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Marlies Boterman 2013


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Portfolio contents: p. 4 - 5 Curriculum vitae p. 6 - 7 Office Company Webcast, Capelle aan den Ijssel p. 8 - 23 Fitness centre RIVM, Bilthoven, RGD p.24 - 31 Master project, changing landscape, Copenhagen DK p.32 - 39 Triptique p.40 - 41 Cupboard Cherry Wood p.44 - 53 De Rotterdam, groundlevel, Rotterdam, OMA p.54 - 55 Elements on the square, Rotterdam, OMA p.56 - 61 City villa, Rotterdam, OMA p.62 - 65 G-Star Raw, headquarter, Amsterdam, OMA p.68 - 69 p.70 - 73 p.74 - 75 p.76 - 79 p.80 - 81 p.82 - 83 p.84 - 85

PPS justice complex, Beveren en Dendermonde BE, HAB Courthouse, Zwolle, HAB Interior courthouse, Zwolle, HAB Chapel De Zande, Ruiselede, BE, HAB Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam, HAB Entrance building Zuiderzeemuseum, Enkhuizen, HAB Dwelling, Bonaire, HAB

p.88 - 89

Smedinghuis, Lelystad, RGD

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Marlies Boterman (1977) education: 2013 English Fluency Course, level C1, UVA, Amsterdam 2006 - 2010 HMC vocational college for woodworking and furniture, Amsterdam (furniture maker) 2001 - 2002 Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, DK 1999 - Environmental Science, University Leiden, 3th year Master Course 1996 - 2003 TUDelft: Delft University of Technology (Master degree Architecture, honorable mention) competence: autocad_2d+3d excellent adobe excellent microsoft excellent Dutch excellent English good, level C1 work experience: 2011- 2013 OMA, Rotterdam (senior-architect) 2010 - 2011 Merkx+Girod architects (M+G), Amsterdam (project-architect) 2006 - 2010 Hootsmans architectuurbureau (HAB), Amsterdam (project-architect) 2009 Internship ‘The Set Compagny’ (TSC), Amsterdam (to become furniture maker) 2003 - 2006 Rijksgebouwendienst (Rgd), Den Haag (designer and project-architect) 2001 - 2002 Henning Larsen tegnestue a/s (HL), Copenhagen, DK (designer) 1999 - 2001 MIII architecten, Rijswijk (designer) personal projects: 2013 - heden Office Company Webcast, renovation and interior, Capelle aan den Ijssel 2005 - 2007 Fitness centre RIVM, renovation and interior, Bilthoven, nomination ‘Lensvelt de Architect interieurprijs’ projects: 2013 PPS Renovation Rijnstraat 8, Den Haag (OMA) 2013 De Rotterdam, NHOW hotel, interior, Rotterdam (OMA) 2013 Brighton College, extention and new construction, competition, Brighton (OMA) shared winners 2013 Element on the square, competition, Rotterdam (OMA), second price 2012 - 2013 City villa, new construction, Rotterdam (OMA) 2012 Floriade 2022, competition, Zoetermeer (OMA) 2011 - 2013 De Rotterdam, groundlevel, roofgardens, new construction, Rotterdam (OMA - Inside Outside) 2011 - 2012 Interior headquarter G-Star, new construction, Amsterdam (OMA - Inside Outside) 2010 - 2011 House Amstel 276, renovation en redesign, Amsterdam (M+G) 2010 - 2011 Hilton hotel, interior public space groundlevel, Schiphol (M+G) 2010 - 2011 House Singel 136, renovation en redesign, Amsterdam (M+G) 2010 Kiosk, competition new construction, London (HAB) 2010 Interior courthouse realisation fase, Zwolle (HAB) 2010 Landscape design chapel De Zande, Ruiselede, BE (HAB) 2010 PPS justice complex, Beveren en Dendermonde, BE (HAB) 2010 Justice complex, competition renovation and new construction, Chemnitz, DE (HAB) honorable mention 2009 Entrance building Zuiderzeemuseum, study new construction, Zuiderzeemuseum, Enkhuizen (HAB) 2009 Rietveld academy, study to move to GAK-building, renovation, Amsterdam (HAB) 2008 - 2009 Rietveld Academy and Loyens en Loeff, study extention and new constructions, Amsterdam (HAB) 2008 - 2010 Chapel de Zande, renovation and restoration, Ruiselede, BE (HAB) 2008 Competion ‘brede school’, Rotterdam (HAB) 2007 - 2008 Villa Bonaire, nieuwbouw, The Netherlands Antilles (HAB) 2007 Competition ‘Grundschule, Regensburg’, DE (HAB) 2007 Study Faculty of Architecture, closed competition, Delft (HAB) 2005 - 2010 Courthouse Zwolle, renovation en new construction (Rgd/HAB) 2005 - 2007 Fitness centre RIVM, renovation and interior, Bilthoven (Rgd) 2005 Wilhelminahof II, study new construction courthouse, Rotterdam (Rgd) 2004 High Council, study rehousing, Den Haag (Rgd) 2004 Oostereiland, urban plan, Hoorn (Rgd) 2003 - 2005 Smedinghuis, renovation en interior, Lelystad (Rgd) 2001 Opera house, new construction, Copenhagen, DK (HL) 4


teaching: 2013 Academie van Bouwkunst, Arnhem, graduation supervisor 2013 Academie van Bouwkunst Rotterdam, teacher 2010 - heden Academie van Bouwkunst Amsterdam, graduation supervisor 2009 - heden Academie van Bouwkunst Amsterdam, teacher 2009 Academie van Bouwkunst Tilburg, teacher 2008 - 2009 Academie van Bouwkunst Arnhem, visiting critic 2008 Academie van Bouwkunst Tilburg, visiting critic 2002 - 2003 Technische Universiteit Delft, teacher 2001 - 2002 Start graduationateliers TU-Delft, student assistent publications and exhibitions: 2009 Publication ‘Pasajes Diseno’, n 09, Fitness RIVM 2007 Publication ‘de architect interieur, jaargang 38, nr 11’, fitness centre RIVM 2007 Publication ‘smaak 32, fitnessen: de gezondheidcultus op kantoor’ 2004 Exhibition of my graduation project in Copenhagen, DK 2003 - 2004 Exhibition about elderly homes (zorgcircel Purmerend) 2002 Exhibition children playgrounds Aldo van Eyck (Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam) 2002 contribution publication book Aldo van Eyck, children playgounds in the city 2002 contribution publication archis #3, bike map Amsterdam playgrounds of Aldo van Eyck 2001 - 2002 Research for children playgrounds of Aldo van Eck, for Liane Lefaivre (TU-Delft) additional: 2010 Triptique 2009 Furniture VVV, Leiden (TSC) 2009 Furniturel Hilfiger, Amsterdam (TSC) 2009 Furniture: table Plywood 2007 Furniture: cupboard Cherry Wood 2006 Furniture: box and chest Oak Wood 1996 - heden Architecture excursions

Marlies Boterman Merelstraat 8-1 1022 AP Amsterdam 06 24810907 mboterman@hotmail.com

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Office Company Webcast The new workroom of Company Webcast has an industrial character, with a clear height of 4.9 metres and large windows. The enormous amount of light and air has an impact on you. These excessive dimensions are marvellous and a starting point for the new design. At the location of the entrance and the reception the plan is open, while walls have been placed more to the back for concentration workplaces. The height of these closed walls is only 2.3 metres and they match the horizontal rail in the windows. More than half of the top room remains empty. The board rooms are closed with glass at the top side, because of the acoustics. Every room offers space to the employees to show their own materials and work inspiration on the metal L-sections along the walls and on the white board on the inside of the wall that separates the hall. In addition, every room has an own cupboard for maps and files. The studio and production room are visible from the traffic room and are located at the back, next to the lunch room.

usual room

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Office Company Webcast Client: Iwan and Olaf Lawerman, Company Webcast Architect: Marlies Boterman Building surface:1094 m2 Start design: August 2013 Start building: November 2013 Finished: January 2014


board room

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Fitness centre RIVM text Machteld Kors, translation: Willem Boterman, photos Joachim Baan The National Institute for Public Health and Environment (RIVM) is a closed campus tucked away in the woods of Bilthoven. The campus is dominated by gloomy office blocks and concrete laboratories. It was planned that the Cohenbuilding (1986) should host the new gym for employees, which nowadays has become a standard part of Dutch terms of employment in order to keep workers fit and healthy. The available space, which was in use as standard offices in a spacious yet dark office landscape, was stripped completely. The closed front panels were replaced with glass. In the part of the space with a double high ceiling a volume is placed that is floating in the air, which accommodates the dressing rooms. The wooden benches on either side are carefully positioned in line with the size and pattern of the tiles. The same applies to the shower drain and the mirror. The lockers, made in perforated-steel, are placed against the outer glass wall, enabling backlight to conceal the partially visible contents of the lockers. The wash-hand basins are, as well as the framework and the number plates of the lockers, made in sandblasted stainless steel. As a project architect of the Government Buildings Agency Marlies Boterman has turned different levels of transparency, reflection, and concealment into important themes in her design. Supplies as installations, lightning, and also mirrors have been wholly integrated behind a layer of perforated white panels, which cover the ceiling and the walls too. This white ‘veil’ differs subtly between surfaces and together with the white and shiny cast-floor brings about a serenity, which enables the sportsman to concentrate and perform optimally. The employees can look outside through the veil, while it is hardly possible to be watched from the other side, thereby guaranteeing privacy to the sportsmen. Confrontational mirrors are placed carefully. Through the partition-wall with its golden trophy box, passersby can only catch a glimpse of exercising colleagues. Due to the mirroring effect of the shining golden studs they mainly see their own reflection. It is a glamorous eye-catching element in the design. On the golden studs silhouettes are punched that resemble sports trophies. From a distance these golden studs together constitute on a bigger scale again shapes of sports cups and ribbons. The idea of this trophy box was by Joachim Baan. The integral approach and the precise and consequent detailing together with the glamorous use of materials make this design a powerful statement that speaks out for an attractive space.

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Fitness centre RIVM in Bilthoven Client:Rijksgebouwendienst and RIVM Project architect:Marlies Boterman, RGD Project team: Aad van Berkel, Maarten Meester, Elmer Gouw, Diedrick de Vilder, Winfried van Zeeland Graphic designer: Joachim Baan, Another Company Construction engineer: Han Eckhardt, RGD Area: 295 m2 Start design: October 2005 Start building: July 2006 Finished: February 2007 Nominated for Lensvelt interior price 2007


fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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5

4

3

2

1

8

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1 entrance 2 fitness space 3 corridor 4 physiotherapy 5 office 6 storage 7 dressing room 8 lockers 9 shower

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fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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fitness centre RIVM

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Changing landscape Bathhouse in Copenhagen During my study period in Copenhagen I became fascinated by the Refshaleøen area. It is a deserted port area north east of the city centre, where the scale of buildings and infrastructure refer to the activities that had taken place there. It touched me. Senses are stimulated in a different way here. There is a strong wind, it whooshes around your ears. It influences the structure of the surface of the water. There is the smell of the sea. And the view is extensive because of the surrounding water, with the mermaid and the old centre in the distance. My intervention consists of a national plan for the entire area, whereby the architectonic intervention is a bathhouse on the most western point. The buildings and the environment change as a result of the influence of ebb and flood, and the drifting sand of the new beach. The variety in the level of the water is emphasised even more because of the slightly sloping sections of the roof of the building. Walking routes are sometimes inaccessible. Algal growth is stimulated and creates a kind of soft transition from buildings to water. In the building the use of materials has been examined with due care, such as the rail of copper, a material that can be found everywhere in the building, and the working details of the dressing rooms. The construction of the building consists of concrete, which also has an influence on the climate through concrete core activation. The texture of floors is such that you can walk on it with bare feet. Low intimate rooms change over into a large high central room. Seawater flows inside through recesses in the roof, depending on the tides. The view is staged, however it will only a play role after the relaxation of the first baths.

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Master project TUD: Title: Changing landscape Location: Copenhagen Teachers: dr. ir. Bernard Leupen, ir.Jan van de Voort, ir.Remco Bruggink, Design: 2002-2003 Honorable mention


changing landscape

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changing landscape

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changing landscape

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changing landscape

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33 triptique


Triptique photos: Leonard Faustle This cupboard hangs on the wall. It is a simple block. When opening the parts it turns out to be a triptych with a multiform interior. On the left the front sides consist of three parts and on the right of four parts of various dimensions, which can be opened separately. Its manifestation may differ and the cupboard is in particular suitable to be left open. The piece of furniture has been made with a CNC machine. The exact dimensions are: lxwxh 360x216x594mm. The piece of furniture consist of thirty-three slices of 18-mm birch plywood. It is always based on the same outer form. In total nineteen parts are required for making this, with a total of hundred individual parts. Magnets have been included in the plywood inversely, so that the rotating parts remain closed in a closed condition. The hinges are invisible when the cupboard is closed. I designed and made this cupboard myself during my training

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triptique

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triptique

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triptique

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Cupboard Cherry Wood From the outside this cupboard has a tight rectangular volume, with very slim legs of mild-steel strip. The seams of the planks continue, as is the case with the grains. The layout is asymmetric from the inside, with a small cupboard on the left, a drawer in the middle and a broader cupboard on the right. The cherry-wood parts are mutually connected with a loose spring. Mild-steel strips have been included In the wooden parts in order to limit the action of the wood. The legs emerge from this hidden steel construction. Because the rotating parts and the drawer under the mitre fall in the piece of furniture, and the seams between the parts are just as large as the other seams, it can hardly be seen that this piece of furniture can be opened. I designed and made this piece of furniture myself during my training.

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Cupboard Cherry Wood

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WORK AT OMA

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De Rotterdam De Rotterdam is conceived as a vertical city: three interconnected mixed-use towers accommodating offices, apartments, a hotel, conference facilities, gym, shops, restaurants, and cafes. The project began in 1997. Construction started at the end of 2009, with completion scheduled for 2013. The towers are part of the ongoing redevelopment of the old harbour district of Wilhelminapier, next to the Erasmus Bridge, and aim to reinstate the vibrant urban activity - trade, transport, leisure - once familiar to the neighbourhood. De Rotterdam is named after one of the ships on the Holland America Line, which departed from the Wilhelminapier in decades past, carrying thousands of Europeans emigrating to the US. The three towers reach 150m high, with a gross floor area of approximately 160,000m2, making De Rotterdam the largest building in the Netherlands. OMA’s architectural concept produces more than sheer size: urban density and diversity - both in the program and the form - are the guiding principles of the project. De Rotterdam’s stacked towers are arranged in a subtly irregular cluster that refuses to resolve into a singular form and produces intriguing new views from different perspectives. Similarly, the definition of the building changes according to its multiple uses internally. The various programs of this urban complex are organized into distinct blocks, providing both clarity and synergy: residents and office workers alike can use the fitness facilities, restaurants, and conference rooms of the hotel. And these private users of the building have contact with the general public on the ground floor, with its waterfront cafes. The lobbies for the offices, hotel, and apartments are located in the plinth - a long elevated hall that serves as a general traffic hub for De Rotterdam’s wide variety of users. I focused in particular on the ground floor and also on proposals for roof gardens and an interior proposal for the hotel. The starting point for materialising the ground floor was to create a unity between the various areas, such as lobbies, public areas, restaurants and shops. There is the same outer facade around the plinth, with the same working details. The finishing of walls, floors and ceiling has been kept the same as much as possible. Together with the spatial reception this determines the perception of the architecture of the building. Materials that are used with the general finishing cab also be found in the interior and are connected to each other inextricably in this way. The dark grey natural stone floor and the key cladding of travertine in combination have a modest high representative quality. The columns are dark-grey concrete colossuses. The bronzed brass wall covering of the lift pockets have a golden glow. Because the light changes during the day, the reflection will also change and create a lively changing perception of the interior areas. In order to increase this effect even more, this material is also applied in the fixed design. The counters will have the same covering. Fixed lighting elements from floor to ceiling will have a brass interior layer. Large chandeliers with vertical lineation will also be placed in the lobby of the houses and the lobby of the hotel. The fixed furniture is clearly present because of its large dimensions. Materials that are used for the fixed furniture include: bronzed brass, travertine and felt. The fixed furniture is supported by cube-shaped elements that can be used as a seating element or side table. The cubes may be made of different material. Robust material such as concrete may be combined with delicate brass. The signing is in line with this building. The plinth and public parts have a special font. Fixed parts such as fire protection and health facilities, signs of toilets and stairs will not change and can therefore be integrated in a fitting way. We hereby take the high-quality materials that are applied such as wall covering as a starting point.

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Construction phase / interiors De Rotterdam Client De Rotterdam CV, The Hague (Joint venture MAB, The Hague / OVG, Rotterdam) Partner: Ellen van Loon Associate / project architect: Kees van Casteren Team 2011- interiors: Marlies Boterman With: Nathalie Gozdziak, Mengxi Wu, Tom Shadbolt, Sai Shu, Boris Tikvarski Program: total 160,000m2: offices 72,000m2; 240 apartments 35,000m2; hotel (285 rooms) / congress / restaurant 19,000m2; retail / public program 6,000m2; fitness 2,000m2; parking (approx. 650 vehicles) 25,000m2; central lobby 700m2; loading 300m2 Start design 1997 Start construction phase 2010 Finished november 2013


materials groundlevel

lobby’s and public space

De Rotterdam_OMA

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white curtain

dark gray , g684, chinese basalt

desk / mailbox

travertine snake skin

carpet

lighting fixture

brass / brounished first step

large sitting element

cubes

APARTMENT LOBBY username

need characters

loose

fixed

object

fixed pieces

loose pieces

single

dinky

family

older person

disabled person

visitor by bike

secretary

wc

garbage cleaner

plant waterer pizz

a

mail deliverer

food deliverer

movers

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pizz

a

pizz

a


hotel lobby by night

HOTEL LOBBY username

need characters

fixed

object

fixed pieces

business traveler

loose loose pieces

s

characters

family traveler

object

fixed pieces

s

older traveler

loose pieces

s

young traveler

s

disabled traveler secretary wc

wc

porter

roomservice

cleaners

bell boy

pizz

a

mail deliverer

pizz

a

facility

group

waiting

De Rotterdam_OMA

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OFFICE LOBBY

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on legs

cabinet 1.2m high

cabinet 1.4m high, small desk

cabinet 1.4m high, large desk

cabinet 1.7m high


office lobby_desk back _normal use

office lobby_desk back_use emergency centre

office lobby_desk front_normal use

office lobby_desk front_use emergency centre

De Rotterdam_OMA

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CURTAINS

typical floor plan high rise

typical floor plan low rise

sections highrise

sections translated to ‘walls’

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LIGHTING

lighting element floor to ceiling

light cube

light tetrahedron

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how to make lighting element floor to ceiling

De Rotterdam_OMA

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CUBES need

integrate small cube

integrate big cube

+plants

+lighting

+waste bin

+sitting element

+information

+newspaper

+suggestion box

+coffee machine

+showcase

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CARPETS

modelpicture_inverse inside outside

model picture_reflection on column

QR-codes

enprofile faces of all people that contributed to realise De Rotterdam

poem

names of all people that contributed to realise De Rotterdam

De Rotterdam_OMA

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Elements on the square This assignment offers a fine chance to make the square in the Museumpark even livelier. The colour pattern, which is hardly visible at present, has been made visible from a distance through our intervention. The sides of the new elements reflect, so that the underlying coloured floor pattern stands out in the vertical section. During the day the elements will always manifest themselves differently with the change of the light and the moving visitors. As an addition to the large rectangular open square, we suggest elements that are clearly recognisable as a form, for example a circle and a line. They reinforce the already present qualities on the square and may make people curious from a distance. The circle has various qualities. It is functional as a seating and playing object, both for children and adults. The net of cords invites you to lie down and ‘chill’. Climbing is also possible, even under the net, and the edge of the soft rubberlike material can also be used as sofa. The reflection will cause a surprise, as with the works of art of Dan Graham. The linear ‘whiper’ gives people the chance to exert an influence on the environment. Because of a fixed point of rotation, the element can turn 180 degrees, whereby not only the reflection creates a special and surprising effect, but also the length of the element, the experience of the weight and the chance to turn the sofa in the direction that you prefer in order to look around you.

studie maquette foto_basis stand_evenwijdig aan patroon

studie maquette foto_whiper onder een hoek tov het patroon

studie maquette foto_whiper loodrecht tov vloerpatroon

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Elements on the square Closed competition Client: Municipality of Rotterdam Projectteam: Antonio Barone, Laura Barr, Petra Blaisse, Marlies Boterman, Chris van Duijn, Yasuhito Hirose, Sai Shu, Saskia Simon Design 2012 _ one week


MUSEUMPARK 121215 elementen op het plein

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2.

1.

2.

3.

2.

4.

5.

CHILL DONUT 1. spaghettimat_black 2. mirror finish 3. manilla rope 4. aluminum construction 5. wheel

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6.

1.

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4.

2.

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WHIPER 1. spaghettimat_yellow 2. mirror finish 3. 4. aluminum construction 5. wheel 6. rotationpoint

elements on the square_OMA

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City villa Rotterdam The location of this city villa is on the Noordereiland at the Maaskade, as a continuation of De Hef (railway lift bridge). The greatest quality of this place is the view to three sides, whereby the higher the more beautiful. The typology that we made is a typical Rotterdam house, whereby the ground-floor apartment has been left out. A lift and staircase open up the house, which starts at 8.8 metres. The plinth of concrete, on which the upstairs apartment rests, has a rough finishing. It is located between the idyllic green, which continues from the dike body downwards, with a reflecting ceiling which doubles the monument of De Hef once again. The space that is created between the plinth and the current development is an outside room. It has an unexpected view. A parking place is hidden in the dike body, enclosed by a garage door covered with green. A transparent box is placed on the massive T-shaped plinth. The lowest layer offers space to the more functional rooms, such as workrooms, bedrooms and bathrooms. Because of the closed wall up to a height of about 1.3 metres, the underlying functions have privacy. Supporting functions are hidden In this thickened outer facade, such as cupboards, a foldaway bed for the guests, a fireplace, etc. People live and eat on the top layer. The patio with stairs to the roof offers a protected outside space on this layer. A roof terrace is situated as a hidden hollow in the dunes, between a band of sea buckthorn and dune grass.

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City villa Rotterdam Phase: SD - Buildingpermit Client: private Partner: Ellen van Loon Associate: Chris van Duijn projectleader: Marlies Boterman projectteam: Laura Barr, Anu Garla, Nathalie Gozdziak, Sai Shu Program: 300m2 Start design november 2012 Submission building permit: June 2013


city villa Rotterdam_OMA

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basic materials

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dune grass

diamond plate, galvanized

buckthorn

grill, galvanized

roof terras_natural versus artificial

grill, galvanized

classic wooden finish

tiles in functional zone

concrete with transparent finish

mirror ceiling_(wiel arets)

city villa Rotterdam_OMA

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materials special elements

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epoxy_(rachel whiteread)

epoxy_(rachel whiteread)

silicone_(joep van lieshout)

aluminum

galvanized steel cabinet_(maarten van severen)

epoxy_(rachel whiteread)

reflection

Lion Cachet

bronze plated_(merkx)

flexibel material_(knoll OMA)

raw versus delicat_(51N4E)

city villa Rotterdam_OMA

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Headquaters G-STAR RAW Situated next to the A10 in the industrial Zuid-Oost area of Amsterdam, the new HQ for G-Star RAW will consolidate G-Star RAW’s disparate facilities into a single building that aims to stimulate interaction between various departments. The 27,500m2 horizontal building - 140 metres long - consists of a creative nucleus containing the core departments of G-Star RAW, which are enveloped by a ring of offices, parking and support facilities. The distinction between the support activities and the creative core is heightened through contrasting materials - a monolithic solidity rendered in black concrete for the ring, while the creative core is visible through the glass façade. The lower part of the ring forms a plinth for parking and drop off; the plinth also provides a location for installations and events. The main entrance is situated at the level of the plinth and is underneath a cantilevered glass box that houses G-Star’s showrooms. This end of the building, distinct from the inner workings of G-Star, is dedicated to visitors; however there is still exposure of these inner workings through controlled views and access. Inside the creative core of the building, staggered floor plates and double height spaces promote a dynamic exchange between the different creative departments allowing for cross communication. The RAW-space, a flexible multiuse zone, either open to the outside or concealed behind sliding hangar-type doors, provides a space for work and production, parties, and fashion shows. Oriented towards the A10, the shifting façade and changing uses of the RAWspace, together with the various possible uses of the plinth, will create a constantly varying appearance reflecting the inner dynamism of G-Star RAW. In this project the fist question asked to Inside Outside was to look more closely to the G-Star project. Regarding the total design concept of the building and qualities that could be added. In the next page you can see a small summery of ideas. In this period I worked parttime at Inside Outside in Amsterdam, and the rest of the time at OMA, as a bridge and continuaty between the two firms. Next to this search for potentention and quality I developped the office part of the building, where most people would work. With introducing the toolkiton these level, we could bring flexibility and elements that were perfectly fitting with the needs of G-Star.

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Concept interior Headquaters G-STAR Amsterdam Client G-STAR RAW C.V. Partner: Ellen van Loon Projectleader: Saskia Simon in collaboration with Inside Outside, Petra Blaisse: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Sarah Moylen, Mafalda Rangel, Marina Cogliani, Green van Gogh, Tjeerd van der Sandt


G-STAR

TRANSFORM VISION

G-STAR

WE SEE MORE POTENTIAL TO INSPIRE WITH G-STARS OWN QUALITY

TION,

it’s a message, and this is connected to the idea of dialogue we talked about before.

bringing luxury to the streets. It’s a new way of thinking and it’s accessible to everyone.

IDENTITY

USE G-STAR PRODUCTS IN A DIFFERENT WAY (SCALE, PUPOSE, USE, ETC), LIKE SHOWCASE DOLL IN PRADA

IDENTITY

CURTAIN MADE OF COLLECTORSITEMS OF G-STAR

LOOK DIFFERENT (LIKE AMO AT PRADA)

LOOK DIFFERENT (LIKE INSIDE OUTSIDE AT KNOTS AND TILES) HOW DO WE APPROACH MATERIAL LIKE THIS EXAMPLE: TACTILE KNOTS, PRINTED ON A TILE; SO YOU SEE THE OBJECT IN A DIFFENT WAY.

TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD THE IDENTITY NEEDS TO BE VERY CLEAR, INSIDE THE IDENTITY COULD BE MUCH WIDER AND MORE INSPIRATIONAL. GIVE MORE KNOWLEGDE ABOUT THE COMPANY (NETWORK, WHERE IS G-STAR WORLDWIDE, HISTORY, DEVELOPMENT PRODUCTS, NY RAW COLLECTION)

HOW DO THEY WANT TO BE SEEN ENLARGE YOUR BRAIN

EXPERIENCE IN 5 SECONDS, PASSING BY 140 M, DRIVING 100KM/H

• IDENTITY KNOWLEDGE AND INSPIRATION IN HISTORY DIAGRAM ABOUT G-STAR PRODUCTS RANGE OF ALL THEIR JEANS, WITH PRESCRIPTION transport store brain/design consumer

needlework

NOW < > FUTURE color and fabric

HISTORY MUJI

cottonsow

picker

transport

weaving

HOW DO YOU WANT TO BE SEEN (MIRROR) HOW DO YOU WANT TO RAISE YOUR BRAIN? SHOULD THEY REFLECT ON THE WHOLE PICTURE? SHOULD THIS BE VISUAL (COULD BE IN MANY WAYS) IN THE BUILDING, LIKE A PRESCRIPTION (COULD BE ABOUT TYPE OF WOOL, WITH ICONS OF SHEEP PRODUCEING DIFFERENT KIND OF WOOL, LONGER, MORE STIFF, ETC) YOU COULD USE ALL PARTS OF THE PRODUCTION PROCES AS INSPIRATION AND BRANDING STRATEGIE NOW THE IDENTITY IS FOCUSED ON THE PART THAT TAKES PLACE IN THE WEST PART (FAMOUS MODELS, FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPHER, NICE DESIGNED SHOPS) THE FUTURE IDENTITY AND INSPIRATION COULD BE FOCUSED MORE ON THE PRODUCTION AND CRAFTMANSHIP IN THE ‘POORER’ PRODUCTION COUNTRIES. USE PRODUCTION CIRKEL AS PART OF YOUR IDENTITY.

IO OMA

VISION FOR

INTEGRATE DAILY WORK AND SYSTEMS

headquarters G-STAR RAW_OMA

IO OMA

VISION FOR

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product development units

office part

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type

scale 1:50

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

1200.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 1200.....1800.....480

TYPE A:

low cabinet

type

toolkit in function

scale 1:50

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

1200.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 1200.....1800.....480

TYPE A:

low cabinet

type

scale 1:50

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

1200.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 1200.....1800.....480

TYPE A:

low cabinet

type

scale 1:50

type

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 1200.....1200.....600 3000.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 3000.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 6300.....1200.....600 1200.....1800.....480

TYPETYPE A: B on top of low cabinet TYPE A

scale 1:50

1200.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 1200.....1800.....480

TYPE A:

type

TYPE B

scale 1:50

type

scale 1:50

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 3000.....1200.....600 1150.....1150.....600 3300.....1200.....100 3000.....1200.....480 2400.....1200.....600 TYPE D TYPE E 4200.....1200.....100 curtain TYPE Crack 6300.....1200.....600 7500.....1200.....100

TYPE D TYPETYPE B Crack on topglass of wall TYPE A

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 1150.....1150.....600 3000.....1200.....600 2400.....1200.....600 3000.....1200.....480 6300.....1200.....600

TYPE D rack

on top of TYPE A

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

scale 1:50

type

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

low cabinet

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 1200.....1200.....600 3000.....1200.....600 1200.....1200.....480 3000.....1200.....480 1200.....1200.....300 6300.....1200.....600 1200.....1800.....480

TYPETYPE A: B

type

scale 1:50

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

low cabinet on top of TYPE A

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

type

1150.....1150.....600 2400.....1200.....600

TYPE D rack

type

scale 1:50

TYPE D TYPE E rack

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

curtain

type

scale 1:50

TYPE D rack

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

1150.....1150.....600 2400.....1200.....600

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

3300.....2400.....600 1150.....1150.....600 4200.....2400.....600 2400.....1200.....600 7500.....2400.....600

TYPE E curtain

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

measurements in mm heigh width depth x y z

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 3300.....1200.....100 1150.....1150.....600 7500.....2400.....600 4200.....1200.....100 2400.....1200.....600 7500.....1200.....100

glass wall

scale 1:50

3300.....2400.....600 3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

TYPE E E TYPE curtain curtain

TYPE E curtain

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

type

G-STAR_

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 3000.....1200.....600 3000.....1200.....480 6300.....1200.....600

TYPE B on top of TYPE A

TYPE A:

low cabinet

shelfs

2100.....1200.....600 2100.....1200.....480 2100.....1200.....300 3300.....1200.....100 3000.....1200.....600 4200.....1200.....100 3000.....1200.....480 7500.....1200.....100 6300.....1200.....600

TYPETYPE B C on topglass of wall TYPE A

drawers

fold-down door_drawers

big doors

rotating doors

3300.....2400.....600 3300.....1200.....100 4200.....2400.....600 4200.....1200.....100 7500.....2400.....600 7500.....1200.....100

TYPE E

TYPE C

curtain

glass wall

tube for hangers

sliding door

3300.....2400.....600 3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

TYPE TYPE E E curtain curtain

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

TYPE E curtain

sliding display

G-STAR_

3300.....1200.....100 4200.....1200.....100 7500.....1200.....100

TYPE C glass wall

TYPE B on top of TYPE A

shelfs

3300.....1200.....100 4200.....1200.....100 7500.....1200.....100

TYPE C glass wall

vitrine

rotating doors

sliding door

TYPE E curtain

G-STAR_

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

G-STAR_

3300.....2400.....600 4200.....2400.....600 7500.....2400.....600

TYPE E curtain

tube for hangers

G-STAR_

toolkit overview

TOOLKIT AXO

G-STAR_

TYPE C glass wall

A3 glass wall with frame

type

glass wall with perforated material

glass wall

pivot hinge door

sliding door

rotating door

TBD

43.102

A.

TYPE D rack

rack

rack double heigh

TYPE E curtain

curtain open

curtain half open

curtain closed

toolkit part TYPE E curtain

hang one piece

hang permanent rack

hang temporary rack

hang roll curtain

headquarters G-STAR RAW_OMA

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WORK AT Hootsmans architecuurbureau

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Justice complex Beveren and Dendermonde This assignment has several challenges. First of all, the complex programme, with very different users. How can you create a functional pleasant building for everyone. We assumed a structure of ‘streets’ which come together at a central point. By making these ‘streets’ different in a very extreme way, it is possible to create diversity, and people can orientate themselves. From the central point there is a view on the outside world through a street. In the case of the design for the location in Beveren, this meant a view on the motorway, including a theoretical chance of catching a glimpse of the passing car of your lover. Secondly, the large team who worked in this plan from the very beginning was also a challenge. With projects that are put out to contract in a conventional way an architect only has to deal with a contractor at a much later stage, and often not at all with the party who is going to maintain and clean the building.

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PPS Justice complex Beveren and Dendermonde Client: Belgian government Architects: Rob Hootsmans, Remco Bruggink, Freek Persijn (51N4E) Projectarchitects Marlies Boterman (HAB), Aglaia Demulder (51N4E) Projectteam:Donna van Milligen Bielke, Daan Petri, Rienk Alberda, Esther Edelmann, Jonathan Hibma, Alejandro Hernandez-Moreno, Jurgen Metz, Giovanni Ceccarelli (RHBA) Landscape design: Petra Blaisse, Jana Crepon (Inside Outside) Construction engineer: Jan De Nul, Aalst Building contractor: Jan De Nul, Aalst Technics: Sinis, Berkel-Enschot Sustainability: DiadalosPeutz Facility: Quares, Belgie Presentation images: Luxigon, Parijs Presentation model: Vincent de Rijk, Rotterdam Building surface Beveren 26500 m2 binnen 11000 m2 buiten Building surface Dendermonde 25000 m2 binnen 11300 m2 buiten Start design: February 2010 Finished: juni 2010


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Courthouse Zwolle photos: Dirk Verwoerd / Hélène Binnet The existing courthouse in the city of Zwolle designed by architect Kruger dates from 1964. As soon as the mid 1980s there arose a need for extension. After many years of successive plans a new start has been made at the end of 2004 which is now under construction . Our design comprises a new court building and the renovation of the old one. The new building is located next to the old one; at the ground floor they are spatially connected. In contrast with the closed and introverted features of the Kruger building, the new building is transparent and accessible, with its public spaces directed to the surroundings. Its form is determined by the existing urban fabric, directions and boundaries, as well as by the heights and positions of the trees. In this way an urban coherence and new views are created. The new building consists of four programmatic layers. The first one contains an underground parking of two floors connected on the -1 floor to the old parking. The second layer is the ground floor with the entrance zone and facilities like storage, archive, prison cells, interrogation rooms and rooms for technical facilities. The old building’s entrance zone is connected here to the new visitors entrance. The third layer consists of a two floors layer with a corridor (public waiting room), courtrooms, council chambers and a library. The upper layer consists of three floors with office rooms. In line with its function each layer has its own type of construction, installation and materialisation.

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New courthouse and renovation of the old courthouse, Zwolle Client: Rijksgebouwendienst Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectteam: Maarten van der Hulst, Eric van Noord, Marlies Boterman, Daan Petri, Monique Smit, Stefan Kentie, Jonathan Hibma, Erwin Zomers, Johan van Sprundel, Lea Wiederholt, Anreas Bogenschutz Construction engineer: Arcadis Advisors: van Heugten en Peutz Constructor: Dura Vermeer Building surface: 16.420m² nieuwbouw en 11.725 m² renovatie Start design: 2004 Start construction: 2010 Finished:2014


courthouse Zwolle_HAB

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plan level +3

plan level +1

72

plan level 0


courthouse Zwolle_HAB

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Interior court of Zwolle photos: Hélène Binnet In the Provisional design and Definitive design many interior matters were discussed in the various study groups. Hereby the focus was on the architectural part, however the interior aspects were also discussed regularly, for example during an excursion to the office of Directorate-General for Public Works and Water Management (Rijkswaterstaat) in Middelburg and the court in Gent. The visual quality plan for the interior of the court in Zwolle is the result of an extensive period of consultations and cooperation between employees of the Court, the Government Buildings Agency and Hootsmans Architectuurbureau. A special interior study group was set up in order to develop this document. In it the court was represented by people who had been involved before in other specific study groups, whereby specialists of all sectors were involved. With this group we had an excursion to a lawyer’s firm in Amsterdam and to the main office of Woonzorg Nederland in Amstelveen. Through a survey the opinions about these excursions were processed and included in the ultimate plan. This cooperation with the court proved to be very valuable for us, as an architect’s office. We were able to process practical input of users in our plan already at an early stage. When planning we always applied a number of criteria, including: functionality, ergonomic quality, operational costs and flexibility, master contracts and sustainability.

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Interior courthouse Zwolle Client: Rijksgebouwendienst en rechtbank Zwolle Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectarchitect: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Donna van Milligen Bielke, Christin Leutritz, Paul Matet, Steve Schaft


courthouse Zwolle_HAB

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Chapel De Zande The site of the Communal Institution for Child Projection De Zande at the outskirts of Ruiselede in Belgium houses a protected chapel. The chapel goes back to 1856 and till 1974 it had a religious function. Since then it has served mainly as a storage. The assignment was to convert the chapel into a school building comprising seven classrooms for lessons into general education. The conversion of the interior had to take into account the experience of the monumental space. This demand confronted us with a dilemma that we made into the core of our design. We fragmented the whole space of the nave and a part of the aisles by means of dividing walls of the same height as the space. The new created spaces are accessible by a corridor zone along the wall. The openings in the dividing walls provide for incidence of light and offer a view of the old structure. For this we developed two devices: 1) daylight: depending on the time of the year with its longest and shortest day, June 21 and December 22, the sun enters the spaces via the round windows. 2) perspectives: from a couple of spots in the corrirdor perspectives are projected which make it possible to discern the full size and some old details of the building. The result of these rational interventions is an Emmental cheese structure, that now and then is intelligible, but often mysterious, irrational and ambiguous. With this radical conversion we add something to the building that, also with regard to the materialisation, clearly distinguishes itself from the existing structure. But everything we have installed is reversible and temporary. From the jury report of the Vlaams Bouwmeester: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rob Hootsmans chooses to carry the unavoidable fragmentation of the interior of the chapel to the point of generating new qualities and meaningsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

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Conversion of Chapel Client: Vlaams Bouwmeester / Gemeenschapsinstellingen Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectarchitect: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Stefan Kentie, Donna van Milligen Bielke, Giacomo Ceccarelli Building regulations: Bureau Bouwtechniek Construction engineer: ABT Belgie Technics: Bureau Bouwtechniek Building surface: 1500 m2 Start design: 2008 Start building:November 2012 Finished: November 2013


chapel De Zande_HAB

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plan level +1

plan level 0

plan level -1

78


chapel De Zande_HAB

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Rietveld Academy For the purpose of an extension of the lawyer’s office Loyens & Loeff,located in the area of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, we made a feasibility study, in which we also studied the possibilities of an extension of the academy itself on the adjacent parcel. So the whole programme comprised an extension of the lawyer’s office (with 7.000 m²), a new student’s housing complex (10.000 m²), an extension for the purpose of the education programme (4 à 5.000 m²) and office spaces (6.000 m²) for the academy. In our proposal two parcels are assembled into one ensemble with a clear identity, but with divers programmes. The new buildings consist of a stacking of functions -- studios, lecture-rooms and exposition spaces -- on the bottom floors. The structure on top of them can accommodate various configurations with different functions like dwellings and offices. The buildings have a clear lay-out. The façades consist of transparent membranes. Functional devices like sun blinds and green are as an extra layer placed behind the glass façade. To be an outspoken example in the field of innovation and sustainability, techniques like sun blinds, climate façades, natural airing, heat recovery, energy saving equipment and lightning, heat and cold storage and active concrete will be applied. A green roof will provide for a better isolation and will be energy saving. It also holds rain which partly evaporates and partly will be drained away to be used as rinse water. The existing greenstructure is an important quality of the area. In our proposal we would like to extend it by way of a dense greenbelt along the street, and the area of the academy will be designed as a sequence of gardens, each having its own paving and plants and thus its own atmosphere. The plan for the Fred. Roeskestraat is part of the development of the Zuidas. The public space in the area will be improved and adjusted to the quality standard of the Zuidas.

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Study extention Rietveld Academie en Loyens en Loeff Client: Rietveld Academie Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectarchitect: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Giacomo Cecarelli, Nicki Clifford, Guus Teunissen Building surface:: 28.000 m2 Design: 2008 - 2009


ensemble of buildings

entrance Rietveld/ supply

building heights

structure small scale /open groundfloor

entrance offices/dwellings

green/inside landscape

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Entrance building Zuiderzeemuseum The current control room is located at the most western point of the site of the Outside Museum of the Zuiderzeemuseum in Enkhuizen. This building is used 24 hours a day. It is too small for the current work and does not comply with the technical requirements anymore. Moreover, the architecture of the building is not in line with the rest of the buildings. Because this entrance will be used regularly for groups and parties, for example weddings, the access and layout of the site and building will be more representative. We were asked to investigate the possibilities of expanding the current building and the new building. With regard to the new building variant we placed the building right opposite the entrance. This offers more natural supervision on people who come in and will stop unwelcome visitors to enter the site. The site will have a clear layout, with the parking place at the southern side. From the adjacent dike the view on the site is limited by the new volume. Because of the newly chosen position it is possible to continue to use the current building until the new building can be opened. We came up with proposals for the site, whereby the parking site will have grass tiles, the current gates will be replaced by hedges, whereby the sliding gates and access gates will be in line with the style of the museum, with current designers (demakersvan). A red weeping beech will be placed as a solitary tree at the site with the bike shed. The form of the building has the archetypal form of a house. However, it has a perspectivistic deformation, so that the building looks longer from the front side than it actually is. The room where the guards sit day and night is almost double high. The long wall that continues will fully be equipped with cupboards and also the seating furniture is integrated in this, it has the same type of wood and similar working details. On the outside the building is clad with moulded wooden sections. It is a reference to the richly detailed casings of the buildings that can be admired in the museum. This building will be covered entirely with these decorative elements, while the casings have been detailed straight. The wood will be made sustainable by carbonising it. This establishes the association with the tarred houses in the museum.

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Entrance building Zuiderzeemuseum Enkhuizen Client: Zuiderzeemuseum Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectarchitect: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Giovanni Cecarelli, Steve Schaft Building surface: 200 m2 Design: 2009


83


Dwelling Bonaire At Kaye Jaspe, a parcel on hill Kralendijk on the island Bonaire,Hootsmans architectuurbureau has designed a welling. The design has specifically been tailored to the local climate, which throughout the year is quite constant with temperatures around 30 degrees and a mild cooling wind. The lay-out consists of large floor surfaces in which five volumes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; kitchen, living with bedroom, guestroom, swimming pool and a storage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are carefully fitted in. The kitchen is deepened as a result of which the kitchen working top is at ground level. If the panels with slats are opened, the space offers an uninterrupted view and the wind brings pleasant cooling in the house. All panels are of the same size. Their same contour line creates serenity in relation to the different levels of the roof and floor surfaces. The construction of the roof surfaces consists of slender columns placed in a grid of three meters. The staggering positioning of the roof surfaces enables the cooling wind to blow in. Their slats provide for shadow and climbing plants can grow over it. By these arrangements the whole of the dwelling is aired in a natural way.

84

Dwelling Bonaire , the Netherlands Antilles Client: prive Architect: Rob Hootsmans Projectarchitect: Marlies Boterman Projectteam: Aranza Torio Building surface: 200 m2 Design: 2007 - 2008


dwelling Bonaire_HAB

85


WORK AT RIJKSGEBOUWENDIENST

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87


Smedinghuis Lelystad photo: Bas Princen The Smedinghuis in Lelystad was in 1972 the first large building in the Lelystad. The main office for DirectorateGeneral for Public Works and Water Management (Rijkswaterstaat) fits perfectly in the idealistic ideas of this new town. The car traffic was planned on the ground floor and pedestrians and cyclists were given a new layer above. This is why the main entrance connects to the first floor. After a large fire in 2003, whereby only the body remained, Jules van Vark, who was employed as an architect by the Government Buildings Agency, was commissioned to draw up a plan for restoration and a new design. The starting point in this respect was to bring back and reinforce the quality of the original building. The beautiful cassette ceilings certainly were a guiding element at the office floor. The lighting and inner wall system has adjusted itself according to the structure and made it more radical.

88

Smedinghuis Lelystad Client: Rijksgebouwendienst Architect: Jules van Vark, RGD Projectteam: Diedrick de Vilder, Marc Prins, Marlies Boterman, Aad van Berkel, Michiel Buren, Richard Croft Contractor: Strukton Building surface: 22.000 m2 Start design: June 2003 Start building: January 2005 Finished: March 2007


Smedinghuis_RGD

89


Marlies Boterman