary Stafford remembers how he and his colleagues became determined to shed some serious light on just what was going on at the Marquette School of Dentistry. They were attending an annual American Dental Education Association (ADEA) meeting of the Commission on Change and Innovation (see sidebar, page 5), listening to representatives from another dental school wax poetic about what they perceived as a pioneering curricular approach. “We were sitting there thinking, ‘Marquette’s been doing this for 12 or 13 years!’” says Stafford, who chairs the Dental School’s Department of General Dental Sciences. The approach – upgrading from a procedural-based curriculum to a more patient-centered, comprehensive care curriculum – was adopted by Marquette in 1999 for the entire student body. The presenting school at ADEA, by contrast, had just recently implemented it, and only for their fourth-year students. This wasn’t the first time Stafford had heard other schools discuss curricular initiatives that 4

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seemed “innovative to them, but kind of standard for model for MUSoD that the school began adoptus,” he says, adding that he’d had similar experiences ing in 1999. It embraced the comprehensive every year since 2007, when he began attending the care approach, early clinical experiences, integraCCI meetings. It had become crystal clear to him tion of content and instruction, community that Marquette and its dean, Dr. William Lobb, outreach, evidence-based decision making, and a were “far ahead of the curve.” rounds education model. It served as a blueprint Earlier in 2011, Stafford and his colleagues for the 2002 building, which was designed had also witnessed the presentation of the annual specifically to enable implementation of the William J. Geis Award for innovation in dental plan’s progressive elements. In keeping with the education. “We said, ‘The Dean has to get this. Jesuit values of the University as well as Lobb’s He’s done so much,’” Stafford says. personal commitment to community outreach Stafford and his CCI colleagues decided to education, the curriculum also emphasized comnominate Lobb for the 2012 Geis Award (see page munity service and care for underserved popula20). Having served in the School of Dentistry since tions. (This remains a curricular cornerstone: 1994, Lobb has been the driving force behind what Marquette School of Dentistry clinics serve Move Over, Stafford, in the nominating letter to the Geis Foun27,000 patients annually, and the school remains dation, described as Marquette’s “groundbreakingMenone of Wisconsin’s largest Medicaid providers.) Percentage in faculty continuand dynamic” approach to dental education. Lobbof andwomen the Marquette ally evaluate the curriculum to ensure that it the 1962 Dental Not done developing remains true School to the 1999 plan’s vision and at program. Inspired in part by the Institute of Medicine’s D.D.S. the forefront of dental education. This ongoing 1995 report calling for curricular change in dental audit also seeks out and accommodates new Percentage of women education nationally, Lobb devised a new curricular approaches that support student learning. Lobb in the 2011 Dental School D.D.S. program.


The inaugural Grand Rounds program took place in the Weasler Auditorium in the spring.

recently appointed a faculty subcommittee to examine and redesign a key element of the original plan: dental rounds. Having debuted in the fall of the 2011-12 academic year, the school’s newly revamped rounds program (see story, page 6) is already attracting national attention. “What I like about Dr. Lobb is, he’s still supporting that our curriculum is dynamic and subject to change,” says Dr. Frederick Sutkiewicz, director of assessment and institutional outcomes for the Dental School, who serves on CCI with Stafford. Sutkiewicz led a curricular review when he joined Marquette in 2008. “We looked at things like, is it contemporary? Is it best practice? Is the learning just-in-time? Are there too-large gaps between didactic instruction and clinical application? We need to make sure we are using time effectively and offering the most powerful learning experience for students, so that we can also make as much room as possible for their clinical time. So it’s not like we’re done developing.” Marquette’s approach is something Stafford and others are excited about sharing with the greater dental community. The Geis Award, Stafford says, is already elevating the Dental School’s profile, garnering the school and its Dean some well-deserved recognition for leadership in educating tomorrow’s dentists.

Agents of Change Help Dental Education Evolve As agents of change for the Dental School, the Marquette liaison team for ADEA’s Commission on Change and Innovation (CCI) is charged with questioning the status quo. Drs. Gary Stafford, Frederick Sutkiewicz, Sheila Stover and Moaiwa Kassab were handpicked by Dean William Lobb to represent MUSoD in a collaborative idea exchange among U.S. dental schools, aimed at helping dental education evolve. Not all schools have CCI representatives, but the Marquette CCI team takes the job seriously. “We have functions at the annual ADEA meeting, but then we have a separate summer meeting that’s just for the liaisons at all of the schools,” Stafford explains. “We share, give presentations and do a lot of workshops.” Charged with developing institutional projects that move the curriculum forward, the CCI team has spent several years designing and implementing its current initiative: the professional portfolio as an alternative model of student assessment. Though Stafford says MUSoD is not unique in using portfolio assessment, he is quick to add, “I like our model better! Ours is modeled after a promotion and tenure dossier, and all the artifacts that come in go under one of three domains: research, service or learning. So our students are seeing how an academic dossier is being put together.” From the first year of dental school, students begin adding material to their portfolios. Their

rounds projects, all of their research, photographs of procedures and more create a body of evidence showing the quality and depth of their work that can serve as an extended resume once they leave school. Another requirement is self-reflective writing about procedural and clinical experiences. “Instead of students doing a procedure and having that looked at and critiqued, with the portfolio they do more self-reflective writing. I want to know, for example, where the students stumbled, how they recovered, what they learned from that experience,” Stafford says. “Say they do something like taking a dental impression. And they have to do it four times. Well, what happened on the fourth time to finally capture it? What did they do differently so that it worked? They have to think about it, reflect on what they gained from the process. It makes for a better practitioner.” Kevin Greene, a D1 student, is enthusiastic about the portfolio requirement and enjoys creating a tool that will help him recall his time in dental school and seek a job when he’s finished. “I think it’s great that the school is having us do this, because it’s just going to help us in the end,” he says. “It’s a great thing to have when you graduate, along with your CV. It shows whoever’s reading it so much more about who you are, and it’s going to help me remember my thoughts about the things I did here. Like the first time I assisted, it was harder than I thought it would be. I reflected on that, and it humbled me and made me want to work harder.”

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New Dental Rounds Model Grounds Students in Science When Dean William Lobb and the faculty designed a new curriculum for Marquette’s Dental School in 1999, evidence-based dental rounds were a centerpiece of the plan. “When we adopted Dr. Lobb’s comprehensive care and integrated curricular model, rounds was supposed to be the glue that would pull everything together and encourage students to discuss cases,” says Dr. Toni Roucka, assistant professor of general dentistry, who led a subcommittee to reinvent the rounds program in 2010. “But rounds ended up being more of a small lecture venue for topics not found elsewhere in the curriculum. It became more like a catchall for content that needed to be taught somewhere.”

With its focus on scientific research and evidence assessment, “The rounds model gives you a way to consider just about

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any problem that’s in front of you,” says Dr. Geoffrey Thompson, director of the graduate program in prosthodontics and head of the dental rounds program. But before Marquette’s program was revised, “It wasn’t as penetrative throughout the curriculum as the dean had imagined, and there was a distinct lack of specialty participation.” Lobb enlisted Roucka and her subcommittee to revisit the original plan and redesign the rounds program. A first step was to research the approaches of other schools, and Roucka found that very few incorporate rounds into the curriculum. Her group liked New York University’s formation of vertical student teams (one from each year, D1 through D4) working together to tackle different aspects of a patient’s case. But true to form, Marquette faculty took things a few steps further, to create what the faculty insist is the most robust rounds program in dental education today. A well-rounded model What Roucka’s subcommittee ultimately proposed was an ambitious, threetiered plan that demands commitment from both students and faculty. Rounds happen outside of the typical class schedule, either at 7 a.m. or in the late afternoon. Roucka and Thompson say this was the best option, as the regular

curriculum, though efficient, was already quite full and there was nothing the administration saw fit to let go. “At first, people said, ‘There’s no way we can do this.’ To add something more to the curriculum was quite an endeavor. But we actually pulled it off,” Thompson says. “Dr. Lobb had envisioned us doing rounds better than anybody else, and he was the driving force.” The evidence-based approach that anchors Marquette dental rounds aims to form students into critical consumers of scientific literature. Upon graduation, the students are able to uncover, evaluate and apply scientific evidence for a particular treatment approach, and then balance it with the patient’s needs and desires, as well as with their own level of experience. Integrated clinical case seminars (ICCS) take place in the fall and spring. Under guidance from a faculty group leader, the D4s lead a vertical team and bring forth a case from their own patient population. They present the case and background, and act as a mentor to the more junior students. The D3s delve into formulating research questions in a way that will extract the most relevant evidence on treatment option outcomes from scientific databases like PubMed. The D1s and D2s address case-related basic science and pathology topics, respectively.


Involving the D1s and D2s in this vertical team allows them to “see over the horizon,” Thompson says. “So while they’re immersed in their books, they can witness what they are studying being applied to the patient in the chair, which is a beautiful thing.” Each vertical team presents its case to the other students in their clinic subgroup, and for each session, a specialist who has also performed the relevant literature search is on hand to challenge the students with his or her own questions. During summer, the focus shifts to treatment planning rounds. “Even though our students are in the clinic really early, it’s still a big transition for the D2 students when they go from being more of an assistant caregiver to a full caregiver in the D3 year. They tend to have trouble with treatment planning, because it’s very complex,” Roucka explains. “During summer rounds, the students work in vertical teams of just three students. The D3 serves as a mentor and it’s their patient case, the D2 is responsible for the treatment plan, and the D1 is more of an observer, with some assigned readings to help them learn the process of treatment planning.” As with medical rounds models, the patient is fully present for the student presentation and faculty input, and

ultimately receives the recommended treatment plan. For grand rounds, the entire student body and many of the faculty come together to hear presentations from the outstanding ICCS team or teams, as well as from a keynote speaker. The inaugural grand rounds took place this past spring, and Roucka says, “It went really well, people were happy with the format. It will be an annual event.” A foundation for lifelong learning After completing four years of dental school, all of today’s D1 students will have the full rounds experience under their belts. And although the new rounds model is more demanding in terms of student research requirements, it gets generally high marks from students, even those from this year’s graduating class who experienced rounds in its previous form. “I really enjoyed the new rounds format,” says Stacy Michels, a D4 student, who led one of the presenting teams from the spring grand rounds (topic: Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment Options in the Elderly Population). “It gave us, as D4s, a chance to interact with the D1s and D2s, which we don’t get to do often because they are not in clinic with us. It was formatted as sort of a mentor relationship, which I really liked, and I know when I was a D1, I would have loved to have upperclassmen friends to ask questions. Our

group really bonded and ended up getting together outside of planning our rounds. Also, the format of the presentations emphasized evidencebased dentistry more than the old rounds model, and this forced us to practice searching for and finding the most relevant articles. Overall, the new rounds model, while more challenging, was also more rewarding intellectually than the old model.” Thompson, Roucka and others are pleased that the new model seems to be fulfilling the dean’s original vision and significantly enhancing the students’ training and preparation for professional practice. “This is a model for lifelong professional learning and decision making,” says Thompson, adding that the consideration process students practice during rounds will serve them well in determining best practices for patient care, material selection and procedures as dentistry evolves. “The dentistry students are learning today is not going to be the same dentistry they are doing in 20, 30, 40 years. I would argue that in addition to clinical skills, you have to be a scientist, because your clinical skills from dental school are not going to hold you up for an entire career. The field is going through an explosion of change, and if you don’t change, you’re going to be left behind.”

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alumni awards

Richard Escobar, right, is congratulated by Sherman, D ‘70, and Harriet Berger.

Class of 1971 classmates, from left, Nicolas Shane, Charles Chenoweth, Michael Connor, Charles Bohl, Dean Crow, Frank Marinelli, Daniel D’Angelo and Frank Micek. Class of 1970 classmates, from left, Ronald Santilli, James Guttman, Richard Escobar and Sherman Berger.

Drs. Bohl and Escobar Honored with National MU Alumni Awards Two outstanding Dental School alumni were honored during Marquette’s 2012 Alumni National Awards Weekend, April 26-28. The annual event honors distinguished alumni from every college and school who embody the heart, soul and spirit of Marquette University.

Charles F. “Chuck” Bohl, D ’71, of Brookfield, Wis., received the Distinguished Alumnus in Dentistry Award. An orthodontist in private practice, Bohl has taught in the Dental School and is a member of several local professional associations as well as the American Dental Association. He was also among the first Wisconsin orthodontists involved in Smiles Change Lives, which provides life-changing orthodontic treatment to children from low-income families. Richard V. Escobar, D ’70, of Tucson, Ariz., was recognized with the Outstanding Dental Service Award. In addition to his private practice, Escobar has volunteered at a local clinic, ministering to underprivileged patients with

Award winners Richard Escobar, left, and Charles Bohl, far right, with Dean William Lobb.

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Dr. Bohl shows his award to his grandchildren.

dental needs. He even makes housecalls to his elderly, housebound or hospicebased patients. He credits his father, Ventura, as well as Marquette, as influential in shaping his worldview and values of faith, responsibility, leadership, hard work and persistence.

To nominate someone for a future award, forms are available online: www.marquette.edu/dentistry/ nominationform.


ALUMNI PROFILE

Marquette gave Allison Dowd “a really diverse education, and a great desire to serve.”

A l l i s o n

D ow d :

I n s p i r e d

You might think a full-time pediatric dentist and mother of two

to

S e rv e

Dowd volunteered to head up the pediatric section of the WDA’s

young children would be too busy to take on extra roles as volunteer,

first MOM event in 2009 in LaCrosse, Wis. — recruiting other

teacher and advocate within her profession. But Allison Dowd,

pediatric dentists, organizing equipment and supplies — and has

D ’01, manages to make room in her schedule.

continued chairing this section annually.

“There are lots of people out there with needs,” she says simply.

“I petitioned to have (MOM) in Madison for this year, because

“The most important thing coming out of dental school is to learn

we invite legislators to come and see what we’re doing,” Dowd says,

how to serve and to take care of the people who really need it.”

adding that the public is invited as well. “I think people need to be

Dowd, who practices with Children’s Dental Center of Madison,

made aware of the problem before it can be fixed. Dental health has

Wis., was drawn to pediatric dentistry during

never really been a priority for our government,

her Marquette years. Providing services during

and I think it’s about time they see what’s in their

rotations at the former Johnson Clinic in Milwaukee, she saw firsthand the need for dental services among children from underserved populations. Encouraged by faculty mentors, she began to focus her clinical hours on pediatrics, and upon graduation she earned her certificate in pediatric dentistry from Children’s Hospital in Denver. After settling into her practice and starting

“The most important thing coming out of dental school is to learn how to serve and to take care of the people who really need it.”

her family, Dowd mentioned to a colleague that she wanted to get more involved with organized

own backyard — the problems with access to care, and the people in need.” In addition to her MOM work, Dowd helps educate dental residents as chief of Pediatric Dentistry at the Max Pohle Dental Clinic at Meriter Hospital, serves on the cleft lip and palate team at Dean Medical Clinic, is a clinical instructor at the University of Wisconsin Medical School, and conducts a lecture series on the dental care of special-needs children through the Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin.

dentistry. Knowing Dowd’s commitment to charitable work, he

Furthermore, she serves on the Dane County Dental Board and on

suggested the Mission of Mercy (MOM), which the Wisconsin

the bylaws committee for the WDA.

Dental Association (WDA) was, at the time, working to bring to the state. “I went to Iowa to experience one of their events,” Dowd

It’s a more-than-full plate, but Dowd is as grateful for the opportunities as her patients are for the care she gives. “Some of these things do take time from my life, but I feel very blessed in my life,”

remembers. “And, well, the first patient threw up on me and wasn’t

she says. “I don’t have to worry whether I can afford the co-pay for

all that cooperative. But he was a good kid, and the family was so

my kids’ medical appointments, medication or dental work. Those

grateful that the work was being done for free, and he needed a lot

are things that I just take for granted, and so many people don’t

of work. His mom explained how she didn’t have the funds to get

have that luxury. So I look at it like a sacrifice that I make, just

it taken care of in a dental office. So afterward, I was like, ‘I got

because it’s the right thing to do.”

thrown up on, and I actually kind of enjoyed the experience.’”

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development

CAMPAiGN UPDATE $8 million

Thanks to the generosity of hundreds of our alumni and friends, we are pleased to report that the “Building for the Future” campaign now has commitments totaling more than $5 million. We need to secure the remaining $3 million in commitments by August 31 if we want a chance to break ground in September and be open in time for the fall 2013.

$5 million

SPECIAL THANKS

HOW YOU CAN HELP

1977 alumnus Dr. Rick Kushner, his wife Cindy and Comfort Dental recently pledged a very generous $1 million toward the project and are challenging our alumni to match their efforts.

Have you made your gift or pledge yet? Can we count on your support as we “Build for the Future” of Marquette’s dental school? Pledges can be made up to over five years. Donor recognition is available to those who contribute $5,000 or more. Recognition opportunities are also available. If you are interested in making a pledge or learning more about naming opportunities or the expansion in general, go to our website at www.marquette.edu/dentistry/ building-for-future-dentistry.

1983 alumnus Dr. Jeff Moos and his wife Beth, PT ’79, have made an additional pledge bringing their personal giving to the project up to $1 million.

Wisconsin Challenge The Wisconsin Dental Association has challenged its members and component organizations to raise $500,000 for the project. When successful, the WDA will earn the naming rights to the new high-tech CE classroom space that will be found in the expansion. We are truly grateful to the WDA for their continued friendship and support.

“GET IT DONE” – PART II John Bergstrom, Marquette University Trustee Emeritus and chair of the last dental campaign’s “Get It Done” committee, has come back to chair a second effort to make our needed expansion a reality. John is a Marquette alumnus and the father of a MUSoD alum. John is involved because, in spite of the fact that Marquette Dental School graduates, faculty and students do incredible work providing oral health care to tens of thousands of underserved children and their families each year, there are still many,

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many children who need access to care. He also believes we must continue to provide excellence in dental education. To grow, advance and continue to serve more patients, we need to expand our dental class by 20 students a year, build research capacity and add an additional patient care clinic. Please join John in helping us “Get It Done” once again. Go to www.marquette.edu/dentistry/building-for-the-future-dentistry or contact John about making your gift at jfb@bergstromauto.com or 920.725.3094.


Dollars & Sense News from the Marquette University School of Dentistry Development Office IS IT YOUR REUNION YEAR? If you graduated in a year ending in a 2 or 7 (such as 1967 or 1972), this year marks your class reunion at Marquette Dental School! The reunion will take place the evening of Saturday, September 15th. There will also be an opportunity for you to participate in a Continuing Education course. Reunion classes have made contributions to both demonstrate their pride in their class and to support the school’s continued success in educating and preparing tomorrow’s dentists. Ina friendly competition among reunion classes, the School of Dentistry will be honoring the class that raises the most funds!. The winning class will be recognized by Dean William Lobb at the reunion dinner, and listed on a plaque hung prominently in our building. Contributions can be for the expansion campaign, class or named scholarships, technology upgrades or other student needs. More details will be available closer to reunion time. Please call 414.288.3093 with any questions.

PLANNED GIVING Tax Savings and Retirement Plans Do you have money saved in an employee retirement plan, IRA or tax-sheltered annuity? Each of these retirement plan assets contains income that has yet to be taxed. Your beneficiaries will owe the income tax at your death, totaling up to 35 percent, which may be reason enough to consider giving your loved ones less heavily taxed assets and leaving your retirement plan assets to charity .

Chart Your Charitable Path If you would like to make a gift to support the long-term future of Marquette University School of Dentistry, you’ll want to start by assessing your goals and wishes. To see which planned giving options suit you best, try ranking these benefits in order of importance to you: (rank one through four)

Retain flexibility

Receive an income tax deduction

Ensure the future of my favorite cause

Provide for my loved ones

Now, see which type of gift matches your priorities.

To retain flexibility, you can leave a gift to Marquette University in your will or living trust. You are free to change your mind at any time to adapt to unforeseen circumstances.

JUST A REMINDER When you make a gift to the School of Dentistry, 100% of your gift is used for the purpose(s) you intended. No fees, charges, etc. are deducted from your gift. So feel comfortable that your gift is “making the difference” for us here at the Dental School.

DEAN’S CIRCLE RECEPTION The Eighth Annual Dean’s Circle Recognition Reception will be held from 6 – 8 p.m. Friday, September 14, 2012 in the Robert & Judith M. Sullivan Atrium at the School of Dentistry. The Dean’s Circle was established to recognize donors who have made a gift of $1,000 or more in the last fiscal year. At Marquette, we talk about “Being the Difference” and as our most generous and loyal contributors, these individuals are truly making the difference for the Dental School.

To receive an income tax deduction, consider creating and funding a charitable remainder trust. You’ll receive payments from the trust for your lifetime (and/or the lifetime of another beneficiary you choose) or a fixed number of years. Thereafter, we will use the trust’s balance for our charitable mission. To ensure the future of your favorite cause, you can create a named endowment at Marquette. You make a gift, we carefully invest the money and then, annually, a portion of the endowment is used to meet our needs. The rest of the endowment remains invested to keep it healthy and growing. Your name and your support of our cause will live on long after you’re gone. To provide for your loved ones, make sure their inheritances don’t carry an unnecessary tax burden. Qualified retirement plans and IRAs are the biggest offenders. Naming Marquette as beneficiary of these types of assets avoids that problem since we are tax-exempt, and you can leave less tax-burdened assets to your loved ones.

2012

We would be happy to assist you and your professional advisors in creating the ideal charitable combination for you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION If you have any questions or need any additional information on how you can support the School of Dentistry, contact Dave O’Neill, director of development, at david.oneill@marquette.edu or 414.288.6048. D E N TA D L EI M N TA A GLE SI M A 1 1G E S

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CLASS NOTES

1970s

2000s

Patrick L. Roetzer, D ’74, has been appointed Director of Operative Dentistry at UOP/ Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry.

Jaime Marchi, D ‘00, was honored with two awards in May 2012 from Coastal Connections, the Young Professionals Network of Sheboygan County in Wisconsin. Dr. Marchi, who owns Just Kids Dental, was named Young Professional of the Year, and Entrepreneur of the Year. Just Kids Dental now treats more than 3,500 patients, and Marchi regularly volunteers for free dental clinics, Give Kids a Smile, and Mission of Mercy programs. Marchi’s colleague and sister, Andi Igowsky, D ‘08, was also named as one of 10 Top Young Professionals by the organization.

1980s

James R . Masuhr

1960s James R. Masuhr, D ‘62, this year celebrated his 50th anniversary as a practicing general/family dentist. Masuhr has maintained dental licenses in Wisconsin and California, where he currently practices out of Riverside County. He and his wife, Carole, have been married 52 years and have four children, four grandchildren and one great-grandson.

Mary Eileen Geary, D ’80, received the 2011 Academy of General Dentistry Mastership Award. The organization’s highest honor recognizes her completion of 1,100 hours of continuing dental education. Christopher G. Halliday, D ’87, became the inaugural dean of the new Missouri School of Dentistry and Oral Health of A.T. Still University on June 1, 2012. Previously, Halliday was Assistant Surgeon General and Chief of Staff to the U.S. Surgeon General.

Christopher G. Halliday

Please share your news! Send honors, awards and any other submissions to dentalimages@marquette.edu.

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community service

All Smiles: Marquette Students Help Fight Childhood Tooth Decay When Melissa Fischer, D2 student, noticed a 2-year-old girl sipping from a baby bottle filled with orange liquid, she seized the opportunity to educate the girl’s father about the importance of dental hygiene. As a dental student and one of more than 1,000 volunteers in 55 communities statewide who participated in this year’s Give Kids a Smile event, Fischer was keenly tuned in to the key issues surrounding tooth decay in young children. She approached the dad and gave him an early childhood cavities brochure. “I began talking to him, and [he] seemed shocked to learn about how bad it was to send his baby to sleep with a bottle,” Fischer says. “I also talked to him about frequency of exposure to juice and how he should be brushing his daughter’s teeth with an infant toothbrush and water. He was very receptive and thankful for the information.” Give Kids a Smile is a children’s dental access program organized by the Wisconsin Dental Association (WDA) with state and local government agencies and community organizations. In addition to providing services for low-income Wisconsin children, the event, now in its 10th year, educates people on the importance of good oral hygiene. The School of Dentistry campus clinic was one of this year’s event sites. In January, more than 100 dental students, 20 WDA dentists and faculty members, and Marquette undergraduate student translators volunteered to screen 368 children, ages two to 12. Then, in February, students like Fischer treated more than 51 children assigned from the screening day. During the two days, MUSoD provided

approximately $14,000 in free services. “Events like Give Kids a Smile get young patients excited about their dental health and help build enthusiasm at home,” Fischer says, adding that volunteering for events like these is as important to the community as it is to her education. “As a dental professional, it is important for me to remember that improving oral health is not something that can only be done in an operatory,” she says. “Providing basic education and instilling the importance of oral hygiene will provide far more important impact on a patient’s oral health than I could ever do with a hand piece.” As for the 2-year old girl and her father, Fischer ran into them again about two hours later. “I saw the bottle hanging from the baby’s mouth,” she says. “But the difference this time was that there was water in the bottle.”

“Providing basic education and instilling the importance of oral hygiene will provide far more important impact on a patient’s oral health than I could ever do with a hand piece.”

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Hooding & Graduation

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2012

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1 Class of 2012. 2 Spencer Morgan leads the class in the Dentist Pledge. 3 Tracy Engelmann receives her diploma from Dean William Lobb. 4 Peter Stanek is hooded by his father Scott Stanek, Arts ’77, D ’82. 5 Katie Hansen and Gina Grenfell. 6 Faculty hooders Jim Glore and Gary Stafford with Ashley Zoeller. 7 First row: Kristin Tussing and Katelyn Modjeski. Second row: Caitlin Miller, Ashley Hankinson, Amy Inman and Emily Ann Bugger. Third row: Carolyn Gardiner and Stacy Michels. 8 James Kellner is hooded by his sister Crystal Kellner, D ’09, and father Donald Kellner. 9 Allison M. Lehman is hooded by her father Matt Lehman and her fiancé Michael Payne, HSci ’08, D ’11. 10 Students recite the Dentist Pledge. 11 Brian Hodgson, Arts ’83, D ’87, swears in the graduates entering the military: Christopher Fall, William Bates, Mitchell Oliver, Schuyler Sessions and Brandon Jones. 12 Brandon Jones and Melanie Nesbitt with friends and family. 13 Mena Ghaly, Mitchell Oliver, Craig Sonneveld, William Bates, Erin Clemens, Thomas Tessendorf, Brando Bruner and Sameet Thakrar. 14 Jared Robertson receives his degree from Dean William Lobb. 15 Michael Dienberg is hooded by Jim Glore and his mentor Paul Mahn, D ’84.

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21 16 Aanal Parikh, Savanna Smolinski, Zohra Metalwala, Himanshu Sharma and Keyur Parikh. 17 Christopher Potrykus is hooded by his father Neal Potrykus, D ’84, and brother Jason Potrykus, D ’09. 18 Stephen Syrjamaki is hooded by faculty members Jim Glore and Gary Stafford. 19 Christopher Streff, a happy MUSoD graduate. 20 Brendon Reddinger, Joseph McNiel, Brett Voegele, Mark Erickson, Peter Stanek, Brian Swanson, Thomas Steinbach and Christopher Goettl. 21 Michael Bennett receives his degree from Dean William Lobb. 22 An exuberant class of 2012 graduates.

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23 Paul Covello, Nicole Brinkman, Andrea Mier, Michael Brammeier and Brenton Soltys. 24 Row 1: Kristin Tussing, Stacy Michels, Amanda Olejniczak and Katie Hansen. Row 2: Allison Lehman, Caitlin Kudlata, Jordan Lunak, Gretchen Kelley, Emily Bugger, Katelyn Modjeski and Carolyn Gardiner.

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25 Brittany Burger, Caitlin Kudlata, Nicole Vilter and Cathleen Raz. 26 Trenton Burrup, Schuyler Sessions, William Bates, Courtney Jackson and Ryan McAffee. 27 Brenton Soltys, Michael Brammeier, Nichole Brinkman, Andrea Mier and Vy Le. 28 Mark Erickson is hooded by his mentor Jim Glore. 29 Danielle Musso, Jordan Lunak, Alyssa John, Hira Chughtai, Evon Heaser and Mansi Upadhyaya.

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30 Gretchen Kelley, Emily Bugger, Cathleen Raz, Stacy Michels, Kristin Tussing, Amanda Olejniczak and Nicole Vilter. 31 Emily Bugger, Amy Inman, Gretchen Kelley, Kristin Tussing, Group Leader Hugh Murdoch, D ’64, Carolyn Gardiner, Ashley Hankinson, Stacey Michels and Caitlin Miller.

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faculty and student accolades

Research from Christopher Okunseri, associate professor of public health, was cited in the April 30, 2012 New York Times story “E.R. Doctors Face Quandary on Painkillers.” The story explored how emergency room (E.R.) health care providers deal with patients who may complain of tooth pain as a way to get narcotic prescriptions. Okunseri’s analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (published online in January, 2012 in the journal Medical Care) found that from 1997 to 2007, painkiller prescriptions rose 26 percent, and were prescribed in three of every four E.R. visits. Denis Lynch, professor and associate dean for Academic Affairs, received an honorary doctorate in May 2012 from Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy (Timisoara, Romania). Lynch also co-authored a chapter

entitled, “Dental Developmental and Oral Soft Tissue Conditions” in the British Dental Association’s A Clinical Guide to Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (2012). The 2012 School of Dentistry Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award went to Adjunct Associate Professor of General Dental Sciences Peter Schelkun, D ’56. Toni Roucka, assistant professor of general dentistry, published “To Treat or Not to Treat…That is the Question,” in the March/April 2012 issue of Academy of General Dentistry. Alberta Abena, Law ’08, Gay Derderian, Richard Hagner, Arts ’76, D ’80, Moawia Kassab, Thomas Smithy and Joseph Vitolo have been promoted to clinical associate professor effective July 1, 2012. Brian Hodgson, Arts ’83, D ’87, and Dawei Liu have been promoted to associate professor with tenure effective July 1, 2012.

At the 2012 National Oral Health Conference, April 30-May 2, 2012, in Milwaukee, a number of Marquette faculty and a group of students shared presentations relevant to dental public health issues:

Peter Schelkun, D ’56

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Aaron Cho, assistant professor, General Dental Sciences, recently published “The Effect of Multiple Firings on the Marginal Integrity of Pressable Ceramic Single Crowns,” in The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, featured with the cover article in the January 2012 issue. Steve Koutnik, graduate resident, prosthodontics, was awarded a 3M scholarship to attend the Dawson Academy, located at St. Petersburg Beach, Fla. Geoffrey Thompson was promoted to director of the graduate program in prosthodontics, effective July 1, 2012. Thompson joined the School of Dentistry in April of 2010 after a distinguished military career. He has served as the assistant director of the graduate prosthodontic program and as the course director of the new rounds model.

Fellowship Program. The one-year post- graduate training program prepares students for practicing in rural areas that may lack other dentists or dental specialists. Eight of the nine participants since inception in 2007 currently serve patients in Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas with rural designations in the state of Wisconsin.

• Christopher Okunseri presented on his analysis of data regarding painkiller prescriptions in emergency rooms for patients complaining of tooth pain. He also pre• Jadwiga Hjertstedt presented a poster ensented as part of a multi-institutional team titled “Improving Oral Health Literacy in the on dental procedures received by children Geriatric Population” looking at the impact enrolled in public and private insurance of a community-based geriatric dentistry rotaplans in the Milwaukee area. tion on older adults’ oral health literacy and oral hygiene. • Students Joon-Jae Park, Adam Pasono and Bradley Wurm, under the guid• William Lobb and Frederick Sutkiewicz ance of faculty Christopher Okunseri, did a poster presentation entitled, “Dental Christopher Dix, D ‘76, and Frederick Student Job Placement Location Relative Sutkiewicz, Grad ‘01, demonstrated to State/Area of Origin.” The presentation Marquette’s dental rounds model through revealed that the vast majority of MUSoD their written and oral presentation adstudents who were Wisconsin residents at the dressing the effectiveness of water fluoridatime of admission remained in the state to tion in reducing dental cavities in children. practice dentistry; however, they were more likely to migrate to a different WDA region • Sheila Stover, D ’97, Grad ’03 and to practice than they were to return to their Sarah Chambers, D ’10 gave a joint WDA region of origin. presentation on the Marquette University School of Dentistry Rural Oral Health


Several students were inducted into Alpha Sigma Nu, The Honor Society of Jesuit Institutions of Higher Education, on April 14, 2012. From the class of 2012: Brenton Soltys and Brett Voegele. From the class of 2013: Kaitlyn Darcy, Jennifer Fehrman, Sarah Graesser, Jon Irelan, Christina Jahnke, Carissa Molina, Lauren Montoure and Michael Nick.

Research Day The Dental School’s annual Research Day, held in February 2012, featured oral presentations by faculty, an open poster session, awards, vendor displays and a keynote address by Dean William Lobb titled, “Research and Scholarship in Contemporary Dental Education.”

Omicron Kappa Upsilon Marquette University School of Dentistry recognizes faculty members who have made outstanding contributions to the art, science and literature of dentistry. The name and key of this

society are based upon three words that represent the dental ideal: conservation, teeth and health.

Front row: President Elect Joseph Best, D ’89; Student Inductees Christopher Streff, Thomas Steinbach, Tracy Engelmann, Chad Seubert and Alyssa John; Faculty Inductee Paul Luepke; and Vice President Elect Ron Santilli, D ’70. Back row: Past President David Martyn, D ’89; Vice President Thomas Smithy; Honorary Inductee David Dray; Student Inductees Brandon Reddinger and Cathleen Raz; President Gary Stafford; Student Inductees Mark Erickson and Bradley DeGroot; Lifetime Member Denis Lynch; and Secretary Treasurer Richard Hagner, Arts ’76, D ’80.

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2012 William J. Gies Award Dean William K. Lobb was recognized for his innovation as a dental educator with the coveted Geis Award for Vision, Innovation and Achievement at the American Dental Education Association Annual Session and exhibition in Orlando, Fla., in March. Hundreds gathered at a reception at the Dental School to honor and celebrate with the dean.

Dean Lobb with his wife Denise and son Jeffrey.

Gary Stafford, Dean William Lobb, Sheila Stover, D ’97, Grad ’03, and Fred Sutkiewicz, Grad ’01, at the Gies Award dinner. Stafford, Stover and Sutkiewicz are members of the Marquette team for ADEA’s Commission on Change and Innovation.

Dean Lobb gives his remarks at a reception to celebrate the award at the School of Dentistry.

Dean Lobb and Rev. Scott Pilarz, S.J., President of Marquette University.

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Ron Stifter, D ’67, Jack Sadowski, D’68, Dean Lobb and Julio Rodriguez.


STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Class of 2012 President Can’t Help But Get Involved When Jon Kelley, D ’12, arrived on the Marquette campus from Idaho, he told himself, “Okay, now, it’s time to stop.” The former high school student body president and college committee junkie planned to stop joining organizations, running for office and immersing himself in activities that might detract from his studies. But early in his D1 year, Kelley found himself running for, and clinching, the position of class president — a position he’s held each year during dental school. “I always get drawn to it one way or another,” Kelley says of extracurricular involvement. Despite some hectic times, he found a way to balance his presidential responsibilities (acting as an intermediary among students, staff and faculty to help resolve student concerns and serving as an ambassador for the Dental School), his involvement in the American Student Dental Association, and his day-to-day class and lab work. “I learned to manage a larger plate,” he says, adding that he even found time to marry fellow D ’12 student Gretchen (Faile) Kelley during a two-week school break last August. The son of a dentist who worked for Indian Health Services in Utah and Idaho, Kelley enjoyed accompanying his dad during emergency calls or weekend visits to the reservation as a youngster. As he continued to shadow his dad and other dentists, Kelley became more fascinated by the profession, noting how a dentist’s attitude and personality could put fearful patients at ease. It’s a challenge he’s embraced during dental school, and he’s happy when initially nervous patients leave his chair feeling more relaxed.

2012 graduate Jon Kelley calls his dad, Delmar Kelley, his “role model.”

The Jesuit mission, early clinic and simulation lab exposure, and generally upbeat atmosphere he noticed during his interview visit attracted Kelley to Marquette. Opportunities like making dentures

pating in that state’s annual Mission of Mercy and to providing care at Medicaid clinics. Not surprisingly, he also plans to get involved with the national and state dental associations.

“Dentistry is much more than oral health, there’s a whole community aspect to it.” as a D1 for lower-income patients, seeing Medicaid patients during clinic rotations and helping underserved populations throughout Wisconsin made a deep impact. As Kelly, his wife and another D ’12 friend prepare to join a D ’10 graduate in his Albuquerque, N.M., family dentistry practice, Kelley says he looks forward to partici-

“An important part of my education is the perspective I gained as a class officer,” Kelley says. “Dentistry is much more than oral health, there’s a whole community aspect to it. The more you’re involved, the more rapport you build up in the community for the issues that need to be tackled.”

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in memoriam

REMEMBERING OUR OWN The Marquette University community joins in prayerful remembrance of those who passed away between January and June 2012. May the souls of the faithful departed rest in peace. Eternal rest grant unto them, Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them.

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1948

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Earl G. Berger Green Bay, WI

Clayton M. Ingham Valparaiso, IN

Clare L. Garner Pompano Beach, FL

Frederick C. Stelmack Kenosha, WI

Richard E. Gladziszewski Charlotte, NC

Warren H. Wong Honolulu, HI

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Robert J. Stark Hot Springs Village, AR

Donald H. Ketterhagen Delavan, WI

Harold J. Gruber Sheboygan, WI

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Warren J. Hoots Mequon, WI

Joseph A. Faupl Nashotah, WI

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Domingo Donate-Torres San Juan, PR

Arthur H. Bunten Glenview, IL William C. Bush Ripon, WI James M. LaLiberte Eau Claire, WI

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Kaye V. Reese Las Vegas, NV

1960 Richard C. Connell Dunnellon, FL

1962 Richard D. Jewell Madison, WI James E. Rogall Muskego, WI

1965 Donald T. Glaesner Tamarac, FL John L. Scaduto Greenfield, WI

1968 James E. Stowell Hartland, WI

1969 Paul R. Hohenfeldt Milwaukee, WI

1980 Fred T. Tenuta Pleasant Prairie, WI


calendar

Mark Your Calendar

Continuing Education and Alumni Relations For more information on these and other events, call 414.288.3093 or visit www.marquette.edu/dentistry.

september

november

September 14

Continuing Education — Drugs and Dentistry

Co-sponsored by Lord’s Dental Studio

September 14

September 15

November 14

Continuing Education — Review of Common Medical Conditions for Dentists

Karen Baker

Dr. Joseph Best

Dean’s Circle Reception

November 28

Continuing Education — OSHA

Dr. Kathy Schrubbe

November 30

Continuing Education — OSHA

Dr. Kathy Schrubbe

Alumni Reunions — MUSoD classes ending in 2 and 7

September 28

Continuing Education — Dermatology for Dentists

Drs. Denis Lynch and Barbara Wilson

december December 7

Continuing Education — Photo Documentation: Simplifying Photography and Case Presentation

Dennis Braunston

october October 3

Continuing Education — Molars, Incisors and Fights, Oh My! Sinking Your Teeth into Dental Office Disputes

Dr. Patrick Knapp

february October 19

Alumni Reception at ADA Annual Session — San Francisco

February 22

Alumni Reception at Chicago Midwinter Meeting

Marriott Marquis San Francisco, 6 - 8 p.m.

Hyatt Regency Chicago, 5-7 p.m.

October 26

Continuing Education — Clinical Dental Update 2012

Coordinator: Dr. Ken Waliszewski

October 30

Continuing Education — Stress, Health and Performance: A Cardiologist Invades the Brain

Dr. Bruce Wilson

march March 10-17

MUSoD/WDA Western Caribbean Cruise — Honduras, Belize and Cozumel

april April 26

Marquette University School of Dentistry Alumni Awards Dinner

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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION US POSTAGE

PAID MILWAUKEE, WI Permit, No. 628

www.marquette.edu/dentistry SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY P.O. Box 1881 Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881

MUSoD students, faculty and alumni were among the more than 2,000 volunteers at the 4th Annual Mission of Mercy free dental clinic in Madison at the end of June. In two days, Mission of Mercy served 3,595 patients and did 1,205 cleanings, 2,567 fillings, 2,822 extractions, 80 root canals and 153 partial dentures, representing $1.75 million in free care. Among those who contributed their time were faculty members Lisa Koenig, D ’87, and Rod Daering, with students Kevin Greene, Luke Noble and Kimberly Bauknecht.


Dental Images Summer 2012