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02.20.13 Issue 242

FEATURE:

Willie Nelson’s Son Takes His Own Stage


w

attn: High School Seniors

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contents

02.21-02.27

meet the team PUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEF Chris Shepperd MANAGING EDITOR Chris Zebo CREATIVE DIRECTOR Brittany Hicks BUSINESS MANAGER Leisha Shepperd ACCOUNT MANAGERS Greg Keith Cody Trimble WRITERS

Luke Murray Brandon Nowalk Amanda L. Reynolds PHOTOGRAPHERS Alana Gonzalez Brittany Hicks Amantha Hons Chelsea Powers CONTRIBUTORS KISS 103.1 KORA 98.3

Essentials:

Listen 4 Think 11 Taste 14 Play 18 Look 22 Etc. 29

INTERNS Amy Bauerschlag Derek Favini Alana Gonzalez Amantha Hons Roberto Molar Chelsea Powers Rebekah Skinner

Cover story:

18

With a sound all his own, Lukas Nelson revels in his individuality. Check out our exclusive interview.

DISTRIBUTION Chris Frank Caleb Holt

Maroon Weekly is an independent, student-operated publication and is not affiliated with Texas A&M University. Maroon Weekly receives no student fees or university funding.

Cover:

Lukas Nelson Listen 7 - New music is always hitting the shelves. We help you know who is worth your time.

Taste 16 - Blue Baker is a

staple in BCS. Find out why they have made such a name for themselves.

Look 24 - Brandon offers

his musings this week on Amour.

Opinions are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the editor, publisher or the newspaper staff. Maroon Weekly is not liable for omissions, misprints to typographical errors. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher. Maroon Weekly 216 W. 26th Street ste 29 Bryan, Texas 77803 ph: 979.574.3200 | @maroonweekly Š Copyright 2013 Campus Press LP 1st copy is FREE, additional copies are $0.50 each


Josh Abbott Band

@ Hurricane Harry’s

by Luke Murray

Venturing into songwriting only eight years ago, Josh Abbott has seen success far and wide with his first two albums. Abbott grew up a diehard fan of Texas country music, and one night at Blue Light in his college town of Lubbock, Abbott found his calling. “It happened to be the Randy Rogers Band playing that night, but it could have been Pat [Green] or Wade Bowen or Cory Morrow, any of those guys that I saw over the years,” says Abbott. “I always had this fascination with what they were doing. I’d go to their concerts and there’d be hundreds if not thousands of college kids singing along.” Abbott’s roots are planted deep in Texas red dirt, but that won’t keep him from venturing into uncharted waters. Focused on future growth, Abbott has already begun to look ahead as he and his band plan to extend their footprint beyond the Lone Star.

where: Hurricane Harry’s when: Friday Feb. 22 info: harrys.bcsclubs.com

“For me, the goal is for us to be able to not just maintain but consistently get bigger,” says Abbott. “I feel like Texas has really done well for us, but I’ll never be satisfied.” Not believing that success is derived from a “platinum or bust” philosophy, Abbott and his band mates don’t seek mega-stardom. Their goal is to establish themselves as one the “most successful independent country bands” of the modern age.

LISTEN

pg 4 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13

Abbott and company will be performing at Hurricane Harry’s on February 22 with guest Hudson Moore. Tickets are available at harrys.bcsclubs.com.


Calendar

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 The Nights With Wu Man @ Rudder Auditorium The Grammy Award-nominated artist, Wu Man, is the leading ambassador of Chinese music. She takes the stage with her pipa, a four-stringed Chinese lute, and The Knights, a cutting-edge orchestra from Brooklyn. The two worlds of music fuse together seamlessly and produce a wholly new universe of sound. February 21, 2013 7:30 PM

The Background w/ Red Box Harbor and the Feeble Contenders @ Grand Stafford Theater The Dallas five-piece American rock band, The Background, who have toured with the likes of The Dangerous Summer, Lydia, and NeverShoutNever, will be rocking the Stafford Thursday night. Openers will be Houston indie pop band Red Box Harbor and indie rockers The Feeble Contenders. 106 S Main St, Bryan February 21, 2013 8:00 PM $5 Austin English & Parker Heights @ The Tap Austin English is back for another show. This time they are joined by Parker Heights for a good ole country, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll concert. 815 Harvey Road, College Station February 14, 2013 9:00 PM

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 MSC Town Hall Presents Black Pistol Fire @ Rudder Fountain MSC Town Hall’s Lunchbox Concert series is bringing you Black Pistol Fire, one of Austin’s best rock and roll duos, for free lunchtime jams! February 22, 2013 12:00 PM FREE Landon Austin CURE International Benefit Concert @ Village Cafe Enjoy the music of Landon Austin, a finalist in the Doritos Crash the Super Bowl Competition in 2007, while helping a good cause. CURE is a non-profit organization that helps children in third world countries get the treatment that they need. CURE has helped over 1.9 million patients, performed over 138,000 surgeries, and trained over 6,100 medical professionals in 27 countries. 210 W 26th st, Bryan February 22, 2013 9:00 PM $10 Josh Abbott Band @ Hurricane Harry’s Venturing into songwriting only eight years ago, Josh Abbott has seen success far and wide with his first two albums. His roots are planted deep in Texas red dirt, but that won’t keep him from venturing into uncharted waters. Focused on future growth, Abbott has already begun to look ahead as he and

his band plan to extend their footprint beyond the Lone Star. February 22, 2013 9:00 PM $15 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 MSC OPAS Present Ramona Quimby @ Rudder Theater Watch the beloved character Ramona Quimby come to life before your eyes! For over 50 years, writer Beverly Cleary has delighted young readers with stories of third grader Ramona Quimby and her tribulations growing up. Families will enjoy Ramona’s humorous escapades as she overcomes her challenges. Additional showing at 4:00pm-5:00pm. February 23, 2013 2:00 PM Salsa Saturdays @ Village Cafe Voted Best Night of Dancing (2011 & 2012), Salsa Saturdays starts with a fun, “30-Minute Crash Course Salsa Lesson” at 10pm followed by a hot night of dancing. Come prepared to sweat and to meet new people at this Aggie hot spot! Visit www.mambosentertainment.com/salsasaturdays. html for more details. 210 W 26th st, Bryan February 23, 2013 10:00 PM Cost: $5 Raspa @ Revolution Cafe and Bar Channeling the music of Bob Marley, Sublime, and Bob Schneider, Raspa fuses roots reggae with jam rock into upbeat melodies and dance favorites. The band is playing an outdoor show at Revolution Cafe and Bar, where heavy dancing and shot taking will make you feel like it’s spring break in February. 211B S Main St, Bryan February 23, 2013 10:00 PM FREE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Trivia Night @ Revolution Cafe and Bar Monday nights are pretty boring; it’s too early in the week to party and too early in the week to study. What if you could spend a Monday night with a drink in your hand and “study” at the same time without feeling like you’re partying or doing your homework? Every Monday night, Revolution Cafe hosts Trivia Night from 9pm till just before midnight. 211B S Main St, Bryan. February 25, 2013 9:00 PM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Breakaway @ Reed Arena Non-denominational Breakaway Ministries’ events have already set a record for attendance, and Tuesday’s assembly of worship, inspiration and entertainment will surely set yet another one. For more details check Breakaway Ministries Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/breakawayministries February 26, 2013 9:00 PM FREE Academy for Visual & Performing Arts Presents Leyla McCalla @ Rudder Theater As a child, McCalla’s parents gave her books of Langston Hughes’ poetry. She remembers being deeply affected and transfixed by his work. Years later, in her musical career, she decided to interpret Hughes’ poetry musically, with cello, voice, and banjo. McCalla will be performing those interpretations before a live audience here in Aggieland. February 26, 2013 8:00 PM

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 5


MSC Town Hall’s Lunchbox Concert Series Presents Black Pistol Fire @ Rudder Fountain by Amy Bauerschlag

MSC Town Hall’s Lunchbox Concert Series has been relocated in years past from Sbisa Dining Hall to the Student Rec Center to Rudder Plaza to the Zone. But finally, now that the heart of campus has been cleared of cranes and tractors and the reconstruction of the MSC is complete, Lunchbox Concerts finally have a home of their own again: at Rudder Fountain’s stage. Nearly every Thursday or Friday of the week, you can expect to see a band of any genre performing during lunchtime hours, between noon and 1pm. MSC Town Hall’s executives, in charge of the production of the daytime shows, start planning and meticulously searching for bands early in the summer and winter breaks. They handpick talent from a range of genres to perform on the outdoor stage, and all performances are free to A&M students with ears in the vicinity. In past shows, Town Hall has brought in Austin bands, such as The Docs and The Rocketboys, and Houston bands, such as The Tontons and New York City Queens. However, they’re not afraid to branch out of Texas. They’ve had Oklahoma’s indie-pop quartet, The Rockettops, perform once, and they’re preparing for Tennessee’s rockers, CALEB, to play at the end of February.

LISTEN

pg 6 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13

On Friday, southern blues-rock duo, Black Pistol Fire, who split their time between Toronto and Austin, will perform their loud, blues-rock, aggressive music on campus. Vocalist and guitarist, Kevin McKeown, and drummer, Eric Owen, have been friends since their kinder years and have played music together for over a decade. Their September release, Big Beat ’59, has received rave reviews for its rough-yet-pleasing blend of soul, blues and southern rock. See Black Pistol Fire perform for free Friday from noon-1pm on Rudder Fountain’s stage. More information about upcoming performances is available at townhall.tamu.edu.


Album Reviews By Amy Bauerschlag

My Bloody Valentine

“mbv” Released Feb. 2, 2013 With the passing of Valentine’s Day just days ago, it seemed that the ever-allusive noise pop, alternative rock band My Bloody Valentine strategically timed the release of their newest album. But as a fan of the band would quickly realize, their name and sound suggests the opposite of that theory. These guys don’t approach love the same way most people do. After 22 years since their last album, Loveless, was released, mbv combines trembling guitars, simple drums, and whispering vocals—creating an even darker and weirder album than Loveless. The album is definitely not short on soul, and you will easily get lost in the group’s patented sound; a sort of introspective, noisy walkabout may ensue.

Foals “Holy Fire” Released Feb. 11, 2013

Justin Bieber “Believe Acoustic” Released Jan. 29, 2013

Jessie Ware “If You’re Never Gonna Move” Released Jan. 13, 2013

Christopher Owens “Lysandre” Released Dec. 14, 2012

The Oxford, England dance rock five-piece have released their third album, Holy Fire, giving listeners a perfect balance between danceable rock and atmospheric post-punk.

To challenge critics who have called him “inauthentic,” Justin Bieber has released an acoustic album featuring eight tracks from Believe along with three new tracks. At first listen, the album seems silly and doesn’t provide anything new from what you already know of Bieber. Hearing a song-by-the-fire version of “Boyfriend,” not only having to endure Bieber whispering “swag” in your ear, but then being required to swallow your laughter, makes listening to the album from beginning to end quite a feat. However, once you get over the humorous undertones of an acoustic driven album from the teen pop idol, you can’t deny his catchy lyrics and smooth voice.

British singer-songwriter Jessie Ware captures the old-school sexiness of Sade with the vocal chops of what’s been compared to a cleaner version of Alicia Keys.

Christopher Owens, recently parting ways with his band, Girls, has begun a new chapter in his musical career. The eccentricities of Girls have been chiseled away a bit to form a man that seems to only want to write sincere love songs yet isn’t completely sure how to go about it.

With jumpy fast guitar and keyboard rhythms, it is capable of getting a room to dance yet spaced-out enough for a mellow conversation. This third release has finally culminated what Foals is, blending the best elements of their two previous albums.

The R&B/soul artist’s latest EP features three previously released tracks from the widely praised album Devotion along with “What You Won’t Do For Love” produced by fellow SBTRKT collaborator Sampha. The album also offers a Two Inch Punch remix of “If You’re Never Gonna Move.”

Lysandre is full of folk guitars, flutes, and a throaty voice similar to Elvis Costello. The album seems a bit scattered, but overall, it’s an easylistening LP.

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 7


FEBRUARY 21

Grand Stafford Theater is Laying Down the Rock with this Weekend’s Lineup by Luke

Murray

This weekend’s lineup at Grand with a truck load of Texas attitude. Calling the Brazos home, guys originated from a three-band merger, making a Stafford Theater is chock full of these metal militia of unhallowed proportions. Preceded by the defiant rock. From north of the border styles of southern and thrash metal performed by In the Trench, rock to southern rock to death Six Gun Sound, and Myra Maybelle, the night will surely be a metal, the Stafford has once metalocalypse. again managed to light the cigarette for FEBRUARY 23 - BLACK PISTOL FIRE W/ THE DOCS, every type of crowd. POOR PILATE & HYDRA MELODY FEBRUARY 21 - THE BACKGROUND W/ RED BOX HARBOR & THE FEEBLE CONTENDERS An Americana rock band from Dallas, The Background is riding the success of their current single, “Take It Slow.” Thriving as a rock band in the Lone Star is always aided by an appearance at SXSW, which The Background landed last year. Red Box Harbor and The Feeble Contenders, fresh out of H-Town and College Station respectively, will kick off the night with a compelling brand of indie rock that can only be grown in Texas.

FEBRUARY 22 - BURNING MIDGET W/ IN THE TRENCH, SIX GUN SOUND & MYRA MAYBELLE Following their Homebrew Live tradition, the Stafford will play host to Burning Midget, a local death metal band

Jumping back and forth between Austin and Toronto, Black Pistol Fire’s rock ‘n’ roll has best been described as CCR meets The Black Keys. Their high-energy stage presence lures in the crowd while their musicality and creative lyricism keeps fans buying records. The Docs, Poor Pilate, and Hydra Melody play organic sounds that test the boundaries of genres.

FEBRUARY 23

FEBRUARY 24 - MIKE AND THE MOONPIES W/ CHAD PETTY Bringing in some down-home flavor, Mike and the Moonpies alter between original heartbreak songs and 1970s country covers. Spending all their time gigging around Texas, honkytonking is all they know. Chad Petty is a local acoustic performer that divides his stage time between College Station and Houston. A local favorite, Petty will warm up the stage and the audience. visit grandstaffordtheater.com for showtimes and ticketing

pg 8 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13

FEBRUARY 24


Landon Austin @ Village Cafe by Derek Favini

Most who pick up a guitar at a young age would be content with learning a few chords and memorizing a song or two. Then there are those who take it to the next level and perform, showcasing their self-perceived talent at local venues only to fumble out a tune for the halfhearted, over-empathetic applause of friends and locals. But every so often, there are those who’s talent truly takes them somewhere, like the case of Landon Austin. From winning the Texas 10 Under 20 competition his junior year of high school to becoming a finalist in the Doritos Crash the Super Bowl Competition in 2007, the calming, acoustic melodies of Landon Austin’s music has taken him all over the nation. Austin makes his return to Texas this week with a special performance at the Village Café. What makes this performance special is that Austin and the Village are teaming up with CURE, an organization whose mission is to give physical and spiritual aid to children suffering from bodily ailments. From its start as a nonprofit organization in 1998, CURE has helped over 1.9 million patients, performed over 138,000 surgeries, and trained over 6,100 medical professionals in 27 countries. Proceeds from the event will go to ensuring treatment is made available to future children and their families. Austin will be taking the stage at 9pm February 22 until 11pm. Tickets are on sale now for $10. Be sure not to miss a night of entertainment for a cause.

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5th Annual Acappellooza @ Rudder Theatre

by Derek Favini

Prior to Pitch Perfect bringing in the big bucks for Redbox, the hippest of a cappella were belting high notes and achieving mellifluous harmonies years before it was cool. The 5th Annual ACAPPELLOOZA a cappella fest, hosted by Texas A&M’s own a capella organization, HardChord DynaMix, will assemble the best regional collegiate a cappella all under one roof, at Rudder Auditorium on February 23. Last year’s a-ca-fest raised the bar for what is considered “hot or not” in Texas collegiate a cappella. This year’s lineup will raise the bar even higher. ACAPPELLOOZA 2013 will play host to eight competitive groups from universities across Texas. \ The lineup includes: HardChord DynaMix (Texas A&M) Men of Moores (University of Houston) Ransom Notes (University of Texas) Femmatas (Texas A&M) Green Tones (North Texas) Swaram (Texas A&M) One Note Stand (University of Texas) Apotheosis (Texas A&M) Covering everything from Carrie Underwood to Radiohead, these groups have made their names by turning radio hits into amazing a cappella renditions. The event starts at 7:30pm with tickets for $5 at the door. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Dallas Symphony Orchestra Kids.

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LISTEN 02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 11


Out From the Shadows: An Exclusive Interview with Lukas Nelson by

Chris Zebo

Having Willie Nelson as your father might present quite a challenge to your music career. In one regard, following in his footsteps would be utterly fruitless; there’s one and only one Willie. In another regard, your career would be overshadowed by expectations; your audience would expect you to either match his legacy or outperform him— both difficult, both unlikely. But for Lukas Nelson, following in his father’s footsteps wasn’t an option. Of course he credits his father’s influence, his formative experiences in the infamous tour bus, and all of the incredible musicians he’s met as a result of his father’s career. But Lukas wanted his own career, his own legacy. The father and son perform together often, but Lukas has his own sound and persona. In live performances, he embodies the presence of a musician absolutely possessed by his music, a charged demeanor that intoxicates his audiences and instills pathos. We caught up with Lukas last week to talk about growing up a Nelson, his style of music and how it fits into the mainstream, and his work with the nonprofit J/P Haitian Relief Organization.


MW: As a child touring with your father, the tour bus must have been quite the incubator for you musically. What are some of your fondest memories from those days? Nelson: One of my favorite memories is watching him play with Leon Russel and Ray Charles in New York for his 70th birthday. There were so many incredible musicians on that bill; Norah Jones, Eric Clapton, Paul Simon. It’s a great memory. MW: It goes without saying that your father had an influence on you back then, but what other musicians did you idolize when you were growing up? And these could be performers that were intimate with the family but also those outside of that universe, that you were listening to. Nelson: I had a spiritual awakening when Jimi Hendrix came into my life. The colors in the music, the feeling of freedom on the guitar—I was transfixed. Stevie Ray Vaughan took me there, too. I really love Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Kristofferson—they have all been mentors to me in my life, as well. I guess you could say that I am a disciple of my father, though. I have learned how to write a song, how to be onstage, and how to be around people, from watching him. He and I were talking the other night, and we realized that in our entire lives together we have never shared a cross word. MW: There’s a rock and blues thread in your music’s DNA that reaches back to the roots of a bygone era, an era that’s lately being resurrected around the globe. What are your feelings about this trend? Is it a response to something? Are musicians recycling? Or is this whole idea of a “return” completely a misconception? In other words, maybe the roots were never abandoned in the first place. Nelson: I agree with the latter. Popular music has always been so fleeting. Trying to predict it is very hard. It’s like reading the stock market. Big producers have found a way to write and produce to where all you have to do is have a bunch of money and they can manufacture a moneymaking song right there. But it’s still possible to read the times. You say, “Oh, look at the newspaper. What’s going on? Hmm, there’s been a bad shooting. What does the nation need to hear right now?” And you write it, because it’s real. Like Neil Young did with “Ohio.” If it’s real, it’s got soul. If it’s got soul, I like it. There’s tons of real music out there, and it jumps in and out of being popular, but it has always been there. MW: You’ve stated in a previous interview that the name of the band, Promise of the Real, isn’t so much a name you chose for the public and fans to identify you but more as a commitment you’ve all made as musicians to be “real.” Nelson: This is personal. It becomes a question of, “How far are we willing to go?” And the answer is as far as our integrity takes us, and no further. It applies to life in all aspects. MW: How did you end up in Hawaii? And what is the music scene like there?

Nelson: My father has had a place there for a long time. It’s mostly a jam band scene, actually. Lots of hippies. So there I listened to a lot of reggae and Grateful Dead and Pink Floyd and Shpongle and anything else that was trippy! MW: How do you strike a balance between living in the middle of the Pacific and touring on the mainland? Nelson: Well, I don’t pay rent. I’m on the road so much it doesn’t make sense. So every once and a while, I use my money and fly back home. It’s a very nice recharge. I play a lot of golf and surf as much as I can. MW: One of your new songs, “Haiti”, was inspired by a trip you made to the devastated country in recent years. You’ve also volunteered extensively in the Sean Penn-led J/P Haitian Relief Organization. How did you end up in Haiti originally? Nelson: Well, I wish I could say I have volunteered “extensively,” but, truthfully, I haven’t made it out since I went and I’m dying to go back. I have a friend who is also a musician named Sarah Wasserman who said she was going to Haiti and I said, “I want to come!” So I came with her and ended up writing that song in Haiti. Hopefully, the song will allow me to go back there and bring more attention to the plights of those people. They are such a strong people, and I fell in love with them.

Nelson: Yes. I will make no limitations on the different varieties of music I hope to play. MW: Since 2010, you’ve released 3 full-length albums and an EP independently. Given the family ties you have, you must have easy access big-label representation and distribution. What were your reasons for keeping the reins in your hands? Nelson: Well, to be honest, we are open to making a deal with someone and are negotiating things now. I think we needed some time together as a band to get ready, to make sure that we are a tight unit, and to make sure that the quality of the music is up to all of our standards. We want the record labels to come to us, because we know we have a good product that people resonate with. I’ve never been good at pushing myself, always felt awkward doing it. So, I just have to be myself, and when the time is right, everything will click together. It’s also been nice to build a strong fan base. people who will be following us forever. And there are more and more of them, and they are why we play!

MW: What kind of work is the organization doing for the people of Haiti? Nelson: So much! They were there to set up camps for the victims of the earthquake in the beginning and have since become the most respected organization over there, especially since they employ many Haitians. They have many branches of the organization that deal with different projects that help rebuild the nation. MW: You are playing both with the band and making solo appearances lately. Do you have plans to pursue both avenues?

THINK

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 13


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MW New Reads by

Roberto Molar

Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing by Po Bronson & Ashley Merryman

It was once said that sporting competitions were created to stop wars among brothers. Today, competing plays a key role in this dog-eat-dog world. Will and ability are not enough to achieve our goals. We must compete with each other cleverly. At work, we compete for a highly compensated position. At school, we go through a selective application process to get the education we need. The competition never ceases, as we are always fighting for scholarships, promotions, and recognition. But we don’t always win. Where there are winners, there must be losers. Top dog analyzes key aspects separating winners from losers. Surveying a spectrum of disciplines, such as politics, science, athletics, and more, Top Dog delivers insights that can help us retool ourselves for triumph rather than failure. Winning, the author argues, is heavily dependent on the competitor. Performance is enhanced when people are aware of being judged and the participants of the competition are similarly matched. In a conversational style that also delivers practical wisdom and pragmatic applications, Top Dog assures that when it comes to competing, “what counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight—it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

Alone on the Ice by David Roberts

Pukka’s Promise by Ted Kerasote

Farside by Ben Bova

Subliminal by Leonard Mlodinow

What is the innate desire in some of us to explore the unexplored? Why go to extreme circumstances and risk our lives to see the unseen? Adventure is what explorers live for. Alone in the Ice begins in 1911 when a lecturer in mineralogy and petrology at the University of Adelaide embarked on an excursion to Antarctica — a journey that would end up in battling bitter cold, starvation, and testing the limits of the human spirit. On January 17, 1913, with two partners dead, the soles of his worn to the flesh, his countenance unrecognizable, a rescuer asked Douglas Mawson, “Which one are you?” When Mawson lost all hope, a piece of poetry gave him inspiration to survive and ultimately become one of the greatest polar explorers of all time. A vividly horrific narrative and a superb collection of Antarctic photographs retell the Greatest Survival Story in the Story of Exploration.

You probably remember that dog from your childhood that took a one-way trip to the “farm.” Dogs are man’s best friends, but they go to doggy heaven far too soon. What if we could extend their life-spans? Award-winning author, Ted Kerasote, wondered the same question when his dog, Merle, died from a brain tumor. Later when he adopted Pukka, a golden Labrador mix, Kerasote determined to give his new furry friend the healthiest and happiest life possible. Studying worldwide breeders, vets, and leaders in animal-welfare, Kerasote gathered research to ensure that Pukka—and all of our dogs—would live a longer life. Everything matters, from the things a dog eats to its vaccines, to the training it follows or the way it travels in a car. A gracefully written memoir of Pukka’s journey through life, Pukka’s Promise is also Kerasote’s meditation on the short lives of man’s best friends.

Imagine the discovery of a new world, spaceships, and settlements on the moon. Now add a little politics, personal ambition, love, jealousy, and murder. What do you have? The new book by award-winning author, Ben Bova.

So you went to the movies and ate the largest bowl of popcorn. It’s okay, you wanted to. What about that dude from the bar you just started dating? That’s okay, too, you chose to. But ask Leonard Mlodinow and he might have a different opinion.

Terrestrial telescopes detect a new Earth-like planet some thirty light-years away. The race begins among political powers and interest groups to erect a magnificent research facility and the largest optical telescope in the solar system on Farside (the side of the moon that never faces the Earth). But not even the fantastically evolved age of Farside is free of the very same human condition that troubles humanity in today’s age. Soon the hopes in Farside for a new Earth are marred by mysterious deaths and a discovery that will change the human race forever.

Subliminal surveys new (and old) neurological research that suggests our perception of the world is ultimately wrong. It is the mind’s subliminal processes, rather than our self conscious, that shapes our behavior, memory, and judgment. Subliminal explores the subliminal aspects of our everyday life, ranging from interpersonal communications, decision-making, and memory of important events. With an intriguing tone that makes even the most abstract scientific subjects accessible for the average reader, Subliminal examines the fascinating science behind human decision making.

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 15


MW’s Best Bets |  THE MUST-SEE, MUST-DO EVENTS OF THE WEEK

Leyla McCalla

@ Rudder Theatre where: Rudder Theatre when: Tuesday, Feb. 26 8 p.m. tickets: Regular $10, Student $5 boxoffice.tamu.edu

New Orleans musician, Leyla McCalla, has studied cello since she was a child. Born in NYC to Haitian emigrant parents and raised in New Jersey, McCalla studied briefly at Smith College in Massachusetts before deciding to return to New York to major in cello performance and chamber music at NYU. Just when her career was gaining momentum in NYC, she decided to move to New Orleans in 2010 to explore regional folk music and the roots music of her parents’ homeland, Haiti. As a child, McCalla’s parents gave her books of Langston Hughes’ poetry. She remembers being deeply affected and transfixed by his work. Years later, in her musical career, she decided to interpret Hughes’ poetry musically, with cello, voice, and banjo. McCalla will be performing those interpretations before a live audience here in Aggieland.

pg 16 | maroonweekly.com | 02.13.13

Black Pistol Fire

@ Grand Stafford Theater where: Grand Stafford Theater when: Saturday, Feb. 23 8 p.m. info: grandstaffordtheater.com

Jumping back and forth between Austin and Toronto, Black Pistol Fire’s rock ‘n’ roll has best been described as CCR meets The Black Keys. Their high-energy stage presence lures in the crowd while their musicality and creative lyricism keeps fans buying records. Vocalist and guitarist, Kevin McKeown, and drummer, Eric Owen, have been friends since their kinder years and have played music together for over a decade. Their September release, Big Beat ’59, has received rave reviews for its rough-yet-pleasing blend of soul, blues and southern rock. The Docs, Poor Pilate, and Hydra Melody play organic sounds that test the boundaries of genres. They’ll open the night and set the stage for an evening full of indie music and innovation.

Josh Abbott Band @ Hurricane Harry’s

where: Hurricane Harry’s when: Friday, Feb. 22 9 p.m. tickets: harrys.bcsclubs.com

Fans of Josh Abbott Band had been waiting two years for the group to release another record after 2010’s She’s Like Texas, an album which propelled the band into the limelight and hit #5 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart. The band’s latest album, Small Town Family Dream, also peaked at #5 on the US Country chart and at #2 on the Indie chart (they’re “indie” because the group continues to manage all of their recordings on their own label, Pretty Damn Tough). The single release of “Touch” from Small Town became an immediate hit with fans, and the band’s video for the single also became extremely popular, a video bandleader Abbott says is more like a short movie set to music. “I just wanted to come up with something different than your normal, cute, little love video,” said Abbott. “I’m tired of seeing those all the time. I wanted something that captivated the audience from a story-line perspective.”


GO TO MAROONWEEKLY.COM/EVENTS FOR MORE

Art By Murder

@ Downtown Bryan where: when: tickets: info:

Downtown Bryan Feb. 21 & 23, 6 - 9 p.m. March 2 & 9, 6 - 9 p.m. $65 ($45 students) artbymurder.com

Ever wanted to be a sleuth like Sherlock Holmes? Are you a fan of Agatha Christie mystery novels? If so, you might enjoy The Mystery of the Missing Pages, an event organized by Art by Murder that is equal parts murder mystery, tour, scavenger hunt, and painting experience. The three-hour mystery tour will take you through Downtown Bryan and College Station in its own peculiar way as you investigate a crime. As you’re sleuthing, you’ll get inspiration to apply paint to a canvas. You might be thinking, “Well, yeah, I can be the next Sherlock Holmes but I really stink at painting!” Don’t worry; the painting segment is guided, step by step, by an artist who will make you rethink your artistic talents. After some puzzling twists and a step-by-step painting led by an artist, even those who claim they cannot paint will go home with a piece of art.The unique event is great for a date, birthdays, fundraisers, office team building, and many other special activities. It will run on February 21 and 23, as well as March 2 and 9.

Acappellooza

Phil Pritchett

@ Rudder Auditorium where: Rudder Auditorium when: Saturday, Feb. 23 7:30 p.m. tickets: $5

Prior to Pitch Perfect bringing in the big bucks for Redbox, the hippest of a cappella were belting high notes and achieving mellifluous harmonies years before it was cool. The 5th Annual ACAPPELLOOZA a cappella fest, hosted by Texas A&M’s own a capella organization, HardChord DynaMix, will assemble the best regional collegiate a cappella all under one roof, at Rudder Auditorium on February 23. Last year’s a-ca-fest raised the bar for what is considered “hot or not” in Texas collegiate a cappella. This year’s lineup will raise the bar even higher. ACAPPELLOOZA 2013 will play host to eight competitive groups from universities across Texas. The lineup includes HardChord DynaMix (Texas A&M), Men of Moores (University of Houston), Ransom Notes (University of Texas), Femmatas (Texas A&M), Green Tones (North Texas), Swaram (Texas A&M), One Note Stand (University of Texas), and Apotheosis (Texas A&M).

@ The Tap

where: when: tickets: info:

The Tap Saturday, Feb. 23 At the door tapbcs.com

P2, as he is known to his ‘Phans’, is Phil Pritchett, leader of Phil Pritchett and the Full Band. After starting his indie rock outfit in 1995, Pritchett has released 10 albums, all on his own label, with himself as producer. The so-called “cottage-industry” musician is know for his livewire shows, thoughtful lyrics, eclectic albums, and sense of humor. With the Full Band, P2 has grown into an internationally known act, touring the US regularly while garnering a following in Europe, South Africa and Australia. Most days find him in his own Trinidad World Recording Studios in Fort Worth, Texas writing songs, recording, or producing projects for other artists. Over the years, he has taken special care to stay out of any “scene” or “mainstream” electing to only work on music, not interested in the antics associated with modern day “celebrities.” The music is raw output, unfiltered by any extraneous forces (labels, producers, lawyers, etc.). Pritchett will be performing Saturday evening sans the Full Band.

02.13.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 17


GO EAT Blue Baker 201 Dominik Dr. 979.696.5055

800 University Dr. E 979.268.3096

Hours: Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Details: Price- $-$$ Cuisine- Sandwich, Bakery, Pizza Parking- Private Patio- Yes Atmosphere- Contemporary Noise Level- Average Dress Code - Casual

Cost Ratings: $ ($5 - 10)

ramen noodle budget

$$ ($10 - 15) part-time job

$$$ ($15 - 20)

hard-earned cash

TASTE by Amanda

L. Reynolds

Remember the days of coming home from school to the smell of Mom baking fresh baked bread? Yeah, me neither. But at local sandwich shop, Blue Baker, you can find that signature smell of homemade bread and so much more. Eleven years ago, owner Dave Fox decided that most sandwich shops were not giving credit to the one item that makes up half of the sandwich: the bread. He decided to focus on creating small batches of artisan loaves that would produce great bread, which would, in turn, produce a great sandwich. To create those great loaves of bread, Blue Baker has developed a three-day process to make each loaf. At the end of the three days, they bake their bread in a large stone oven that stays around a scorching 550 degrees, which can be seen while visiting the store. On any given day, you can find one of their seven standard loaves for sale to take home with you. As if that wasn’t enough of a selection, they rotate seventeen other specialty loaves, both sweet and savory, throughout the week. All of their bread stays on the shelf for one day, because they have no preservatives in them and want you to experience bread in its ultimate freshness. Fox’s motivation to create fresh, high quality breads was salient. The crunchy, firm exterior of the crust and the fluffy, moist interior is the ultimate base for the high quality meats and fresh vegetables that get sandwiched between two slices. One favorite, the Club Bleu, is a club sandwich that’s featured on a croissant (also made in house). The light, airy and flaky croissant will make you think twice before having another club on three pieces of white sandwich bread. A newer addition to the Blue Baker menu is their pizza line. Cooked right before your eyes in a stone oven, their pizzas have a thin yet sturdy crust that won’t collapse under toppings. You can create your own pizza or try their signature offerings. The D’Vinchee is a must try. Instead of a standard tomato sauce base, they use olive oil to let the flavors of the ingredients (Italian sausage, chicken, roasted portabella mushrooms, cilantro topped with mozzarella) to truly shine through. To round out your meal and make an exceptional meal even better, Blue Baker also bakes cookies and pastries. Maybe all of these sound incredibly tempting, but you’re short on cash? Don’t be blue…well, actually you do need to be blue. Blue Baker has a fun discount program called “Blue On You, It’s On Us” and it rewards patrons with free food depending on their levels of blue-ness. A small amount of blue on your skin and the staff honors you with a free cookie or pastry. However, cover all of your skin in blue and dress in blue and your sandwich combo or pizza is on the house! You can experience the Blue Baker artisan approach to sandwiches, pizza, soups and salads at either of their two locations in College Station. The original on Dominick, which is a little cozier, has that ever-present fresh bread smell which we love. The newer location opened in 2007 on University Drive is more expansive and provides plenty of room for large groups. It also offers plenty of booths with power outlets and free WiFi (available at both locations)—a plus for students and for those who like to eat while they work.

$$$$ (Over $20)

mommy and daddy are in town

pg 18 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13


Restaurant Reviews by

Derek Favini

Jason’s Deli

Fast food doesn’t have to be unhealthy, and Jason’s Deli understands this. With a nutrition calculator available online, Jason’s Deli provides a way for diners to enjoy fast food without worrying about their waistlines. Their sandwiches and wraps menu alone is extensive, with well over 20 signature sandwiches to choose from. But don’t let the title of being a deli fool you. Jason’s has an array of soups, pastas, salads and baked potatoes to ensure that you’ll never grow tired of the same old chip and sandwich combo. And should you search through the entire menu and still not see anything that tickles your fancy, Jason’s allows costumers to build their own sandwiches from the bread up! Dine in, take out • 1460 S Texas Ave #5, College Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 764-2929 • $-$$

Feed Barn

Feeling hungry as a horse? Then look no further than the Feed Barn. The name alone should clue you in to the Feed Barn’s specialty, southern food! Try some of Feed Barn’s classic southern dishes, such as fried chicken, chopped sirloin, fried fish baskets, burgers, and banana pudding. The Feed Barn is open Tuesday through Saturday and offers daily discounted specials. Dine in • 2017 Fountain Ave, Bryan, TX 77801 -- (979) 822-9488 • $-$$

Joy Luck

What makes Joy Luck stand out from the Chinese take-out pack? They deliver sushi! That’s right: you can order sushi favorites, such as California rolls, spicy salmon rolls, and the local crowd-pleaser, the A&M roll, on your telephone and have them delivered to your doorstep. Even if sushi isn’t your thing, Joy Luck’s extensive menu of Chinese and Thai dishes are enough to leave you full of joy. Dine in, take out • 1702 George Bush Drive East , College Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 693-9999 • $$

Cotton Patch

their own spin on traditional sandwiches, such as the chicken salad sandwich with grapes, pecans and provolone, all toasted together. Mix things up with any one of Newks fresh tossed salads, including the Black & Bleu, featuring grilled steak, Gorgonzola, pecans, tomatoes, and red onions all tossed with bleu cheese dressing. Newks also offers fresh daily soups that make the perfect sidekick to any one of their sandwiches or salads. Dine in, take out • 1613 University Dr E, College Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 268-3300 • $$

Los Cucos

With attentive service and a large menu, Los Cucos serves classic Mexican food, such as grande sized burritos, delicious tacos, and stuffed avocados with your choice of beef, chicken or shrimp. Having a hard time getting your week started? Los Cucos understands and wants to help with their $1.99 draft beers and $1.99 margaritas, offered every Monday and Tuesday. Los Cucos keeps the fiesta rolling with a happy hour every Wednesday thru Thursday from 3pm to 6pm. Dine in or take out • 1521 S Texas Ave College Station, TX 77840 -(979) 680-8896 • $-$$

The Proudest Monkey

Located next to the Queen Theater, Monkey patrons dine on gourmet bar food such as pulled pork sandwiches, a selection of tacos, chorizo burgers, and parmesan fries while enjoying one of the bar’s signature cocktails. For dessert, try a mint chocolate martini or any of their ice cream martinis for that matter. Large projection screen TVs play games, but check out their bathrooms, even if you only need to wash your hands before eating. They have TV screens embedded in their mirrors, so you won’t miss the score or the dramatic arc in your favorite soap. Dine in • 108 S Main St Bryan, TX 77803 -- (979) 361-4777 • $

Chef Cao’s

Chef Cao’s offers simple Chinese and Thai fare in both entrees and on their buffet table. Classics such as snow leaf stir fry, Szechuan style eggplant, and beef broccoli are available to order with sides of steamed or fried rice. Then there’s the buffet; an MSG haven of lo mein, walnut chicken, Mongolian beef, and vegetable tempuras. Dine in, take out, or deliver • 404 University Dr. College Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 696-8383. 3105 S. Texas Ave #500 Bryan, TX 77802 -- (979) 779-8885 • $-$$

Sully’s Sports Grill

The craving we have for fried foods makes cardiologists cringe. ^ We know it’s wrong, but it feels so right, and that’s why places such as Cotton Patch remain fried-food havens. Fried shrimp, crispy fried catfish, or one of their chicken fried inspired dishes are sure to delight. If you actually listen to your cardiologist, then try any of Cotton Patch’s grilled items, such as chicken, steaks, and burgers. Dine in Takeout out • 3525 Longmire Dr, College Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 695-9707 • $-$$

Newks

A nice change of pace for salad, sandwich, and pizza lovers. Newks gives

The restaurant formerly known as Fowl Digits has evolved from just another chicken strip joint, saying to their neighbors on chicken finger row, “I see your chicken fingers and raise you burgers and booze!” Sully’s serves burgers, chicken wings, sandwiches, quarter pound Black Angus hot dogs, and of course, chicken fingers. Sully’s caters to the sports enthusiast, with TVs mounted on every wall, making it impossible to miss a second of any sports action no matter where you’re seated. Looking to escape the noise of the crowds? Then relax on the open air covered patio. Dine in • 1037 Texas Ave College Station, TX 77840 – (979) 703-4072 • $-$$

Chimy’s

New to Northgate! Tropical décor, nachos, tacos, and quesadillas will give you the feeling of relaxing on a beach, or that might be Chimy’s margaritas kicking in. Happy hour casts off Monday and sails on through Friday from 4pm until 7pm with $2 drafts, $3 double wells, inexpensive crispy beef tacos, and $5 margaritas. Try one of Chimy’s pulled pork sandwiches, green chile cheeseburgers, or cheese steaks. Dine in • 203 University Drive, college Station, TX 77840 -- (979) 703-6106 • $-$$


Art By Murder

“Mystery of the Missing Pages”

@ Downtown Bryan by Roberto Molar

where: Downtown Bryan when: Feb. 21 & 23 Mar. 2 & 9 info: artbymurder.com

pg 20 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13

Ever wanted to be a sleuth like Sherlock Holmes? Are you a fan of Agatha Christie mystery novels? If so, you might enjoy The Mystery of the Missing Pages, an event organized by Art by Murder that is equal parts murder mystery, tour, scavenger hunt, and painting experience. Everything is mysterious when it comes to Art by Murder. Once you purchase your ticket, you’ll have to wait until the day before the event when a “mysterious” phone call will unveil the event’s rendezvous point. The organization is dedicated to keeping your intrigue piqued, and judging from participant reviews, the event has been quite a crowd pleaser. The three-hour mystery tour will take you through Downtown Bryan and College Station in its own peculiar way as you investigate a crime. As you’re sleuthing, you’ll get inspiration to apply paint to a canvas. You might be thinking, “Well, yeah, I can be the next Sherlock Holmes but I really stink at painting!” Don’t worry; the painting segment is guided, step by step, by an artist who will make you rethink your artistic talents. After some puzzling twists and a step-by-step painting led by an artist, even those who claim they cannot paint will go home with a piece of art. The unique event is great for a date, birthdays, fundraisers, office team building, and many other special activities. It will run on February 21 and 23, as well as March 2 and 9. Visit artbymurder.com for more information about Art by Murder and for details about their events and schedules.


Tony Time with the Brazos Valley Chorale @ the Hilton by Derek Favini

In the spirit of Tony Awards season, the Brazos Valley Chorale will be putting on a fundraiser in which over 100 members of The Brazos Valley Chorale will be singing songs exclusively from Tony Award winning performances, such as Kiss Me Kate, Guys and Dolls, My Fair Lady, The Sound of Music, Les Misérables, Hairspray, and The Phantom of the Opera. Jess Wade will be directing the performances for the evening. Wade, in his 25th season as the director of The Brazos Valley Chorale, will be stepping down after this year, the fundraiser being his penultimate performance. Price of admission is $65 per person and includes a plated dinner of either bistro steak or Mediterranean chicken accompanied by salad, veggies, and dessert. In addition to the performances and fine food, eight themed packages will be raffled away. Packages are themed as family friendly entertainment, Brazos Valley venues, local restaurant dinners, Aggie sports fans, pet lovers, backyard enthusiasts, local entertainment lovers, and a relaxing spa package. Each of the eight packages can be viewed more in-depth online at bvchorale.org, and tickets to each individual raffle can be purchased for $10. Winners of the raffles need not be present to claim their prize package, encouraging those unable to attend the dinner to still participate in the raffle. The Brazos Valley Chorale will hold the event on February 23 at The Hilton on University Drive starting at 6:30pm. Space is limited, so interested patrons are asked to call (979)-776-1776 immediately to reserve tickets.

Word of the week @nibsradio

Word of the Week: Hypnopompic hypnopompic (adjective) /hip nuh POM pik/- relating to the semiconscious state you’re in after you wake up but aren’t fully awake. Example: I had never heard the word “hypnopompic” before today, and now I hate it. Because the most miserable time of the day is when my alarm goes off, and I’m jarred into my hypnopompic state.

www.kissfm1031.com 02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 21


Movie Review: Amour by Brandon Nowalk

The Oscars are right around the corner, and the only movie up for Best Picture we haven’t even mentioned is Michael Haneke’s Amour. It’s the story of an elderly French couple negotiating escalating disability brought on by a series of strokes. And it’s not only up for Best Picture but also Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Foreign Language Film, and Best Actress. For her knotty performance as Anne, a wife slowly slipping away, Emmanuelle Riva became the oldest actress nominated by the Academy. And don’t be surprised if she wins. As the husband Georges, Jean-Louis Trintignant is just as wrenching but in a different way. Where Riva’s performance flirts with body-horror (not just physical breakdown but the attendant psychological despair), Trintignant’s performance is wracked by helplessness. Try as he might, there’s nothing he can do to help his wife. Their daughter, played by a

tender Isabelle Huppert (Amour is a curio of world cinema icons) visits periodically, and Anne’s spirit momentarily lifts, but this story can only go in one direction. As Georges says, “Things will go on as they have done up until now. They’ll go from bad to worse. Things will go on, and then one day it will all be over.” Tearjerker or not, Amour unmistakably bears the stamp of its stern auteur, Michael Haneke. Only Amour is a different kind of torture film from the hopeless home invasion of Funny Games, the surveillance harassment of Cache, or the sadism of The White Ribbon. Amour is unbearable because it coldly confronts a harsh reality. Bodies decay, communication breaks down, nobody can ease your pain. No robbers are ever going to rewind the videotape to prevent your escape, as in Funny Games, but Georges and Anne’s story just may be your future.

pg22 22 || maroonweekly.com maroonweekly.com || 02.20.13 02.20.13 pg

Georges feeds Anne with a child’s sippy-cup, and when Anne spits the water out in defiance, he loses his cool and slaps her. You don’t expect violence in a story like this, and every time it hurts. Nobody means to be mean, but they’re all locked in this tragedy. And then comes an alternately poetic and concrete ending that places Amour in a category with the classic Make Way for Tomorrow and the great Summer Hours. It isn’t as rich as those films, but in its acceptance of the inevitable, Amour transcends its deteriorating body and opens up to a world beyond cruelty for entertainment’s sake.

Drama |PG-13|


P TO

13. Lincoln

Daniel Day-Lewis leads an all-star cast in the passage of the 13th amendment, using expediency, corruption, and lies. It isn’t pretty to watch the democratic sausage get made, but with Spielberg, it sure is tasty. PG-13 (150 min.)

0 2

14. Life of Pi

A pan-religious boy crosses the Pacific on a lifeboat with a tiger in this new age light-show that spans the distance from moving triumph to survival guide to thoughtless headache. Is pretty enough? PG (127 min.)

films n

ndo by Bra

Motion Picture Association of America rating definitions: G - General Audiences. All ages admitted. PG - Parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children. PG-13 - Special parental guidance strongly suggested for children under 13. Some material may be inappropriate for young children. R - Restricted. Under 18 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. NC-17 - No one under 17 admitted.

Star Ratings: stay home if you’re desperate has moments worth price of admission good stuff don’t miss it

15. Django Unchained

Nowalk

Ratings:

1/2

1/2

1. A Good Day to Die Hard

It took five movies, and yet the sturdy Die Hard franchise remains just another action series, all clunky explosions and old-man limping. John McClane deserves better. One-liners are supposed to be funny, right? R (97 min.)

2. Identity Thief

1/2

A fat chick steals a wry guy’s identity in this lazy, old, clunky stereotype vehicle. But it is inspiring to see that even a movie starring Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman can be unfunny. R (112 min.)

3. Safe Haven

1/2

Nicholas Sparks strikes again! Pretty white people get over their sympathetic tragedies and learn to love again. Fans know what they’re getting. To everyone else: you’ve got to look up the twist. It’s hilarious. PG-13 (115 min.)

4. Escape from Planet Earth An astronaut responds to a distress signal and finds out—say it with me, Admiral Ackbar—it’s a trap! It’s a kids-only affair, a disappointment after the great animation of 2012, but it’s tolerable. PG (90 min.)

5.Warm Bodies

1/2

Cute becomes cutesy and beautiful becomes well-meaning as this unconventional, homemade zom-com gives way to blockbuster baloney, consigning itself to the friend zone. Who knew Etsy and Hollywood had such aesthetic overlap? PG-13 (97 min.)

6. Beautiful Creatures

1/2

Young lovers Ethan and Lena discover supernatural secrets about their families and their town. The southern setting might scream True Blood or The Vampire Diaries, but come on: this is Twilight-lite. Team Alden! PG-13 (124 min.)

7. Side Effects

1/2

The girl with the depression, uh, tattoo gets embroiled in some dangerous pharmaceuticals in this airport thriller. Steven Soderbergh may be retiring, but he goes out at the top of his game. R (106 min.)

8. Silver Linings Playbook 1/2

Bradley Cooper tries to control his bipolar disorder by preparing for a dance competition with a new friend, the depressed Jennifer Lawrence. Come for the feel-good funny, stay for the electric performances. R (122 min.)

9. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters

Between this straight-faced snoozer and the trailer for the gritty Jack and the Beanstalk movie, it’s going to be a tough development season. I hope you’re prepared for Michael Bay’s Hickory Dickory Dock. R (88 min.)

10. Zero Dark Thirty

Kathryn Bigelow’s cerebral procedural dramatizes the “War on Terror” by following the US on its decade-long manhunt for Osama bin Laden. It’s smart, focused, risky; in a word, adult filmmaking. R (157 min.)

11. Mama

1/2

The greatest takeaway from this creepy, jumpy winter horror picture is that Jessica Chastain will do literally any movie she gets offered. Guillermo “Executive Producer” del Toro’s rubber stamp is more selective. PG-13 (100 min.)

12. Argo

1/2

Ben Affleck the actor glowers to show how serious this is while Ben Affleck the director lets loose on his best movie yet. The Iran hostage crisis has never been so fun. R (120 min.)

Tarantino’s slavery epic is an ungainly beast, but of course it is. Thing is, Django is also Tarantino’s least complicated revenge drama yet, fighting fire with fire and winning. Christoph Waltz needs a new Oscar. R (165 min.)

16. Quartet

Old British actors everyone loves, such as Helen Mirren and Michael Gambon, crack wise and learn to love life again this year. I guess we have 2013’s Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. PG-13 (98 min.)

17. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

The high-frame-rate technology isn’t the jerkiest part of this Fellowship rehash. The story is jack of all plots, master of none. Good thing Jackson’s already done the Gollum legwork. Those bits are gold. PG-13 (169 min.)

18. Les Miserables

The dizziest shrug of a movie since I accidentally filmed the inside of my pocket on my phone. The superficial drama in the script is one thing, the headache montage of the film is quite another. PG-13 (157 min.)

19. Wreck-It Ralph

1/2

John C. Reilly takes a villain on a hero’s journey in this arcade version of Toy Story. More importantly, they made Sarah Silverman a Disney princess, and she tore the establishment down.

20. Amour

A series of strokes turns an elderly French couple into Michael Haneke’s latest portrait of cruelty and humiliation. But it’s not all tragedy and despair. There are also close-ups of paintings! PG-13 (127 min.)

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 23


U

Ramona Quimby @ Rudder Theatre

by Roberto Molar

Unpredictable, exasperating, boisterous, and independent; a big noisy fuss wherever she goes—that best describes Ramona Quimby, the lovable third grader who has entertained young readers for over fifty years. This Saturday, she is coming to life right here in Aggieland, on Rudder Theatre’s stage.

Ramona’s rowdy yet lovable personality makes her a one-of-a-kind girl. But even for her, growing up isn’t easy—especially living in a family with sister trouble, an aunt in love with the wrong guy, and a recently fired father (oh, and she’s also pretty sure her teacher hates her, too). Her life is a mess! Yet a loving family, good friends, laughter, and adventures that often result in trouble always cheer Ramona on as she blasts through middle school and life’s day-to-day challenges.

Ramona’s character was born when award-winning author Beverly Cleary was in the third grade. Before becoming a bookworm, Cleary was put in a special slow reader group. This not only fueled her desire to become a better reader but also made her sympathetic for the problems of struggling readers. Having spent endless hours at a public library, she decided she would one day write the children’s stories she always wanted to read but could never find on bookshelves. Thus she created Ramona, a character who not only enabled her writing career but also embodied the life experiences she had as a youth. Don’t miss a chance to laugh and cheer with Ramona and her friends as she now comes to life on stage. Visit opas.tamu.edu/Ramona.html to learn about show times, dates, and tickets.

PLAY

Wood-Style Flooring Flat-Screens in Every Apartment Stand-Up Tanning Booth Fully-Equipped Fitness Center Basketball & Sand Volleyball Courts Individual Leases Resort-Style Pool Game/Activity Room

thedistrictonluther.com pg 24 24 || maroonweekly.com maroonweekly.com || 02.20.13 pg

Chec out o k upco ur ming SP

ECIA LS

“Luther” to 47464 for information* *standard text messaging rates apply

866.973.5389

01.30.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 24


UA Student New Works Festival

Presented by Performance Studies

@ TAMU Black Box Theater

A box equipped to handle a multitude of things: circuiting for theatrical lighting, a customizable sound system, a centralized technical booth, and a practice and performance stage. The “Black Box Theater” has recently been relocated to one of the newest additions to Texas A&M’s main campus, the Liberal Arts and Humanities Building, and it’s hosting the 4th Annual Student New Works Festival.

a design-as-performance look at grief and surrealism. Slant, by Citally Jimenez and Esmeralda Rodriguez, examines the similarities between humans and animals, relationships, and moving forward. What Are You Really?, the last piece in the first group, by Justin Fullerton, is an over-the-top satirical look at racial attitudes in a postracial America.

The Student New Works Festival is a student-run theatre festival that will showcase five original plays performed, written, produced and directed by the students of the performance studies department. This year, there will two 45-minute one-act plays, two 15-minute plays, and an experimental design-as-performance piece. The five plays will feature an array of different themes and plots from participating students.

The second group will feature Henderson and When I Grow Up and will show at 6pm and 8pm on February 21 and 23. Henderson, the first play, by Emily Sturrock, is a dark comedy about a small Texas town and its ability to defy expectations after tragedy strikes. The last play, When I Grow Up, by Josh Hardcastle, is a coming-of-age story that follows a graduating senior as he attempts to cope with the pressures of life after high school.

The first group of plays The Persistence of Memory, Slant, and What Are You Really? will run February 20 and 22 and show at 6pm and 8pm. The first, The Persistence of Memory, by Tori Dominguez, is

by Amy Bauerschlag

All of the plays can be seen for free at the Black Box Theatre at the Liberal Arts and Humanities Building.

CALL OR TEXT FOR APPT & WEEKLY SPECIALS!

The Persistence of Memory, Slant, What Are You Really? Feb. 20 & 22, 6 p.m., 8 p.m. Henderson, When I Grow Up Feb. 21 & 23, 6 p.m., 8 p.m.

FULL SERVICE REDKEN HAIR SALON & FULL BODY WAX 1804 BROTHERS BLVD STE. B, COLLEGE STATION

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Exclusive Interview with Leyla McCalla New Orleans musician, Leyla McCalla, has studied cello since she was a child. Born in NYC to Haitian emigrant parents and raised in New Jersey, McCalla studied briefly at Smith College in Massachusetts before deciding to return to New York to major in cello performance and chamber music at NYU. Just when her career was gaining momentum in NYC, she decided to move to New Orleans in 2010 to explore regional folk music and the roots music of her parents’ homeland, Haiti. As a child, McCalla’s parents gave her books of Langston Hughes’ poetry. She remembers being deeply affected and transfixed by his work. Years later, in her musical career, she decided to interpret Hughes’ poetry musically, with cello, voice, and banjo. On Tuesday, February 26, McCalla will be performing those interpretations before a live audience here in Aggieland. We caught up with her last week to learn more about her music, playing music in the streets of New Orleans, and her unique connection with Hughes. MW: You play the cello conventionally, with a bow, and rather unconventionally, strumming and plucking the strings as if it was a guitar. You’ve said that you enjoy playing the cello on the streets of New Orleans, playing classical for passersby as a kind of counterpoint against the typical sounds one would hear on the street. Most musicians have connections with their instruments, and yours is unique. What does your style of playing and your connection with your instrument say about you? McCalla: I think that my playing reflects the different experiences that I’ve had that made me want to be a musician in the first place. I was very serious about classical music in the beginning of high school when, in the 10th grade, my mom got a job working with refugees in Accra, Ghana and my family relocated to West Africa for two years. When I moved back to the states, I was a senior in high school and not at all ready for conservatory auditions. I went to Smith College for my first year of college, practiced hard and auditioned for NYU’s cello performance program. When I was in New York, I met a cellist, Rufus Cappadocia, now a dear friend and mentor of mine, who’s playing blew me away and made me realize there was more to playing cello and more to music than the music that I was studying in school. Since then, my playing has been driven more by my ear than what I read on the page. MW: In 2010, you moved from NYC--where your career was burgeoning--to the French Quarter. Throughout your musical career, you’ve been driven by exploration. You’ve been enriched by everything from Celtic to Latin American music. What was it about New Orleans, musically and culturally, that magnetized you? McCalla: New Orleans always felt like home to me. The more I learned about the history of Louisiana, its ties to Haiti and French speaking culture, the more sense of belonging I felt and continue to feel. The history is very deep. I started playing more traditional jazz and old time music through the people that I met on the street, and that’s led me to now start learning more about Louisiana’s pre-zydeco, Creole, fiddle-driven music. The well is so deep, and after 3 years, I’m just scratching the surface. MW: When you’re playing live, how do you think your audience perceives the pan-cultural element of your music? In one song, you might sing in Haitian Creole, in the next song, you might play a musical theme from another continent or perform a pastiche that alludes to multiple genres. Is it jarring? Does it inspire curiosity in the audience? McCalla: People are generally excited to hear what Haitian Creole sounds like and are interested in learning about the culture through the meaning of the songs, which I always explain. People have been very generous with their ears. There is so much misinformation and misconception about what Haiti “is” and I feel that it’s important to share my personal experience and exploration of Haiti through some of its oldest songs. MW: In the performance scheduled here in Aggieland, guests will be treated to a number of pieces inspired by the poetry of Langston Hughes. How does a musician interpret the written word into music? Was it the general feel of a Hughes’ poem that set the tone, the message, or the cadence of the prose? McCalla: When I started writing to Hughes’ poetry, I felt a rhythmic connection to certain poems; that made me pick up my guitar and write some melodies to the words. Hughes’ poems are very musical and so they really lend themselves to music making. A lot of the poems I wrote for are some of his lesser known pieces, but the messages in his poems speak for themselves; the words hit me right in the gut. MW: As a child, your parents gave you books of Hughes’ poetry. You must have had quite a different relationship to his work as a child than you do now. Do you remember your first impressions of his work and what you liked about it? And how has your appreciation and connection to his work transformed over the years? McCalla: When I was younger, I was struck by how clever but simple Hughes’ poetry is. I knew the meaning of most of the words and I could understand the nuances. I still feel that way. But as an adult, I’m much more attuned to the complexity of the history—a lot of it quite painful—behind the inspiration for his work.

pg26 26 || maroonweekly.com maroonweekly.com || 02.20.13 02.20.13 pg

by

Chris Zebo


FORSYTH GALLERIES

Runyon Cameo Examples and Paperweights Permanent Exhibit Tuesday - Friday: 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Saturday - Sunday: 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm MSC OPAS February 15-April 14 Tuesday - Friday: 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Saturday - Sunday: 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

STARK GALLERIES

Absolute Truth, Nothing But Lies January 17-March 3 Tuesday - Friday: 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Saturday - Sunday: 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm Hansegger & Delulio: Fate and Friendship January 24-March 13 Tuesday - Friday: 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Saturday - Sunday: 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

GEORGE BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Conflict & Development: The Nexus of Animals, Environment, and the Human Condition

Ends March 31 Mon-Sat 9:30am-5 pm Cost: Adults- $7.00 Seniors-$6.00 TAMU & Blinn Students- Free Other college students with ID- $3.00 Children (6-17)- $3.00 Genome: The Secret of How Life Works Ends July 5 Mon-Sat 9:30am-5 pm Cost: Adults- $7.00 Seniors-$6.00 TAMU & Blinn Students- Free Other college students with ID- $3.00 Children (6-17)- $3.00

SEAD GALLERY

Anguspaul- Colorpalooza Ends February 22 10:00am-6:00pm FREE

LOOK

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 27


FEB. 1 - MARCH 1


ì”Ob Course” --getting a new start by Matt Jones Across

Down

1 Liberty org. 5 Dave’s bandleader 9 Used as source material 14 Each episode of “24” 15 “Major” constellation 16 Blah 17 Thieves who take X-rated DVDs? 20 Gorp piece 21 He killed Mufasa 22 Nebula animal 23 Really untrustworthy looking 25 As well 26 Tachometer stat 29 Roll call response 30 Company with orange-and-white trucks 33 Like some minimums 34 Fascination with Dre, Eve and Wiz Khalifa? 37 Get wind of 40 Fleur-de-___ 41 Start of a Danny Elfman band 42 Jamaica or Puerto Rico, if you’re drawing a map? 45 Bert who played the Cowardly Lion 46 Change the clock 47 Icicle spot 51 “I’m ___ Boat” (“SNL” digital short) 52 ___ Lingus (Irish carrier) 53 What many gamblers claim to have 55 “Double Dare” host Summers 57 Cheese that melts well 59 Part of TNT 60 Debt to ducts? 64 Wilkes-___, Penna. 65 Kings of ___ 66 Duncan of the Obama Cabinet 67 One-for-one trades 68 ___ Tomb (solitaire game) 69 Ray of light

1 Zooming noise 2 Like cookies made without ovens 3 Keaton of the Silent Era 4 Parabolic path 5 Add sparkle to 6 51, for one 7 Superpower that split up 8 Calif. newspaper 9 Spanish actress often seen on “The Love Boat” 10 Kansas county seat (hidden in VIOLATION) 11 Pinky’s partner 12 It’s north of Afr. 13 Dungeons & Dragons game runners, for short 18 Key at the top left 19 School, to Sarkozy 24 Feeling while watching slasher movies 25 Skirmish 27 ___-rock 28 “Tell ___ secrets...” 31 Less like thou? 32 Seemingly endless pit 33 They usually weren’t hits 35 ___ Taylor LOFT 36 Bobby, to Hank Hill 37 Track star Jones 38 Israeli statesman Abba 39 Moorish fortress in Spain 43 ___-Roman wrestling 44 Symbols called “snails” in some languages 48 Dress 49 Shakespearean title city 50 Feuder with Moby 52 City where Van Gogh painted 54 Positive vote 56 Gp. for Baby Boomers 57 Hot wings cheese 58 Out-of-control situation 60 Channel with the slogan “Very funny” 61 Labor org. based in Detroit 62 Sandwich that’s now a potato chip flavor 63 It’s settled when settling up

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com)

ETC.

02.20.13 | maroonweekly.com | pg 29


r e g n i l S k n i r D

Submit your pictures to editor@maroonweekly.com. Each week, we will feature a picture in the paper.

GET TO KNOW YOUR FAVORITE BCS BARTENDERS

SLINGER OF THE WEEK

James Harris O’Bannon’s Taphouse MW: In your opinion, what is the most disgusting drink people ask for? JH: A four horsemen. MW: Because of what it tastes like or what it does? JH: What it tastes like; all shots do the same thing. MW: What is the craziest thing you’ve seen while working at O’Bannon’s? JH: There was a night where a dude wearing a full kilt flashed one of the A&M Rugby players moms. He was trying to flash one of his friends, I think, but she ended up getting in the middle of them and saw everything. MW: If you could serve one person—a famous celebrity, sports athlete, etc.--who would you want to serve? JH: Living or dead? MW: Alive or dead. JH: Probably my Dad. MW: What would you serve your Dad? JH: An old fashioned.

Slinger’s Signature Drink MW: What’s a drink you get asked for a lot? JH: A screwdriver. Most of the time, I give people a regular screwdriver. But if I ask them if they’ve ever had a good screwdriver and they say no, I’ll give them my special screwdriver.

1) One o ra n g 2) Two p e freshly juiced ackets o 3) One o f suga unce of Drippin r g Spring Vo s 4 ) S h a ke d k a well wit 5) Serve h ice in 6) Garnis a rocks glass h with slice an an orange d cherry

ETC.

pg 30 | maroonweekly.com | 02.20.13

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2-20-13