Page 1


New York On My Mind

NOVEMBER 28 - DECEMBER 30, 2017

4 0 W E S T 57 T H S T R E E T N E W YO R K , N E W YO R K 1 0 0 1 9 2 1 2 - 5 4 1 - 4 9 0 0 | M A R L B O R O U G H G A L L E R Y.C O M


RED GROOMS: IN CONVERSATION by Barbara MacAdam On the occasion of his show at Marlborough Gallery’s spacious uptown venue, Red Grooms acknowledges being an uptown/downtown sort of guy. Now 80 years old, Grooms began his career in the late 1950s—downtown— and that’s where he still lives, but feels at home in the quiet and uncluttered atmosphere of his 57th Street gallery. Similarly, he is at once like a character in his own compositions—gregarious, cheerful, apparently easygoing, and a bemused observer. The Nashville-born artist is deeply immersed in the grand theater that is New York, and sits among constructed studies for his own “stage sets.” Our conversation began as I asked him about what seems to be an out-of-character etching I’ve always liked that he made in 1976 called Manet Romance. It looks idiosyncratic; black and white, and surrealistic as in a dream. What, I wondered, was that all about? “This dry point shows in minute lines the disparate visual elements that I was riff ing on to create an ambiguous and imaginary take on Manet’s world. I wanted to do a portrait of Manet and, like in a poem, I let my mind wonder in a stream of consciousness.” Critic Judith Stein wrote that Grooms seemed to be inf luenced by Hogarth and Daumier.1 “That’s pretty f lattering,” he says. “I have a Hogarth right by my bed.” He grew up in Nashville and came to New York in ’57. “My work was more romantic then,” he says. “I was inf luenced by Picasso’ blue period and Modigliani’s long necks and all the other great European moderns.” When he arrived in New York, he recalls, “I tried to be an abstract painter. The Abstract Expressionists were my heroes.” He’d studied for almost a semester at the Art Institute of Chicago, but dropped out (“I wanted action, not education,” he told critic Judith Stein) “My mother was my adviser. She urged me to go to the New School and study with the social realist painter Gregorio Prestopino.” At the time, he says, “I was looking at Harry Abrams’s small paperback art books and I had a subscription to ARTnews. That’s how I knew to get on a Greyhound bus to New York. I can remember all the reproductions. That was the era in which I grew up.” When Grooms f irst came to New York, where he was living at the McBurney YMCA on 23rd Street and attending the New School once a week. He would also visit art galleries. “I remember seeing Franz Kline’s paintings when he was introducing color and de Kooning when he went abstract again after the women.”

1 Stein, Judith E., et al. Red Grooms, A Retrospective, 1956-1984: an illustrated catalogue with essays. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1985, p. 9


Although he loved abstraction, he notes, “I’m a f igurative artist at heart.” Grooms recalls f irst realizing this fact when helping his dad paint a white wall. “To alleviate the boredom of continuously painting in a logical sequence, I started to paint the cracks. I saw images and I could imagine painting an inf inite world.” “In high school,” Grooms recalls, “my thing was being funny. I liked the comedy duo Bob and Ray on the radio and Woody Allen doing standup on TV. Some high school pals of mine had a country music band. I can’t play or sing, but I became a kind of clown with the band while they were performing. I thought about becoming a stand-up comedian, even though I can’t tell a joke, “but, I can improvise something on the spur of the moment to get a laugh.” He also recalls, “cartooning was natural for me. When you think like a cartoonist, you can pretty much draw anything. In Ruckus Manhattan, I drew the buildings of Wall Street very seriously, then back at the studio I switched to cartooning—because Ruckus was to be a crowd pleasing work—I wanted it to be accessible and simple, like f ilm animation.” “I was taken with the idea of Disney and the excitement of having artists working together to make something so big.” His own work, he admits is over-the-top and good spirited. “Right when I started showing in 1973, at Tibor de Nagy, people called me a benign satirist.” But, paradoxically, he was also on occasion thought of as being too aggressive in his satirizing of public f igures and politicians. “I went to Europe for about a year and I was overwhelmed by it.” Grooms had been creating works with found objects, or as he calls it, “Junk Art.” But in Europe he had trouble f inding the discarded objects on the streets that he’d used earlier on. “I was in Europe in ‘59 and my version of Pop was very f igurative.” In Europe, he says with a smile, “They called that kind of work ‘assemblage.’ It was neater.” The artist recalls that it was around this time that he began painting. “I liked Fairf ield Porter. He was a wonderful man. When I lived in Florence for a year and a half, and I tried to paint like Fairf ield, straight oil on canvas. Then I was with John Meyers at Tibor de Nagy, and he told me I was a Fantasist, not a Pop artist. I told him I wanted to be a Pop artist,” he says, recalling, “When I came back here, Pop was just about to start. I had known Jim Dine and Claes Oldenburg in the ‘50s and they were pretty funky, really marvelous; in the early 60’s they had cleaned up their act and were sensational.” Dealer Ivan Karp, who worked for Castelli Gallery at that time, knew Grooms from Provincetown. “I had an interview with Castelli Gallery at that time,” Grooms remembers. “I saw my f irst Lichtenstein and Rosenquist leaning against a wall in the off ice. I didn’t make the cut, but I saw what was about to happen.” Another major inf luence on Grooms was Meyer Shapiro, the renowned Humanist critic. “He was a wonderful, saintly man—kind and accessible to us artists in our early 20s. I became friends with Jay Milder and Bob Thompson. We admired Lester Johnson. He was our mentor. Jay, Bob, Lester and Lester’s wife, Josephine, spent long evenings discussing the future of art and our place in it.” At that time, there was a big difference between downtown and uptown galleries. Red Grooms had a solo show in 1960 at the Anita Reuben Gallery. “Reuben was an uptown woman,” Grooms says, but it was the gritty iconography of the city that motivated the artists she showed—among them Jim Dine, Rosalyn Drexler, Martha Edelheit, Lester Johnson, Nicholas Krushenick, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, George Segal, Richard Stankiewicz, and Robert Whitman.

4


This fall, we moved from artwork to artwork in the gallery, and I asked Grooms how he feels about the scene today and where he thinks he f its. “I’m a downtown person,” he says. “When I had a show at Marlborough on Broome Street young people came in.” I wondered how he felt about the aggressively changing city itself, especially the downtown area. He seemed thrilled and invigorated by it. His sculptures include, and are continually inspired by, the new buildings. “We saw the new building—the ‘Jenga’ building—going up2. You’re practically living with ‘hard hats’ working on the building, and seeing them eye-to-eye from your window,” he exclaims. “That’s what this new show is about.” The buildings do indeed look like the personages in the artist’s well-known body of work. The exhibition also includes familiar street characters, like the Bahamian Bohemian 3 walking his dogs and Madame Snowf lake 4 strolling in the snow. Grooms’s studio is f illed with wonderful works along with those of his wife, Lysiane Luong, and artists in their collection. A key piece in the group is a tour de force created for the Marlborough show—a huge homage to the most quintessential of New York institutions—the Strand Bookstore on 12th Street and Broadway, a stalwart survivor in the digital age. Grooms’s The Strand 5 is f illed with a cast of characters; real and imagined caricatures, many based on people you’d expect from central casting. But among the recognizable are heroes of Red Grooms, including: Philip Roth, Bob Dylan, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, Eudora Welty, Sylvia Plath, Betty Friedan, Julia Child, Toni Morrison, Patti Smith together with Robert Mapplethorpe, Arundhati Roy and Tom Wolfe. His crammed bookstore has two f loors, and a bustling side street outside, “to add perspective,” as well as a row of cinematic windows visible from the street with f igures, both invented and historical, in the upper portion of the work. It still delights him to spend time with the piece. “Sherlock Holmes,” Grooms points out, “is upstairs investigating a murder.”

Barbara MacAdam is Editor at Large for ARTNews magazine.

2 Herzog and de Meuron’s building on 56 Leonard Street in Manhattan. 3 Bahamian Bohemian, 2017, illustrated on p. 18 4 Madame Snowflake, 2017, illustrated on p. 18 5The Strand, 2017, illustrated on p. 17

5


Many Thanks to: Pierre Levai who inspired me to take another look at NYC. My dear wife, Lysiane Luong for being the CEO of my life and collaborator on many projects. Tom Burckhardt, the master carver on this show. Heather Weston, who completed a myriad details with deft artistic talent.

Red Grooms


Autumn in New York, 2017 ink and acrylic on mixed media mounted on wood 37 1/2 x 62 1/2 x 14 1/2 in., 95.3 x 158.8 x 36.8 cm


Harbor Lights, 2016 water based oil and ink on epoxy mounted on wood 41 1/4 x 61 1/2 x 5 3/4 in., 104.8 x 156.2 x 14.6 cm

8


9

Manhattan Moves Up, 2016 acrylic and ink on paper, vinyl and epoxy mounted on wood 29 x 23 x 5 3/4 in., 73.7 x 58.4 x 14.6 cm


Night Falls on Canal Street, 2016 acrylic and ink on paper, vinyl and epoxy mounted on wood 40 1/2 x 28 1/4 x 5 in., 102.9 x 71.8 x 12.7 cm

10


11

The City Rises, 2016 acrylic and ink on paper, vinyl and epoxy mounted on wood 61 x 23 x 5 1/2 in., 159.4 x 58.4 x 14 cm


Room with a View, 2017 acrylic and ink on vinyl and epoxy mounted on wood 96 1/2 x 33 x 4 in., 245.1 x 83.8 x 10.2 cm

12


13

Walk on By, 2017 acrylic and ink on epoxy mounted on wood 34 1/2 x 45 1/4 x 4 1/2 in., 87.6 x 114.9 x 11.4 cm


Keep Moving, 2017 acrylic and ink on epoxy mounted on wood 35 1/2 x 49 x 10 3/4 in., 90.2 x 124.5 x 27.3 cm

14


15

In the Paint, 2017 acrylic and ink on epoxy mounted on wood 94 1/4 x 31 3/4 x 5 in., 239.4 x 80.6 x 12.7 cm


The Strand (details), 2017


The Strand, 2017 acrylic and ink on epoxy mounted on wood 73 1/3 x 118 1/2 x 9 in., 186.3 x 301 x 22.9 cm


Madame Snowflake, 2017 acrylic and ink on mixed media mounted on wood 30 x 20 x 1 1/4 in., 76.2 x 50.8 x 3.2 cm Bahamian Bohemian, 2017 acrylic and ink on mixed media mounted on wood 30 x 20 x 1 1/4 in., 76.2 x 50.8 x 3.2 cm

18


A View of the Sea, 2017 acrylic on paper 51 1/4 x 65 1/4 in., 130.2 x 165.7 cm Mulberry Street, 1900, 2017 pencil and pastel on paper 22 1/2 x 30 1/4 in., 57.1 x 76.8 cm

19


Union Square Park at Night, 2016 acrylic and ink on mixed media mounted on wood 24 1/4 x 19 5/8 x 2 1/2 in., 61.6 x 49.9 x 6.3 cm

20


21

Little Italy Meets Nolita, 2016 acrylic and ink on paper, vinyl and epoxy mounted on wood 45 x 72 x 8 in., 114.3 x 182.9 x 20.3 cm


Red Grooms / Lysiane Luong Downpour, 2015-2017 acrylic, ink, pastel, cloth and umbrella fabric on wood Panel 1 & 4: 85 x 24 1/2 x 1 1/4 in., 215.9 x 62.2 x 3.2 cm Panel 2 & 3: 85 x 18 x 1 1/4 in., 215.9 x 45.7 x 3.2 cm

22


23


24


RED GROOMS 1937 Born in Nashville, Tennessee 1955 School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 1956 George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee The New School, New York, New York 1957 Hans Hoffman School of Fine Arts, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Red Grooms: The Blue & The Gray, Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Tennessee; traveled to Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York Red Grooms: Torn from the Pages II, Marlborough Gallery New York, New York Red Grooms: Beware a Wolf in the Alley, Marlborough Broome Street, New York, New York Red Grooms’ New York City, Children’s Museum of Manhattan, New York, New York The artist lives and works in New York, New York. Red Grooms: Larger Than Life, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut SELECTED AWARDS AND RECOGNITION Red Grooms: What’s the Ruckus, Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Brattleboro, Vermont 1951 The Scholastic Art and Writing Award, Scholastic Inc., 2012 Torn from the Pages, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York, New York New York 1968 Ingram Merrill Foundation Grant, New York, New 2011 Red Grooms, New York: 1976-2011, Marlborough York Gallery, New York, New York 1970 Creative Artist Program Service Grant for Film, New 2010 Old Masters and Modern Muses: Red Grooms’ Portraits of York State Council on the Arts, New York, New York Artists, 1957-2009, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, 1982 Artists of the Year Award, Art Teachers of New York, Pennsylvania New York, New York 2009 Red Grooms: Dancing, Marlborough Chelsea, New Brickie Award, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, York, New York New York, New York 2008 Red Grooms: In the Studio, Hudson River Museum, 1985 President’s Award, Rhode Island School of Design, Yonkers, New York Providence, Rhode Island 2007 Red Grooms: Recent Paintings, Marlborough Gallery, 1986 National Arts Club Award, Gold Medal Honor, New New York, New York York, New York 2005 Nassau Red! Red Grooms: Ruckus in Roslyn, Nassau Ten Best Illustrated Children’s Books Award, The New County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, New York York Times, New York, New York 2004 Red Grooms: New Works in Wood, Marlborough Gallery, Governor’s Award in the Arts, State of Tennessee, New York, New York Nashville, Tennessee The Private World of Red Grooms, Tibor de Nagy 1988 The Mayor’s Award of Honor for Arts and Gallery, New York, New York Culture, New York, New York Red Grooms: Selections from the Graphic Work, Heckscher 1990 Founders’ Medal, Pennsylvania Academy, Philadelphia, Museum of Art, Huntington, New York Pennsylvania Adventures Past and Present with Red Grooms, Irving 1996 Art Masters Award for Sculpture, American Artist Galleries, Palm Beach, Florida Magazine, New York, New York Red Grooms: Paris–New York, Galerie Patrice Trigano, 2000 Elected Member, American Academy of Arts and Paris, France Letters, New York, New York 2003 Red Grooms, Lord and Taylor, New York, New York 2003 Lifetime Achievement Award, National Academy of The Human Comedy: Portraits by Red Grooms, Design, New York, New York Katonah Museum of Art; traveled to Norton Museum 2011 Honoree, Open House New York, New York, New of Art, West Palm Beach, Florida; Gibbes Museum York of Art, Charleston, South Carolina 2002 Red Grooms: Recent Works, Marlborough Gallery, SOLO EXHIBITIONS New York, New York 2000 Red Grooms in Pursuit of Serious Fun, Contemporary Art 2016 Lincoln on the Hudson by Red Grooms, Hudson River Center of Virginia, Virginia Beach, Virginia Museum, Yonkers, New York Red Grooms: Selections from the Complete Graphics Red Grooms: Traveling Correspondent, Memphis Brooks Works, The National Academy of Design, New York, Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee New York; traveled to the Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, Illinois; Montgomery Museum of Arts,

25

2015 2014 2013


Montgomery, Alabama; Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida; Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida; and Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee (through 2004) Red Grooms: Sculpture, Grounds for Sculpture, Hamilton, New Jersey Red Grooms: peintures et sculptures, Galerie Patrice Trigano, Paris, France 1999 Red Grooms: Sculptures and Constructions, Marlborough Florida, Boca Raton, Florida Red Grooms: New Works, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: New Monoprints, Marlborough Graphics, New York, New York 1998 Red Grooms and the Heroism of Modern Life, Palmer Museum of Art, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania Red Grooms: Moby Dick Meets the New York Public Library, Norton Museum, Palm Beach, Florida 1997 Traveling with Red Grooms, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Snapshots, Hebrew Home for the Aged at Riverdale, Riverdale, New York Red Grooms, Knoxville Museum of Art, Knoxville, Tennessee 1996 Red Grooms: A Personal Art History, New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, Connecticut 1995 Red Grooms: The New York Stories, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: What’s All the Ruckus About?, Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee; traveled to The Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, Florida; The Albany Museum of Art, Albany, Georgia; and The Mitchell Art Gallery at St. John’s College, Annapolis, Maryland 1994 Target: Red Grooms!, Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University, Malibu, California Civic Virtues: Lights! Camera! Action!, Nations Bank Plaza, Charlotte, North Carolina Red Grooms’s Dame of the Narrows and the Greater New York Harbor, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York 1993 Red Grooms, Art Museum of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, Texas Red Grooms at Grand Central, Grand Central Station, New York, New York Red Grooms’ Ruckus Rodeo, Rockwell Museum, Corning, New York Have Brush Will Travel: Red Grooms’ Watercolor World, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms, Nagoya City Art Museum, Nagoya, Japan; traveled to Ashiya City Museum of Art and History, Ashiya, Japan; Mitsukoshi Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan; and The Museum of Art, Kochi, Japan

1992 Ruckus Rodeo, Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Arvada, Colorado Red Grooms: New Work, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: Dame of the Narrows, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York 1991 Red Grooms, Kathryn Ellman Gallery, Aspen, Colorado 1990 Red Grooms: Tourist Traps and Other Places, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: Oeuvres Récentes, FIAC 1990, Paris, France 1989 Traveling with Red Grooms: Watercolors 1987-89, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York 1987 Red Grooms: Recent Prints, Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts Recent Paintings, Sculpture and Drawings, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: Retrospective, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York Graphics, Simms Fine Art, New Orleans, Louisiana 1986 Homage to Red Grooms, Cumberland Gallery, Nashville, Tennessee Rembrandt Takes a Walk (in collaboration with Mark Strand), Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Red Grooms: The Graphic Work, Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee; traveled to Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia; Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater, Florida; Erie Art Museum, Erie, Pennsylvania; William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; South Dakota Memorial Art Center, Brookings, South Dakota; The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona; Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Amarillo Arts Center, Amarillo, Texas; Blanden Memorial Art Museum, Fort Dodge, Idaho; Roanoke Museum of Fine Art, Center in the Square, Roanoke, Virginia; The Canton Art Institute, Canton, Ohio; The Oklahoma Arts Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Anchorage Museum of History and Art, Anchorage, Alaska; Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, New York; The Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York; Federal Reserve Board Art Gallery, Washington, D.C; Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia; and the Sunrise Art Museum/Fine Art Museum, Charleston, West Virginia 1985 Red Grooms: Recent Work, Marlborough Fine Art, London, England Hokin/Kaufman Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Benjamin Mangel Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Red Grooms: The Alley, Circulo de Bellas Artés, Madrid, Spain

26


Red Grooms!, Sette Publishing Co., Tempe, Arizona Red Grooms: A Retrospective 1956-1984, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; traveled to Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California; Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Tennessee 1984 Red Grooms: Recent Work, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York 1983 Graphics from the 80’s, Unicorn Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Maquettes, Monotypes and Graphics, Anderson Ranch, Aspen, Colorado Public Works–Private Patrons: Images of Modern Times by Red Grooms, Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, Florida; traveled to Hunter Museum, Chattanooga, Tennessee Ruckus Rodeo, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina 1982 Red Grooms: Philadelphia Cornucopia, Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Red Grooms: Welcome to Cleveland, the New Gallery of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, Ohio Benjamin Mangel Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Red Grooms: Ruckus Manhattan, Seibu Museum, Tokyo, Japan Red Grooms 1977-1982, Carlson Gallery, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, Connecticut Red Grooms from the Museum’s Collection, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. 1981 Ruckus Rodeo, Aspen Center for the Visual Arts, Aspen, Colorado Red Grooms: Originals from Local Collections, Montgomery Bell Academy, Nashville, Tennessee Red Grooms: Recent Works, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Ruckus Manhattan Revisited, Burlington House, New York, New York Red Grooms: Prints of the Seventies, Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee; traveled to University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi; West Georgia College, Carrollton, Georgia; University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina; Pensacola Museum of Art, Pensacola, Florida; Hickory Museum, Hickory, North Carolina; Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia; Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, Louisiana; Louisville Art Gallery, Louisville, Kentucky; Waterworks Gallery, Salisbury, North Carolina; and Davidson College Art Gallery, Davidson, North Carolina 1980 Red Grooms: Works from the 60s, Hatton Art Gallery, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado

27

Camp Gallery/Signet Fine Prints, St. Louis, Missouri Discount Store, Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 1979 The Bookstore, Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York Benjamin Mangel Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Discount Store, Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 1978 Martin Wiley Gallery, Nashville, Tennessee Discount Store, Purchase College, State University of New York, Purchase, New York 1977 Galerie Roger d’Amecourt, Paris, France The New Gallery of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, Ohio 1976 Ruckus Manhattan, Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York 1975 Works on Paper, Brooke Alexander Gallery, New York, New York 1973 The Ruckus World of Red Grooms, Voorhees Hall, Rutgers Gallery of Art, New Brunswick, New Jersey; traveled to New York Cultural Center, New York, New York; and Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Caracas, Venezuela 1972 Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee Fendrick Gallery, Washington, D.C. 1971 John Bernard Myers Gallery, New York, New York Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Massachusetts 1970 Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, New York 1967 City of Chicago, Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago, Illinois; traveled to the 34 Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte, La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, Italy; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin; and Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, Illinois 1966 Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, New York 1965 Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, New York 1963 Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, New York 1962 Nashville Artists Guild, Nashville, Tennessee 1960 Reuben Gallery, New York, New York 1958 Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts City Gallery, New York, New York PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin, Ohio Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, New York Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, Delaware Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee Iwaki City Art Museum, Iwaki, Fukushima, Japan Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden Museo de Arte Contemporรกneo, Caracas, Venezuela Museum of Art, Kochi, Japan Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale, Florida Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Illinois Museum of the Moving Image, Queens, New York Nagoya City Art Museum, Nagoya, Japan National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C. New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, New Jersey, New York Historical Society, New York, New York Northern Kentucky University, Newport, Kentucky Palmer Museum of Art, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, New York Southern Illinois University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York The Morgan Library and Museum, New York, New York The Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School New York, New York Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut

28


N E W YO R K / MARLBOROUGH GALLERY, INC. 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 Telephone 212.541.4900 Fax 212.541.4948 www.marlboroughgallery.com mny@marlboroughgallery.com

MADRID / GALERÍA MARLBOROUGH, S.A. Orfila, 5 28010 Madrid Telephone 34.91.319.1414 Fax 34.91.308.4345 www.galeriamarlborough.com info@galeriamarlborough.com

MARLBOROUGH GRAPHICS 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 Telephone 212.541.4900 Fax 212.541.4948 graphics@marlboroughgallery.com

B A R C E LO N A / MARLBOROUGH BARCELONA Enric Granados, 68 08008 Barcelona Telephone 34.93.467.44.54 Fax 34.93.467.44.51

MARLBOROUGH CONTEMPORARY 545 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001 Telephone 212.463.8634 Fax 212.463.9658 www.marlboroughcontemporary.com info@marlboroughcontemporary.com

SA N T I AG O D E C H I L E / GALERÍA A.M.S. MARLBOROUGH Avenida Nueva Costanera 3723 Vitacura, Santiago, Chile Telephone 56.2.799.3180 Fax 56.2.799.3181

LO N D O N / MARLBOROUGH FINE ART LTD. 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 Fax 44.20.7629.6338 www.marlboroughfineart.com mfa@marlboroughfineart.com MARLBOROUGH GRAPHICS 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 Fax 44.20.7495.0641 graphics@marlboroughfineart.com MARLBOROUGH CONTEMPORARY 6 Albemarle Street, London, W1S4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 info@marlboroughcontemporary.com www.marlboroughcontemporary.com

FRONT COVER: Vertigo, 2016 acrylic, ink, mixed media & epoxy mounted on wood 33 x 24 x 7 in., 83.8 x 61 x 17.8 cm

BACK COVER: A View of the Sea (detail), 2016

Important Works available by: Twentieth-Century European Masters; Post-War American Artists DESIGN / Dan McCann P H OTO G R A P H Y / E r i n D av s

P R I N T E D I N N E W YO R K B Y J U R I S T

All art works © 2015-2017 Red Grooms © 2017 Marlborough Gallery, Inc. ISBN 978-0-89797-504-9


NOVEMBER 28 - DECEMBER 30, 2017

4 0 W E S T 57 T H S T R E E T N E W YO R K , N E W YO R K 1 0 0 1 9 2 1 2 - 5 4 1 - 4 9 0 0 | M A R L B O R O U G H G A L L E R Y.C O M

Red Grooms, 2017