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PORTFOLIO

Marlon Jonkers

2013


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PORTFOLIO

CONTENT Occupations Profile Tree House Retreat

[BSc 1]

Proposing a New Study Centre

[MSc 3/4 Graduation]

Fish Auction Re-used

[BSc 5]

‘No Tiles Please’

[Internship]

Ornamatics

[Minor BSc]

Hospitality & Medical Care

[BSc 6]

Heavy History

[MSc 1]

2013


INTRODUCTION

OCCUPATIONS

OCCUPATIONS

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INTRODUCTION

OCCUPATIONS

1997-2001 Alkwin Kollege Uithoorn - HAVO (N&T) 2001-2004 Alkwin Kollege - VWO (N&T) Work at Bar/Restaurant - Jachthaven Nieuwe Meer 2004-2005 BSc 1 - Summer House BSc 2 - Greenhouse Work at Restaurant - Pelicaan 2005-2006 BSc 3 - Dwelling BSc 4 - Modern Art Museum Study trip - Iran 2006-2007 BSc 5 - Renovation Fish Auction 2007-2008 BSc 6 - Maternity Hotel Internship - ir C.J Bos architect 2008-2009 MSc 1 Border Conditions - Slavery Museum Internship - Personal Architecture 2009-2010 Exchange - University Of Melbourne Minor - Ornamatics Minor - Film & Architecture Work Restaurant - De Beierd 2010-2011 History Thesis - De huisvrouw, Margarete SchutteLihotzky & de Frankfurter Kuche MSc 3 - Interiors Buildings & Cities - Library for the University of Amsterdam - Graduation 2011-2012 MSc 4 - Interiors Buildings & Cities - Library for the University of Amsterdam [29.06.2012] Graduation 2012-2013 Work at MESS - Biergarten Rotterdam [01.08.2012] Founder & Owner - Marlon Jonkers Architecture

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INTRODUCTION

PROFILE

PROFILE

Hello, This portfolio gives insight into my design work within the field of architecture. The selected projects give a general overview of my skills and each single project touches an interesting subject of architectural concern. In general these examples show how I tend to approach and elaborate architectural queries. What appeals to me most about architecture is that it is able to invent wonderful physical places. It is a honourable task to contribute to an engaging build environment. I like the process of developing conceptual ideas, followed by a executing stage and actually making the ideas tangible. Therefore I think thoughtful urban implementation but also precise detailing and refined materialization are of great importance. Successful architecture brings joy in its use and being. Clearly, in the end, I just want to make enjoyable buildings. Yours sincerely, Marlon born 26 . 08 . 1985 MSc of Science, Architecture TU Delft - Interiors, Buildings & Cities marlonjonkers@gmail.com

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INTRODUCTION

PROFILE

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BACHELOR WORK

SUMMER HOUSE

TREE HOUSE RETREAT [2004, Delftse Hout, BSc 1, first project at TUDelft Johan van der Zwart]

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This summerhouse is designed for a hard working couple and located at the edge of the woods, of the ‘Delftse Hout’. The pace of modern day life can be hectic sometimes. This design therefore offers a place to withdrawn from the fuss of daily routines. The clever floor plan leads to a very compact organized design. The remarkable routing through the house is functional while exciting. The architectural form relates to its context; the border of surrounding trees. The ‘front’ façade of the house is turning its back to the road and is mostly closed, while the ‘back’ façade is open towards the trees. Large windows will frame a serene view into the wood-landscape. Enjoy your quiet stay.


BACHELOR WORK

SUMMER HOUSE

1m

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

PROPOSING A NEW STUDYCENTRE

embedded in the historic inner city of Amsterdam [2010-2012, Amsterdam, Graduation project Studio - Interiors Buildings and Cities Mechthild Stuhlmacher / Dirk Somers / Henk Mihl]

The city centre of Amsterdam is known for a lot of things. Besides the obvious commercial and tourist attractions the historic urban ensemble of the canal district, and especially the canal houses give face to the identity of Amsterdam. It is not surprisingly that UNESCO in 2010 included this area in the World Heritage List. The University of Amsterdam (UVA) is strongly engaged to the historic city centre of Amsterdam. This still growing organisation is accommodated in about 85 separate buildings, scattered around the city. To enhance the academic communal feeling, the UVA wants to create a central gathering place for students to meet and study. By developing a new university library, the perfect opportunity arises to create a unique spot for social and intellectual get-togethers. If you are doing research and you need reliable information, the place to find this is a university library. The prior purpose of a university library has always been, to deposit and distribute academic knowledge. But the beauty about libraries is that they also contain

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wonderful spaces in which you can quietly and seriously engage those recourses. It is a unique place in which the communal feeling of an academic community can be experienced. And this collective experience is precisely what makes a library successful. On a larger scale different concerns arise. When adding a quite large new public building in an existing urban structure, multiple conflicts appear. The task lies in making modern architecture that does not conflict with but enhances the surrounding. Interventions must be done thoughtful, and with great care for surrounding buildings and urban structure. But a new important public building, such as a library, is also allowed to stand out. This is allowed because besides the urban implementation, and in addition to the social and functional use, this building is also a representation of the UVA towards the city. The prominent task for this design is how to deal with a complex program and especially how to suitably fit this program into an existing urban context.


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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Library revolves around books

Rotterdams Leeskabinet [1884] Image of a classic conventional library

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Did the building become obsolete?

Books have always played a leading role within the academic library. When thinking about libraries, you automatically think about books. There will always be a demand for knowledge, but the form in which this knowledge is communicated is changing. Technical inventions result in a notable shift form printed media to digital information. Initially books where used to gain information, while nowadays it is much easier and quicker to consult digital information. Ways of finding, seeking and using information has changed. This also influences ways of study, and the behaviour of students. You used to see students walking around with huge book stacks; all they carry now is a small sized laptop. Technology makes it possible that information can be accessed everywhere; at home, in a coffee bar or at the faculty. Introducing this liberty suggests that the academic library as a physical place, has become obsolete. Thankfully, this seems untrue. Large numbers of students

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Collective experience is essential

take their laptops, leave their homes, and head to the city’s library, to sit and study together for upcoming exams. The purpose of the modern library doesn’t focus as much on information resources, but it revolves around the collective experience of studying together. Collective experience is essential in this design proposal. Seen and being seen, while being part of an academic community. Unquestionably, everyone has personal preferences about how to study. The architectural design is focussed on creating different study scenarios. These scenarios are arranged in an exciting composition to offer all types of study places; quiet individual spaces, but also collective reading rooms. Large open spaces and peek views create opportunities for surprising encounters. Hereby multiple gradations of interaction are possible. Students will experience engaging study spaces and social coherence.


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Creating study scenario’s

Arranged in a spatial composition

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Current urban situation

By analyzing the Binnengasthuisterrein, it becomes clear that it is an exception within Amsterdam’s urban fabric. The canals determine the cities main structure, and perpendicular to that are small housing parcels. The Binnengasthuisterrein can be seen as an autonome enclave within this formal structure. This unique area is one of the oldest parts of Amsterdam, and used to be a nunnery. The history is still to recognize in the enclosed character of the area, it is only accessible through small gates and alleys. It almost seems to be hidden behind a representative edge. This hidden character is a distinguishing quality. Another quality is that the individual buildings behave independent. They are loose objects within this hidden area. The almost arbitrary distribution gives the Binnengasthuisterrein an unrestrained feeling The new urban proposal confirms these qualities. The old clinic hospital building is being renovated and made suitable for scientific research. A new building will accommodate the new library. This urban intervention will re-close the edge, introduce an alley and create a public square. The building is very aware of the context and is anchored to the existing edge. But the architectural form also manifests itself as an independent sculpture. The design relates to its direct context by dealing with human scale on ground level, while maintaining a strong dialogue with the broader context.

Design proposal

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Kloveniersburgwal - Oudemanhuis poort

Oudezijdsachterburgwal - Oudemanhuis poort

Kloveniersburgwal

Turfdraagsterpad

Oudezijdsachterburgwal

Acceses to Binnengasthuisterrein

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

00 - 01

02 - 03

04 - 05

06 - 07

08 - 09

10 - 11

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The column structure supports the open spaces that are connected by large vides. Every two levels are related to each other and they are visually and physically connected. A facilitating zone foresees the building from useful necessities. In here toilets, lockers, print rooms and the main circulation are placed. The libraries interior is focussed on creating possible interactions, this also counts for the integrated exterior spaces. The design offers balconies, patio’s, a roof terrace and a roof garden, where students can read in the sun, have a chat, make a call, or just to get some fresh air.


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

17 Ground Level - 1:500


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

18 4th Floor - 1:500 Main reading room


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

19 10th Floor - 1:500 Accessible rooftop


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

20 Lobby entrance


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

21 Central lobby and main entrance


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Amsterdam’s skyline is defined quite formal. The canal houses draw a straight horizontal line. Only larger public buildings such as church towers are an exception to this. Far outside the cities periphery larger buildings appear. The new library behaves like a self-conscious sculpture within the city. But from street view it fits proportionally into the cities landscape. And by doing this, it really becomes part of the public city life.

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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Section BB’ Study area’s


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

24 Within the city


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

25 Streetview from Rokin


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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Section AA’ Cross-section


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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Section CC’ Facilitating zone


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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The facade consists of ceramic shingles and precast concrete elements that articulate the balconies.


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

31 Main reading room


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

32 Roof patio


GRADUATION WORK

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

33 Split level patio


BACHELOR WORK

SUSTAINABLE DWELLING

FISH AUCTION RE-USED [2006, Scheveningen, BSc 5 Peter Wienberg]

An upcoming occurring phenomenon is the renovation of existing buildings. The fish auction in Scheveningen is not being used that much anymore, but the main structure of the building is still in good shape. The characteristic building is approximately 400 meters long, and has a remarkable shed roof. This building is located beautifully along the quay, and contributes to the unique identity of Scheveningen harbour. Sustainability has become a daily topic in the field of architecture. This master plan focuses on integrating sustainable developments. The new area will be using wind energy, the dwellings have a grey water system and it is a no-carzone. The old fish-auction building is re-designed to be suitable for housing. To achieve this, a number of prefabricated blocks are added. The blocks are designed for housing and small retailers. In between these blocks are small alleys and collective places. This area is covered with a glass roof. This roof functions to keep the rain out, but also works as an extra thermal buffer.

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BACHELOR WORK

SUSTAINABLE DWELLING

The existing building

Masterplan - Scheveningen haven

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BACHELOR WORK

SUSTAINABLE DWELLING

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BACHELOR WORK

SUSTAINABLE DWELLING

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BACHELOR WORK

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BACHELOR WORK

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INTERNSHIP

BATHROOM RENOVATION

‘NO TILES PLEASE’

I learned a lot during my internship at ‘Personal Architecture’. One of the most memorable projects for me is this re-designed bathroom. This small room was outdated and asked for a change. The client was well aware of what she liked her new bathroom to be. She also had a peculiar wish regarding the materialization. To avoid any associations with unfriendly swimming pool atmospheres, this bathroom had to be one without any tiles.

[2009, Personal Architecture, internship]

The design process was limited but also feasible by technical possibilities. To realize this unique result we had to look for unconventional technical means. The bathrooms visible topcoat is mainly a light-grey epoxy coating. This coating is water resistant, while giving the room the polished desired look. This design is also remarkable in its exceptional precision of detailing. Within this small room, every millimeter is designed; the heated slope floor, the lowered sealing with indirect lights, the sunken mirror and the bathroom furniture. By unconventional materialization and distinctive design, an appealing bathroom is realized. The client still enjoys the result.

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INTERNSHIP

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INTERNSHIP

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INTERNSHIP

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INTERNSHIP

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INTERNSHIP

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BACHELOR WORK

ORNAMATICS

ORNAMATICS [2009, Minor BSc Robbert Nottrot / Martijn Stellingwerf]

Through time positions about ornament in architecture have been broadly discussed. Ornaments have mainly been an expression of wealth and craftsmanship. But not always have ornaments been celebrated. In modern architecture the radical aesthetical purist attitude of Adolf Loos declares ornaments obsolete and even refers to them as waste and crime. The interesting discussion about the use and necessity of ornaments is continuing. But aesthetic preferences and architectural positions will keep changing the purpose of ornaments in architecture. Besides the general architectural discussion, it is interesting to research the opportunities for contemporary ornamentation. Especially in regard to new possibilities like computer aided modelling and new production technologies. New techniques have contributed to wholly new ways of shaping building elements. Obviously this asks for new thoughts on architectural components and connections.

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In this course I researched how a parametric design can make a 3D sculptural object, out of one simple wooden element. Using one element and then slightly manipulating variants can generate the widest variety and most interesting forms. Also the strength of repetition and composition is explored through a 3D tile design. One tile on itself is not too impressive, but when a lot are arranged together imposing gestures can be made. By thinking about 3D ornamental objects I realized a lot of the richness of architecture lies in the materialization and clever treatment of details.


BACHELOR WORK

ORNAMATICS

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BACHELOR WORK

ORNAMATICS

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BACHELOR WORK

ORNAMATICS

3D tile design - excecuted by 3d-printer

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BACHELOR WORK

MATERNITY HOTEL

HOSPITALITY & MEDICAL CARE [2007, Rotterdam, BSc 6 Marta Miguel / Moritz Bernoully]

One of the most special happenings in life is when a baby gets born. It is an exciting time for all women to be pregnant. In this period a lot changes and decisions have to be made, for example about where to give birth to the baby. Some choose to go to a hospital, where all medical care is nearby. Others prefer to have a baby at home, because it offers a trusted surrounding and privacy. But there is also a third option that combines the best of both. A maternity hotel offers a calm place where you can give birth to a child, while being surrounded by medical care 24 hours a day. This architectural design is all about combining three wellknown functions into one design. Specific qualities of hospital,

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house and hotel are put together. The task is to give pregnant women a relaxed stay. Architecture contributes to this by integrating the official institutional character of a hospital with the trusted feeling of a home, and the luxury of a hotel. Compact rooms offer the functionality of a hospital dorm, while they appear more like neat hotel rooms. Special trained nurses will always be around. And on both floors there are two clinical areas, with birth-rooms and medical facilities just in case something goes wrong. The hotel is the perfect place to give pregnant woman professional help and personal attention, to make sure the can return home happily with a new family member.


BACHELOR WORK

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BACHELOR WORK

MATERNITY HOTEL

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BACHELOR WORK

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MASTER WORK

SLAVERY MUSEUM

Arrangement of slave ship 17th century

HEAVY HISTORY [2008, Amsterdam, Prins Hendrikkade, MSc 1 Micha de Haas]

Amsterdam has one of the most noticeable historical inner cities. The 17th century built heritage remind us of a prosperous time full of wealth. The trading spirit and adventurous minds of that time brought us where we are today. But there is a downside. Brutal means where used to conquer overseas land, and the inhumane matter of using slaves was common. Nowadays we know it is important to protect human rights, and we therefore strongly reject every kind of slavery. Unfortunately, history can’t be unwritten, and that’s why the Dutch slavery past must be recognized and accepted. ‘NiNsee’ is an organization that facilitates distribution of information and documentation of the Dutch slavery past. By research and education they tend to contribute to recognition of the slavery past by all Dutch people. And bring realization and acceptance of the impact it still has on Dutch society. The building design is a Slavery Museum for the ‘NiNsee’

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institute. The experience within the building contributes to bring knowledge about, and recognition and acceptance of the Dutch slavery past. But also points out the slavery-issues we still deal with today, like woman-trade, and child-labour. The interior of the building may seem arbitrary and complex, but actually has a clear route and focuses on specific city views. These views relate the exposed historical topics to the current context. The design proposal deals with how to represent and arrange such a sensitive topic. The architectural form is aware of its powerful presence at this central location. By affirming its substance, it becomes a noticeable object in the city’s landscape. The museum is symbolic and metaphorical but the abstract shape prevents the building from being obvious. The building should not be seen as a monument. It is an informative museum, for those interested. Simultaneously it does endeavour to encourage curiosity towards this topic.


MASTER WORK

SLAVERY MUSEUM

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MASTER WORK

SLAVERY MUSEUM

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The conceptual design approach led to a hanging heavy block that metaphorically refers to the dark side of our glorious Dutch history (still hanging over our head). The square underneath carries the museum on waves of concrete. These waves also function as ramps to enter the museum and the underlying parking deck.


MASTER WORK

SLAVERY MUSEUM

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Marlon Jonkers 2013


portfolio marlon jonkers