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PAU L A R E G O


1- 25 October 2014

PA U L A REG O The Last King of Portugal and Other Stories

Marlborough Fine Art 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY t: +44 (0) 20 7629 5161 e: mmiller@marlboroughfineart.com www.marlboroughfineart.com


THE LAST KING OF PORTUGAL

Paula Rego’s London studio feels like a place that might belong to a theatre troupe or a puppeteer. It is filled with props, bits of sets, manikins and models made by the artist and others. In one corner can be seen Pillowman, that bulky, disconcerting figure with swollen facial features that Rego fashioned out of two pairs of tights. He is a recognisable figure with a slight celebrity aura, familiar from Rego’s series of images based on Martin McDonagh’s play Pillowman. Elsewhere there is a large frog, there a monkey. They share a space that feels prepared for convulsions of metamorphosis, to borrow a phrase from James Joyce. The sit about, among easels and pastels, waiting to be cast in new roles. They are ready to join in the telling of stories. Few contemporary artists are as invested as Paula Rego in story. It has been at the centre of her art ever since her late husband, the painter Victor Willing, suggested when she was at a loose end that she try illustrating something, and at the centre of her life from earliest childhood. She has produced images from Jane Eyre, Peter Pan, The Crime of Father Amaro, The Return Of The Native, The Maids, and many other texts. But it would be a mistake to think of these works straightforwardly as illustrations. They might usefully be compared to Franz Liszt’s versions of poems by Byron and Petrarch in his sequence of piano pieces Années de pèlerinage. Liszt translates those works into music, an entirely different nonverbal art form that is charged with its own imperatives and capacities, instinct with its own kind of nuance and formal logic. He dramatises, he describes, but the original poems could never be reverse engineered from the piano pieces. Similarly, Rego’s art does not offer simple a equals b equivalences for things in stories. Rather she explores

them, plays with them, dramatizes them in her studio mixing live models and her inanimate cast, makes decisive interpretations in metaphors, multiplies associations, adds surreal elements that please her and always insists on allowing the image its own prerogatives, its own processes of accident and discovery on the page. Rego has insisted that her pictures are not illustrations, nor are they narratives, but stories in which “everything happens in the present.” So what are these present tense stories, crowding her pages, teeming and multiple? Rego once said that she paints “to give terror a face.” Previous work has often been concerned with cruelty and fear, with power differentials between the sexes wherein men bully and women quietly subvert their authority or threaten violent revenge. In her Dog Woman and Abortion sequences, Rego produced indelible images of grief and pain expressed physically: women, heavy-bodied and plausible, roaring, snarling, grimacing, clenched, cringing. There have been many other types and declensions of feeling, more mischievous and gleeful, as well as the sombre and sardonic moral reckonings to be seen in the Crime Of Father Amaro pictures, but it seems true to say that a new complex of feelings is opening up with the works of The Last King Of Portugal and Other Stories. They are fearless images, both

technically and in their exuberance and humour. Some are plush with tender memory and nostalgia; others are extravagant and seemingly improvisatory in composition. They mark yet another development in Rego’s remarkably metamorphic artistic career. Rego’s pastels from The Relic are a return to the fiction of the great nineteenth century Portuguese novelist Eça de Quieroz, author of The Crime Of Father Amaro. The Relic is a larky comic novel first published in serial form in 1887. It follows the adventures of its priapic young hero, Teodorico Raposo, who is perforce a committed hypocrite, living as he does with his grimly religious aunt and hoping to inherit from her when she dies. The aunt is much given to thoughts of lewd behaviour in order to condemn it. Teodorico is much given to lewd behaviour in order to enjoy it. A pilgrimage to Jerusalem, made on the aunt’s behalf, fills the central section of the novel. During this holy journey, Teodorico falls in love with a prostitute in Alexandria who gives him her negligée as a keepsake, and has several dreams, in the longest of which he is transported back to ancient Palestine where he sees in sincere but sincerely non-transcendent terms Jesus’s last days. Later he acquires a fake relic, a crown of thorns, to present to his aunt on his return. Unfortunately, parcels get swapped around and our


AD AM F OUL D S

hero accidentally presents his aunt with the negligée, complete with its inscription ‘To Teodorico, my brave little Portuguese lover, in memory of all the pleasures we enjoyed.’ Banished, disinherited, Teodorico finally commits himself to honest unbelief and thereby (it’s a long story) finds himself a wife and prosperity. The novel’s tone is distinctly modern – jaunty, carefree, sensorily and romantically susceptible – and at times recalls in style the work of Witold Gombrowicz or Bohumil Hrabal. In its humanist rendition of Christ’s Passion it follows on from the sceptical biblical revisionism of Strauss and Renan. In its critique of religion and hypocrisy it resembles in conviction if not in method those other great nineteenth century social critics, Ibsen and Flaubert. Rego’s images from the novel are typically far from illustrations. For those familiar with the novel, Rego’s recombinations and interpolations have Teodorico dreaming reimagined dreams. The beach scene of ‘Dream’ has a vision of Christ crucified floating before a giant sun. It also has a leering Satan with a comically large phallus appearing from behind a rock. Another ridiculous, hefty male appendage, pink and vulnerable, lolls from the body of a dying donkey in the crowded phantasmagoria of ‘Holy Land.’ The risible nature of these protuberances is important. Male

lust, belonging principally to randy Teodorico, is laughable, ungainly and preposterous. Men are at its mercy. The female objects of desire, Mary and Adelia, are contrastingly selfpossessed. Adelia in ‘Meeting Adelia’ is large and stationary and encircled by figures who might be her courtiers. The gorgeous ‘Serenade’ takes its cue from the briefest of moments in the novel describing Teodorico’s father’s attempts at seduction. (Elsewhere he dies in a single sentence, collapsing while dressed as a bear for a fancy dress party). The boyishly bare-legged guitarist plays for an exquisitely melancholy, head-scarfed woman whose unforgettable face stares directly out at the viewer. Teodorico’s father is in profile. They might almost be in different pictures. This vision of hapless manhood is a long way from the overbearing masculinity that sublimated its sexual desires into fascistic authority in the famous earlier paintings. Elsewhere, in The Relic’s ‘Our Lady of Sorrows,’ the Virgin Mary, run through with many swords, bears on her lap the soft fabric body of a puppet of a man, not obviously the agonised Christ, more of a big silly baby. In the handling of Teodorico’s aunt there is a similar relaxation into the comic mode of a potentially oppressive figure. To cast the thought in Freudian terms, Aunt Dona Patrocínio das Neves isn’t

that much of a super-ego to overcome, even backed up as she is by the image of the Virgin Mary on the wall behind her in ‘Get out of here you and your filth.’ She wears purple feathers on her head, her eyes bulge as she points a long, thin, twisted arm at her knockkneed, wrong-footed nephew who holds in his hands Mary’s negligée. But isn’t the open space inviting on the right of the painting’s dramatically cinematic composition? Doesn’t it look like freedom? The horizon beckons. The sky above is lively with white clouds that streak and shimmer. In the matter of composition the comparison with Liszt’s music again suggests itself. Like Liszt’s music, these pictures seem composed from the subject matter outwards. And just as Liszt’s music doesn’t often go through the strict musical procedures of Bach’s or Beethoven’s, these are not put together like Cezanne’s, in the tradition that thinks primarily of pictorial construction, of vectors and relations on the picture plane. Rather, they get engrossed in their objects. They bring them together. They have descriptive passages, some fast, some slow. In telling their story, some details are more important than others and degrees of resolution vary. (To see this happening, look at the various hands in these pictures, how finely some gesture, how loosely others are notated).


The title sequence of ‘The Last King Of Portugal’ mixes official history with memory, family stories with imagination. Manual II, known as ‘the Patriot’ or sometimes ‘the Unfortunate,’ fled Portugal with his mother, Queen Amelie of Orleans, after the assassinations of both his father the King and his elder brother and the coming of a Republican revolution. Like the Rego family, the Prince ended up in Britain. He lived in a house in Twickenham where he pursued scholarly work in the history of Portuguese literature of the medieval and renaissance periods. ‘Rowing from Ericeira’ depicts the flight that took the King and his mother firstly to Gibraltar. The Prince cradles his stricken mother as he rows a rubber dinghy over turquoise water. Behind him loom the cliffs on which stands Ericeira, the town where Paula Rego spent her childhood summers. Unhappy local loyalists watch as the boat struggles away. Queen Amelie makes a happier appearance in ‘Magpie.’ As ‘Our Lady Of Sorrows’ of The Relic, Amelie bears the male, the finely dressed adult Prince, pieta style on her lap, but she does so smiling with both breasts exposed. The King is presumably pausing between suckles. Rego long ago heard a family story that involved the busty Queen Amelie travelling in an open-topped coach and the bouncing motion over cobbles causing her breasts to leap free of her low cut dress. Unsurprisingly, this image lodged in her mind and ultimately fed into this figure of the mother of a nation generously available for nourishment. (As Rego commented when showing me this picture, “everybody likes a bit of tit.”). ‘The King’s Wedding’ is a faithful reconstruction of Manuel II’s marriage to Augusta Victoria of

Hohenzollern, Princess of HohenzollernSigmaringen. Manuel II stood for the ceremony on a crate of imported Portuguese earth. The interior of the Chapel of Sigmaringen Castle is not accessible to the public and images are hard to come by. Rego worked from a photograph sent to her from the castle after a special request was made. The bridesmaids are identifiable as members of Rego’s studio theatre troupe, large dolls of little girls. Here as elsewhere, Rego depicts her dolls as dolls and does not transform them into naturalistic figures. This is a Paula Rego story, a unique compound of the literal and metaphorical, of observation, imagination and mise-en-scène a world in which Rego’s dolls attend the wedding of a scrupulously depicted King of Portugal. ‘The King’s Death’ shows Manuel in his final moments, hands clutching his neck. He died of a swollen throat, a tracheal oedema that may have been caused by poisoning. Rego gives the moment a sad grandeur as well as intimacy. The King, lying down in striped pyjamas, with beautifully eloquent bare feet, gasps in pain, watched over by a female servant. The painting seems to tell us that this is how history happens: to particular mortal individuals, wearing whatever they happen to be wearing, with a certain pattern of wallpaper on the wall. The other works in this exhibition are images from a folk tale, Stone Soup, which has many versions, this one written by Rego’s daughter, Cas Willing. It is an apt story for a period of poverty and austerity. Penniless and starving, the daughter of a crippled fisherman struggles to find food for

the family. Appeals for charity are met with hard-hearted refusals that are then circumvented with a brilliant ruse. The daughter sets up a cooking pot in the middle of the village and starts boiling a stone to make “stone soup.” The fascinated villagers are only too happy to contribute the extra ingredients she needs to complete the dish – butter and cabbage – and then to offer yet more, carrots and paprika sausage. The triumphant end of the story has the girl begged to stay. She becomes a cook and is never hungry again. Unlike other Paula Rego images for books published by Enitharmon Editions, these are in their final state in pen and watercolour, previously used for drawings that would become various kinds of prints. The ink line is mostly fine and whippy, superbly sure and vivacious in its delineations. Take for example the handle of the bag in ‘Foraging,’ a single descriptive gesture, a simple loop that cuts across a line of the same thickness that moves in smaller increments to articulate the profile of the daughter’s face. Beside that is the lovely scribbly notation of her windblown hair. Her legs stand among sea creatures in a blue wash of watercolour that has never been more watery. The pleasures procured by the works in this exhibition are in a certain sense predictable: Paula Rego has been producing work of the highest calibre for six decades now. What is remarkable is that her techniques and her imaginative scope continue to grow. Adam Foulds is a poet and novelist who lives in London. His latest novel is ‘In The Wolf’s Mouth’, Jonathan Cape, 2014.


LIST OF WORKS

THE LAST KING OF PORTUGAL Magpie 2014 Pastel on paper 160.2 x 120.2 cm. / 63 x 471/4 in. Gaby 2014 Pastel on paper 100.3 x 80.3 cm. / 391/2 x 315/8 in. Rowing from Ericeira 2014 Pastel on paper 240 x 120.2 cm. / 941/2 x 461/8 in. Bridesmaid 2014 Pastel on paper 100.3 x 80.3 cm. / 391/2 x 315/8 in. The King’s Wedding 2014 Pastel on paper 240 x 120.2 cm. / 941/2 x 471/4 in. The King’s Death 2014 Pastel on paper 119.4 x 180.3 cm. / 471/4 x 707/8 in. THE RELIC Dinner Party 2013 Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in. Our Lady of Sorrows 2013 Pastel on paper 129.5 x 110 cm. / 51 x 431/4 in. Meeting Adelia 2013 Pastel on paper 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in. Mary Makes Gloves 2013 Pastel on paper 80 x 100 cm. / 311/2 x 393/8 in.

Serenade 2013 Pastel on paper 109.2 x 129.5 cm. / 43 x 51 in.

Husband berates Wife 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

The Holy Land 2013 Pastel on paper 159.5 x 120 cm. / 623/4 x 471/4 in.

The Fathers Dies 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

Dream 2013 Pastel on paper 180 x 119.5 cm. / 707/8 x 47 in.

The Buzzards 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

Get out of here you and your Filth 2013 Pastel on paper 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in.

Making the Soup 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

ST ONE SOUP

The Perfect Soup 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

Shells 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. Foraging 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. One Limpet 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. Her Prettiest Smile 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. Sick of it all 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. The Thanks 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

At the Dinner Table 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in. The Fat Cook 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


T HE LA ST KING OF PORT U G AL

Magpie 2014 Pastel on paper 160.2 x 120.2 cm. / 63 x 471/4 in.


Gaby 2014 Pastel on paper 100.3 x 80.3 cm. / 391/2 x 315/8 in.

Rowing from Ericeira 2014 Pastel on paper 240 x 120.2cm / 941/2 x 461/8 in


Bridesmaid 2014 Pastel on paper 100.3 x 80.3 cm. / 391/2 x 315/8 in.

The King’s Wedding 2014 Pastel on paper 240 x 120.2 cm. / 941/2 x 471/4 in.


The King’s Death 2014 Pastel on paper 119.4 x 180.3 cm. / 471/4 x 707/8 in.


T HE R E LI C

Dinner Party 2013 Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in.

Our Lady of Sorrows 2013 Pastel on paper 129.5 x 110 cm. / 51 x 431/4 in.


Meeting Adelia 2013 Pastel on paper 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in.

Mary Makes Gloves 2013 Pastel on paper 80 x 100 cm. / 311/2 x 393/8 in.


Serenade 2013 Pastel on paper 109.2 x 129.5 cm. / 43 x 51 in.

The Holy Land 2013 Pastel on paper 159.5 x 120 cm. / 623/4 x 471/4 in.


Dream 2013 Pastel on paper 180 x 119.5 cm. / 707/8 x 47 in.

Get out of here you and your Filth 2013 Pastel on paper 120 x 160 cm. / 471/4 x 63 in.


ST ON E SOUP

Shells 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


Foraging 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


One Limpet 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


Her Prettiest Smile 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

Sick of it all 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


The Thanks 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

Husband berates Wife 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


The Fathers Dies 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


The Buzzards 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


Making the Soup 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.

The Perfect Soup 2013 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


At the Dinner Table 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


The Fat Cook 2012 Watercolour on paper 52 x 35.6 cm. / 193/4 x 14 in.


BIOGRAPHY

Born in Lisbon Educated in St. Julian’s School, Carcavelos

2013 Honorary Fellow, Murray Edwards College, New Hall, Cambridge

Studied painting at the Slade School of Fine Art, London

Lives and works in London

1957-63 Lived in Ericeira, Portugal with her husband, the painter Victor Willing

 S E L E C T E D R E C E N T SOLO EXHIBITIONS

Lived in London and Portugal 1983 Visiting Lecturer in Painting, Slade School of Art Appointed first National Gallery Associate Artist 1992 Honorary Master of Art, Winchester School of Art, 12 June Honorary Doctorate of Letters, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, 24 June Honorary Doctorate of Letters, University of East Anglia, Norwich, 8 July Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Rhode Island School of Design, USA, 3 June 2002 Honorary Doctorate of Letters, The London Institute, 23 May 2004 Grã Cruz da Ordem de Sant’Iago da Espada presented by the President of Portugal 2005 Commissioned by the Royal Mail to produce a set of Jane Eyre Stamps Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Oxford University, June Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Roehampton University, July 2008 Commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery to paint Sir David Hare 2009 Opening of the Casa das Histórias Paula Rego, Cascais, Portugal, designed by Eduardo Souto de Moura 2010 Created a Dame of the British Empire in the Queen’s Birthday Honours Winner of the Mapfre Foundation Drawing Prize, Madrid

Children’s Crusade, Edinburgh Printmakers Workshop, 28 Nov - 24 December Paula Rego, Pendle Witches, Children’s Crusade and Drawings, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal, 10 February - 12 March 2001-02 Paula Rego, Celestina’s House, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal, 11 June - 7 October; travelling to the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut, 18 April - 14 July 2002 Paula Rego – Pendle Witches, Hebden Bridge Arts Festival, Linden Mill, Hebden Bridge, N. Yorkshire, 18 June - 20 July Jane Eyre and Other Stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London, 15 October - 22 November 2003-04 Paula Rego, Corner 2004, Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, 27 December - 18 January 2004 2004 Paula Rego Retrospective Exhibition, Serralves Museum, Oporto, 15 October 2004 23 January Paula Rego in Focus, Tate Britain, 27 October 2004 2 January 2005 2005-06 Paula Rego Printmaker, Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, 5 August - 24 September; Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, 12 November - 22 January 2006; Victoria Art Gallery, Bath, 4 February - 7 May; University Gallery, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, 19 May - 30 June; Waterhall Gallery of Modern Art, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery; Royal

College of Art, London 9 - 15 October 2006 Paula Rego, Marlborough Fine Art, London, 11 October - 18 November 2007 Paula Rego Graven Images, Waterhall Gallery of Modern Art, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, 23 June - 7 October 2007 Paula Rego O Vinho, a series of eight lithographs, Marlborough Fine Art, 6 September 6 October, and at Galeria Marlborough, Madrid 2007-08 Paula Rego Retrospective exhibition, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, 25 September - 30 December; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, 1 February - 25 May 2008. Exhibition curated by Marco Livingstone. 2008 Paula Rego Human Cargo, Marlborough Chelsea, New York, 17 April - 17 May Paula Rego Retrospective de l’oeuvre graphique, Ecole Superieure des Beaux-Arts, Nimes 19 June - 21 September. 2009 Paula Rego, Casa das Histórias Paula Rego, Cascais, Portugal, 18 September - 18 March 2010 – Opening Exhibition 2010 Thresholds: works from the British Council collection chosen by Paula Rego, Whitechapel Gallery, London, February March Paula Rego Oratorio, Marlborough Fine Art, London, 7 July - 20 August 2010-11 Paula Rego Retrospective exhibition, Museum of Contemporary Art, Monterrey, Mexico, September 2010 March 2011; travelling to the Pinacoteca de Sao Paulo, Brazil, 19 March - 5 June 2011


2011 My Choice – Selected works by Paula Rego at the British Council Collection, Casa das Historias Paula Rego, 10 February - 12 June 2011 Paula Rego Oratorio, Casa das Historias Paula Rego, Cascais, 7 July - 31 December 2012 Paula Rego Retrospective, The Gulbenkian Museum, Paris, 26 January - 30 March Paula Rego: Balzac and other Stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London, 29 May - 30 June 2013 Paula Rego Dame with the goat’s foot and other stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London, 25 January - 1 March 2014 Paula Rego, Fábulas Reales, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Gas Natural Fenosa, La Coruña, Spain, 10 April - 28 September  S E L E C T E D R E C E N T GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2000-01 British Art Show 5, Hayward Gallery, South Bank Centre Travelling exhibition: Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, 7 April - 4 June; Southampton City Art Gallery, 23 June - 20 August; National Museum of Wales, Cardiff, 8 September - 5 November; Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, 24 November 2000 - 4 February 2001 2002 The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, Mall Galleries, London, March Paula Rego - Jane Eyre; Marlborough Gallery Inc., New York, 8 January - 2 February 2003 Paula Rego – Pendle Witches, Hebden Bridge Arts Festival, N. Yorkshire, 18 June - 20 July 2005 The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, Pastel Society, Pall Mall, 2-13 March Only Make Believe, Compton

Verney, Warwickshire, 23 March - 5 June Guys’n’Dolls. Art, Science, Fashion and Relationships, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, 23 April - 12 June 2006 The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, The Mall Galleries, London, March travelling to the Mercer Art Gallery, Harrogate, April-May Drawing Inspiration, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal, 4 April - 1 July, catalogue with introduction by Deanna Petherbridge

das Historias Paula Rego, Cascais, 7 July - 28 October 2013 Ahmed Alsoudani, Philip Guston and Paula Rego, Marlborough Chelsea, New York, February A Opera Segundo Paula Rego, Casa das Historias, Cascais, 17 May - 29 September Paula Rego Honoré Daumier, Scandal Gossip and other Stories, Casa das Historias, Paula Rego, 7 November 2013 - 20 April 2014

2008 Darger-ism: Contemporary Artists and Henry Darger, American Folk Art Museum, New York, 15 April - 21 September

2014 1961: Ordem e Caos (Order and Chaos), Paula Rego, Victor Willing, Eduardo Batarda and Bartolomeu dos Santos, Casa das Historias Paula Rego, Cascais, 22 May - 26 October 2014

2009 Enchanted Worlds - Art and Fairy Stories & Mermaid Tales, Harris Museum & Art Gallery, Preston, 13 June - 6 September

Meeting Point, Rembrandt, Paula Rego, Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, 27 June - 21 September

The Artist’s Studio, Compton Verney, Warwickshire, 26 September - 13 December 2009. Exhibition curated by Giles Waterfield Decadence, the Rake’s Progress, Dunkers Kulturhus, Helsingborg, Sweden, 30 October 2009 until February 2010 to include Rego’s Hogarth Marriage a la Mode from the Tate Britain’s collection, the After Hogarth etchings and O Vinho series of lithographs 2010 Mat Collishaw, Tracey Emin & Paula Rego: At the Foundling, The Foundling Museum, London 27 January - 9 May 2011 My Choice – Selected works by Paula Rego at the British Council Collection, Casa das Historias Paula Rego, 10 February - 12 June Nothing in the World but Youth, Turner Contemporary, Margate, 17 September 2011 - 8 January 2012 2012 Paula Rego and Adriana Molder – A Dama Pé-de-Cabra, Casa

 P U B L I C C O L L E C T I O N S  Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal  Arts Council, London  Berardo Collection, Sintra Museum of Modern Art, Portugal  British Council, London  British Government Collection, on loan to the British Embassy, Lisbon  British Museum, London  Bristol City Art Gallery  Chapel of the Palacio de Belém, Lisbon  Frissiras Museum, Athens  Leeds City Art Gallery, Leeds  Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York  National Gallery, London  National Portrait Gallery, London  New Hall, Cambridge  Portuguese Embassy, London  Rugby Museum and Art Gallery  Saatchi Gallery, London  Tate Gallery, London  Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester  Yale Center for British Art


MARLB OROUGH

LONDON Marlborough Fine Art (London) Ltd 6 Albemarle Street London, W1S 4BY Telephone: +44-(0)20-7629 5161 Telefax: +44-(0)20-7629 6338 mfa@marlboroughfineart.com info@marlboroughgraphics.com www.marlboroughfineart.com Marlborough Contemporary 6 Albemarle Street London, W1S 4BY Telephone: +44-(0)20-7629 5161 Telefax: +44-(0)20-7629 6338 info@marlboroughcontemporary.com www.marlboroughcontemporary.com NEW YORK Marlborough Gallery Inc. 40 West 57th Street New York, N.Y. 10019 Telephone: +1-212-541 4900 Telefax: +1-212-541 4948 mny@marlboroughgallery.com www.marlboroughgallery.com Marlborough Chelsea 545 West 25th Street New York, N.Y. 10001 Telephone: +1-212-463 8634 Telefax: +1-212-463 9658 chelsea@marlboroughgallery.com Marlborough Broome Street 331 Broome St. New York, N.Y. 10002 Telephone: +1-212-219-8926 Telefax: +1-212-219-8965 broomestreet@marlboroughchelsea.com www.marlboroughchelsea.com/broome-st/exhibitions

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Design: Shine Design, London Print: Impress Print Services Ltd. Photography: Prudence Cuming Associates ISBN 978-1-909707-12-2 Catalogue no. 639 Š 2014 Marlborough


PAUL A R E G O The Last King of Portugal and Other Stories

Paula Rego: The Last King of Portugal and Other Stories  
Paula Rego: The Last King of Portugal and Other Stories  

Online catalogue for Paula Rego's 'The Last King of Portugal and Other Stories' exhibition at Marlborough Fine Art.