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Unknown Fabergé New Finds and Re-discoveries Mark Moehrke EDITOR

With contributions by Mark Moehrke & Marilyn Swezey

Unknown GUE S T CUR ATOR S

Ulla Tillander-Godenhielm

FABERGÉ Mikhail Ovchinnikov

NEW FINDS AND RE-DISCOVERIES The Museum of Russian Art Minneapolis, MN

The Museum of Russian Art M I N N E A P O L I S ,

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11 IMPERIAL CUFFLINKS Fabergé, St. Petersburg, circa 1907 Workmaster Henrik Wigström Scratched inventory number 80377 Gold, enamel, diamonds H. ¾ in. LITER ATURE

A. von Solodkoff, The Jewel Album of Tsar Nicholas II and A Collection of Private Photographs of the Russian Imperial Family, London, 1997, no. 267, illustrated p. 37 of the album. Nicholas II, Jewel Album, Archives at the State Museums of the Moscow Kremlin, no. 267, illustrated p. 37. Wartski, Fabergé and the Russian Jewellers, London, 2006, no. 231, p. 88, illustrated p. 79. EXHIBITED

London, Fabergé and the Russian Jewellers, Wartski, 2006, no. 231.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION

These cuff links were purchased by Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna (1847–1928) from Fabergé’s St. Petersburg shop and given to Emperor Nicholas II (1868–1918) on Easter 1907. They were recorded in his gift album in watercolor and captioned,

“From Mama, Easter 1907.” The entry from Nicholas’ album is reproduced below.

Original watercolor from the album of Nicholas II. Courtesy of Alexander von Solodkoff.

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20 IMPERIAL CIGARETTE CASE Fabergé, St. Petersburg, circa 1890 Workmaster Mikhail Perkhin Gold, enamel, silk tinder cord, in the original chamois slip case L. 4 ¾ in. LITER ATURE

U. Tillander-Godenhielm, Fabergé: ja hänen suomalaiset mestarinsa, Helsinki, 2008, pp. 98–99. U. Tillander-Godenhielm, Fabergén suomalaiset mestarit, Helsinki, 2011, p. 75.

EXHIBITED

Tampere, The Era of Fabergé, Museums in Finland and Moscow Kremlin Museum, June 17–October 1, 2006. Shanghai, Christie’s, October 2014.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION, F I N L A N D

The inside cover engraved in facsimile handwriting of the Empress Maria Feodorovna: 28 October 1890. A gift from the Empress Maria Feodorovna (1847–1928) to her husband, Emperor Alexander III (1845–1894), on their 24th wedding anniversary, then by descent. In 1866, Alexander III (1845–1894) married the Danish Princess Dagmar (1847–1928), daughter

of King Christian IX of Denmark (1818–1906) and Queen Louise, née Louise of Hesse-Kassel (1817– 1898). Dagmar took the name of Maria Feodorovna after her conversion to Russian Orthodoxy. Together the couple had f ive children, including Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich (1868– 1918), who would succeed his father as Emperor of Russia in 1894.

The tall, powerful emperor and the petite princess, so unalike in both personality and appearance, shared a very happy marriage and family life. They remained devoted and attached to each other throughout their lives.

INSIDE COVER

Emperor Alexander III and Empress Maria Feodorovna.

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21 IMPERIAL RHINOCEROS AUTOMATON Fabergé, St. Petersburg, circa 1905 Workmaster possibly Julius Rappoport Oxidized silver, key, in the original wood case L. 2 7⁄8 in. LITER ATURE

M. Saloniemi, U. Tillander-Godenhielm, T. Boettger, The Era of Fabergé, Tampere, Finland, 2006. U. Tillander-Godenhielm, Fabergé: ja hänen suomalaiset mestarinsa, Helsinki, 2008, pp. 340–341. EXHIBITED

Tampere, The Era of Fabergé, Museums in Finland and Moscow Kremlin Museum, June 17–October 1, 2006. Shanghai, Christie’s, October 2014.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION, F I N L A N D

A gift of the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna (1858–1939) to her grandson, Vasili Alexandrovich (1907–1989), then by descent. When the rhinoceros is wound with a key, it lumbers forward, raising and lowering its head and moving its tail. The oxidized silver simulates the coarse texture and color of the animal’s skin. Prince Vasili Alexandrovich was the youngest child of Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich

(1866–1933) and Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (1875–1960), the daughter of Emperor Alexander III (1845–1894) and sister of Emperor Nicholas II (1868–1918). Vasili escaped Russia in 1919, at the age of 11, and later emigrated to the United States. There he met Princess Natalia Golitsyna, whom he married in 1931. The couple lived in California and had one daughter.

number known to have been produced by Fabergé. One was formerly in the Forbes Magazine Collection and is now preserved in the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg. The others are in private collections, including one which was given to Queen Alexandra (1844–1925) for her sixty-f ifth birthday in 1909 by the Lord Chamberlain, Lord Howe (1861–1929).

This rare silver rhinoceros automaton is one of only a small

Prince Vasili Alexandrovich with his mother, Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna.

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23 IMPERIAL PHOTOGRAPH FR AME Fabergé, St. Petersburg circa 1901 Workmaster Mikhail Perkhin Scratched inventory number 3748 Gold, enamel, diamonds H. 1 ½ in.

A RT I E A N D D OROT H Y MC F E R R I N C OL L E C T ION AT T H E HOUSTON M USEU M OF NAT U R A L SC I E NCE

Collection of Grand Duke George Mikhailovich (1863–1919), then by descent. This rare mechanical photograph frame contains original photographs of Grand Duke George, Grand Duchess Marie (1876–1940) and Princess Nina Georgievna (1901–1974) as an infant. The original purchase has not been traced, but the age of Nina in the photograph and the workmaster’s mark of Mikhail Perkhin (who died in 1903),

suggest a date of 1901, the year of Nina’s birth. Each photograph is covered by functioning windows, which are operated by a diamond push-piece at the bottom edge of the frame and powered by an intricate mechanism located inside the back cover. The design and construction undoubtedly were inspired by the surprise in the Imperial Pansy Egg (1899), a similar enamel heart-shaped photograph frame with functioning windows, which also was made in Perkhin’s workshop.

ANOTHER VIEW

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30

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PHOTOGRAPH FRAME

PAIR OF SCENT BOTTLES

K. Fabergé, Moscow, before 1899 Gold, enamel, diamonds H. 3 3⁄8 in.

K. Fabergé, Moscow, 1899–1908 Gold, enamel, glass H. 5 ½ in. LITER ATURE

A. K. Snowman, Victoria & Albert Museum, Fabergé 1846–1920, London, 1977, no. K27, pp. 68–69.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION

Containing a photograph of Princess Margaret. Former collection of H.R.H. The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden (1930–2002) at Kensington Palace, London. Princess Margaret was born the second daughter to T.R.H. The Duke and Duchess of York, the future King George VI (1895–1952) and Queen Elizabeth (1900–2002). The younger sister of Queen Elizabeth II (b. 1926), the glamorous princess become H.R.H. Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden.

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a prominent player on the world stage for the rest of her life.

whom she later divorced, and had two children.

Princess Margaret, charming, sophisticated, and the epitome of royal elegance, was a fashion icon and a regular f ixture on the world’s best dressed lists. Although the attractive and exuberant princess gained a reputation as a free spirit, she was known for her generosity to friends and for her devotion to the queen. The princess was married once, to Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon (b. 1930),

A gifted singer and pianist, the princess was a devoted patron of the arts. In addition to her love of music and ballet, her artistic patronage extended to her signif icant collection of jewelry and Fabergé, including the photograph frame which contains her portrait (cat. number 30) and the pair of elegant scent bottles (cat. number 31).

A. K. Snowman, Carl Fabergé, Goldsmith to the Imperial Court of Russia, London, 1980, p. 28. Queen’s Gallery, Fabergé from the Royal Collection, London, 1985, no. 47.

EXHIBITED

London, Fabergé 1846–1920, Victoria & Albert Museum, 1977, no. K27. London, Fabergé from the Royal Collection, Buckingham Palace, Queen’s Gallery, 1985, no. 47.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION

Former the collection of H.R.H. The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden (1930–2002) at Kensington Palace, London.

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44 “SNOWFLAKE” PENDANT WITH RED CROSS Fabergé, St. Petersburg, 1915 Workshop of Albert Holmström, designed by Alma Pihl Scratched inventory number 100171 Rock crystal, platinized alloy of gold and silver, diamonds, rubies H. 2 ¼ in. LITER ATURE

A. von Solodkoff, Masterpieces from the House of Fabergé, New York, 1984, p. 167. M. Kelly, Highlights from the Forbes Magazine Collection, New York, 1985, p. 18. J. Booth, The Art of Fabergé, New Jersey, 1990, p. 76. K. Snowman, Fabergé: Lost and Found, 1993, p. 163, illustration of the pencil design. C. Forbes & R. Tromeur-Brenner, R. Fabergé, The Forbes Collection, New York, 1999, p. 150–151. EXHIBITED

Boston, The Museum of Science, Gems, 1991. Virginia/Minneapolis/Chicago, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, The Minneapolis Institute of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, Fabergé, Selections from the Forbes Magazine Collection, 1983, no. 38, p. 13. Fort Worth, The Kimbell Art Museum, Fabergé, The Forbes Magazine Collection, 1983, no. 69. Detroit, The Detroit Institute of Arts, Fabergé, The Forbes Magazine Collection, 1984, no. 71. Washington D.C., Corcoran Gallery, Fabergé and Finland: Exquisite Objects, 1996. Stockholm, Nationalmuseum, Carl Fabergé: Goldsmith to the Tsar, 1997, no. 226, p. 206. Biltmore, Biltmore Estate, The Glitter and the Gold: Fabergé at Biltmore Estate, 1998.

This pendant is yet another snowf lake jewel relating to World War I, the tragedies of which greatly upset and engulfed the entire world. The female members of the Russian Imperial family, inspired by Empress Alexandra Feodorovna (1872–1918) and her daughters, worked as nurses in hospitals created for urgent help to injured soldiers. Many ladies of the highest society followed the good example of their sovereigns, doing all in their power to assist the many unfortunate. The workshops of Fabergé produced a mass of objects, jewels and miniature Easter eggs, decorated with the symbol of the Red Cross. Many of these pieces were intended as gifts for those who did valuable voluntary work.

One of the sketches shows this red cross pendant. The diamond drop at the bottom is, however, missing. It may be a later addition. Ulla Tillander-Godenhielm K. Snowman, Fabergé: Lost and Found, (1993), p. 163. The ledgers are today in the collection of Wartski in London. 1

On the very last page (dated March 20, 1915) of the ledgers of the workshop of Fabergé’s head jeweler, Albert Holmström, several of these jewels are illustrated. 1 The original design from the ledgers is reproduced below. Original design for the ice pendant with red cross from the design books of Fabergé workmaster Albert Holmström. Courtesy of Wartski, London.

T H E C OL L E C T ION OF R ICH A R D H. DR I E H AUS , CH IC AG O

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49 SEDAN CHAIR Fabergé, St. Petersburg 1899–1903 Workmaster Mikhail Perkhin Scratched inventory number 2707 Gold, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl, enamel H. 3 ½ in. LITER ATURE

G. von Habsburg, A. von Solodkoff, 1979, Fabergé: Court Jeweler to the Tsars, New York, 1979, color plate 89/90. Fabergé: Imperial Jeweler, State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 1993–1994, no. 253. Elsebeth Welander-Berggren, Carl Fabergé: Goldsmith to the Tsar, Stockholm, 1997, no. 150. U. Tillander-Godenhielm; M. Engman; R. Niskanen; et al, Fabergé: loistavaa kultasepäntaidetta, Lahti, Finland, 1997. G. von Habsburg, Fabergé: Imperial Craftsman and His World, London, 2000, p. 187, no. 432. M. Saloniemi, U. Tillander-Godenhielm, T. Boettger, The Era of Fabergé, Tampere, Finland, 2006. U. Tillander-Godenhielm, Fabergé: ja hänen suomalaiset mestarinsa, Helsinki, 2008, pp. 188–189. U. Tillander-Godenhielm, Fabergén suomalaiset mestarit, Helsinki, 2011, pp. 82–83.

This sedan chair was reputedly in the collection of the Neuscheller family of St. Petersburg, one of Fabergé’s foremost customers. The Neuscheller family was in business in the Russian capital since the mid-nineteenth century. In 1860, they established the Russian-American Rubber Company. Known in Russia for its galoshes, the company eventually became the world’s largest rubber company. This sedan chair, which can be categorized among the pieces of miniature furniture produced by the f irm, is one of the rarest types of object produced by Fabergé. It closely resembles

another sedan chair, formerly in the Forbes Magazine Collection and the collections of J.P. Morgan and Lansdell Christie, which is now in the Sandoz Collection in Switzerland. Another Fabergé sedan chair of different form is preserved in the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg. Other notable examples of miniature furniture by Fabergé include a Louis XVI style table and a Louis XV style desk, preserved in the Royal Collection; a bidet, formerly in the India Early Minshall Collection and now preserved in the Cleveland Museum of Art; and a grand piano in the Sandoz Collection in Switzerland.

EXHIBITED

Helsinki, Fabergé and his Contemporaries, The Museum of Applied Arts, 1980. St. Petersburg, Paris, London, Fabergé: Imperial Jeweler, State Hermitage Museum, St.Petersburg, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 1993–1994, no. 253. Stockholm, Carl Fabergé: Goldsmith to the Tsar, Nationalmuseum, June 6–October 19, 1997, no. 150. Lahti, Fabergé: loistavaa kultasepäntaidetta, 1997. Tampere, The Era of Fabergé, Museums in Finland and Moscow Kremlin Museum, June 17–October 1, 2006. Shanghai, Christie’s, October 2014.

P R I VAT E C OL L E C T ION, F I N L A N D

ANOTHER VIEW

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Unknown Fabergé  

An excerpt of the catalogue for the upcoming exhibition at: The Museum of Russian Art, Minneapolis, MN. October 6, 2016 to February 26, 201...

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