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Safer Journeys in Marlborough 2011-2012

Kaikoura 1 Christchurch


Introduction Contents

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Safer Journeys in Marlborough INTRODUCTION Page 2

Introduction

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Cycle Safety

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The Marlborough District Council supported by NZTA and ACC have produced this road safety focused tabloid in The Saturday Express community newspaper to educate Marlborough road users about the causes of road crashes. Extra copies of the tabloid are available from Marlborough District Council, the AA office or online at www.marlexpress.co.nz

Cycle Wordfind Competition

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM?

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Motorcycle Safety

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Motorcycle Rider Training

IN THE LAST YEAR: 154 People were involved in injury crashes – 9 were fatal. 8 Cyclists were involved in injury crashes. 13 Moped/Motorcyclists were involved in injury crashes – 2 were fatal. 57 People involved in injury crashes were aged 15 - 29 years – 5 were fatal.

Page 10-13 Road Safety

Comprehensive information on road safety including the road code and fact sheets are available by going to: ★ www.landtransport.govt.nz ★ Freephone Land Transport New Zealand on 0800 699 000. ★ Official New Zealand Road Code. You can buy a copy from any good book shop. It is also available at local libraries.

Page 14-15 Safe Driving Page 16

COMPETITION! – Be in to Win

DO YOU KNOW?

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TREET MAIN S AD

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THE BLENHEIM CBD HAS A 30KM SPEED LIMIT 30KM

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$500 Fuel Vouchers & an Avanti Black Thunder Bike See page 6 & 16

Road Safety our responsibility PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY Road Safety

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Cycle Safety Safer Journeys in Marlborough

GOOD LIGHTS AND REFLECTORS GREATLY INCREASE VISABILITY WHEN YOU RIDE ON THE ROAD DURING THE LEGAL HOURS OF DARKNESS, YOUR BIKE MUST HAVE:: ★ One or two white or amber frontt lightss that can be seen from a distance e of 100 metres (one of these front lights may flash). ★ A red rear-facing light that can be seen from a distance of 100 metres (this may be steady or flashing.

REFLECTORS Legally, you must have a rear reflector on your cycle when you ride on the road at any time. This must be red or yellow, and be large enough to be seen from 100 metres when light shines on it.

WHEN YOU SHOULD USE YOUR LIGHTS You’re legally required to use your lights during the “hours of darkness”. “Hours of darkness” means from half an hour after sunset to half an hour before sunrise, or at any other time when there isn’t enough light to see a person or vehicle that is 100 metres away.

WHEN RIDING IN HOURS OF DARKNESS, YOU MUST: ★ Have cycle lights fitted. ★ Switch your cycle lights on. ★ Have pedal reflectors or wear reflective material.

LIGHTS YOU SHOULDN’T HAVE Your cycle must not have: ★ White lights at the back. ★ Red lights at the front.

PENALTIES FOR NOT HAVING REFLECTORS OR LIGHTS

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You can be fined $55 for not having the correct reflectors or lights fitted to your bike.

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INDICATING ROUNDABOUTS CORRECT INDICATION

A bicycle is a vehicle and, at intersections and roundabouts, must follow the same road rules as motor vehicles. All vehicles must indicate their intention to turn or leave an intersection/roundabout.

TURNING RIGHT ★ Signal right as you come up to the roundabout. ★ Signal left before the exit you wish to take.

GOING STRAIGHT

Alabama Rd/Redwood St roundabout – Indicating to turn right.

★ Don’t signal as you come up to the roundabout. ★ Signal left before the exit you wish to take. At some roundabouts it may not be possible to give 3 seconds warning of exiting but it is courteous to give as much indication as you can.

Seymour St/High St roundabout – Going straight. The road code advises that once you are in the roundabout you may need both hands on the handlebars to keep control of the cycle, so it is okay to only indicate when you are able.

TURNING LEFT ★ Signal left as you come up to the roundabout. ★ All road users including cyclists need to indicate their intentions. ★ Take an extra look for cyclists at roundabouts and apply the same give way rules to cyclists as you would to any other vehicles on the road.

Seymour St/ High St roundabout – Indicating to turn left.

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HOLD YOUR LANE ON ROUNDABOUTS

ON NARROW ROADWAYS

All vehicles should use the correct lane when driving through roundabouts. Cyclists will need to hold their lane in order to execute their entry and exit from roundabouts safely. Other vehicles will need to wait behind the cyclist if following in the same direction until it is safe to pass

If the road is too narrow to safely allow other vehicles to pass, cyclists are in danger of being run off the road or hit by the passing car. In this situation it is acceptable to move further out into the path of traffic to prevent other users from passing you. Marlborough has a number of narrow bridges where it is not possible for motor vehicles to

GROVE ROAD BRIDGE VEHICLES SHOULD NOT PASS ON THE BRIDGE UNLESS THERE IS 100 METRES OF CLEAR ROAD AHEAD

HOLD YOUR LANE

BURLEIGH BRIDGE VEHICLES SHOULD NOT PASS ON THE BRIDGE UNLESS THERE IS 100 METRES OF CLEAR ROAD AHEAD

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pass cyclists without crossing the centre line. If this is the case, before passing, vehicles must make sure there is 100 metres of clear road ahead. Where there is a cycle path, a cyclist may ride on the cycle path or on the road. Where there is no cycle path, cyclists must ride on the road and keep as far left as is safe to do so.


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Safer Journeys in Marlborough MARLBOROUGH DISTRICT COUNCIL

WIN!

– DEDICATED CYCLE LANES FOR SAFER CYCLING The safety of cyclists has been identified as one of the five key road safety issues in Marlborough. The records show that most of the accidents involving cyclists happen at intersections in town during daylight hours. As part of the Urban Design Study currently underway, cycle lanes, routes, paths and associated intersection safety improvements are being considered. These are considered as part of a range of possible improvements including increased green space and pedestrian connections. Visit www.marlborough.govt.nz to find out more about dedicated cycling/ walking tracks in Marlborough.

“Be seen on your bike” Word Game – Find the Words” H

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is an advocacy group of both cyclists and walkers/runners. This group is an open forum and welcomes keen cyclists or walkers to “have their say” in what they want in their district. The group performs a valuable role in providing feedback and advising Council on walking and cycling initiatives.

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BELL BRIGHT CONFIDENT CYCLISTS EQUIPMENT HEADLIGHTS INDICATE RED ROAD RULES SEAT STOP TRAFFIC WEATHER LOOK

Visit www.marlborough.govt.nz or call Robin Dunn at Council on 03 520 7400 to find out the date of the next meeting

Just had a near miss? Just seen a bike crash?

BIKE BUS COURTESY DISTANCE GIVEWAY HELMET LIGHTS REFLECTORS ROUNDABOUT SPEED TURNING WHEELS GO MAP

BRAKE CHAIN CYCLE ROUTES DRIVEWAY HANDLEBARS INTERSECTIONS PEDALS ROAD SAFETY SOCIAL SLOW TYRES CAR

Rearrange the leftover letters for a safety tip when you are riding your bike:

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TO GO IN THE DRAW SIMPLY COMPLETE THE WORD FIND PUZZLE, FILL IN YOUR INFORMATION BELOW AND SEND TO:

A quick 4 minute survey is all it takes to help us gather information about where it happened and why.

The Marlborough Express, Road Safety Bike Competition, PO Box 242, Blenheim 7240, or drop into The Marlborough Express office.

The information will be analysed and used to help us make cycling in Marlborough safer by:

Name:

★ Highlighting trends and blackspots

Daytime Ph No.

Address:

★ Guiding future education and enforcement programmes ★ Improving design and maintenance of cycle paths and roads

Conditions: Entries close 4pm, August 29 2011. No photocopies accepted. One entry per person. Winners will be notified by phone. Judges decision is final.

★ Only 20% of cycle crashes are reported – if we have more information, we can direct resources to make it safer for cyclists.

The car door zone is the space spanning about 1.2m from the sides of parallel parked cars. It is hazardous to ride a bicycle or motorcycle in a door zone because if a door suddenly opens, the cyclist must either crash into it, brake suddenly or swerve into the adjacent lane of traffic. An opening door may also c, knock the cyclist into passing traffic, leading to serious injuries or death.

So please.....

Phone 0800 CYCLECRASH 0800 292 532 Help us make cycling safer Marlborough Roads, Marlborough District Council, Nelson City Council, Tasman District Council, ACC and NZ Transport Agency are gathering information to make cycling safer.

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Motorcycle Safety Safer Journeys in Marlborough

SAFETY GEAR & VISIBILITY GET PROTECTION Helmet – Every motorcyclist should wear a full-face helmet that’s the correct fit for their size and head shape. Remember your pillion needs a correctly fitted helmet too. Never buy a second-hand helmet and if you have a crash, throw it away and buy a new one. Gloves – Protective gloves are a must. The first thing you do when you come off is put your hands out to protect yourself. Cold or wet hands also interfere with your control, so think about weather protection too. Jackets and pants – These should cover most of your body. Aim for no bare skin. Even better choose ones with armour to protect elbows, shoulders, back, hip and knees. Your gear provides abrasion resistance when you’re skidding along the road. So avoid the temptation to go for style over substance. Good protective gear also provides warmth, ventilation and waterproofing. Boots – These should be comfortable, but with secure fastenings – you don’t want them coming off in a crash. Strong, thick leather boots that protect ankles and shins are best. Plus it pays to have good waterproofing and oil-resistant soles as wet feet quickly become cold then numb.

MAKE SURE YOUR MOTORCYCLE IS SAFE Like anything, even the best motorcycle gear can go downhill rapidly if you don’t look after it. There’s a lot riding on what you’re wearing (pun intended), so a little TLC makes big sense.

Before you take your motorcycle out or at least once a week, remember to check:

FATE DOESN’T MAKE YOU VISIBLE, YOU DO ★ Ride a bright-coloured motorcycle. ★ Wear bright-coloured clothing and a light-coloured helmet. ★ Use reflective strips or wear fluorescent clothing . ★ Always ride with your headlight on. ★ Own your lane, ride in the centre of your lane rather than hugging the left side. ★ Stay out of vehicles’ blind spots by riding so you can see the driver in their side mirror. ★ Try to stay long enough in each driver’s rear-vision mirror so they see you, before you move. ★ Indicate well in advance of turning or changing lanes, and change position smoothly rather than a sudden, sharp movement. ★ Only pass on the right. ★ Move within your lane to improve your chances of being seen (sometimes just the act of moving will catch a driver’s attention).

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FASTENINGS Check for loose or missing nuts, bolds or split pins.

BRAKES Pads/linings and cables

TYRES Tread and pressures

SHOCK ABSORBERS Check for ’bounce’ or ‘clunks’, adjust or replace if required

CLUTCH Cables and adjustment, lubricate cable ends

CHAIN Lubricate and check tension

WHEELS Spokes for looseness and rims for cracks/dents

SPROCKETS Check for worn teeth


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CONSIDER OTHER ROAD USERS _ KEEPING EACH OTHER SAFE MEANS SHARING: WITH CYCLISTS

WITH PEDESTRIANS

Think of cyclists as your slightly slower soul brother; your ally in the fight for recognition on the roads. Like you, they are generally pretty aware of road dangers. Yet unlike you, they don’t have mirrors, they can’t accelerate in the way you can, and they might not stop as quickly (particularly if they are wearing cleats that lock their feet onto the pedals).

Please look out for pedestrians whenever you ride your bike. Pedestrians can be unpredictable, they may have impaired hearing and eyesight, or be absentmindedly talking on their mobiles.

GOOD ETIQUETTE, patience, some planning and common courtesy are the keys to safely sharing the road with cyclists (and motorists too, for that matter). Be wary, and: ★ Look for cyclists on the road. ★ When passing, slow down, give cyclists a wide berth (at least 1.5m) and avoid using your horn. ★ When moving or turning left watch for cyclists on your left. ★ Watch for cyclists overtaking on your left in slow-moving traffic. ★ Wait for any cyclists ahead to clear the intersection before you turn – do not turn across their path. ★ Dip your headlights as you would for motorists. ★ Only drive across cycle lanes when entering or leaving side roads, driveways or parking spaces. ★ If you are crossing a cycle lane, give way to cyclists before you cross. ★ Take extra care around young cyclists.

GENERAL

CROSSINGS

★ Always be ready to stop near schools, bus stops and pedestrian crossings. ★ Give way to people using the footpath, when entering or leaving a driveway. ★ If someone looks as if they are about to cross in front of you, sound your horn or flash the headlight.

★ Never overtake a vehicle that is slowing for a pedestrian crossing or has stopped to let someone cross. ★ Take special care near roadside stalls and parked vendors – pedestrians visiting these may forget to watch for traffic.

CHILDREN ★ Watch out for children, especially from 8am to 9am and from 3pm to 4pm. Kids often lack road sense. ★ Slow to 20 km/h when passing or coming towards a school bus that has stopped to let children on or off.

REMEMBER RE Cyclists may veer away from the kerb or occupy a lane to: ★ Avoid drains, potholes or roadside rubbish. ★ Be seen as they come up to intersections with side roads. ★ Discourage drivers from squeezing past where it’s too narrow. Cyclists turning right need extra consideration, especially on multi-laned roads with fast-moving traffic.

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GROUP CROSSING ★ Be vigilant near churches and other community landmarks where, trusting to safety in numbers, a number of people may attempt a group crossing.

URBAN AREAS ★ Watch your speed and keep well out from the left side of the road – pedestrians regularly emerge from between parked vehicles.

RURAL AREAS ★ Give pedestrians a wide berth as you’ll probably be travelling at higher speeds, making it difficult for them to judge your approach.


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PLAY IT SAFE – FOLLOW THE TIPS FROM THE ROAD CODE As a motorcyclist, you can’t guarantee your safety on the road – but you can come close to it, by following the 8 golden rules of safe riding.

1. LOOK WHERE YOU WANT TO GO

3. KNOW THE ABILITIES OF YOUR MOTORCYCLE

6. WHEN IN DOUBT – GIVE WAY

A motorcycle will tend to go where you are looking. If you don’t think you are going to make it around a corner, turn your head and look to where you want to go. Don’t look towards the edge of the road or at lamp posts etc – look ahead to where the road is going. As long as the tyres don’t lose grip, that’s where you’ll go. Remember LOOK WHERE YOU WANT TO GO, not where you are going.

Too many motorcycle crashes happen because motorcyclists don’t know how to get the best from their machines. In particular, many riders are not able to use the full braking capacity of their bike. If you don’t know how to control a rear wheel skid, or if you are scared of applying both brakes firmly, you should attend a course to improve your skills.

Always be prepared to give way if a motorist doesn’t give way when he/she should – use your horn or gesture but don’t put yourself at risk by “being right”.

2. MOVE AWAY FROM DANGER The further you are from potential danger the safer you are and the more time you have to react to avoid a crash. ★ If a vehicle ahead is waiting to turn across your path, move across your lane away from it. ★ If a pedestrian or animal is on the side of the road, move to the side of your lane away from it. ★ If the vehicle ahead of you is travelling slowly, drop back and increase your following distance. ALWAYS be thinking “What if ….” If in doubt, give hazards more space and slow down so you can stop more quickly if necessary.

4. RIDE UNIMPAIRED Motorcycle riding depends on your mental skills. If your reactions are slowed by alcohol or drugs (including some types of medication), it may be harder to make the many complicated mental decisions motorcycling requires.

5. LEAN BY COUNTERSTEERING The best way to lean a motorcycle for a corner is to countersteer. Countersteering is the technique where you push forward on the handlebar in the direction that you want the motorcycle to go. For example, to lean and turn to the left, you should push forward on the left handlebar. While it seems to be the “wrong” thing to do, countersteering is a very positive means of changing direction and controlling the motorcycle.

LEARN HOW TO BE A BETTER RIDER

7. CORNERING – SLOW IN, FASTER OUT Fast entry speeds complicate cornering and can be the cause of a crash. On the road, where any corner may hold a patch of recently dropped oil, loose gravel or other unexpected dangers, it is important to be travelling at a slow enough speed to avoid the hazard. Do not accelerate out of a corner until you can see that the way out is clear.

8. LEARN, PRACTISE, LEARN, PRACTISE Learn all you can about riding and practise the skills until they become automatic. Remember, practice makes perfect. Continuing to practice will make you a better motorcyclist.

Marlborough Training Dates 2011 - 2012 Sunday 11 September – Progressing riders off road training Saturday 19 November – Progressing riders off road training Sunday 20 November – Advanced riders off road training

Register for a motorbike or scooter training course and learn some helpful tips to stay safe on your bike. Training and up-skilling training courses accommodate riders of all ages, abilities and on all types of bikes from 50cc scooters to the large cruiser-style bikes. There are courses for those just starting out or with some experience, or for the more advanced rider who wants to brush up on skills and techniques. Progressing riders: For those just starting out, or without any formal training. Learn some practical techniques to keep yourself safe on the road. Advanced riders: For those wanting a tune up. This is a chance to brush up on your skills and fill any gaps in your knowledge.

The courses have been subsidised by Marlborough District Council and ACC, and only cost $20.

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Saturday 3 March – Progressing riders on road training Sunday 4 March – Advanced riders on road training

To enrol or find out more contact Robyn Blackburn Phone: 03 520 7400 Email: robyn.blackburn@marlborough.govt.nz


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WINTER DRIVING - DRIVING TO THE CONDITIONS

DRIVING IN THE WET

Every year there are around 10 fatal and 125 injury crashes where bad weather is a contributing factor. However bad weather seldom causes crashes on its own. Generally crashes occur because people haven’t adjusted their driving behaviour to the conditions. Wet and slippery roads are less forgiving when a driver makes a mistake. That is why extra care and attention is required for winter driving. Winter driving doesn’t have to be dangerous or intimidating. By preparing your vehicle and adjusting your driving for the conditions, you can go a long way towards ensuring your safety and that of others on the roads this winter.

Remember that stopping distances are nearly doubled on wet roads - slow down and keep a generous following distance between you and the car in front. The two-second rule should become at least the four-second rule. Be extra vigilant: take corners slowly. Heed road signs warning of flooding and remember that you will need more time to stop and avoid hazards in wet conditions.

PREPARE YOUR VEHICLE A few simple steps can help you ensure your vehicle is prepared for whatever winter throws your way: ★ Have your vehicle checked out. Many garages offer safety checks covering tyres, lights, brakes, cooling systems, fanbelts, batteries and alternators. ★ Make sure that your heater, fans, wipers, defrosters and demisters are working. ★ Antifreeze is an essential winter ingredient for your car’s engine.

DRIVING IN SNOW AND ICE

It’s a good idea to keep warm clothes, blankets and even a small supply of food in your car. All of these will help you stay warm if you become stranded. Consider carrying a cellphone for emergencies. Always carry chains if you expect to encounter snow.

Whenever possible, avoid driving in heavy snow. If you do drive in snow, SLOW down. Braking distances are greatly increased on snow and ice. Avoid braking suddenly. Give the brake pedal a few soft taps rather than one hard push, to avoid sending your vehicle into a skid. Remember to carry chains, and use them when necessary.

SUNSTRIKE

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Be Prepared

Sunstrike can occur at sunrise or sunset, when the sun’s rays hit your windscreen at a low angle. This can make it difficult or even impossible to see. To reduce the danger of a crash caused by sunstrike or bright sunlight: ★ Be prepared for possible sunstrike when driving at sunrise or sunset, especially when turning or driving towards the sun. ★ Be especially careful in winter, when sunstrike is more likely to occur. ★ Take a second look for cyclists when driving at sunrise or sunset, especially at intersections where you are looking towards the sun. ★ Keep your windscreen clean, inside and out. Dust and grime on the windscreen can make the effects of sunstrike much worse. ★ Wear sunglasses or have them ready to put on and use your car’s sun visors. ★ If you experience sunstrike and you can’t see, pull over and wait for a few minutes until visibility improves. ★ Be careful when driving in snowy areas in the sun – sunlight reflecting off the snow can cause similar effects to sunstrike. ★ Increase your following distance.

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A road safety message, brought to you by The Marlborough District Council

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ALCOHOL AND DRUGS LIMITS Alcohol and drugs, including some drugs given to you by a doctor, can seriously affect your driving. They can slow your reaction times and affect your senses. You risk causing death and serious injury to yourself and other people if you drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

LEGAL ALCOHOL LIMITS FOR DRIVING The law says you must not drive if the amount of alcohol in your blood or breath exceeds certain age-related limits. These limits are shown below.

UNDER TWENTY The legal alcohol limit, if you are under 20, is 150 micrograms per litre of breath or 30 milligrams per 100 millilitres of blood. This is effectively a zero limit – consuming just one drink will mean you can be charged with drink-driving. This law is due to change this year

TWENTY OR OVER You must not drive if you have consumed more than the legal alcohol limit, which is 400 micrograms per litre of breath or 80 milligrams per 100 milliliters of blood. It is difficult to say how many alcoholic drinks you can have before you reach these limits. It depends on many factors, including: ★ Whether you are male or female. ★ Your size. ★ How much food you have eaten. Because of this, and because even small amounts of alcohol can affect your driving, the best advice is: if you drink at all, don’t drive. If you’ve been drinking, call a taxi, or get someone who hasn’t been drinking to drive home. you home e.

DRUGS AND DRIVING The law also says you must not drive if you have taken any type of drug that may affect your driving ability. If you are prescribed drugs by a doctor, always ask if they will have any effect on your driving.

TESTING FOR ALCOHOL AND DRUGS You can be stopped by the police and breathtested at any time. The police can use the following tests to see if you have been drinking or taking drugs.

PASSIVE BREATH TEST The officer will place a hand-held device in front of your mouth and ask you to talk into it. This will show if you have recently drunk any alcohol. If any alcohol is detected, a breath screening test will be required.

BREATH SCREENING TEST The police officer will give you either a tube of crystals with a bag on the end or a small electronic device, and will ask you to blow into it. If your alcohol level is high, you will be asked to take an evidential breath test or have a blood test.

EVIDENTIAL BREATH TEST This is an electronic device you blow into, which gives a reading that can be used in court as evidence of your breath–alcohol concentration.

BLOOD TEST If you have a blood test, a medical doctor or other approved person will take a sample of your blood to be tested for alcohol or drugs.

COMPULSORY (DRUG) IMPAIRMENT TEST This includes an eye assessment, a walk and turn, and a one leg stand assessment. If you fail you may be forbidden to drive and required to have a blood test.

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WHEN ARE THE TESTS CARRIED OUT? A police officer can ask you to take a passive breath test or breath screening test if: ★ You are suspected of drinking and driving ★ You are signalled to stop at a police alcohol check point. You must wait with the officer for the result of the test. If the test shows you have been drinking, you must: ★ Take a further test – this will be either an evidential breath test or a blood test. ★ Hand over the keys to your vehicle, if asked by a police officer. ★ Go with a police officer, if required. ★ Agree to a blood test, if asked by a police officer, medical doctor or other approved person. If you don’t, you may be arrested. A compulsory impairment test can be required if a police officer has good cause to suspect that you are impaired by a drug or drugs. This could be because of your erratic driving, or if you have been stopped for another reason and appear to be under the influence of drugs.

WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS? You may: ★ Choose not to take a breath screening or evidential breath test – however, if you: ✪ Refuse a breath screening test, you will be asked to take an evidential breath test. ✪ Refuse an evidential breath test, you must undergo a blood test. ★ Choose to give blood if an evidential breath test suggests you are over the legal limit. ★ Talk to a lawyer (if you wish to) after a positive breath screening test and before an evidential breath or blood test – a telephone will be made available to you for this purpose. If your blood test shows you are over the legal limit, you will be given a copy of the blood test certificate. You may ask for your blood sample to be tested by an independent analyst. If you want this to happen, it’s important that you talk to a lawyer as soon as possible.


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Safer Journeys in Marlborough DRIVER FATIGUE Before you go out on your next long drive, use the “Fatigue Chart” and give yourself a rating – you may want to leave your trip for another day!

CALCULATE YOUR FATIGUE RATING

FATIGUE Driver fatigue can affect a driver’s reaction time, their ability to concentrate and their understanding of the road and traffic around them. Fatigued drivers can be tired, drowsy or sleepy. The main causes are: ★ Insufficient sleep. ★ Driving during times when they are usually asleep. ★ Long periods of work or activity without a break. ★ Sleep apnoea, a medical condition affecting some people.

RISK FACTOR • Less than 6 hours sleep in the past 24 hours • Less than 14 hours sleep in the past 48 hours • Awake for more than 16 hours • Worked night shift in the last 3 days • Have a sleep disorder • Driving between 2pm and 5pm • Driving between midnight and 6am • Had any alcohol at all in the last 2 hours • Driven for more than 5 hours without a break OR • Driven for more than 8 hours without a break RESULTS • If you score 4

• If you score 5 - 7 • If you score 8 or more

PENALTIES: $80 AND DEMERIT POINTS

Anything that takes a driver’s attention away from the road can be a potential hazard. You should avoid or minimise the following distractions when you are driving: ★ Looking at things on the roadside. ★ Lighting a cigarette. ★ Electronic gadgets. ★ Adjusting radio or climate. ★ Reaching for items in the glove box. ★ Using a hands-free mobile phone. ★ Talking to passengers. ★ Day dreaming. ★ Cleaning the inside of the windscreen. ★ Noisy children. ★ Tiredness. ★ Pets. ★ Reading maps.

3 CRASH RISK Caution: You are at risk from micro sleeps and a significant road hazard Warning: Serious driving risk/hazard: avoid driving, power nap Danger: Extreme driving risk/hazard: do not drive at all, ignore all other factors and sleep immediately

Crashes resulting from driver fatigue are among the most severe on the road. This is because a fatigued driver may not be able to brake or avoid an impending crash in time. Severity and risk is further increased when fatigue is combined with speed, alcohol and/or drugs. In the past, most efforts to reduce driver fatigue were focused on commercial drivers. More recently, it has become evident that driver fatigue is affecting drivers from all situations, both commercial and private, during the day or at night and young and old.

DRIVER DISTRACTIONS

★ Looking at scenery.

ADD 3 2 3 2 3 1 3 2 2

Cellphones – Did you know? Evidence exists that using a mobile phone while driving affects driving performance, and can substantially increase the risk of a crash, because of ‘driver distraction’. One study has shown that using a mobile phone while driving can increase a driver’s risk of being involved in a crash by up to four times. Recent research has also shown the danger in texting and driving (NZLT, 2009).

★ Eating and dropping food. ★ Objects moving in the vehicle.

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Remember, if you accumulate 100 demerit points within a 24 month period, you lose your licence for three months! The rule does not allow drivers to create, send or read text messages under any circumstances. Writing, reading or sending text messages, or using other features of a mobile phone while driving is illegal. Although the Road User Rule allows the use of hands-free mobile phones, the NZTA recommends that drivers minimise the potential for distraction by switching phones off while driving, or pulling over to make or receive calls.

CIRCLE SOME THINGS YOU COULD DO TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR MATES SAFE WHILE DRIVING: ★ Wear your seatbelt. ★ Throw things about. ★ Hang out the windows. ★ Show the driver a text. ★ Turn the music down.

★ Annoy the driver. ★ Drive sober. ★ Have your current WoF. ★ Secure loose items.


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Safe Driving Safer Journeys in Marlborough

SPEED LIMITS Posted signs show the maximum speed you can travel in good conditions. (Be aware of the speed limit for the vehicle you’re driving – vehicles over 3500kg or towing trailers have a maximum speed limit of 90 km/h)

SLOW DOWN For speed advisory signs on corners, narrow, wet or icy roads, poor visibility, rain and fog, busy traffic, pedestrians and cyclists or if you are unfamiliar with the road. If you have to cross the centreline when cornering, you’re travelling too fast.

SAFETY BELTS

TRAVELLING SLOWER THAN THE SPEED LIMIT ★ Keep as close to the left as possible and pull-over as soon as it’s safe to let the following vehicles pass.

TRAVELLING IN A CONVOY ★ Allow room for other vehicles to fit in between.

FOLLOWING DISTANCES ★ Use the “2-second rule” to keep the correct following distance. Increase to 4 seconds when towing or in bad weather.

– WEAR THEM

FATIGUE

ALCOHOL

– TAKE A 10-15 MINUTE BREAK EVERY TWO HOURS OF DRIVING

– TAKE A SOBER DRIVER You are 3 times more likely to be involved in a crash at the legal limit for drinking and driving. (Legal limits for drivers 20 or over: 80 milligrams alcohol/100 millilitres of blood or 400 micrograms of alcohol/litre of breath.)

PARKING IN TOWNS

IF YOU FEEL SLEEPY STOP AND HAVE A SHORT SLEEP (40 MINS MAX) BEFORE DRIVING ON

– PARK IN THE SAME DIRECTION AS THE TRAFFIC FLOW

★ 17 hours without sleep will give drivers response times similar to drivers at the legal alcohol limit.

If you cross the centreline of the road and park facing oncoming traffic you could receive an infringement notice.

★ 24 hours without sleep is like driving at 500 micrograms of alcohol/litre of breath, well over the legal limit.

LOSING CONTROL OF YOUR VEHICLE In Marlborough around 26% of all injury crashes occur when drivers lose control of their vehicle on a bend. The total number of crashes due to loss of control on bends in Marlborough shows an increasing trend since 2005 with the highest number recorded in 2008. Most crashes on bends happen when a driver loses control of the vehicle and either runs off the road or collides with another vehicle. Most commonly, vehicles that run off the road will hit a pole, fence or cliff, or go over a bank. The Weld Pass (above & below) has a history of crashes relating to vehicles travelling too fast for the terrain. The disruption to traffic after a severe crash on this stretch of road is extreme, with the only alternative route being partially unsealed and unsuitable for heavy traffic.

ROADING INFO – FREEPHONE 0800 44 44 49 COURTEOUS DRIVING BY SLOW DRIVERS IS IMPORTANT Southbound traffic: On the way up the pass, drivers of slow small vehicles should use the widened corners to pull over to let others pass. Trucks should use the additional width at the top of the pass to let any queues formed pass by before accelerating down the hill. Northbound traffic: On the way down, all drivers should exercise patience – there is a narrow bridge at the bottom of the pass (below) with a record of crashes including a fatality caused when vehicles have crossed the centreline. Not far beyond the pass towards Blenheim is a passing lane.

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Safe Driving

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Safer Journeys in Marlborough CROSSING THE CENTRE LINE ON BENDS IS DANGEROUS Around 1/3 of fatal injuries involve vehicles crossing the centre line. That’s why it’s best to keep left.

CROSSING THE CENTRE LINE The results of head-on crashes are particulaly severe because when your vehicle hits another vehicle head-on, the speed you collide at is the combined speed of both your vehicles: sometimes more than 200 km/h. When a vehicle crashes, it undergoes a rapid change of speed. However, the occupants keep moving at the vehicle’s previous speed until they are stopped – either by hitting an object or by being restrained by a safety belt or airbag. Human bodies are not designed to be hurled against objects at speed, and the faster the speed, the more severe the injuries. The speed limit is the maximum legal speed that you can travel at on a road in good conditions. However, road conditions are rarely perfect. As a safe driver, you’ll have to look out for changes in traffic, road and weather conditions, and reduce your speed accordingly.

IT’S BEST TO KEEP LEFT ★ When driving, try to position your seat at about the mid-point of your lane. ★ Keep well to the left on bends, whether they are laned or unlaned bends. ★ Reduce speed to maintain your position through bends. ★ When laden, reduce your speed on bends to at least 10 km/h below the posted speed shown. ★ Be aware of what is to your left, so you can take evasive action to avoid oncoming vehicles - don’t swerve to the right. ★ Use the left-hand lane at all times, unless passing.

REMEMBER A strip of white paint (the centre line marking) is not a median barrier. To save lives and reduce injuries, Police are actively targeting vehicles that cross the centre line.

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Road Safety Quiz

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Safer Journeys in Marlborough

A

A policeman

B

An ambulance officer

C

A judge or magistrate

D

5

2

Who can require you to undergo a breath screening test?

None of the above

B

You must speed up when you see the roundabout

A

B

You must stop completely; give way to any traffic, and only move off again when your way is clear

B

You must slow down and give way, except for if you are cycling

C

You must stop only if there is another vehicle coming

C

You must slow down and give way, (or stop, if necessary)

C

D

You must stop if you are in a car or truck only

D

You must give way to everything bigger than you

D

7

8

What does this sign mean?:

You must go around the roundabout You must go as fast as you can to make it safely around the roundabout What does this sign mean?:

A

You must not turn left

A

B

You must cycle here

B

Road has no bends

B

C

No black bikes allowed

C

You must not turn right

C

You must not go into this road unless you live on this road

Walking your bike

D

No parking your bike on this sign

D

You must turn left

D

You must not go into this road unless you are cycling

9

What does this sign mean?:

10

11

Cycle Helmets

12

A

Children’s playground ahead

A

100 metres

A

B

Railway station ahead

B

120 metres

B

C

Steam engine museum entry

C

140 metres

C D

D

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Turning, slowing down or stopping, passing or pulling out Cycling in a straight line

D

Railway level crossing ahead

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When can you use your horn?

You must turn your vehicle headlights on when visibility is less than:

160 metres

A

To warn another driver of your presence

A

Traffic lights

B

To warn a horse and rider you are approaching

B

Give Way rules

C

If someone cuts you off

C

Road signs, such as stop signs

D

17

21

D

As you are leaving your friend’s house “Hours of darkness” means from half an hour after sunset to half an hour before sunrise, or any other time when there is insufficient light to see a person or vehicle 100 metres away T OR F

18

Wearing bright coloured clothes will make you more visable when you are on a motorbike or bicycle

22

T

OR

All of the above

T

OR

B

No-one is responsible

C

Must be worn by children only

C

The owner of the vehicle

D

Must be worn only if the cyclist is using a busy street

D

The child

F

WIN

$500 Fuel Vouchers

All completed entries go into the draw to win $500 of fuel vouchers.

T

OR

16

Going straight through at an uncontrolled intersection You must stop for all traffic

B

You are going straight through, but you must give way to straight-through traffic from your right

C

You are going straight through so you have right of way

D

You must give way to traffic bigger or faster than you

T

23

OR

T

OR

When would you use the 2 Second Rule?

When following another vehicle

B

When reversing from a carpark

C

When parking your vehicle

D

When signalling a right turn There are no motorcyclist training courses in Marlborough this year

F

T

24

You do not have to have a rear reflector on your bicycle

F

.

A

20

A bicycle is not classed as a vehicle

F

Having one alcoholic drink will not put you over the legal driving limit if you are under 20 years of age

Who is responsible for making a child under 14 years use a safety belt or a safety seat in a vehicle?

Must be worn, meet approved standard, and be securely fastened

19

Helmets are compulsory on motorbikes and bicycles

You must go into this road

The driver of the vehicle

15

At an intersection what do a police officer’s directions over-rule?

Must be worn on the handlebars only

You must not go into this road

A

A

3888841AA 8 8841AA

You must slow down and be prepared to stop for traffic in the roundabout or entering the roundabout from the right

You must only give way to vehicles coming from your right

You must not cycle here

B

16

A

You must stop only if you are going straight ahead or turning right

What does this sign mean?:

What does this sign mean?:

A

A

Feeling confident about taking your hand off the handle-bars

4

What does this sign mean?:

A

6

You must use hand signals when you are:

3

What does this sign mean?:

OR

F

Young male drivers are more at risk of being involved in a road injury crash than any other group

F

T

OR

F

Test your knowledge of road safety rules by completing the quiz above

1 8 15 Name:

2 9 16

3 10 17

4 11 18

5 12 19 22

6 13 20 23

7 14 21 24

Address: Phone:

Drop completed entries to The Marlborough Express office or post to: The Marlborough Express, Road Safety Quiz, PO Box 242, Blenheim. Entries close 4pm, August 29 2011.

Printed by The Marlborough Express a division of Fairfax Media

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Road safety