Page 1

Avigdor Arikha PAINTINGS & WORKS ON PAPER

1


COVER Tomatoes in a Glass Bowl and Chopping Board (detail) cat. no. 35

2


Avigdor Arikha PAINTINGS & WORKS ON PAPER

3


Self-Portrait in a Black Shirt cat no. 48


18 SEPTEMBER – 17 OCTOBER 2015

Avigdor Arikha PAINTINGS & WORKS ON PAPER

Marlborough Fine Art (London) Ltd 6 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BY T: +44 20 7629 5161 F +44 20 7629 6338 E: mfa@marlboroughfineart.com www.marlboroughfineart.com


A Portrait of Avigdor Arikha

You always imagine a painter’s studio to be a silent place. Whoever saw Arikha paint heard a strange concert of little cries, hisses, puffs, the noise of the forge, the boiler room. To accompany the sounds, there was agitated movement: you saw in front of his easel a man shaken by fits and starts, screwing up his eyes, closing them, knitting his brows, moving his hands about, all of a sudden staying absolutely still, like a musician at his piano, as if in the peculiar trance that possesses someone playing a piece of music. You can see why he was so fascinated by those interpreters, violinists, double-bass players, pianists of whom he has left us so many admirable portraits. But if an interpreter executes music noted down on a sheet, what score does the painter interpret on his canvas? What previously written notation engages his body at the same time as his eye?

Execute comes from the Latin sequire, to follow. To execute is to pursue, complete, bring to conclusion, follow to exhaustion. That implies noises, wails, movement, sudden gestures. Nothing to do with those voices of silence that Malraux spoke about in connection with art, nor with that “dumb thing”, as the painter’s profession was described in the words of Poussin, whom Arikha yet loved so. Exhaustion of the visible, but not to arrive at the white canvas, the last black square or the magic triangle of abstraction distilling the essence of the world, and not the obsessive pursuit of the accidents of the visible, either, down to the academic truth of a boot button. He himself, when he was painting, body thrown forward, eyes bulging from their sockets, mouth half-open, was prey to unspeakable anguish, he painted like a panting animal, as if anxious to make it through in time to be saved. Saved from what? Such an excessive attitude to a form of art that is usually measured, considered, silent, reflective – so much so that you were sometimes scandalised to see Arikha execute a portrait like an instrumentalist who in a few minutes executes a perfect concerto or sonata – such a galvanic approach to the face, so contrary to a whole tradition of retouching and repainting, must doubtless have had to do with a pressing awareness of death. We can guess one origin of this constant anxiety while not wanting to imagine it too clearly: the daily encounter with death in the camp into which he had been thrown when he was thirteen. That presence, at such a tender age and in its most brutal forms, preserves you from the temptation of civilised beings, who, believing that time is theirs, have a taste for procrastination. There is not a moment to lose: work, drawing, painting, executing, must be, at

6

every moment of the day, that act which puts off just a little longer, for one day, or two, imminent death. A painter’s work, for Arikha, was somewhat akin to an Oriental tale: he must draw and paint, just as Scheherazade must keep endlessly telling stories, to escape the sentence that the Mighty of this world hand down in the small hours of the day. Another memory comes back to me, in my mind inexplicably connected to this feeling of the urgent need to paint, and paint quickly. It was the first picture by him that I saw. It was at Minda de Gunzburg’s, hanging on a wall. It represented a walking-stick, a humble black stick, suspended against a white wall, and hanging askew because of its weight. I did not know yet who its author was but was immediately captivated by this deceptively simple painting that was in reality so beautiful that I could not draw my eyes away from it. Of course, I could always whisper a few learned words, then, in the sixties, such as “minimalism” or “objectality”, in the jargon of the day. And as I was no fool, I was even tempted to recall, in that strange, oblique line of the black walking-stick placed against a white wall, the kind of domestic irony of certain interiors in the manner of Pieter de Hooch, where you see a broom leaning across a passage, barring the way to whoever would try to cross the threshold. It was indeed something of the sort. A question and a forbidden place, beneath the apparent banality of the subject. A simple white wall, like a wall in a Vermeer, but also a rampart of paint quite similar to the one Balzac describes in The Unknown Masterpiece and beneath which hides a woman, life, a presence. There comes a time when the foot, the piece of flesh starts to perish, is abolished, and the black walking-stick - what was it? - if not the cane with which the blind


man, feeling his way in the night of the body, strikes the wall of abstraction, of all the abstractions of our time, and taps it to find the hidden entrance back into reality. To save the world, or at least save its appearances, there is not a minute to lose. The urgency, the imminence, the anguish of this painting, born of a collective tragedy, thus resolved itself into a secret inquiry that would sustain his work. Anne one day confided to me that it was very difficult for her to tear Arikha away from his studio.The idea of being separated from his easel was unbearable to him. He was inhabited by a feeling of imminence such that he was incapable of taking even a few days away from the work that was for him a necessity. On the last evening when I dined with the painter and his wife, when he still had the pleasure of eating and drinking a Bordeaux which he found excellent, we came to speak of asparagus. I was thinking of the wonderful little picture of a bunch of asparagus, hanging on the wall, which he always kept, wrapped in the deep blue paper which is now to be found almost only in the Rialto market in Venice, where it is used for wrapping, not asparagus, but magnificent bouquets of sweet peas, the colour of which are in perfect harmony with the colour of this paper. We spoke of the famous anecdote about Manet and Ephrussi. It revolves around the impossibility of setting a price for a bunch of asparagus – once it has been painted: Ephrussi offers him a thousand francs for it. Manet refuses: he asks for eight hundred. Ephrussi insists and presses the thousand francs into his hand. Not long after, Manet sends his generous collector the small picture of a lone asparagus, like a market trader who, at the last minute, adds a tomato or an apple to his customer’s shopping-basket. An asparagus is priceless, once the painter’s talent has summed up in it all that is real, as

much as possible of the real thing that painting can still offer, the real thing, nothing but the real thing, but all that is real about it, beyond all anecdote or narrative, the real thing – there, embodied, recreated, saved, safeguarded... And I was thinking to myself that Arikha’s genius was to restitute both the physical and rational properties of real things with the same precision and sensuousness as winemakers who succeed in so accurately describing the qualities of a wine in their own language. Able with the same knowledge and savour to translate into words its colour, its depth, its taste and after-taste, its nose, its clear or cloudy appearance, its fruity or woody character and its appeal to drink it again... Avigdor excelled that evening in describing the wine he drank, with the same mastery that he put into painting asparagus. I say wine or asparagus but it will be obvious to everyone that I am really speaking of the likenesses, the portraits, the faces Arikha painted. Nothing can be said of Arikha’s painting because it is all in what it is and, in that sense, it is sufficient in itself. Nothing can be added to it, commentary, explanation or analysis, because it lets nothing escape which could be used to tie it to anything historical, mythological, religious or political. It does not show the faces of the mighty, of the powerful or the important, who have functions, titles, responsibilities, even though it may on occasion have done so, but it is always first and foremost faces, anonymous for the viewer, upon whom he has conferred the highest dignity, the uniqueness, the singularity of the human being. The face, alone and unique, like the bunch of asparagus and the glass of wine, with all its qualities, and only its qualities, except that these are people and not things. The asparagus may be replanted and the glass of wine filled again. People, as individuals, cannot be replaced.

I know of hardly any contemporary painters who have to such an extent been able to give the feeling, truly poignant, of the uniqueness of a being, from the new-born baby – and Arikha is one of the very rare painters, like Bonnard, to have known how to paint babies – to the very old who are soon to die. When people say “to save appearances” or “to save face”, they do so with a faintly ironic smile. And yet naming, calling, recalling appearances is to save man from death. Naming and not enumerating. To say and to paint is to bring beings back to life, the opposite of casting them into numerical indifference. One day we will have to try to understand why the great return to the figure in postwar painting was first undertaken by painters whose religious tradition was dominated by a ban on the figurative representation of animate beings, of their graven images, in any case. It is a whole family of painters – I am thinking of those who were close to him, Kitaj, for example, or Lucian Freud – who recalled that a face is without price.They have been witnesses to, and often also victims of a period driven by an insane ideology, when people were marked with a registration number. People were numbered and the number was written onto their skin in indelible ink, a serial number. Lest it should no longer be possible, at the Last Judgment, to recognise them and distinguish them from one another? It was the most murderous enterprise mankind has ever had to confront.The painter responds as he can: people are identifiable not by their numbers, like animals, but by their faces, their features. And to name them, paint them one by one, transform them into individual beings, is to pull them back from death.

JEAN CLAIR January 2015 Translated by Oliver L. Wootton, Paris 7


Arikha and France

Avigdor Arikha’s talents at drawing were recognized early on, from the time he was about twelve years old. He was interned in a concentration camp in the Ukraine. Someone found drawing paper for him; he made brushes out of sticks and hair.

He even had a set of his drawings – scenes of the horrors around him – bound for him (after his father had been beaten to death) by a friend of his father’s, a binder by trade. In 1944, aged 14, he was one of some 1500 children saved by Aliyat Hanoar and the Red Cross: under another name, he escaped to Palestine and was settled in a kibbutz near Jerusalem where, again, his talent for drawing was quickly noted.

useful, was the art of fresco painting, a technique that required rapid execution: one had to finish before the plaster dried, the first underlying drawing having first been traced in charcoal on the fresh plaster. This necessity for rapid execution eventually served as Arikha’s dictumguiding principle when, some decades later, he began to draw, and then to paint from life: he had to finish the work in a single session.

He would work in the kibbutz fields in the morning, go to school in the afternoons, worked as a night guard and received military training. He then attended the Bezalel Academy of Fine Arts in Jerusalem (Bezalel is the name of the painter mentioned in the Bible). After the 1948 war and the official birth of the State of Israel, a scholarship set up by the founder of Youth Aliya, Henrietta Szold, allowed him to leave for France, to which artists from all over the world had flocked. The first year at Bezalel was given over primarily to drawing. Arikha’s teacher, Mordechai Ardon, one of the many German Bauhaus artists who had found refuge in Israel, would say to pupils impatient to start oil painting, “What? You want to spend what you don’t yet have?”

It was also at Bezalel that Arikha discovered the great works of the Spanish, French, Italian, German, Dutch, Flemish masters as well as those of Cézanne, Picasso, Kandinsky but only in reproduction. Cézanne was a model for the students, and so was Picasso, whose Guernica hung on many walls. When he arrived in Paris from Marseille, his dream realized, he dropped off his suitcase at the hotel reserved for him by the Aliyat Hanoar organization and went straight to the Louvre. It was 7:30 am. The Louvre opened its doors only at 9:00 am. Arikha lay down on a bench by the steps and fell asleep. When the doors opened, he tells of how he ran like an animal, not knowing what to look at first. He went to see Giovanni de Paolo, Patinir, then the Raphaels, etc. As he put it, when he recounted the moment, he was almost drunk on painting. From then on, Arikha frequented all the museums, from morning until night; and he began copying the masters.

The Bezalel curriculum was aimed at teaching students what might help them earn a living. The teachers, many of them refugees from Germany like Ardon, and like him imbued with the Bauhaus method, taught design, graphic arts, calligraphy, lithography and etching techniques such as aquatints and engravings, watercolor, the art of grinding pigments, and so on. When Arikha arrived in Paris, in 1949, he met many painters, writers, philosophers and art historians, but he was disappointed by the teaching at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. The teachers only appeared twice a week made just a few corrections and suggestions and offered some criticism. The only thing he learned there, which later would prove 8

He travelled to Italy (once again sleeping on benches when he had to), to Scandinavia where he quickly befriended poets, writers, philosophers, includng Pär Lagerquist for whom he illustrated two books. He made himself known to art materials shops (such as Sennelier, Gattegno, La Grande Chaumière) as well as to printers, suppliers and studios like that of Frank Bordas, who still remembers him 50 years later. Gallery owners and collectors started to recognize him. He obtained French citizenship thanks


to the persistence of some of the curators and art historians with whom he worked in the Louvre, and who considered him one of theirs. Arikha prepared two major projects for them - one on Poussin, on which he worked for three years, another on Ingres, which took him two years. Ingres’s statement that « Drawing is the probity of art » became his mantra. Michel Laclotte, who was then Chief Curator and Director of the Louvre, asked him why he had chosen these two painters, so antithetical to his principles, rather than Velazquez or Caravaggio. Arikha replied: “because the French don’t appreciate them enough, they don’t figure on the hit parade of favorite artists. He was given a small office at the Louvre to allow him to work on these and other projects. Arikha was in one way or another involved in most of the departments of the Louvre, participating in questions of restoration and attribution, lecturing curators on drawing at the request of Françoise Viatte, then Head of Prints and Drawings in the Department of Graphic Arts, whose curators wanted to learn more about red chalk and other drawing techniques. Because of his passion and art historical erudition, Arikha was much appreciated in the museum world. He gave talks at the Frick Collection, New York; Princeton University, New Jersey; Yale, Connecticut; Houston; London, as well as the Prado Museum, Madrid. And there were exhibitions of his drawings in Lille and at the British Museum. Before the canvas of a master, Arikha scrutinized and judged how well - or not the painter had drawn a hand, a foot, a petal, leeks. It was the dirty feet in Caravaggio’s The Raising of Lazarus (in Messina), shown in the Louvre’s Caravaggio show in 1965, that convinced Arikha to abandon abstraction (in spite of his admiration for Mondrian). One night, while we were strolling with

Beckett, at three in the morning, in front of the Dôme in Montparnasse, we ran into Giacometti, who had been trying for years to convince Arikha to draw more. He would say, “You shouldn’t be abstract. Since you know how to draw, why don’t you draw from life? And why don’t you draw more?”A while later Arikha drew a portrait of Giacometti (now in an unknown collection). Giacometti asked him to choose a drawing, any drawing, as a gift in exchange. In 1965 we met Giacometti – same time, same restaurant, same protagonists – and Arikha told him, “Alberto, you were right! No more abstraction! I’m drawing from life now!” But Alberto, frail and ill, died in 1966, one year after his fateful words, and never saw Arikha’s drawings from life. Art critics admired his work throughout all his periods, figurative, abstract, from life: Pierre Cabanne and later André Fermigier, both writing in Le Monde, John Ashbery, Robert Hughes for Time, Maurice Tuchman, Barbara Rose - this in spite of their attachment to other trends in painting.

therefore it must be perfect.” Arikha was about 17. That was precisely the lesson the Chinese and Japanese sumi masters taught; once the brush has touched the paper, one can’t go back to correct anything. This was a lesson Arikha retained all his life, even with regard to oil painting: never flinch. In order to achieve this, one had to learn and master the material, respect the paper – and he never gave up on this goal. It was the same constraint he imposed on himself in daily life: finish a painting or drawing before the spirit or the inspiration failed, the chi faded away, before the bombs exploded, before the light fell.

ANNE ATIK ARIKHA February 2015 With thanks to Noga Arikha

Whether drawing with goldpoint, silverpoint, graphite, or charcoal, Arikha put on spiritual gloves, like the Chinese and Japanese sumi masters. Arikha loved all varieties of paper: papier velours, papier gras, Arches, Fabriano, parchment, for which he used special brushes, like other artists throughout history, as Natalie Coural demonstrated in her exhibition for the Louvre, Le papier à l’œuvre. It was necessary for Arikha to finish a work in one go. During the 1948 war, between two explosions, Arikha drew the soldiers in the trenches in different positions. At his side was one of the Bezalel teachers. Observing the rapidity with which Arikha was drawing, he said to him what he had said gravely to other students as well, “Consider that you may die before drawing a line; it may be the last line you’ll ever draw; 9


10


List of Works

1. Avenue de Tourville from the Balcony, 1966 sumi ink 65 x 50 cm / 255/8 x 193/4 in signed lower centre dated lower right 9 viii 1966 illustrated on page 49 2. Anne Wearing Sunglasses, 1967 sumi ink 27 x 35.8 cm / 105/8 x 141/8 signed lower right dated lower left 26 iv 67 illustrated on page 49 3. Champrond, 1969 sumi ink 24 x 33 cm / 91/2 x 13 in signed upper left dated lower centre 1969 illustrated on page 48 4. In the Park, 1969 sumi ink 24 x 33 cm / 91/2 x 13 in signed lower right dated lower left 6 vii 69 illustrated on page 48 5. Samuel Beckett with his Hand Over his Mouth, 1971 silverpoint 27 x 17 cm / 105/8 x 63/4 in signed lower centre dated upper centre 3 i 71 illustrated on page 36 6. The Jacket, 1972 sumi ink 35.5 x 27.8 cm / 14 x 11 in signed lower right dated upper centre 10 xii 72 illustrated on page 16

7. Three Apples and their Shadows, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 23.8 x 17.7 cm / 93/8 x 7 in edition of 20 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 24 8. The Old Armchair, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 27.5 x 24.5 cm / 107/8 x 95/8 in edition of 15 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 25 9. Shoes and Socks, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 24 x 18 cm / 91/2 x 71/8 in edition of 10 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 24 10. Trousers, 1974 sumi ink 43.7 x 23 cm / 171/4 x 9 in signed lower right dated lower left 21 viii 74 illustrated on page 16 11. A Spoon, 1975 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 18 x 13 cm / 71/8 x 51/8 in edition of 27 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 25 12. Orange Tie Folded, 1975 watercolour on paper 28 x 38 cm / 11 x 15 in signed and dated lower centre illustrated on page 21

13. Winter Coat, 1976 charcoal 37.5 x 52.7 cm / 143/4 x 203/4 in signed and dated lower centre illustrated on page 34 14. Pile of Books, 1976 graphite 50.5 x 32.5 cm / 197/8 x 123/4 in signed and dated lower centre illustrated on page 36 15. Le Pain, 1976 etching plate: 19.5 x 14.5 cm / 73/4 x 53/4 in edition of 75 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 20 16. Fruit, 1976 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 24.5 x 29 cm / 95/8 x 111/2 in edition of 75 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 20 17. Self-Portrait with Sketchbook, 1978 graphite 26 x 17.5 cm / 101/4 x 67/8 in signed and dated lower right illustrated on page 37 18. Jerusalem Bread, 1981 oil on canvas 22.2 x 41.3 cm / 83/4 x 161/4 in signed and dated upper left dated on reverse 13 viii 81 illustrated on page 15

11


19. Chestnut Buds, 1983 pastel on paper 32.1 x 23.2 cm / 125/8 x 91/8 in signed lower left dated lower right 18 iii 83 illustrated on page 22 20. Pastel Boxes, 1983 pastel on paper 24.1 x 31.8 cm / 91/2 x 121/2 in signed upper right dated upper left 19 iii 83 illustrated on page 23 21. Kitaj, 1983 graphite 66 x 51 cm / 26 x 201/8 in signed upper right dated upper left 27 iii 83 illustrated on page 37 22. Catherine Deneuve, 1984 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 46.5 x 34.5 cm / 181/4 x 135/8 in edition of 30 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 27 23. Shoes, 1984 pastel on paper 31.8 x 47.6 cm / 121/2 x 183/4 in signed lower right dated upper centre 21 viii 84 illustrated on page 17 24. Flat Nude, 1984 pastel on emery paper 52.1 x 68.6 cm / 201/2 x 27 in signed lower right dated lower left 21 iii 84 illustrated on page 18

12

25. A Glimpse into the Bathroom, 1984 oil on canvas 76.2 x 46 cm / 30 x 181/8 in signed and dated upper left dated on reverse 12 iv 84 illustrated on page 14 26. Sleeping Nude and Indian Rug, 1985 oil on canvas 100 x 39 cm / 393/8 x 153/8 in signed and dated lower centre dated on reverse 18 iii 85 illustrated on page 19 27. Self-Portrait with Outstretched Hand, 1986 graphite 41 x 31 cm / 161/4 x 121/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 4 vi 86 illustrated on page 30 28. Catherine Deneuve, 1990 charcoal 76 x 56.5 cm / 297/8 x 221/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 14 ii 90 illustrated on page 26 29. Morning Toast, 1996 oil on canvas 61 x 46.2 cm / 24 x 181/4 in signed lower centre dated on reverse 6 vii 96 illustrated on page 28 30. Thyme and Laurel, 1996 pastel on paper 40 x 29.9 cm / 153/4 x 113/4 in signed lower right illustrated on page 43

31. Shell and Cones, 1997 pastel on paper 24 x 31 cm / 91/2 x 121/4 in signed lower right dated lower left 13-14 iii 97 illustrated on page 32 32. Clouds, 1997 oil on canvas 97 x 162 cm / 381/4 x 633/4 in signed and dated upper centre dated on reverse 27 vii 97 illustrated on page 31 33. Concert at Evian, 1997 sumi ink 14 x 23.7 cm / 51/2 x 93/8 in signed upper right dated and entitled upper left ‘evian’ 9 v 97 illustrated on page 45 34. Socks, 1998 oil on canvas 38 x 46 cm / 15 x 181/8 in signed lower left dated on reverse 30 x 98 illustrated on page 39 35. Tomatoes in a Glass Bowl and Chopping Board, 1998 oil on canvas 46 x 38 cm / 181/8 x 15 in signed lower right dated on reverse 23 i 98 illustrated on page 38 36. Aldo (Ceccato) Conducting the Orchestre National d’Ile de France, Salle Pleyel, 1998 sumi ink 18 x 26 cm / 71/8 x 101/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 31 i 98 illustrated on page 44


37. Seated Nude, Legs Folded Behind Her, Hands Covering Her Mouth, 1999 charcoal 89 x 64.5 cm / 35 x 253/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 2 x 99 illustrated on page 35 38. Houseplant, 1999 sumi ink 60 x 42 cm / 235/8 x 161/2 in signed lower left dated upper right 30 i 99 illustrated on page 42 39. Self-Portrait Naked to the Waist, 1999 sumi ink 54.5 x 37.5 cm / 211/2 x 143/4 in signed lower left dated upper centre 30 vii 99 illustrated on page 41 40. A Dead Leaf, 2000 pastel on board 25.5 x 32.2 cm / 10 x 125/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 23 x 2000 illustrated on page 40 41. Autumn Leaves, 2002 oil on canvas 46 x 38 cm / 181/8 x 15 in signed lower left dated on reverse 11 x 02 illustrated on page 33 42. Fur Hat, 2002 pastel on paper 34 x 61 cm / 133/8 x 24 in signed lower right dated upper left 4 i 02 illustrated on page 47

43. Drawings on the Wall, 2003 drypoint plate: 23.5 x 17.8 cm / 91/4 x 7 in edition of 8 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right illustrated on page 27 44. Geranium and Hibiscus, 2003 drypoint plate: 17.8 x 23.5 cm / 7 x 91/4 in edition of 8 numbered in pencil lower left signed and dated in pencil lower right illustrated on page 42 45. Trees in Luxembourg Gardens, 2003 drypoint plate: 12.8 x 17.7 cm / 5 x 7 in edition of 13 numbered in pencil lower left signed and dated in pencil lower right illustrated on page 46 46. Pianist 1, 2004 sumi ink 10 x 14 cm / 4 x 51/2 in signed lower right dated upper left 14 v 04 illustrated on page 44 47. Pianist 2, 2004 sumi ink 13.8 x 10 cm / 51/2 x 4 in signed lower left dated upper left 14 v 04 illustrated on page 45

49. Desk, rue de la Chaise, 2005 graphite 21 x 29.5 cm / 81/4 x 115/8 in signed lower right dated upper right 20 iv 05 illustrated on page 29 50. The Library Seen from the Studio (Square de Port-Royal), 2007 graphite 40 x 30 cm / 153/4 x 113/4 in signed lower right dated lower left 17 vii 07 illustrated on page 29 51. Self-Portrait Standing, Facing Forward, Head Turned to the Left, 2008 charcoal and red chalk 75.2 x 56.5 cm / 295/8 x 221/4 in signed upper left dated upper right 30 ii 08 illustrated on page 46 52. Bench on Casters, 2008 charcoal 25 x 25.5 cm / 97/8 x 10 in signed lower left dated upper right 8 x 08 illustrated on page 30 53. Hats Placed on a Pile of Books, 2009 graphite 69 x 51 cm / 271/4 x 201/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 4 iv 09 illustrated on page 34

48. Self-Portrait in a Black Shirt, 2005 charcoal 25.5 x 35.5 cm / 10 x 14 in signed upper left dated upper right 11 i 05 illustrated as frontispiece

13


25. A Glimpse into the Bathroom, 1984 oil on canvas 76.2 x 46 cm / 30 x 181/8 in signed and dated upper left dated on reverse 12 iv 84

14


18. Jerusalem Bread, 1981 oil on canvas 22.2 x 41.3 cm / 83/4 x 161/4 in signed and dated upper left dated on reverse 13 viii 81

15


10. Trousers, 1974 sumi ink 43.7 x 23 cm / 171/4 x 9 in signed lower right dated lower left 21 viii 74

6. The Jacket, 1972 sumi ink 35.5 x 27.8 cm / 14 x 11 in signed lower right dated upper centre 10 xii 72

16


23. Shoes, 1984 pastel on paper 31.8 x 47.6 cm / 121/2 x 183/4 in signed lower right dated upper centre 21 viii 84

17


24. Flat Nude, 1984 pastel on emery paper 52.1 x 68.6 cm / 201/2 x 27 in signed lower right dated lower left 21 iii 84

18


26. Sleeping Nude and Indian Rug, 1985 oil on canvas 100 x 39 cm / 393/8 x 153/8 in signed and dated lower centre dated on reverse 18 iii 85

19


15. Le Pain, 1976 etching plate: 19.5 x 14.5 cm / 73/4 x 53/4 in edition of 75 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

16. Fruit, 1976 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 24.5 x 29 cm / 95/8 x 111/2 in edition of 75 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

20


12. Orange Tie Folded, 1975 watercolour on paper 28 x 38 cm / 11 x 15 in signed and dated lower centre

21


19. Chestnut Buds, 1983 pastel on paper 32.1 x 23.2 cm / 125/8 x 91/8 in signed lower left dated lower right 18 iii 83

22


20. Pastel Boxes, 1983 pastel on paper 24.1 x 31.8 cm / 91/2 x 121/2 in signed upper right dated upper left 19 iii 83

23


7. Three Apples and their Shadows, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 23.8 x 17.7 cm / 93/8 x 7 in edition of 20 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

9. Shoes and Socks, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 24 x 18 cm / 91/2 x 71/8 in edition of 10 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

24


11. A Spoon, 1975 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 18 x 13 cm / 71/8 x 51/8 in edition of 27 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

8. The Old Armchair, 1973 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 27.5 x 24.5 cm / 107/8 x 95/8 in edition of 15 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

25


28. Catherine Deneuve, 1990 charcoal 76 x 56.5 cm / 297/8 x 221/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 14 ii 90

26


22. Catherine Deneuve, 1984 sugar-lift aquatint plate: 46.5 x 34.5 cm / 181/4 x 135/8 in edition of 30 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

43. Drawings on the Wall, 2003 drypoint plate: 23.5 x 17.8 cm / 91/4 x 7 in edition of 8 numbered in pencil lower left signed in pencil lower right

27


29. Morning Toast, 1996 oil on canvas 61 x 46.2 cm / 24 x 181/4 in signed lower centre dated on reverse 6 vii 96

28


49. Desk, rue de la Chaise, 2005 graphite 21 x 29.5 cm / 81/4 x 115/8 in signed lower right dated upper right 20 iv 05

50. The Library Seen from the Studio (Square de Port-Royal), 2007 graphite 40 x 30 cm / 153/4 x 113/4 in signed lower right dated lower left 17 vii 07

29


52. Bench on Casters, 2008 charcoal 25 x 25.5 cm / 97/8 x 10 in signed lower left dated upper right 8 x 08

27. Self-Portrait with Outstretched Hand, 1986 graphite 41 x 31 cm / 161/4 x 121/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 4 vi 86

30


32. Clouds, 1997 oil on canvas 97 x 162 cm / 381/4 x 633/4 in signed and dated upper centre dated on reverse 27 vii 97

31


31. Shell and Cones, 1997 pastel on paper 24 x 31 cm / 91/2 x 121/4 in signed lower right dated lower left 13-14 iii 97

32


41. Autumn Leaves, 2002 oil on canvas 46 x 38 cm / 181/8 x 15 in signed lower left dated on reverse 11 x 02

33


53. Hats Placed on a Pile of Books, 2009 graphite 69 x 51 cm / 271/4 x 201/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 4 iv 09

13. Winter Coat, 1976 charcoal 37.5 x 52.7 cm / 143/4 x 203/4 in signed and dated lower centre

34


37. Seated Nude, Legs Folded Behind Her, Hands Covering Her Mouth, 1999 charcoal 89 x 64.5 cm / 35 x 253/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 2 x 99

35


5. Samuel Beckett with his Hand Over his Mouth, 1971 silverpoint 27 x 17 cm / 105/8 x 63/4 in signed lower centre dated upper centre 3 i 71

14. Pile of Books, 1976 graphite 50.5 x 32.5 cm / 197/8 x 123/4 in signed and dated lower centre

36


21. Kitaj, 1983 graphite 66 x 51 cm / 26 x 201/8 in signed upper right dated upper left 27 iii 83

17. Self-Portrait with Sketchbook, 1978 graphite 26 x 17.5 cm / 101/4 x 67/8 in signed and dated lower right

37


35. Tomatoes in a Glass Bowl and Chopping Board, 1998 oil on canvas 46 x 38 cm / 181/8 x 15 in signed lower right dated on reverse 23 i 98

38


34. Socks, 1998 oil on canvas 38 x 46 cm / 15 x 181/8 in signed lower left dated on reverse 30 x 98

39


40. A Dead Leaf, 2000 pastel on board 25.5 x 32.2 cm / 10 x 125/8 in signed lower right dated upper left 23 x 2000

40


39. Self-Portrait Naked to the Waist, 1999 sumi ink 54.5 x 37.5 cm / 211/2 x 143/4 in signed lower left dated upper centre 30 vii 99

41


44. Geranium and Hibiscus, 2003 drypoint plate: 17.8 x 23.5 cm / 7 x 91/4 in edition of 8 numbered in pencil lower left signed and dated in pencil lower right

38. Houseplant, 1999 sumi ink 60 x 42 cm / 235/8 x 161/2 in signed lower left dated upper right 30 i 99

42


30. Thyme and Laurel, 1996 pastel on paper 40 x 29.9 cm / 153/4 x 113/4 in signed lower right

43


36. Aldo (Ceccato) Conducting the Orchestre National d’Ile de France, Salle Pleyel, 1998 sumi ink 18 x 26 cm / 71/8 x 101/4 in signed upper right dated upper left 31 i 98

44

46. Pianist 1, 2004 sumi ink 10 x 14 cm / 4 x 51/2 in signed lower right dated upper left 14 v 04


47. Pianist 2, 2004 sumi ink 13.8 x 10 cm / 51/2 x 4 in signed lower left dated upper left 14 v 04

33. Concert at Evian, 1997 sumi ink 14 x 23.7 cm / 51/2 x 93/8 in signed upper right dated and entitled upper left ‘evian’ 9 v 97

45


45. Trees in Luxembourg Gardens, 2003 drypoint plate: 12.8 x 17.7 cm / 5 x 7 in edition of 13 numbered in pencil lower left signed and dated in pencil lower right

51. Self-Portrait Standing, Facing Forward, Head Turned to the Left, 2008 charcoal and red chalk 75.2 x 56.5 cm / 295/8 x 221/4 in signed upper left dated upper right 30 ii 08

46


42. Fur Hat, 2002 pastel on paper 34 x 61 cm / 133/8 x 24 in signed lower right dated upper left 4 i 02

47


3. Champrond, 1969 sumi ink 24 x 33 cm / 91/2 x 13 in signed upper left dated lower centre 1969

48

4. In the Park, 1969 sumi ink 24 x 33 cm / 91/2 x 13 in signed lower right dated lower left 6 vii 69


1. Avenue de Tourville from the Balcony, 1966 sumi ink 65 x 50 cm / 255/8 x 193/4 in signed lower centre dated lower right 9 viii 1966

2. Anne Wearing Sunglasses, 1967 sumi ink 27 x 35.8 cm / 105/8 x 141/8 signed lower right dated lower left 26 iv 67

49


Biography

Solo Exhibitions 1952 TEL AVIV, Galeria Zeira, Paintings and Drawings, no catalogue 1953 JERUSALEM, Artists’ House, Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations, 3 - 24 January 1953, Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations, foreword by Binyamin Tammuz, Hebrew and English, brochure 8pp. JERUSALEM, The National Museum Bezalel, Paintings, Drawings, Woodcuts, 5 - 22 September 1953, Peintures, Dessins, Bois, foreword by Mordechai Narkiss, Hebrew and French, folder 1954 STOCKHOLM, Galerie Moderne, Paintings and Drawings, 24 April - 7 May 1954, checklist, Swedish, folder 1955 COPENHAGEN, Athenæum Kunsthandel, Paintings, Drawings, Book-Illustrations, 1 - 15 September 1955, Tegninger, grafik og bogkunst introduction Peter P. Rohde, Danish, folder, 1 repr. (cover) PARIS, Galerie Furstenberg, Paintings and Drawings, 4 - 17 October 1955, no catalogue 1956 LONDON, Matthiesen Gallery, Paintings and Drawings, ‘First London Exhibition’, 5 - 28 April 1956, folder 1957 PARIS, Galerie Furstenberg, Paintings, 2 - 16 April 1957, Peintures récentes, text by Jean Wahl, folder

50

1959 LONDON, Matthiesen Gallery, Paintings, Gouaches, Drawings, 8 April - 2 May 1959, Paintings, gouaches, drawings, with a poem (French) by Samuel Beckett, brochure, 8pp. 1 col. repr., cover 1960 AMSTERDAM, Stedelijk Museum, Paintings, Gouaches, Watercolours, October November 1960, catalogue no. 248 (joint with Panter), Dutch, foreword by W. Sandberg, brochure 12pp. 7 b&w 1 col. repr. 1961 PARIS, Galerie Karl Flinker, Paintings, Gouaches, Watercolours, Drawings, 11 October - 4 November 1961, 1 col. repr. (cover) 2 b&w repr. (untitled brochure) 1966 JERUSALEM, Israel Museum, Paintings 196366 and Drawings 1947-1966, September October 1966, introduction by Yona Fischer, Hebrew and English, 12pp. 4 b&w repr. (brochure) 1967 PARIS, Galerie Claude Bernard, Arikha – dessins, January - February 1967, announcement, with the text ‘Pour Avigdor Arikha’ by Samuel Beckett, 26 January 1967, no catalogue 1970 PARIS, Centre National d’Art Contemporain, Drawings 1965-70, Dessins 1965-1970, 8 December 1970-18 January 1971, foreword by Samuel Beckett, introduction by Barbara Rose, and two texts by the artist, 64pp. 42 repr. Supplementary checklist 8pp.

1972 TEL AVIV, Gordon Gallery, 8 Paintings, 10 February - 1 March 1972, folder, no catalogue LOS ANGELES, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Drawings 1965-72, art, 39 ink drawings, 25 April - 28 May 1972 (extended to 31 July), with a text by Samuel Beckett, introduction Barbara Rose and a presentation note by Maurice Tuchman, 1 repr. (cover), folder NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, December 1972, foreword by Samuel Beckett, introduction by Barbara Rose, 1 repr. 8 p. folder 1973 SYRACUSE, NY, Everson Museum, Ink drawings 1965-1972, February 1973, foreword by Samuel Beckett, introduction by Barbara Rose, 1 repr. 8 p. folder FORT WORTH, TEXAS, Fort Worth Art Center Museum, Ink drawings 1965-1972, April - May 1973, foreword by Samuel Beckett, introduction by Barbara Rose, 1 repr. 8pp. folder TEL AVIV, The Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Paintings: 1957-1965 and 1968 (retrospective of the abstract period), introduction by Haim Gamzu, 28pp. 12 b&w repr., brochure, Hebrew and English 1974 HOUSTON, TEXAS, Janie C. Lee Gallery, Inks, Drawings and Prints, 6 December 1974 16 January 1974, announcement, poster, no catalogue LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Drawings, Inks and Etchings, March 1974, introduction by Robert Hughes, 30pp. 64 repr. (mostly vignette)


1974–79 PARIS, CNAC – MNAM Centre Georges Pompidou, circulating exhibition of Prints, 39 gravures 1970–73, catalogue (later increased number of prints from 1974–1979), with an introduction by André Fermigier, and interview with Germain Viatte, 8p. 40 repr. (vignettes), brochure.1974: BOULOGNESUR-MER, Musée des Beaux-Arts et d’Archéologie; SAINT-QUENTIN-ENYVELINES, Chapelle de la Villedieu; 1975: LE MANS, Musée Tessé; NICE, Ecole Internationale d’Art Décoratif; DOLE, Maison des Jeunes et de Culture; 1976: MITRY-MORY, Municipalité; BRIVE-LA-GAILLARDE, Foyer Culturel; SAINT-CLOUD, MJC; ANNECY, MJC; MANDELIEU-LA-NAPOULE, MJC; VERBERIE, MJC; BORDEAUX, Renaissance du Vieux Bordeaux; 1977: MOUGINS, Maison pour Tous; SAUMUR, Bibliothèque Municipale; TOURCOING, Ecole des Beaux-Arts; VIEUX CONDÉ, Lycée Technique; GENNEVILLIERS, Société Creusot-Loire; GÉRARDMER, MJC; CHAMONIX, Bibliothèque Municipale; BASTIA, Musée d’Ethnographie Corse; 1978: GRASSE, Fédération Régionale des MJC; SORGUES, Comité d’Animation de la Bibliothèque; COMPIÈGNE, Lycée Pierre d’Andilly; CASTRES, Musée Goya; LYON, Espace Lyonnais d’Art Contemporain; MUSSIDAN, Amicale Laïque; EVRY, Bibliothèque de l’Agora; 1979: COLOGNE, Institut Français; AACHEN, Institut Français; ESSEN, Institut Français; GRENOBLE, Bibliothèque Municipale 1975 PARIS, Cabinet des Estampes, Bibliothèque Nationale, Prints, Spring 1975, no catalogue, see Nouvelles de l’Estampe no.20, March April 1975 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Paintings and watercolors 1973–1975, 1 October 1 November 1975 (first showing of the lifepaintings) with a text by the artist, 24pp. 13 b&w repr. 6 col.

1976 LONDON, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Samuel Beckett by Avigdor Arikha, 11 February - 23 May 1976, foreword by C. M. Kauffmann, introduction and catalogue by Mordechai Omer, 12pp. 16 repr., brochure 1977 ZURICH, Marlborough Galerie, Paintings, Watercolours and Drawings, Ölbilder, Aquarelle, Zeichnungen, April - May 1977, foreword by Samuel Beckett, 20pp. 9 b&w 2 col. repr. ZURICH, Galerie Amstutz, Prints, reproduction of the facsimile catalogue published by the Atelier Crommelynck, Paris, 1977, Avigdor Arikha Huit Gravures, Paris 1977 (collotype 500 copies), with additional German captions, brochure 12pp. 1978 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Oil paintings – Watercolours – Drawings, May - June 1978, interview with Barbara Rose, 20pp. 9 b&w 6 col. repr. EDINBURGH, New 57 Gallery, Paintings Drawings Watercolours, 14 August 9 September 1978, foreword by Samuel Beckett, 16pp. 9 b&w 3 col. repr. 1979 HOUSTON, Texas, Janie C. Lee Gallery, Drawings, Watercolors and Paintings, February - March 1979, introduction: interview with Barbara Rose, 16pp. 5 col 2 b&w repr. (brochure) WASHINGTON, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Twenty Two Paintings 1974-78, 15 June - 26 August 1979, introduction by Jane Livingston, 40pp. 18 b&w 4 col. repr. PARIS, FIAC Marlborough stand, Avigdor Arikha Peintures et aquarelles, 18 - 27 October 1979, no catalogue, folder 1 repr. (col)

1980 PARIS, Galerie Berggruen, Dessins et gravures, 29 May - 12 September 1980, with a text by the artist, 98pp. 80 repr. NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Recent work, 4 October - 1 November 1980, 44pp. 5 col. 32 b&w repr. 1981 DIJON, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Arikha, 29 March - 28 June 1981, introduction by Pierre Georgel, 60pp. 107 b&w repr. (mostly vignette) 1982 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Oil paintings and drawings, May - June 1982, 48pp. 9 col. 33 b&w repr. 1983 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Paintings, drawings and pastels, 8 September 4 October 1983, 14 col. 28 b&w repr. 1984 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, New York Drawings – January - May 1984, 8 November - 4 December 1984, introduction by Jane Livingston, 36pp. 36 repr. 1985 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Recent paintings, 29 May - 22 June 1985, 30pp. 15 col. 10 b&w repr. 1986 TEL AVIV, Tel Aviv University Gallery, Prints 1950-1985, January - February 1986, introduction by Mordechai Omer, reprint of 1974 Robert Hughes introduction, and of ‘Avigdor Arikha interviewed by Barbara Rose’. (Second corrected limited reprint) 144pp. 110 repr. Book LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Oil paintings, pastels and drawings, October 1986, pp.48 18 col. 25 b&w repr. 51


1987 VENICE, CALIFORNIA, L.A. Louver Gallery, 7 April - 9 May 1987, with excerpts from texts by Samuel Beckett, Robert Hughes, Barbara Rose, Maurice Tuchman, (two pages errata), 32pp. 13 col. 8 b&w repr. 1988 TOKYO, Marlborough Fine Art, Oils, watercolours, pastels, inks and drawings, 19 April - 31 May 1988, introduction by Shûji Takashina, 50pp. 25 col. 7 b&w repr. Japanese & English NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Paintings, pastels and drawings 1986-1988, October 1988, with a text by the artist, 48pp. 29 col. 10 b&w repr. 1990 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Oils, pastels, drawings, 14 March - 14 April 1990, 56pp. 31 col. 16 b&w repr. 1992 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Works 1990-91, 7 May - 6 June 1992, 44pp. 28 col. 8 b&w repr. + cover 1994 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Works 1992-1993, 6 May - 4 June 1994, 40pp. 27 col. pl LONDON, Marlborough Graphics, Etchings and Lithographs, 6 May - 4 June 1994, 24pp. 20 repr. brochure TEL AVIV, Gordon Gallery, Drawings, 25 May - 14 June 1994, Rishumim, 56pp. , 40 repr. Hebrew

52

1996 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Recent Paintings and Drawings, 14 May - 15 June 1996, 44pp. 29 col. pl. 9 b&w pl. NEW YORK, Marlborough Graphics, Selected Prints 1966-95, 14 May - 15 June 1996, 38pp. 65 pl. 1996 TEL AVIV, Gordon Gallery, ‘Meheva le Avigdor Arikha – avodoth nivharot’, a loan exhibition of Paintings, Drawings and Prints, October November 1996, announcement 1 col. repr. No catalogue 1998 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Sixty-Five Drawings 1965-1997, 4 - 28 March 1998, 56pp. 65 pl. LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Arikha, 15 May -15 June 1998, 48pp. 41 col. & b&w pl. JERUSALEM, Israel Museum, Retrospective exhibition, Avigdor Arikha Selected Paintings 1953-1997, 20 November 1998-20 February 1999, introduction by Jean-Pierre Cuzin, with a text by Marc Jordan, chronology by Duncan Thomson, and a dialogue with Yona Fischer, 166pp. 102 pl., Hebrew – English, book TEL AVIV, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Retrospective exhibition, Drawings, 19 November 1998-20 February 1999, contains a dialogue with Mordechai Omer, 172pp. 116 pl., Hebrew – English, book 1999 EDINBURGH, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Retrospective exhibition, Avigdor Arikha, 13 March - 9 May 1999, Israel Museum & Tel Aviv Museum catalogues and an additional folder by Duncan Thomson

LILLE, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Paris sur le vif, drawings, 11 June - 13 September 1999, dialogue with Arnauld Brejon de Lavergnée, catalogue published by La Réunion des Musées nationaux, Paris, 1999, 96pp. 107 pl. MADRID, Galería Marlborough, Pinturas, pasteles, dibujos, 1969-1999, 26 October 27 November 1999, catalogue 56pp. 44 repr. 2000 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Paintings, Pastels and Drawings, 1999-2000, 27 September - 28 November 2000, catalogue, 48pp. 35 repr. 2002 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Recent Work: oils, pastels, drawings, 12 September 5 October 2002, catalogue, 60pp. 52 repr. 2004 LONDON, Marlborough Graphics, 23 June 24 July 2004, catalogue, 20pp. 16 repr. PARIS, FIAC Marlborough stand, 20-24 October 2004, eighteen paintings 2006 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Avigdor Arikha, Recent work, 7 June - 15 July 2006, catalogue, 48pp. 36 col. repr. LONDON, The British Museum, Avigdor Arikha, From Life, Drawings and Prints 1965–2005, 29 June 2006 - 7 January 2007, catalogue preface by Neil MacGregor, introductions by Stephen Coppel and Duncan Thomson, with three texts by Samuel Beckett and two essays by Robert Hughes, 144pp. and 114 col. repr; The British Museum Press, London, 2006


2007 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery, Avigdor Arikha, Twenty-Five Pastels 1983-2007, 1 November - 8 December 2007, 40 pp. 25 col. repr., with statement by the artist 2008 MADRID, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Arikha, 10 June - 7 September 2008, with texts by Guillermo Solana, Robert Hughes and Samuel Beckett/Avigdor Arikha, 220 pp. 2010 TEL AVIV, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Avigdor Arikha: Self-Portraits, 4 September 27 December 2010, with texts by Mordechai Omer, 86 pp. 2011 LONDON, Marlborough Fine Art, Avigdor Arikha Works from the Estate, 29 March 7 May, preface by Martin Gayford 2012 NEW YORK, Marlborough Gallery Inc., Avigdor Arikha Works from the Estate, 20 March - 21 April NIMES, Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Avigdor Arikha Oeuvres sur Papier, 10 July - 31 August 2013 LONDON, Avigdor Arikha Works from 1966-2010, 9 October - 2 November, preface by Stephen Coppel 2014 CHAMBON-SUR-LIGNON, Images from the kingdom of the dead - children’s drawings from the deportation camps 1942-43, 12 June - 12 September, with texts by Eliane Wauquiez-Motte and Jean Clair 2015 PARIS, SALON DU DESSIN, Avigdor Arikha (1929-2010), 25 - 30 March, with texts by Jean Clair and Anne Atik Arikha

Public Collections:

Monographs

AMSTERDAM, Stedelijk Museum BOSTON, Museum of Fine Arts DENVER, Denver Art Museum DIJON, Musée des Beaux-Arts EDINBURGH, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art EDINBURGH, Scottish National Portrait Gallery FLORENCE, Galleria degli Uffizi HILLERØD, Det Nationalhistoriske Museum på Frederiksborg HOUSTON, Museum of Fine Arts JERUSALEM, Israel Museum LILLE, Palais des Beaux-Arts LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas Arts Center LONDON, British Museum LONDON, National Portrait Gallery LONDON, Tate Gallery LOS ANGELES, Los Angeles County Museum of Art MARSEILLE, Musée Cantini NEW YORK, Exxon Corporation Collection NEW YORK, The Jewish Museum NEW YORK, Metropolitan Museum PARIS, Cabinet des Estampes, Bibliothèque Nationale PARIS, Musée du Louvre, Cabinet des Dessins PARIS, Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou PRINCETON, The Art Museum – Princeton University ROANNE, Musée Déchelette SAN FRANCISCO,The Fine Arts Museum – The Achenbach Foundation TEL AVIV, The Tel Aviv Museum of Art WASHINGTON, Hirshhorn Museum

AVIGDOR ARIKHA: BOYHOOD DRAWINGS MADE IN DEPORTATION Seven facsimile reproductions of drawings made at age thirteen in Nazi concentration camps (1942–43) with an introduction, 18pp. box, English edition of 200 copies, French edition of 100 copies all signed and numbered. Printed in collotype by Daniel Jacomet, Paris, 1971, published by Alix de Rothschild for the benefit of Youth Aliyah ARIKHA Texts by Samuel Beckett, Richard Channin, André Fermigier, Robert Hughes, Jane Livingston, Barbara Rose. Interviews by Barbara Rose, Joseph Shannon and Maurice Tuchman. 224pp. 106 col. pl. 83 b&w, Hermann, Paris/Thames and Hudson, London, 1985 ARIKHA by Duncan Thomson, 256pp. 216 pl, most in col., Phaidon, London, 1994. Soft cover reprint, 1996, 2000 AVIGDOR ARIKHA Testi di Monica Ferrando e Arturo Schwartz, ‘Ritratti d’Artista’, Moretti & Vitali, Bergamo, 2001, 80pp. 26 col. ill. AVIGDOR ARIKHA, FROM LIFE, DRAWINGS AND PRINTS 1965–2005, by Duncan Thomson and Stephen Coppel, preface by Neil MacGregor, with three texts by Samuel Beckett and two essays by Robert Hughes, The British Museum Press, London, 2006, 144 pp. 114 col.repr. University, Jerusalem

53


Marlborough

54

LONDON

NEW YORK

MADRID

Marlborough Fine Art (London) Ltd 6 Albemarle Street London, W1S 4BY Telephone: +44-(0)20-7629 5161 Telefax: +44-(0)20-7629 6338 mfa@marlboroughfineart.com info@marlboroughgraphics.com www.marlboroughfineart.com

Marlborough Gallery Inc. 40 West 57th Street New York, N.Y. 10019 Telephone: +1-212-541 4900 Telefax: +1-212-541 4948 mny@marlboroughgallery.com www.marlboroughgallery.com

GalerĂ­a Marlborough SA Orfila 5 28010 Madrid Telephone: +34-91-319 1414 Telefax: +34-91-308 4345 info@galeriamarlborough.com www.galeriamarlborough.com

Marlborough Contemporary 6 Albemarle Street London, W1S 4BY Telephone: +44-(0)20-7629 5161 Telefax: +44-(0)20-7629 6338 info@marlboroughcontemporary.com www.marlboroughcontemporary.com

Marlborough Chelsea 545 West 25th Street New York, N.Y. 10001 Telephone: +1-212-463 8634 Telefax: +1-212-463 9658 chelsea@marlboroughgallery.com

BARCELONA Marlborough Barcelona Enric Granados, 68 08008 Barcelona. Telephone: +34-93-467 4454 Telefax: +34-93-467 4451 infobarcelona@galeriamarlborough.com


Marlborough Fine Art represented Avigdor Arikha exclusively and world-wide from 1972 until the artist’s death in 2010. The Gallery is proud to represent the Estate of the Artist.

Catalogue edited by Will Wright Design: Shine Design, London Print: Impress Print Services Ltd. UK Photography: Reto Rodolfo Pedrini, Prudence Cuming Associates and Todd White ISBN: 978-1-909707-21-4 Catalogue no. 648 © 2015 Marlborough Fine Art (London) Ltd. 55


56

Avigdor Arikha: Paintings & Works on Paper  

Catalogue displaying the works from Avigdor Arikha's 'Paintings & Works' at Marlborough Fine Art, London

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you