Page 1


Advertisement


Purple Heart Magazine

©

®

Of cial Publication of the Military Order of the Purple Heart of the U.S.A., Inc.

TABLE OF CONTENTS November / December 2008 Operation Denali 2009 American Lake Veterans Golf Course

8

14

Constitutional Law

18

J.J.: We Remember

24

Roger Joseph Dion Sr Honored 28

6 FROM THE HEART. . . . . . . . . 31 LETTERS TO EDITOR . . . . . .

Medal of Honor Society National Convention 30

Acceptance of advertising contained herein does not imply endorsement nor attest to the ef cacy of advertis ed products by the Military Order of the Purple Heart or any of its members or staff.

OFFICERS CALL National Commander . . . . . . . 44

47 47 BOOK REVIEWS . . . . . . . . . . . 50 DEPT. COMMANDERS LIST 53 VETERANS AFFAIRS 54 LADIES AUXILIARY . . . . . . . . 56 TAPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 62 Change of Address Form. . . . . 7 National Chaplain

National Commander’s Action Plan 45 Annual Membership Conversion to Life Membership 49

2008 - 2009

Year of the Volunteer MOPH VISION STATEMENT “MOPH is to undertake a ProActive Representation in all forums of public opinion that will consistently seek to improve the status and stature of its Veteran Members, their dependents, families and survivors.”

THE COVER

T

his story spells out details of a planned mission by four brave warriors who were seriously wounded in the Global War on Terror to overcome their devastating combat injuries by successfully summiting the 20,320 foot Mt. Denali (Mt. McKinley), the North American continent’s tallest peak. The mission ts in with the Military Order of the Purple Heart’s legislative efforts that, hopefully, will enable seriously wounded military members to be retained on active duty in limited duty billets where qualied. Story on page 8.)

Are you in the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor? If you are a Purple Heart recipient or you know someone whose memory should be preserved in the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, let us know. Consider sharing your story, whether on paper, through photographs and personal mementos, or videotaped interviews. For more information contact:

The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor P.O. Box 207 Vails Gate, NY 12584 Phone: (845) 561-1765 Fax: (845) 561-6577 www.thepurpleheart.com

It’s not for you—it’s for the generations that follow. You become a part of America’s history in a tradition that began with General George Washington during the American Revolution.


Purple Heart

®

Magazine ©

ISSN: 0279-0653

VOLUME LXXIII, NO. 6 NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2008 Of cial Publication of the MILITARY ORDER OF THE PURPLE HEART OF THE U.S.A., Inc. Chartered by Act of Congress

Cyril L. Kammeier, Editor

Cathy John, Advertising Manager

cykamm@verizon.net

cathy.john@jspublications.com

T

he Military Order of the Purple Heart of the U.S.A., Inc. (MOPH) is comprised of combat-wounded veterans who have been awarded the Purple Heart Medal by the Government of the United States. Purple Heart Magazine Military Order of the Purple Heart of the U.S.A., Inc ., a Congressionally chartered national veterans organization. Copyright 2008 by Military Order of the Purple Heart, Inc. All rights reserved. The cost of subscription to Purple Heart Magazine is included in the annual dues paid by members. Rates for non-members in the United States and its possessions are $12 per year (6 issues) or $3 per single issue; in other countries, $22 per year, which includes postage. Published bi-monthly. SUBSCRIPTIONS, CHANGE OFADDRESS, REPORT OF MEMBER’S DEATH: Contact MOPH National Headquarters at 5413-B Backlick Road, Springeld, VA 22151; Phone 703-642-5360; Fax 703-642-1841; Email: memberships@purpleheart.org ADVERTISERS: Contact Advertising Manager, J&S Publications, 8220 Hilton Rd., Gathersburg, MD 20882 • 301-482-0720 cathy.john@JSPublications.com. CORRESPONDENCE: Address all correspondence regarding editorial content and submit all materials for publication or reprint authorization, to Cy Kammeier, Editor, Purple Heart Magazine, P.O. Box 1577, Inwood, WV 25428-1577; Phone 571-218-5235; Fax: 707-897-2637; Email: cykamm@verizon.net. Include self-addressed envelope with return postage for material to be returned. POSTMASTER: Please send change of address information to: Purple Heart Magazine 22151. Postage for periodical mailing of Purple Heart Magazine

2008 - 2009 NATIONAL OFFICER LISTING

lasd.ret1@yahoo.com

kenusmc1@yahoo.com

jroy@vw-du.net

98584-9245 : (360) 432-8195 jim.ginny@wildblue.net

Nixa, MO 65714-8784 : (417) 724-1095 Cell: (417)860-6372 cjones0311@yahoo.com

: (508) 754-2919 (774) 253-9643 se mper jg@ch arter.n et

ken.lee1@va.gov

22151-3960 : (703) 642-5360 : (703) 642-1841 jleonard@purpleheart.org

fvanhoy@purpleheart.org

chiefusa2000@yahoo.co m

: (304) 229-7445 : (571-218-5235 : (707) 897-2637 cykamm@verizon.ne t

Ron Siebels (Elaine) 1945 N. Salem Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-5180 Res: (907) 562-4254 ronakph@gci.net

(256) 891-0592 : (2 56) 89 1-05 92 (cal l rst) dplusk@aol.com

55443-1736 : (763) 424-4055 : (651) 227-4456 : (651) 290-0624 moph@qwest.net

MOPH SERVICE FOUNDATION

: (703) 256-6139 : (703) 256-6142 gbresser@purpleheart foundation.org

22151 : (202) 550-2491 : (703) 536-1046 goberh@aol.com purpleheartdad@peoplepc.com

: (703) 354-2140 : (703) 642-2054

hallo6@aol.com 210-822-4041

fjeffery@aol.com

bish op@w inrst.com HEADQUARTERS STAFF jjwjr@bellsouth.net , VA 22151-3960 : (703) 642-5360 : (703) 642-2054 or 1841

73105-64422214 : (405) 842-1971 : (405) 842-1972 lingi75w@earthlink.net

caphookvmo@sbcglobal.net

jcasti@ec.rr.com

torres1144@aol.com cnottage@purpleheart.org

(253) 582-7589 chic47@aol.com

jbeene@purpleheart.org

dr_dale@hawaii.rr.com wallotd@aol.com nicholsdon@sbcglobal.net

14811 S

: (703) 256-6139 : (703) 256-6142 gbresser@purpleheartfound ation.org (See page 52 for Service Foundation Listing)

wthichangthong@ purpleheart.org

cwalker7@satx.rr.co m smckeown@purpleheart.org

mophregivcdr@aol.com modan5776@aol.com

pidi1955@yahoo.com jpereyra@purpleheart.org

mophinspector@aol.com cnkokeefe@msn.com

4

atlsam@aol.com

(See page 62 for Ladies’ Auxiliary Listing)

mophwi96@aol.com

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


MISSION STATEMENT

O O MOPH CALENDAR O O NATIONAL CONVENTIONS 2009 – Rogers/Springdale, AR – Aug 11 - 15 2010 – Orlando, FL – August 10 - 14 2011 – St. Paul, MN – August 9 - 13

he mission of

T

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR How long does it take?

S

ome years ago, when I was national Chaplain, there was a serious discussion on whether or not some who died while and as a POW should be awarded a Purple Heart. The then existing regulation did not permit such awarding. Prior to the convention, I had a very heartfelt conversation with the Commander of Ex Prisoners of War organization. His concept was that the POW decedent should be awarded a Purple Heart. And memory serves that there was a letter in the Purple Heart magazine on the same subject. I presented their pleas and mine in the memorial address I had that year. Prior to the address, the national body had voted to go along with existing regulations. I was roundly chastised by the National Commander and other head end types for going against the membership and the regulation. Evidently (my ego at work) the concepts of the Ex-POWs and myself were heard in the Hallowed Halls of Congress. The award can now be made. It will be tough on the next of kin. It will revive memories long latent. Yet, it will ll the void as many questioned where was the notation of the PH in the DD214. In that there is a connection between here and Heaven, the Ex-POWs will know that their wishes are now in compliance. Some seeds take a little longer to sprout than others. Pro Deo et Patria, Padre Francis Jeffery Editor: Like good wine ... 6

the Military Order of the Purple Heart is to foster an environment of goodwill and camaraderie among Combat Wounded Veterans, promote Patriotism, support necessary legislative initiatives, and most importantly, provide service to all veterans and their families.O

REGION MEETINGS Month of October CHAPTER ELECTIONS Month of April DEPARTMENT CONVENTIONS / ELECTIONS Between May 1 - June 30 MARCH ON THE HILL March 2009 Publication Committee & Finance Committee Meetings August 2008 and March 2009 NATIONAL COMMANDER / PRESIDENT, LADIES’ AUXILIARY / NAT’L EXECUTIVE CMTE. MTG. & TESTIMONIAL DINNER TBD 2009 MEMORIAL DAY May 31, 2009 KOREAN ARMISTICE 56th ANNIVERSARY July 27, 2009 NATIONAL PURPLE HEART DAY AUGUST 7, 2009 ARTICLES & REPORTS FOR PURPLE HEART MAGAZINE 1st day of even months: Feb., Apr., June, Aug., Oct., & Dec. Distributed each odd month of the year: Jan., Mar., May, July, Sep., & Nov.

TOP RECRUITER HONOR ROLL MEMBERSHIP YEAR 2008 - 2009 Name

RECRUITED BY INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS* Chapter Dept. No. Recruited

Harry C “Kip” Monroe Jr 0717 FL 11 Stephen H Cobb 0353 VA 10 Colin H Carter 0628 MN 8 Barry D Gasdek 0707 WY 7 Harry H Clark Jr 0992 PA 5 William M Ebersbach 0636 NC 5 Daniel T Finn 0575 IL 5 Joseph R. Hems, PNC 0181 NJ 5 Luis Rivera 0083 CA 5 Dennis A Roy 5354 WY 5 RECRUITED BY NATIONAL SERVICE OFFICERS Mike Presslitz PA 10 Dave Srock MN 10 William H. Jones PA 6 Ray Peltier MI 4 Rodney Stowers CA 3 Dan Ashcraft MI 2 Corinne Hogg CO 2

NEW CHAPTERS Region IV Flagler County Flagler Beach, Fl 9/23/2008 — Organized by Felix Garcia III Region IV Cpl. Matthew Vincent Dillon Memorial Aiken, SC 9/11/2008 — Organized by Clarence Palmer Region IV Greenville and Simpsonville Greenville, SC 9/211/2008 — Organized by Billy Rodgers

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


REGION COMMANDERS/AUXILIARY PRESIDENTS 2008-2009 Joeseph Genduso Worcester, MA Region I CT, DE, MD, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA, & VT Elizabeth (Betsy) Robins Milton, PA Region I, Auxiliary

William Hutton Thousand Oaks, CA Region VI AZ, CA, HI, NV, UT & GUAM

Ellen Bishop Sacramento, CA Region VI, Auxiliary

David Bowman Westeld, IN Region II IA, IL, IN, KY, MN, MI, MO, NE, OH, WI, & WV Barbara Cherone New Berlin, WI Region II, Auxiliary Bruce McKenty Lakewood, WA Region III AK, ID, MT, ND, OR, SD, WA & WY

Doris Monson Camas, WA Region III, Auxiliary Bruce McIver Tallahassee, FL Region IV AL, FL, GA, MS, NC, PR, SC & TN EdithShown Cedar Hill, TN Region IV, Auxiliary Ken O’Keefe Albuquerque, NM Region V AR, CO, KS, LA, NM, OK & TX Elaine Rey Austin, TX Region V, Auxiliary November / December 2008

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

Mail, phone or email your change of address to:

MOPH 5413-B Backlick Rd. Email: info@purpleheart.org 1-888-668-1656 Fax: 703-642-1841

Name: _____________________________ Member #: __________________________ Old Address: _________________________ ____________________________________ New Address: _________________________ ____________________________________ Email: _______________________________ Phone: ______________________________

By taking the time to notify us of your change of address (preferably by email) when it occurs, you save your organization the cost of receiving the Postmaster’ s Notication of Patron’ s Change of Address at 70¢ each. Purple Heart Magazine

7


O

O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

operation denali 2009

By Major Marc F. Hoffmeister, U.S. Army Team Leader, Operation Denali

I

was wounded in April 2007 in a roadside bomb attack in Al Hillah, Iraq while serving with the 4th Brigade 25th Infantry Division (Airborne) from Fort Richardson, AK. I sustained severe damage to my left arm, side and head. As a result, I have mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), acute stress disorder, and the titanium in my body that now brings me one step closer to being ‘the bionic man’ but, unfortunately, without the Herculean benets. I have extensive nerve damage and limited use of my hand and arm. No worries though—it is manageable and I’m still around to grow old with my loving wife and family. I work hard to keep my injuries hidden from the casual observer. As an avid outdoorsman and endurance athlete, my wounds have redened many things in my life, but they haven’ t changed who I am or what I dream to achieve. The reason I write this article today is not for sympathy or in pursuit of any acknowledgement of sacrice. The reason is actually completely opposite. People are severely injured every day—disabled in accidents, on the job, on the highway, you name it. But combat wounded Soldiers, unlike the general population, receive honors, medals and the thanks of our Nation. Everyone else is simply expected to move on and deal with it. I have been personally overwhelmed 8

by the recognition I’ve received from this community for something that, to me, is a normal and acceptable job risk. I don’t think anyone joins my line of work or goes into combat actually thinking it’s a safe occupation. Through my efforts, We hope to inspire others with the story of several brave men, our recovery, and our goals for the future. We hope our aspirations will motivate others with similar obstacles, combat wounded or otherwise, to aggressively pursue their dreams. The mission of Operation Denali is to enable four warriors wounded in the Global War on Terror to overcome their devastating combat injuries and successfully summit 20,320 foot Denali, the highest mountain in North America. The climb symbolizes the strength of our Nation and those who defend it. We live in a very goal oriented society. We in the military tend to be even more so. Most successful Soldiers are Type A, task driven, and measure progress through very dened metrics. When I speak with people about Operation Denali, everyone immediately denes success as all of us achieving the summit. While the summit is our objective (yes, I am goal oriented), our mission is truly about the journey. This journey will focus us, dene us, and drive us to go

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

beyond what we believe we are capable of. This is what recovery is about and it is what I envisioned when I began Operation Denali. When I began recruiting team members, I wasn’t looking for hardened mountaineers. I was looking for warriors in need of a mission of rediscovery. Soldiers who had a desire to push themselves further than others expectations but no avenue by which to achieve it. I not only found them among the ranks of our wounded service members, I was overwhelmed by the volunteers, all with impressive stories of heroism and a re inside them yearning to be let out. Selecting the nal team was not an easy process. I’ d like to take a moment to tell you a little about each of the warriors I will climb with next year.

in arm prosthetics. That’s why anytime the team has to gure out something technical, Jon gets the job. As you would espect of an energetic, good Marine, Jon managed to break his prosthetic several times during the time we’ve spent training up around Denali. With a little ingenuity, we rebuilt it every time. Climbing Denali should be an excellent proving ground for his own prosthetics. Jon says that the climb won’t make getting dressed, eating, or anything else any easier, but it’s his hope is that it will make any challenge seem possible, and less of a chore to undertake.

The rst is Specialist Dave Shebib who by all rights should not be alive today. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion of the 40th Cavalry Regiment from Fort Richardson, AK. He was in Iraq for only two months when in December 2006 an improvised explosive device detonated beneath him during a foot patrol. He suffered a severed carotid artery and a host of other injuries. During medevac, he survived a stroke which should have paralyzed the left side of his body. Instead, he’ll be climbing Denali with me in June 2009. Pins hold his knee together and he has to hide the scars of his face from exposure to sunlight, but Dave still considers himself lucky. Two of his friends in the lower right picture of the accompanying photo did not make it home at all. Jon Kuniholm, a former Captain in the Marine Corps, lost his right arm in an ambush in Iraq on New Year’s Day, 2005. Before his injuries, he was an engineer, spending his free time with family, long distance running, and piloting an airplane. Following the loss of his arm, the most basic of things became a challenge: writing his name, putting on a pair of pants in the morning, tying his shoes, cutting a steak. After putting up a ceiling fan that Spring with his 5 year old son, Sam, he realized that as long as he was patient enough, he could do whatever he wanted. Realizing the deciencies in arm prostheses, he now works as an engineer on the DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009 program, and has started a non-prot called The Shared Design Alliance Open Prosthetics Project to address the lack of innovation 10

Next is Matt Nyman. Matt is a consummate warrior, currently assigned to Special Operations Command. In 2005, he was on a little bird helicopter in Iraq when it crashed. He was tossed into the rotor, cutting off his right leg below the knee, crushing his left foot, and causing a compound femur fracture, and collapsed lungs. Matt says that it has always been his dream to climb a big mountain. Since he got hurt, it just made him want to do it even more to prove to himself that he could overcome anything. We bring Matt along becomes if someone falls in a crevasse and we have to make an expedient snow anchor, we can always just bury his leg. (Okay, so that was a bit of dark humor, but trust me, he suggested it!) Matt is as tough as they come. All his training and experience in Special Operations translates pretty easily to the rigors of the mountain. I’ve watched

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Operation Denali 2009 he physical struggle to survive and overcome visible combat wounds is obvious to the casual observer, but it is the battle of rediscovery that is the longest, most hard fought struggle a Wounded Warrior must face. There is an insidious threat, buried in the soul of every warrior who has left a part of himself upon the eld of battle. To fall prey to this threat is to become the greatest casualty …he who forgets himself—what he once was and what he can still be. To be this casualty is to give up the ght, to wallow in your condition with no trace of hope, no recognition of what is still possible. We will not be that casualty!

T

him climb things on a prosthetic leg that most people won’t even attempt with four limbs. Oh yeah, and nally it’ s me. I’m the guy on the blame line for this whole Denali plan. After months of hospitalization, surgeries, and the constant pain of therapy, I admit, I allowed my wounds to convince me, for a brief moment, that my dreams were gone, but not anymore. I will climb Denali to remember who I am and for the Wounded Warrior’s like me, to shrug off the limits of perception formed within the scars of our wounds. If my ght can be an inspiration to another Warrior, then I don’t want it to be a secret. And when I summit, I will have these accompanying likeminded Warriors at my side because I know that I am not alone in this common dream. O Denali (The High One) is the Native (Athabascan) American word for North America's highest peak, Mount McKinley, in the mountain chain called the Alaska Range. Denali was renamed Mount McKinley for William McKinley, a nominee for president, by the Princeton graduate and gold prospector, William Dickey. Dickey was one of the hundreds of prospectors seeking gold in the 1896 Cook Inlet stampede. He had written an article for the New York Sun where he described the mountain as the highest in North America at over 20,000 feet.

Expenses:

Event

Cost/climber

Mountaineering Course Fee

$2,500

Course Equipment Rentals

$650

Denali Climb Guide Service Fee

$5,300

Denali Climb Equipment Rentals

$1,050

Personal Equipment Requirements $2,500 Air Fare to Alaska x 2 (est)(3 climbers only) $2,000 Es mated expense per climber Total Team expense (see note):

$14,000 $74,850

The team consists of 6 total climbers: 4 wounded warriors and 2 team mentors to assist with wound limitations and care (one wounded warrior spouse and one EMT) Three require travel from lower 48, three are from Alaska. Only ve will attend the mountaineering course. All donations/grants are fully tax deductible and processed by the Veterans Fund of the United States, a non-prot veterans service organization with an IRS determination of 501 (c) (3) and ID #23-287794. Any funds not used to nance the climb will be contributed to the Wounded Warrior Project and the Veterans Coalition to enable their continued support of Warriors in need. Donations/grants may be directed to the below address: The Veterans Fund of the United States (or VFUS) 805 So. Township Boulevard Pittston, PA 18640-3327 570-603-9740 Further details available online at: http://www.theveteranscoalition.org/operation_denali/ Marc Hoffmeister: marc.hoffmeister@us.army.mil O

Several of the Denali climbers reect their optimism in a patriotic pose, (composite at left) along with the memorial located at Ft. Richardson, AK. The inscription is from President Abraham Lincoln’s letter of 1864 to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, a widow who lost ve sons during the Civil War. It states: I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrice upon the altar of freedom.”Appropiately added to the inscription is: “Freedom is Not Free.” 12

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

American Lake Veterans Golf Course By Bruce McKenty

I

’m sure that all of you Purple Heart recipients out there think that an article about a golf course, in this maga-

zine, is ludicrous. Let me tell you about a special golf course and what a dedicated group of volunteers does for combat wounded veterans and disabled veterans. Sit back and read. The American Lake Veterans Golf Course, located in Lakewood, Washington, on the grounds of the American Lake VA Medical Center, was built and maintained by the Veterans Administration in the early 1960’s. The mission of this golf course was to give all veterans an affordable golf course and to provide disabled veterans with a golf course that they can enjoy and use for rehabilitation. But in 1995 the VA stopped funding golf courses. That same year, a small group of veterans made a proposal to take over the golf course, maintain it, and keep it going for our veterans. The golf course limped along for about nine years. The turning point was in 2004, when the group called The Friends of the American Lake Veterans Golf Course, referred to simply as The Friends, applied and received IRS 501(c)(3) status and began raising funds to rehabilitate the golf course. They receive their funding from donations, grant requests, and on-going fund raisers. The Friends are now credited with funding all major improvements to the course. Their rst project was funding a new watering system that began to revive the course. They then began to plan and seek funding for a covered activity center for lunches and awards ceremonies after tournaments, a requirement 14

for this rainy Northwest environment, a covered driving range for practice, golf carts, new tee boxes, renovated sand traps, a three-hole course for handicapped golfers, and Solo Rider golf carts for use by mobility-impaired golfers. The course now has nine of the Solo Rider carts (more than any other golf course in the nation), four of them purchased by the MOPH Service Foundation in May 2008. These Solo Rider golf carts are designed to drive on all of the surfaces of a golf course to include tee boxes, sand traps and putting greens. This course is specically designed and has been modied to accommodate these golf carts and their disabled golfers. The golf course is operated and maintained by approximately 150 volunteers, many of them Purple Heart recipients from WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. These volunteers perform all the tasks necessary to run the course including

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

cutting grass and mowing greens at 6 a.m. every morning. The average age of the grounds crews is 79 and most are WWII veterans. Other volunteer positions include golf course manager, assistant manager, operations and maintenance manager, check-in counter personnel, golf marshals, golf instructors, range ball crew, cooks, and volunteers to assist with the many activities for disabled veterans that the course provides. Every Monday they conduct a golf clinic for wounded warriors and other handicapped and disabled veterans and serve them a barbeque lunch. The primary participants of this clinic are wounded warriors from the Warrior Transition Battalion, the veterans from our two closest State Veterans’ Homes in Orting and Retsil, and the local in-patients at the VA Hospital. Receipts from green fees, cart rentals, and range ball sales allow the course to remain open almost all year round except for a brief two-week period over the end-ofyear holidays. Throughout the year the golf course hosts a variety of tournaments, ranging from fundraisers for the new projects to charity tournaments for our current wounded warriors. The golf course pays for everything to include prizes, green fees, cart rentals and feeding participants breakfast and lunch. Each May the golf course hosts a tournament for the Warrior Transition Battalion at Fort Lewis. This year we hosted 144 golfers in the tournament and over 600 participants in other related activities. In June, Chapter 407 of the Military Order of the Purple Heart held its second annual fundraising tournament in conjunction with the Department of Washington Annual Convention. The MOPH Tournament this year made over $6,000—all of which will benet our veterans in the State Veterans’ Homes in Orting and Retsil. The highlight of the year comes in September with the 9-11 Tournament. Last year the 9-11 Tournament raised over $35,000 which was used to complete the covered driving range. A high point during the year is the Champions Tour Golf Clinic held in conjunction with the Boeing Classic Golf Tournament at Snoqualmie Ridge, WA. Five of the Champions Tour players, including Jim Thorpe, Dana Quigley, Ed Dougherty (a Vietnam veteran), Lonnie Watkins, and Alan Doyle come and give a two-hour clinic and hand out autographed hats, shirts, and balls to approximately 200 veterans in attendance. They put on a great show every year. Other highlights are the tournaments the golf course conducts for disabled golfers. The course holds special tournaments for physically disabled golfers, blind rehab golfers, and wounded warriors from OIF and OEF. The golf course is currently seeking funding for a new Learning and Rehabilitation Center (LRC) which we refer to locally as our clubhouse (the old one, not handicap ac16

O

O

O

O

In rainy Washington, a covered driving range was considered an important investment in the rehabilitation of the American Lake Veterans Golf Course. cessible, was about 700 sq. ft. and has been demolished), and an additional nine holes to be added to the golf course. The existing nine-hole course is becoming inundated with disabled veterans from OIF and OEF and needs a back nine to support the population. We are mounting a campaign to solicit funding for the LRC (club house) and the additional holes from all veterans’ organizations, especially the four largest: the VFW, American Legion, DAV, and AMVETS. These organizations may be embarrassed if they will not fund this new Learning and Rehabilitation Center and the additional nine holes. Hole sponsors is another project we’re working on. Golf course hole sponsors receive a redwood sign and other amenities at the tee box. Local Chapter 407 recently sponsored the rst hole and dedicated it as the “ Purple Heart”hole on Purple Heart Day, August 7, 2008. The third hole, our signature hole, will be sponsored by the Legion of Valor and will be named the “Medal of Honor” hole. We are currently seeking other veterans’ organizations to sponsor the other holes, each one to be named after a prestigious military medal. We hope to have the entire original nine holes sponsored by early 2009. If you are a member of any other veterans’ organization, please urge your leadership, national, department and chapter to contact Bruce McKenty at e-mail chic47@aol.com. or cell phone 253 209-3166 to learn how to make a donation or sponsor a hole. The latest word is that AMVETS, Department of Washington, has just offered $5,000 to sponsor a hole. Negotiations are currently underway to determine which hole and what medal they will sponsor. If you are ever in the Pacic Northwest, please make an effort to visit the American Lake Veterans Golf Course and see this “crown jewel” for yourself. You’ll see why it recently won the American Hospital Association “Outstanding Volunteer Organization of the Year” award because of the efforts of and for veterans. O

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

Constitutional Law By Gene Owens

T

he United States Constitution was signed into law on September 17, 1787, this date has been forever enshrined in Article VII of the U.S. Constitution. By an act of Congress the week of September 17 is now National Constitutional Week; however, as veterans we should study our Constitution every day of our lives and give thanks to the greatest, freedom and liberty document in man’s history. It is our agreement upon the U.S. Constitution that truly makes all of us Americans. When you study the U.S. Constitution you’re actually studying Constitutional Law. Every study of Basic American Civics must begin with the fact that America is a Republic. The truth of this is found in Article IV Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution which states: “The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion. . .” This article is not referring to any party, it’s referring to the word republic. REPUBLIC versus DEMOCRACY: There is no doubt that America is a Republic, with rule by Constitutional Law. America has never been a democracy, with rule by majority. 1) Article IV Section 4 guarantees that every State in this Union shall be a Republic. 2) The word democracy cannot be found in the Constitution or in any State Constitution. 3) The California ag reads: CALIFORNIA REPUBLIC. 4) When We, the People, recite our pledge we say: “and to the republic for which it stands.” 5) The word republic comes from the Latin words res publica; res meaning thing and publica meaning public; the public thing is the law and in our nation this means Constitutional Law. 6) China calls itself The Peoples Republic of China. However, remember that republic means to rule by law. In China their rule of law comes from the Communist Party. 7) When Benjamin Franklin walked out of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 he was asked by a Mrs. Powell of Philadelphia, “Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?” With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin replied, “A Republic, if you can keep it.” This exchange was recorded by Constitutional signer James McHenry in a diary entry that was later reproduced in the 1906 American Historical Review. 8) James Madison, who is rightly known as the “Father of the Constitution,” wrote in The Federalist, No. 10: “... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security, or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they are violent in their deaths.” 18

Samuel Adams, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, stated: “There was never a democracy that did not commit suicide.” • During his inaugural address, on April 30, 1789, President George Washington stated: I shall dedicate myself ‘To the preservation ... of the republican model of government.” 9.) Under our Republic the Founding Fathers created a mixed-form of government. 10) “An unconstitutional act is not law; it confers no rights; it imposes no duties; affords no protection; it creates no ofce; it is in legal contemplation, as inoperative as though it had never been passed.” —Norton vs. Shelby County 118 US 425 page 491.

LIVING CONSTITUTION VERSUS LEGAL CONSTITUTION: This argument is often put forth: “Since the Constitution can be amendment under Article V, it’s a living document and therefore there are no absolutes.” Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is quoted from C-SPAN: “The Constitution is not a living document, it’s a legal document.” Black’s Law Dictionary states: “Our Constitution is a rigid constitution because it has a formal amendment process.” An easy way to understand Constitutional Law is to view the Constitution as a contract. Would anyone sign a contract, if they were told: ‘This is a living contract and it’s subject to change according to future opinion.” Would you feel safe about buying a home, a car, or your veterans benets under a living contract? Of course our Constitution/contract can be amended under Article V; however, the Constitution contract stands as agreed upon until a formal amendment process has taken place. Our Constitution/contract is to be read as a document of equal distribution: meaning one clause cannot be read as if to stand alone. Article 1 Section 9 clause 3 states: “No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed.” A Bill of Attainder is a pain or punishment without benet of a trial. When someone is not allowed to exercise a right, this is a Bill of Attainder. For example: Going to war without a Congressional Declaration of War is unconstitutional. Taken taxes from the people to pay for an unconstitutional war is taxation without proper representation and this is a pain or punishment without a trial. To say there is no need for a Declaration of war because its merely a police action, like Korea, under the authority of a treaty made with the United Nations or that Congress can pass a resolution giving the president war

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

making powers is all unconstitutional. Under Article V1 all treaties and all laws must be made in pursuant of the Constitution and there is no enumerated power for Congress to abdicate their war making powers. There are no war making powers enumerated in the Constitution for the president. The president has no war making powers under Constitutional Law. The president cannot make laws by executive order and he cannot hold signing statements where he refuses to obey laws passed by Congress. The Electoral College elects a president: our chief executive ofcer who is directed by the Constitution to “ take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” The president does not automatically become “commander in chief.” The president must be called into service by Congress; if this were not true, the president would be our King. The following is from the Congressional Record of 1922: “ In their nal and deliberate judgment one of the most important features of our Constitution is that our country should be distinguished from other nations in its refusal to concentrate in one man exclusive power over foreign relations of the government and especially over issues of peace and war.” Once a contract is signed into law, or a poker game has started, under Article I Section 9 there can be no ex post facto laws. If the signers of a contract disagree, or the players of poker wish to change the rules, the game must be stopped, new agreements must be made, and then the contract or game can continue. Until a formal amendment is made by Congress our Constitution is set in stone. All of our representatives are elected to ofce; however, they all must take an Oath of Ofce to obey the Constitution/contract. When they go beyond the pale and ken of the Constitution they’re no longer our representatives acting under Constitutional Law. When studying the Constitution millions of Americans get confused because of all the lies they have heard. Millions of Americans falsely believe they have more freedom in a democracy; when, iN fact, under majority rule there are no unalienable Rights. Unalienable and inalienable both mean that which cannot be changed, not by a dictator of by majority vote. Under our Republic every individual is actually protected from the tyranny of the majority. LIBERAL VERSUS CONSERVATIVE Millions of Americans claim to be liberal or conservative; however, what are they actually saying? They’re saying: “I am an American liberal,” or “I am an American conservative.” If a liberal or a conservative goes beyond the pale and ken of Constitutional Law they’re no longer an American liberal or an American conservative. To put this in simple terms, suppose you’re playing a game of poker. A few American liberals and a few American conservatives set down to a game of poker. The rules 20

O

O

O

O

of poker are set before the play begins (remember under Constitutional Law there can be no Bill of Attainder or ex post facto laws). The liberal and the conservative players agree to the rules. Now a liberal may bet a little too high and the conservative may tend to hang on to his money, however, they both stay with the rule of law—the rules of poker. Suppose someone stated: ‘The rules of poker are living rules and I say two-of-a-kind is higher than three-of-kind.” The players stop, check the written rule of law and nd that two-of-a-kind is not higher than three-of-a-kind. What should the players do? Should they agree with the protester or with the rules of poker? Suppose they decide to follow the rules of poker and still the protester continues. In fact the protester says: ‘This game is under a democracy and I want to vote that two-of-kind is higher than three-of-a-kind.” The players check the rules of poker again and nd that the rules are actually under a Republic. They nd that the powers to make rules for poker has been given to a Gaming Commission. They nd that under Article V the rules of poker can only be amended by the Gaming Commission. The game is stopped. They discover that under the 1st amendment any player has a right to le a “ redress of grievances;” however players have no amendment powers. Black’ s Law Dictionary denes our Constitution as a rigid Constitution because under Article V we have a formal amendment process. To add or subtract a single word in the Constitution, without a formal amendment by Congress, is an illegal amendment and it is null and void. The U.S. Constitution is a document of perfect equipoise, meaning one of perfect distribution; not one clause can be read as if to stand alone. Article I Section 1: “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress. . .” Article I Section 9: “No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed.” Article IV Section 4: Every State shall be a Republic, with rule by Constitutional Law. Now put this all together! Congress can only make laws that are “herein granted.” Congress cannot pass any “ex post facto laws” and suddenly make two-of-a-kind higher than three-of-a-kind. Congress cannot give a pain or punishment, which is a “bill of attainder,” without a trial by jury. Under Article IV Section 4 Congress must obey the rule of law. Think about the rules of poker. The power to make rules for poker was given to a Gaming Commission (their Congress). The people can either obey the rules of poker or le a “redress of grievances” against the Gaming Commission. Until Congress, or the Gaming Commission, changes the rules, all players must obey the rule of law. POLITICIAN VERSUS STATESMAN. The dictionary denes a politician as someone who is artful, crafty, cunning, or even deceitful. A Statesman is dened as someone who is well versed in their own form of government.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

why our Founders instituted a limited form of government, with a written rule of law that all American citizens must obey—a Constitutional Republic. This article is not talking politics, it’s talking statesmanship. Become a statesman by studying the Constitution. Become united Americans for freedom for standing up for freedom and liberty under our Constitutional Republic. May God bless our Republic. Democracies breed politicians because there are no unalienable rights and everything is simply up for a majority vote. Politicians get involve in the art of politics. They become crafty. In a democracy people do not want to “talk politics” because the rules simply become the stronger opinion. Republics, with a written rule of law, breed Statesmen, people who are well versed in their own form of government. Millions of Americans, who have never met, can agree upon our form of government simply by read-

ing Article IV Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution. Americans can become united under the rule of law simply by studying the U.S. Constitution. With united understanding, We, the People, can protect our Liberty. Our actual ght is not liberal against conservative; it’s limited government against total government. America was founded under the Madisonian Dilemma: self government versus total-government. Too much self-government and we would have anarchy. Too much total government and we would have tyranny. That’s

Editor’s note: Gene Owens is a Vietnam Marine veteran who takes great pride in his research and study of Constitutional issues. This is his fourth contribution to Purple Heart Magazine, which provides stimulating thought for our readers. While some of the Constitution of the United States is left to interpretation, the drafters meant for it to be what it says, and to read as it reads. Through it they provided a great gift to the American people that transcends generations and which is intended to provide us with an unintrusive, restrictive form of government “of the people, by the people, and for the people.” One of the charges in belonging to our Military Order of the Purple Heart is to maintain true allegiance to the Constitution and its laws. Gene Owens gives us cause to revisit our obligation in this regard. O 22

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


Advertisement


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

J.J.: We Remember By Gregory P. Phillips Birmingham, AL (Photos provided by the author)

ecently, I was preparing to attend my very rst 101st Airborne Division Association reunion in Reno, Nevada, and it was suggested that since I was in Nevada that I should consider visiting the grave of a soldier who had gave his all in a battle that I, along with ve others, were wounded in on May7, 1970. He, in addition to six other young men lost their lives in this battle. In the 38 plus years since, I thought of these seven everyday and can still see their faces as if it was yesterday. The soldier’s name was Lloyd Jackson and he was from Austin, Nevada. Lloyd was what I term one of the rst Americans, a Shoshone Indian and his nickname was J.J. I joined the 1st of the 506th, 101st Airborne Division in March of 1970 in the extreme northern part of what was then South Vietnam. I was a veteran of the Big Red One which had just been sent back to the states or at least the colors were sent and we soldiers were reassigned throughout the remaining divisions inVietnam. During the next few weeks I couldn’t help but notice what a good soldier Jackson was. He did everything by the book and was probably the best warrior I have ever known. He once told me that he would have been in line for a promotion to sergeant had it not been for my arrival. I certainly wasn’t a better soldier than he, I just happened to have more combat experience. When he told me this there wasn’t any jealousy in his voice. Our platoon, numbering 22 men, was attacked by a vastly larger force during the early morning hours of May7, 1970. J.J. along with the six others were killed almost immediately and never really had much of a chance of survival. The side of the perimeter they were defending was the easiest side to attack. So what I have always termed as the perfect soldier never really had a chance. I thought on this going to Austin for several days and decided that J.J. would have done this for me and it was the right thing for me to do for him. I, via e-mail, got in touch with the Austin, Nevada Chamber of Commerce and was given the location of the grave and an offer that, when I was certain of the date I would be arriving, to advise them and they would try to have a fellow veteran meet us at the cemetery. This was in April of 2008. The 101st Airborne reunion was set for August 13-17, 2008. I decided that I would go to Reno a date early, rent a car and journey to Austin on August the 13th. This was all

R

24

done and a fellow veteran from Austin, Ray Williams was in touch with me and proved to be most helpful in my quest to visit the grave. He invited Lloyd’s remaining family to visit with us at the gravesite if they desired to do so. On August 13 I along with my wife Krystal, a Vietnam veteran comrade of mine, Dick Doyle (we served in three different combat units together) and another friend of mine from California, Dr. Ralph Matkin (Ralph was awarded two Silver Stars while serving as a medic attached to the 101st in early 1970) set out at eight o’clock in the morning headed east of Reno on Highway 50 for 175 miles. Interestingly for the last 150 miles of the journey we saw nothing but highway, no service stations, no rest stops, nothing. We arrived at the cemetery after a three hour journey and were greeted by Lloyd’s sister and her daughter plus Mr. Williams and a friend of J.J.’s from high school, Justice of the Peace Joe Dory. Much to my surprise J.J.’s family never knew how he died; they only knew that he died from wounds sustained in combat. I had the opportunity to tell them what a great soldier he had been and how he had died defending our perimeter and helping save the lives of the remaining 15 members of the platoon.

Members of the 101st Airborne Division Association take time to visit the family and gravesite of fallen soldier Lloyd (J.J.) Jackson, a Shoshone Indian Warrior of Austin, NV. Jackson, was killed in Vietnam on May 7, 1970, when an overwhelming force attacked along a parameter being defended by a 22-man platoon of the 1st Battalion of the 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne Division.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

F E A T U R E

O

The VFW Post in Austin, NV, is named to honor the memory of fallen Warrior Lloyd (J.J.) Jackson, the sole member of that community killed during the Vietnam War. After this visit with the family we visited the gravesite and placed 101st Airborne Division pins on the simple white cross atop J.J.’s grave. The family didn’t realize that Lloyd had used the nickname J.J. in Vietnam until just before our visit and couldn’ t gure where he had got the nickname until we passed by Lloyd’s fathers grave. Just after his name were the letters J.J. Lloyd had taken his father’s nickname in a place where we all had gone by nicknames. Once we had paid our respects at the cemetery Mr. Williams gave us a tour of Austin and allowed us to view the V.F.W. post which was named for Lloyd. It turns out that Lloyd was the only soldier from the area that lost his life in Vietnam. We, then dined with the family and Mr. Williams at Mr. Williams’ Café in the heart of Austin. Here we learned the history of the tribe and how they make A Christian cross, name, Lloyd Wilner their livings today. Jackson, unit designation, Vietnam After lunch in and dates appear on the bronze grave Austin our group marker in an Austin, NV, cemetery. thanked the family and Mr. Ray Williams for an eventful visit and headed west to Reno. On the way back I reected on what a treat it would have been if Lloyd had lived and could have actually joined us at the 101st reunion since it was so close to his home. My point in writing this article is if you lost friends in combat and have never visited the graves or the families please try to do so while there is still time. It will warm the hearts of the family members and yours as well for remembering a fallen warrior. Currahee! (Stands Alone) O 26

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

ROGER JOSEPH DION SR. HONORED AND MEMORIALIZED AT THE PURPLE HEART TRAIL IN NEW HAMPSHIRE By Larry Pelland Contributing Writer

I

n a solemn ceremony, one of New Hampshire’s beloved sons, Roger Joseph Dion Sr., was given a place in history on July 30, 2008 by the New Hampshire Chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, on U.S. Route 4 in Northwood, New Hampshire. The sign which bears his name and the war in which he fought (Vietnam) is the last to be mounted on New Hampshire’s Purple Heart Trail. Roger Dion Sr. was born in Laconia, NH, the son of The late MSgt. Roger Joseph Dion Sr. Walter and Cecile Cote. He served with distinction and bravery during reserved man, Roger never spoke of his his 22 year career with the United military experiences. He came home States Army, retiring in the grade of during the era of the Vietnam War Master Sergeant. As a Green Beret he when many did not want to hear of volunteered for four tours in Special such things. Roger, along with his felForces during the Vietnam War. Earlier low Vietnam veterans, kept their feelin his military career he was with the ings to themselves. Today, he and all 82nd Airborne Division based at Fort those who served in Vietnam and shed Bragg, NC. their blood in the eld of combat, are Among his personal awards are four recognized along the New Hampshire Purple Hearts, four awards of the Purple Heart Trail. We should never Bronze Star, the Air Medal, Meritori- forget their great personal sacrice. ous Unit Badge (500 jumps), three The New Hampshire Chapter of the awards of the Army Commendation Military Order of the Purple Heart, the Medal with Combat “V”, two awards organization responsible for establishof the Combat Infantryman Badge, ing the trail, decided that on Route 4, a the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with smaller and very beautiful Purple Heart Palm and five awards of the Good sign, with a design unique to New Conduct Medal. Unit awards include Hampshire, would have inscribed the the Presidential Unit Citation, Vietnam name of the individual who received Campaign Medal, Vietnam Service the Purple Heart medal and the war in Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary which it was received by him. “The intent is not so much to honor Medal and the National Defense Service Medal. the individual directly, but rather for David Smith, State Representative that serviceman to perform a higher for Hillsborough District 22 and Com- calling; that being to serve as a lasting mander, Chapter #804, Military Order reminder to passing motorists, that of the Purple Heart stated, “It is very behind every Purple Heart there is tting that a man like Roger Joseph an individual who shed his blood for Dion Sr. be named on this trail. A quiet freedom. It was also necessary he be 28

Purple Heart Magazine

a citizen of New Hampshire. Visitors at this site may never have known the person named personally, but they are reminded that a wounded New Hampshire man or women served their country in time of war. It serves as a powerful witness to the greatness of our military.” Roger is survived by his three children, Roger J. Dion Jr., Daniel Dion, and Lorrie Gasses. His daughter Lorrie offered these touching words about her father. “My Dad was a very private man. He didn’t speak of his military career

Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart Ceremonial Team. (l.-r.) Gerard Dumon, Sergeant-at-Arms; David L. Smith, Commander; and Albert G. Grow, Chaplain.

Photos by Larry Pelland

very often. He loved the military and his fellow comrades in arms, and continued to follow everything about the military after his retirement. He passed away on Veterans Day, November 22, 2003. My brothers, Roger and Dan, like myself, are very proud of him and his military career as well as those who knew him. We love you and miss you very much Dad. Your spirit continues to live on within our hearts.” O November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F E A T U R E

O

O

O

O

Medal of Honor Society National Convention Maj. Robert O’Brien, U.S. Army

T

he Medal of Honor Society recently concluded its’ annual convention in Denver on September 20th. The last event was the Patriot Awards Gala Dinner, attended by numerous local dignitaries and 50 Medal of Honor recipients. The Society honored writer, comedian and economist Ben Stein, presenting the John McCrary Excellence in Journalism Award. The Society also honored A c a d e m y Aw a r d winning actor/director Clint Eastwood by presenting the Bob Hope Award for Excellence in entertainment. The recipients of the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for military valor, are quite simply the bravest of the brave. Being in their presence is an extremely humbling experience, a sentiment echoed by Mr. Stein and Mr. Eastwood. However, the recipients are the most humble men in the room. A number of recipients greeted the enlisted members of the joint color guard, thanking them for their service. This week-long event was billed as “A Celebration of Valor.” At every opportunity, they seem to focus attention away from themselves. They visited schools to educate children about the value of military service. They have visited the wounded from the Global War on Terrorism in VA hospitals. MOH recipient Brian Thacker praised Denver for the warm reception they received, stating that “it has been an incredible event, from the concert the rst night [featuring Carrie Underwood]… I’m just blown away by the kids.” When asked about the humility of the recipients, he responded that “It’s an ‘us’ award, not a ‘me’ award.” MOH Recipient Gary Weitzel summed up what motivated him during combat this way “[You act]…with a servants’ heart of love for others more than oneself.” Recipient Gary Beikirch added, “To really live, you must almost die. The things I took away from the war affect my life every day. For me getting better was someone I could hurt with … and my faith in God.” Clint Eastwood was honored for his work positively portraying the military. The rst thing he said was, “ Like everyone here, I am humbled to be among the Medal of Honor recipients.” Mr. Eastwood portrayed a MOH recipient in his lm Heartbreak Ridge. “ It was great to portray a MOH recipient because I got to wear that ribbon for nine weeks. … There is something about the feeling of wearing that ribbon, because [the recipients] have given so much.. It’s inspiring. [You should] realize that here’s a guy that 30

Leonard B. and Mrs. Keller (center) are greeted by two young admirers during their National Convention Grand Banquet. served in the US military; but only at the swimming pool at Fort Ord. … You think about the current generation, until a real emergency comes, people are very blasé [about their sacrices]. The elds of stone of Normandy and Arlington never fail to bring tears to one’s eyes, and I am no exception.” He added his support for the current generation of warriors saying “I’ll be out there supporting whatever we can do in the rear lines.” Ben Stein was also honored for his patriotism and support of the military. He began “People say to me you live in Malibu, near all the stars…[I tell them] No! All the real stars are wearing BDUs and body armor in Mosul, Kirkuk… Baghdad!” When asked recently in a C-SPAN interview ‘Who was the most impressive person you ever met?’ , he responded “Anyone in Walter Reed Army Hospital. Every trip to Washington, I make it a point to visit Ward 58 and 59, where the men and women who were injured in Iraq and Afghanistan are. They are so brave, you cannot believe it, especially Specialist Chris Levy, who had his legs blown off. He was riding down a street in Baghdad when an Iranian made Explosively Formed Projectile struck his HMMWV. He said I am not going to give up. I am going to stay in the Army and teach others to use prostheses. These are stars. These are the heroes!” He went onto recount his visit to Arlington National Cemetery, where, in section 62 the veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are laid to rest. Teddy bears and children’s books adorn the graves, and the ground is still soft. “I looked over toward the Capitol and see the ags ying. There really is

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O F E A T U R E O an equation here. Those ags ... our freedom … our prosperity … paid for by these men [in military cemeteries], … the guys in Walter Reed paid for this ... these men and their families paid for this. Do not forget that the military wife is the backbone of the United States of America.” This sentiment was repeated by all the speakers and the recipients. These men, MOH recipients, the Nation’s Finest Heroes, disagree when called a “national treasure.” They honor the sacrices of the current warriors who have made so many sacrices in the Global War on Terrorism. They highlight the accomplishments of today’s Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines. I spoke to one of the many volunteers at the convention who worked to ensure the success of the event. He is a Vietnam veteran and a hero in his own right. He was a helicopter crew chief and has several awards for valor including a Soldier’s Medal. He took time off from work to volunteer in support of the MOH convention. He stated, “The convention went fantastic! The recipients are all so incredibly humble. They really are for the kids and the younger generation.” This nation has heroes, the living MOH recipients, the returning warriors, and the military spouses. They do not make 20 million dollars a year. They have paid for their hero status with blood. They have done the right thing when no one would have blamed them if they didn’t act. They did the hard, right thing, at risk of life and limb, simply because it was the right thing to do. The Medal of Honor Society has a book in bookstores now: Medal of Honor, Portraits of Valor: Beyond the Call of Duty, published by Artisan. It recounts the deeds of the living recipients. The prots support the Congressional Medal of Honor Society’s efforts. You can visit their website at www.cmhos.org. Ultimately, the convention was a tting tribute to all the recipients of the nation’s highest honor. They in turn, honored the sacrices of today’ s warriors. The chances are that there is a hero of the current conict living in your very own neighborhood. It is up to all veterans to reach out to each other. Colonel Marty Barnon, USMC (Ret.) put it best when he said, “It [this event] shows what America is all about. Too bad CNN wasn’t here to report it.” The Author Maj. Robert O’Brien, U.S. Army, Military Police Branch, is a student at the Command and General Staff College, FT Leavenworth, KS. He returned from Iraq last December where he was assigned as a Combat Advisor to a National Police Battalion. Maj. O’Brien enlisted in 1982 was commissioned in 1987 via ROTC. He served for eight years, had a break in service, served in the Army Reserve and returned to active duty status in 2006. O November / December 2008

O F R O M

T H E

H E A R T O

Here’s what Chapter 771 does three times a month. They have two ice cream parties at the Biloxi VA Medical Center. The parties are held on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Wednesdays. At 1300 they have an ice cream event featuring premium ice cream, on one of the wards for patients and staff. Immediately afterwards they proceed to one of the out patient clinics and treat the staff to an ice cream party. Needless to say, their arrival is much anticipated at the Biloxi Medical Center. (l.-r.) Patriot Tom Dempsey, Ch. #771 adjutant, Patient Eugene Friday, a U.S. Army veteran, Mary Dempsey, Unit President and Patient Avis Harteld, US Army veteran enjoying ice cream treats at a patient ice cream party.

Purple Heart Magazine

Submitted by Henry J. Cook, III, PNC

31


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

The Honorable Shelly Moore Capito, U.S. Representative (WV) with Harold Payne at the Kanawha County Courthouse in Charleston, WV. Payne was recognized for his service in World War II in a ceremony on October 10, 2008, where he received the Purple Heart for wounds he received in combat. Payne was wounded in a mortar blast and taken prisoner by the Germans in 1945, but after lost records and 60 years, he never received his Purple Heart—until Friday, October 10, 2008. Thanks to the hard work of the Payne family and members of Capito’s staff, they were able to cut through the red tape and nally honor Mr. Payne with his Purple Heart at a ceremony at the Kanawha County Courthouse. Mr. Payne served our nation with honor and now we can all be proud that he’s received the recognition he deserved.

The Patriots of Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776, Department of Florida, presented a $500 donation for patient needs on behalf of the Purple Heart Service Foundation to the VA Community-based Outpatient Clinic, Lecanto, Florida. Accepting the donation from Chapter 776 Commander J.B. Haskins is Linda Morris, Administrative Assistant Submitted by Patrio Curt Ebitz., Adjutant, Chapter 776 at the VA facility. 32

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

John Tarasuk, Chapter Commander, and Victor Miller, Finance Ofcer, Broward County, FL, Ch.#674, presented a check in the amount of $1,250 to Millicent Sucoff, Representing VAVS at the Oakland Park, VA Clinic. They also presented another check in the same amount to Bob Banebury, Executive Director of the Veterans MultiPurpose Center in Davie, FL. Tarasuk is a twice wounded veteran of the Guadalcanal Campaign and Miller was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge. Submitted by Patriot John Tarasuk

Mr. Richard Green, co-manager of the Winston Salem, NC, Wal-Mart summoned most of his employees together, about 30, for the presentation of a grant check of $1,000 for use in support of Ladies’ Auxiliary Unit #638 projects that support hospitalized and needy veterans. The check was accepted by Joe K. Clary, Commander, Ch.#638. (l-r) Richard Green, Co-Manager, Wal-Mart; Joe Clary, Commander, Ch. #638; and Judy Taylor, President, Unit #638. Wal-Mart in Winston Salem and across the country has been a consistent supporter of community service activities, and Green states it’s good for morale of the employees to know that they work for an employer that believes in giving back to the community.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O F R O M

T H E

H E A R T O

Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Ch. 1916, of Brookville, IN, celebrate the dedication of their completed memorial. The huge concrete base surrounded by brick is in the shape of a heart which lies to the front of the memorial. (See inset.) (l.-r.) Edward Ison, Robert Welhelm, Kenneth Huber, Kenneth Hertel, Virgil Tebbe, David Stutzman, Herschel Ertel, David Brooking and William Pierce attended the dedication. The bricks around the Purple Heart include the names of deceased and wounded veterans. Names of those who served in the Armed Forces are at the bottom portion. Over 850 bricks have been donated to date and they have space for more. Submitted by Patriot Virgil J. Tebbe

Chapter #10, Milltown, NJ, along with friends and family members marched in the 2008 Plaineld, NJ Annual Labor Day Parade. They handed out over 2,000 American ags to parade on lookers along the 2 ½ mile route. March music was played from the chapter’s vehicle which was decorated for the event. This the largest annual Labor Day parade in New Jersey and the crowd appreciated the ags and participation by the Purple Heart members, families and friends. Submitted by Donald J. Zolkiwsky, Adjutant

November / December 2008

Purple Heart Magazine

33


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

Felix Delgado, Chapter #792 Adjutant, and Warren Ambrose, Jr. Vice Commander, receive a $1,000 check from Rachel Ruiz, Avondale Wal-Mart SuperCenter Store Manager, Avondale, AZ, for use in support of veterans programs. Subm itted by Felix Delgado, A djut ant/ Service Of fi cer Glendale, AZ., MOPH

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

The Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter 83, heard that the Sepulveda VA Ambulatory Care Center needed a new at screen for their “Welcome Home”center for the returning veterans from Afghanistan and Iraq. Presenting the new 42” at screen TV to the VA are Luis Rivera, Vietnam Veteran, and Chapter Commander of Ch. #83 along with VAVS volunteers Frank Romero, Paul Robles and Isadore Binder on September 6, 2008, when they delivered the new TV to the Sepulveda VA Hospital in Southern California. On hand to receive the new TV is Robert Gutierrez, Special Assistant to the Director. Submitted by Patriot Luis Rivera and Larry H. Wong, MS, Volunteer Service Specialist

Let’s keep working it! We want the Purple Heart Stamp to be a Forever Stamp—a single price reflecting the current price of a First Class Postage Stamp.

34

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


Advertisement


O O O O

F R O M

T H E

H E A R T

O O O O

Attention Vietnam Veterans A survey of Vietnam veterans who have sustained a traumatic amputation during the Vietnam War began this month and is expected to gather information to help identify and examine lifelong challenges that they have experienced. The survey results should help fulll an urgent need for information regarding the Vietnam veterans’ ongoing care, as well as the care of veterans returning from the Middle East. The Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research is conducting the study. A collaborative effort between Indiana University and The Ohio State University, the Center is funded by the U.S. Department of Defense in an effort to understand the long-term health challenges that are likely to affect ve terans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as conicts that occur in the future. To date, the Center has enrolled 419 Vietnam veterans who experienced traumatic amputations and investigators are recruiting throughout the United States to nd and register more veterans in the coming months. Enrollment in the Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research project is restricted to Vietnam veteran amputees. To register for our study or for additional information visit our website at www.vietnamwaramputee.org. You can also call toll-free at (866)283-2599. Mail all inquires to Mr. Chris Robbins, Project Coordinator School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Indiana University, 1140 West Michigan Street, Coleman Hall CF 124, Indianapolis, IN 46202

The John D. Goodin Chapter 244 in Johnson City, TN, is the oldest chapter in the state started by John D. Goodin shortly after WWII. Goodin also served as National Commander 1950-51. The chapter attempts to participate in community events and make contributions to veterans and service organizations when possible. On October 21, 2008, the chapter purchased $1,000 of sod that was needed at the local National Cemetery to be used on various gravesites. The Mountain Home National Cemetery in Johnson City, TN, is one of the nation’s largest National Cemeteries and the ground crew does an excellent job in maintaining the grounds. The photo was taken on October 21 when the chapter made the presentation for the purchase of the sod when it was delivered. From left to right are Eugene Hancock, Finance Ofcer, Ch. #244; Paul Serchia, Adjutant and Commander for the Department Tennessee; and at far right is Donald C. Reece, program support assistant at Mountain Home National Cemetery. Submitted by Paul Serchia, Adjutant/Cdr., Dept. of TN

A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor and bread it has earned—this is the sum of good government. —Thomas Jefferson

36

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O O O O

F R O M

T H E

Chapter #558, Dept. of Kansas, donated $500.00 worth of items to veterans’ facilities (emptying nearly all the shelves in one local Walmart store!!!). Participating from Chapter #558 areCommander Warren Lewis, Susan Lee, Service Coordinator Wichita VA Center; Tom Creel, Adjutant, Chapter 558; and Ray Banks, Welfare Ofcer, Chapter 558. Submitted by Patriot Tom Creel

H E A R T

O O O O

Col. Dave Ulmer, U.S. Army (Ret.) (r.), of Lexington, NC, Ch. #638 presented the Military Order of the Purple Leadership Medal and Citation at the Central Davidson High School Awards Ceremony to Cadet Command Sergeant Major Will Everhart, a U.S. Army JROTC Cadet. At left is LtCol. Mike Dawkins, U.S. Army (Ret.), who is the Senior JROTC Instructor in Lexington. Submitted by Col. David T. Ulmer, SF, USA (Ret.)

LOOKING FOR???

T

his is a long shot, but I never give up trying! My dad was a B29 crewmember, shot down over Korea in 1952 and was awarded the Purple Heart. His high school buddy had quit school and joined the Army, ending up with Btry. B, 57th FA Bn, 7th Inf Div. in the Hagaru-ri Valley/Chosin. He was also awarded a Purple Heart. I believe it was the death of his HS buddy that made my dad quit a college scholarship and enlist in the Air Force. I am writing a book, in novel format, intertwining the lives of my dad, his friends and his buddy killed at Chosin, along with my life and career in the Army. I am trying to locate anyone from the 7th Infantry or other units involved in the Chosin disaster who might have known Cpl John A. Spruell, 17259651 or been connected in someway with his unit on the day he died in Hagaru-ri Valley, on December 6, 1950, plus anyone that is still alive who would have been connected with my dad, A1C Jimmie R. Hobday, 17329984, assigned to the 19th Bomb Grp, 307th Bomb Wing, 371st Bomb Sq, out of Kadena, Okinawa. He died on September 13,1952 over Suiho, Korea. I have left notices with as many Veterans Reunion, website and military groups as possible over the last eight months with only a few direct leads, and some good information. But I would like my book to be as accurate as possible and not just use ‘stock photos and general quotes.” Both John Spruell and my dad were incorrectly listed in military records somewhere along the line. My dad, though listed as “no next of kin,” three members of the family were notied by the AF of his MIA/KIA status, but the les on November / December 2008

Spruell listed him from another State with no next of kin. Both records were corrected this summer. The Spruell family, only knew of John’s death because three letters were returned “Indiv. deceased.” Being “back country folk,” they never inquired further. They have now received a gravestone and they will hold a memorial service in November in Cortez. My dad will have a memorial service in the Remains Not Recovered Section of Arlington National Cemetery within a few months. I will be there for the ceremony. I am looking for any survivors that may have known either men? I would like to try to obtain photos, or at least a letter or two from folks that knew them, or were at least in their respective units in order to add factual information to my book and to give both the Spruell family and myself further closure. Dane Hays (Hobday) US Army E7 Ret. 100 Service Connected Disabled. Email: ramblinsarge@hotmail.com

A Bill of Rights is what the people are entitled to against every government, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.

Purple Heart Magazine

—Thomas Jefferson 37


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

Cancer Prevention Communications Initiative

T

Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart in Hawaii assembled at the J.W. Marriott in Las Vegas, NV, during the 2008 National Convention. Present were (l.r.) Thomas Tanaka, Commander, Dept. of Hawaii; Dale Wilson, Ph.D., Nat’l Historian; (rear row) Jack Shimizu, Commander, Dept. of the Pacic and Bob K. Young, Past Sr. Vice Commander, Dept. of Hawaii and presently Department Inspector. Submitted by Patriot Robert K. C. Young

his year, more than 1.5 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer and more than a half a million will die of the disease. Furthermore, cancer is responsible for one in every four deaths in our country. However, research shows that as many as 7 in 10 cancer deaths can be prevented with simple lifestyle changes. There are four simple things everyone can do each day to reduce their risk of cancer. • Eat Well • Be Active • Don’t Smoke & Avoid Tobacco • Get Screened Too many Americans are unaware that they have the power to reduce their risk of cancer by taking these small steps. This is why C-Change, a coalition of the country’s key cancer leaders has partnered with the Ad Council to develop a communications program that utilizes the collective strengths of the 130 C-Change members from the public, private, and non-prot sectors to address Americans with consistent, evidence-based messages about reducing their risk of cancer. Through extensive research C-Change has developed a series of cancer prevention and early detection messages that have been proven to change the minds and hearts of the public. This initiative encourages all C-Change members and partners to incorporate these messages into their own communications programs. This includes advertising, marketing, or any form of communications with their constituents and the general public. By providing a range of organizations with a focused list of proven messages for dissemination, C-Change believes that this effort can achieve the critical media mass necessary to turn the tide on cancer in this country. Please visit http://www.c-changeprojects.org/CommunicationsPlan for additional information and a more detailed overview of the initiative.

Commander Carl Marks, Dept. of Nebraska, presents a check in the amount of $2,000 to John Liebsack, Nebraska State Quartermaster for the VFW. The monies will be used to fund the Honor Flight for World War II veterans to visit Washington and their WWII Memoral. (l.-r.) are James Pierce, VFW Project coordinator; John Liebsack; Carl Marks; Helen Marks, President, Dept. of NE Ladies’ Auxiliary and Linda Varejcka, Project chairwoman for the Military Order of the Purple Heart.

Jim Holland, Florida State Commander; Mrs. Jacqueline Everett, outgoing President of Unit #566, Ladies Auxiliary; Bill Everett, outgoing Commander of Ch. #566; Gene Loving; and Carol Loving, new President of Unit #566 receiving Florida’s Chapter of the Year Award. Chapter #566 received the award a second time in two years. The chapter was recognized primarily for its outstanding work in support of Wounded Veterans, Fallen Heroes and for support of the families involved. It is noted that Bill Everett was also recognized as Patriot of the Year during the Order’s August National Convention in Las Vegas.

Photo provided by Carl Marks

38

Purple Heart Magazine

Photo submitted by Patriot Bill Everett

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

France Honors WWII Veterans

Six members (l.-r.) Ken Stormer, Fred Rosenbaum, Ken Arterbury, Chris James, Earl Shannon and J.T. Stanley of Chapter #744 of Cooke County, Military Order of the Purple Heart, went to Dallas Fort Worth Airport USO on Monday October 6, 2008 to see the troops off to Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan. They took decks of playing cards to be given to the troops for their long 21 hour ight overseas. 150 to 250 troops depart daily from D/FW. The cards were donated by a casino. This will become a regular scheduled event by the Chapter. Plans are to also to provide playing cards to the Veterans Administration Medical Centers in Dallas and Bonham, outpatient clinics in Sherman, Ardmore and Denton, and State Veterans Nursing Homes in Bonham and Ardmore. MOPH members spend as much a six hours at the USO reception area, lounge and departure gate.

William (Bill) Czyzewski, Elliot Carpenter and Richard Seeley of Martinsburg, WV, manning Chapter #646 Recruiting Booth during a major air show held at the Eastern Panhandle West Virginia airport in nearby Martinsburg. The show brought in over 20,000 visitors each day for the two-day event. While recruiting is tough, MOPH received a lot of exposure. The aireld is a shared USAF Air Guard C-5 / commercial facility. November / December 2008

Patriot “Patsy” Centimole

Patriot Mitchel Chockla

O

n August 27, 2008, eight Southern Florida veterans were recognized by the French Government for their “eminent services to the Republic of France” during World War II. These men were decorated with the highly honored and prestigious “Chevalier de la Légion d ‘Honneur” Medal. Previously each had received a certicate signifying the award. Among the eight recipients were two Life Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, and both members of Ch. #475 of Miami, FL. “Patsy” Centimole, 85, also serves as Chapter Commander, a post he has held for several years. Pat served with the 141st Infantry of the 36th Division and was twice wounded—once in Italy in the summer of 1943 and again in France in the winter of 1944. In addition to two awards of the Purple Heart, he also holds the Silver Star and the Bronze Star, plus other campaign and service awards. Centimole entered the Army in Redbank, NJ, and now resides in the Cutler Bay area of Miami. Life Member Mitchel Chockla, 88 served with the 7th Regiment of the 3rd Infantry Division. After landing in North Africa in June 1943, he was assigned to the 3rd Division, just in time for the invasion of Sicily. He was then engaged in the Italian campaign from Salerno to and through the Anzio-Rome battles. Then in August 1944, Mitch was assigned to the French campaign, beginning with the landing at St. Tropez, on the Riviera, and on up to the Vosges Mountains where, on November 22 he was wounded in the battle for Nayemont. In addition to the Purple Heart, Mitch holds the Bronze Star, Combat Infantryman’s Badge, six campaign awards that included two amphibious landings. He entered the Army from Derry, PA, and retired from the U.S. Postal Service in Miami where he now resides. Both men were surprised and highly honored to be so recognized by the French Government and the awards were accepted as a reection upon all their former comrades in arms performances and sacrices. O

Purple Heart Magazine

39


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

Commander Sergio Antonio Morales of the Elite Badge of Military Merit Chapter 1782 based out of Washington’s Headquarters and Patriot Warren Craig with a billboard sign which is going to be placed in the city of Newburgh, NY, and various places throughout NY. The sign is intended to convey a positive message in every aspect. It conveys the message of our very existence as an “elite or unique” organization and to promote the the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor. Submitted by Patriot Sergio Antonio Morales

During the Military Order of the Purple Heart’s annual tribute to military nurses on September 12, 2008, at Arlington National Cemetery, Patriot Kevin Kavanaugh and Rick Cherone, Commander, Department of Wisconsin took time to pay tribute to one of the most recent citizens of Wisconsin who gave the nal full measure of devotion and lies in a gravesite area of the Arlington cemetery populated by Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom war dead. MOPH photo by Cy Kammeier

Chapter 164 participation in the 2008 Pulaski Polka Days Parade in Green Bay, WI. The Black Camaro has Dave Westphal (White Shirt) waving to the crowd. Lee Frangquist is hidden by the ags. John Dedrich is riding shot gun and Gary Lapp is driving. Submitted by Patriot Gary Lapp, Green Bay, WI

Nat’l Commander Jeff Roy honors Patriot Jim Casti of the Department of North Carolina with the Commandant’s Special Award for Casti’s exceptional service on behalf of veterans. MOPH photo by Cy Kammeier 40

A veteran - whether active duty, retired, National Guard or Reserve - is someone who, at one point in his or her life, wrote a blank check made payable to “The United States of America”, for an amount “up to and including my life”. That is honor, and there are way too many people in this country who no longer understand that. ~ Author unknown.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

F R O M

T H E

H E A R T

O

O

O

O

This setting depicts a typical National Staff Meeting. This was National Commander Jeff Roy’ s rst get together with his National Ofcers since National Convention. The meetings are conducted in accordance with a ritual as contained in the bylaws and are no-nonsense and highly constructive toward planning service and programs for veterans.

PURPLE HEART “FOREVER” STAMP

E

arlier this year, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., and Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., introduced a bill in Congress to create the Purple Heart Forever stamp, eliminating the need to keep reissuing such stamps with specic postage rates. As long as the U.S. Postal Service must decide whether to reissue the stamp, it may eventually be retired from circulation. The Perpetual Purple Heart Stamp Actt sought to create a stamp that would forever honor U.S. servicemembers killed or wounded in combat. The American Legion joins MOPH in endorsing the legislation. But the Purple Heart Forever stamp can no longer be created via legislation, since congressional committees on oversight and government reform no longer consider such bills. So King and Clinton need a groundswell of national support, directed at the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC), to convince the Postal Service to issue the “forever” version of the Purple Heart stamp. “I am grateful for The American Legion’s dedication to the creation of the stamp,” King told the Online Update. “Its endorsement demonstrates the wide range of support for making the Purple Heart stamp a permanent xture. I am certain that the support from our nation’s veterans will resonate even stronger.” Sen. Clinton also commended The American Legion for its strong support of the Purple Heart Forever stamp. “I hope that by working together, we can ensure that this tribute receives the permanence it deserves,” she told the November / December 2008

Online Update. “I have urged the Postal Service to make it a permanent ‘ forever’ stamp. Our gratitude for the sacrices of our heroes is eternal.” On Oct. 6, DoD announced that an estimated 17,000 deceased U.S. prisoners of war could be awarded Purple Hearts under a new policy. The medals have been denied in the past to POWs who died in captivity, if it could not be proven they had been wounded or killed by the enemy. The revised Pentagon policy, retroactive to Dec. 7, 1941, presumes that such deaths were the result of enemy action, unless compelling evidence is presented to the contrary King and Clinton are asking Legionnaires to help make the Purple Heart Forever stamp a reality by sending a letter of support to the CSAC. In July, King wrote to the committee and received this reply from Katherine A. Sitterle, government relations representative for the Postal Service: “Your letter of support for the issuance of the Purple Heart stamp as a ‘forever stamp’ is being included in the Committee’ s les. If it is approved for issuance in the future, the announcement will be made publicly, in keeping with our standard practice.” Sitterle did not indicate whether CSAC would make a determination anytime soon, and new stamp designs are already locked in through the end of 2010. Letters of support for the Purple Heart Forever stamp should be mailed to: Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee, c/o Stamp Development, U.S. Postal Service, Suite 5013, 1735 N. Lynn St., Arlington, VA 22209. O

Purple Heart Magazine

41


Chapter #794 was organized in Panama City, FL, on May 29, 2008 with seven members. They now boast 31 members. They meet the fourth Thursday of each month at the local VFW Post. The photo follows election of Patriot James E. Doescher as their current commander—(l.-r.) Frank Coleman, Dale Clark, Jim Doescher, Albert Belisle, Raymond Dozier and Sam Thurman. Submitted by Patriot Samuel R. Thurman Jr

42

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

O F F I C E R S’

C A L L

O

O

O

O

National Commander Jeff Roy

W

e will soon be entering into our Holiday Season; a time when everyone is busy planning dinners, trips to families, etc., but this year let us not forget our fellow veterans who cannot or just are not fortunate enough to do these same things. Most of all let us not forget those young men and women serving throughout the world who protect us from those who wish us harm. To all a very happy and safe holiday season! In this issue of Purple Heart Magazine you will see the rst of what we all hope to be several articles regarding Operation Denali. This is the story of a journey that four wounded warriors are undertaking in an attempt to climb Mount Denali, the highest peak in the State of Alaska this June. Several of us have had the opportunity to meet Major Marc Hoffmiester and Dave Shebib during a recent staff meeting in Washington. It is difcult to convey the passion and motivation that these brave warriors have in their desire to overcome any obstacle they feel is standing in their way. Mount Denali represents an especially rigorous challenge. In their quest, they deserve our support for this journey and we have pledged to do so. Some may ask the question why? Well who better than the Military Order of the Purple Heart, the only Congressionally Chartered Veterans Service Organization, comprised of Combat Wounded Veterans to support such a physical challenge. Operation Denali also ts into our support of legislation that will permit disabled warriors to remain on active duty when t for limited duty assignments. What better way to demonstrate to Congress that wounded (disabled) warriors can continue to serve in limited capacities on active duty than by showing that four wounded warriors can literally climb mountains. We are progressing on our Action Plan for the year, which is publishedon the opposite page. As I write this, I am preparing to travel to the Boston area to meet with the representatives of ‘Cell phones for Soldiers’ a fund raising program that defrays expenses and for items in support of veterans. If successful, I will report on the program in the future. With regard to homeless veterans, Kevin Kavanaugh has already met with representatives from the VA to map out what we might do to assist these unfortunate veterans. Our Employment Ofcer, Don Nichols, is also working on several initiatives to achieve gainful employment for veterans who are out of work. We conducted a leadership meeting in September in which we, among other things, laid out plans for improving our service to veterans through our service program and our Veterans Affairs Voluntary Service (VAVS) 44

program. Much of this information will be coming to you through your department and chapter commanders following their Region and Department (State) meetings. There is much to do and it seems like such a short time to accomplish all that we desire. However, I want to assure you the we are working hard to ensure that the Military Order of the Purple Heart achieves an earned reputation as the best Veterans Service Organization in the country. In closing I want to congratulate our VAVS Director Del Turner for his appointment as Chairman of the Recruiting Committee on the VAVS Advisory Board. This is a prestigious appointment and is not only an honor for Del, but an honor for our Order. O

Jeff Roy, Nat’l Commander, Military Order of the Purple Heart addresses the group assembled in the hall of Women in Service for America Memorial, during the Order’s annual special ceremony in which military nurses are honored. The event included remarks by Commander Roy and General Deborah C. Wheeling, Deputy Surgeon General for the Army National Guard and a wreath laying at the nurse memorial in Section 21 of Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony paid special tribute to the late Captain Maria Ortiz, who was the rst female Army nurse to die in the Iraq Capt. Maria Ortiz conict. On July 10, 2007, she was hit by a mortar round in Baghadad’s Green Zone. A special granite statue of a nurse in uniform was sculpted by Frances Rich, and originlly honored nurses who served in the U.S. armed forces in WWI, may of whom rest in Section 21.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

O F F I C E R S’

C A L L

O

O

O

O

NATIONAL COMMANDER’S ACTION PLAN 2008 – 2009

T

he following action plan was disseminated to all Region, Department and Chapter Commanders. It should have been or be included in agenda items for Region and Department Fall Conferences. Assistance from members who are not regular attendees at meetings should be aware of what the leadership is attempting to achieve on behalf of the entire membership and which will lead to an organization better able to serve the best interests of the veteran community.

Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) and its Ladies’ Auxiliary paid special tribute to military nurses in a wreath laying ceremony and reception on Friday, Sep. 12, 2008. An initial gathering in the Women in Military Service to America Auditorium at Arlington National Cemetery included remarks by Nat’l Commander Jeff Roy and MajGen. Deborah C. Wheeling, Deputy Surgeon General for the Army National Guard. The assembled members of the Order and Army, Navy and Air Force nurses, paid special tribute to Captain Maria Ortiz, who was killed in Iraq and among her awards was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. The wreath laying was at the foot of the Nurses Memorial at Arlington Cemetery, Section 21, honoring the service of the many nurses who served and who lay in permanent rest in their special section of Arlington Cemetery. The photo at the memorial includes principal guests Navy Captain Colleen K. Gallagher, Head, Nurse Intern Program, Navy Nurse Corps; Chaplain Conrad Walker, Nat’l Chaplain, MOPH; MajGen. Wheeling; Jeff Roy, Nat’l Commander, MOPH; Jane Stoel, Nat’l President, Ladies’Auxiliary, MOPH and Col. Gloria Twilley, U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps. MOPH photo by Cy Kammeier

November / December 2008

ACTION PLAN Focus – Return to the basic precepts and objectives of the Order – those being “…educational, fraternal, historical, and patriotic, perpetuating the principles of liberty and justice which have created the United States of America…” Additionally we will focus on the business of the Order by being more open to the membership with our nances and business and being accountable to the membership and the Foundation with our grant request and expenditures. Develop internal policies and procedures to meet these areas as well as compliance with applicable IRS regulations and Sarbanes –Oxley recommendations for non-prot organizations. Most of all we will seek to improve our support to veterans by increasing our volunteer service hours and improving our VAVS grant administration and our Service Program. The following goals and objectives are established to meet these focus areas: Goals – ♥ De ve lop t he a nnua l gr ant re quest ( budget) to meet the target of 85 percent program expe ns e —15 pe r c e nt a d m i ni s t r a t i v e exp en se. (To meet this objective the Commanders, Adjutant, Service Director, Finance Committee Chairman and Finance Ofcer will work collectively to develop and administer the annual grant request and budget. The budget will reect major program areas such as Headquarters Administration, VAVS, Americanism, other National Programs, Service Program Administration and Service Program Operating Expense and any other program areas that are identied to open up and explain our annual expenses.) ♥ Institutionalize the National Audit Committee to meet the recommendations of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. ♥ Develop a Service Program Stafng Standard to insure adequate and proper placement of National Service ofcers and facilities.

Purple Heart Magazine

45


O

O

O

O

O F F I C E R S’

♥ Assume responsibility and administration of the VAVS Grant program from the Service Foundation. Develop policies and procedures for proper administration and accountability of the VAVS grants (applicable to non grandfathered states). ♥ Increase VAVS volunteer hours by 15 percent nationally. ♥ Conduct four MOPH sponsored Job Fairs with the sub-goal of nding employment for 1000 veterans. ♥ Membership program, under the direction of the Senior Vice Commander will seek for a 5 percent increase in total membership. ♥ (To assist in meeting this goal we will continue with the current individual, department and chapter incentive programs. Additionally we will seek approval of the current $50 life membership to be permanent and drop annual memberships.) (Done at National Convention 2008.) ♥ Initiate a Homeless Veteran Program by appointing a National Homeless Veteran Program Coordinator. (Kevin Kavanaugh appointed to position.) ♥ Partner with the Cell Phone for Soldiers organization and develop a nation wide donation program in conjunction with the Departments and their Chapters. ♥ Increase the responsibilities of the Region Commanders in the areas of membership recruitment and VAVS administration. ♥ Improve Legislative support at the Department level by taking national positions in support of local veteran issues. ♥ Develop a National Public Relations Program in conjunction with the Service Foundation to further the Principles and Objectives of the Military Order of the Purple Heart and the Service Foundation. ♥ Seek a viable working relationship with the Service Foundation to improve our annual request for funding, daily operations and Service Program administration that results in efcient operations of the order and improved support to veterans. O

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. —Edmund Burke

46

C A L L

O

O

O

O

MOPH NATIONAL COMMITTEES Awards Committee—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy GORDON BRENNER, CHAIR, LEON THOMAS RICK WEEKS

Bylaws—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy DAN MURPHY- CO-CHAIR CLAYTON JONES- CO-CHAIR, JIM YOUNG, KEVIN KAVANAUGH, GORDON BRENNER, MIKE GRIGSBY, SID SHOWN, NICK MCINTOSH, JOE GENDUSO

Credentials Committee—Nat’l Cdr. Roy Retained CLARENCE STOEL- CHAIR, AL FLYR, DENNIS WALLOT, JOHN LOGAN, ,JIM CASTI, HARRY SMART

Finance Committee—Elected DENNIS WALLOTT- CHAIR, DEL TURNER, AL FLYR, JOHN AGENBROAD, BOYD BARCLAY, DAN MURPHY, JEFF ROY Ex-Of cio with vote, JACK LEONARD, JIM SIMS, CLAYTON JONES

Grievance Committee—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy LOU SPINELLI- CHAIR, TOM POULTER, AL SILVANO

Legislative—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy HERSHEL GOBER- CHAIR, DEL TURNER, GREG BRESSER, KEN SANTOR, JACK LEONARD

Publications—Elected ROBERT LINDEN- CHAIR, TONY RIVERA, JR, RICK CHERONE, NICK MCINTOSH, CYRIL KAMMEIER, BOYD BARCLAY, JEFF ROY- ExOf cio with vote, JACK LEONARD, ANN TURNER

Rules Committee—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy JOHN AGENBROAD- CHAIR, DAN MURPHY, HERSHEL GOBER, DR. DALE WILSON

Scholarship Committee—Appointed By Nat’l Cdr. Roy/Sr. Vice Cdr. Sims JIM SIMS- CHAIR, ROBERT LINDEN, DAVID PRICE, DELEON WESTON, REV. FRANCIS JEFFERY, NEIL VAN ESS, DR. ALEX WAIGANDT

Time And Place—(Region Commanders) KEN O’KEEFE- CHAIR, DAVID BOWMAN, JOSEPH GENDUSO, BILL HUTTON, BRUCE MCIVER, BRUCE MCKENTY

A typical committee meeting either at National Convention or at a Special Staff Meeting. Here the National Finance Committee, Chaired by Denis Wallot, is deliberating during the National Convention this past August. Deliberations are no nonense by dedicated Patriots and most have backgrounds and experience in areas related to the committee to which they are elected, assigned or appointed.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O

O

O

O

O F F I C E R S’

C A L L

National Chaplain

Patriots, Ladies Auxiliary, Family and Friends: Grace and Peace to you, and and to all whom you hold in your hearts of Prayer, from God our Father, Redeemer and Winsome Holy Spirit. Isaiah 40: 28-31: Do you not know, have you not heard? The Lord God the everlasting God, creator of the wide world, grows neither weary nor faint; no man can fathom his understanding. He gives vigour to the weary, new strength to the exhausted. Young men may grow weary and faint, even in their prime they may stumble and fall; but those who look to the Lord will win new strength, they will grow wings like eagles; they will run and not be weary, they will march on and never grow faint. Ephesians 6:10-11: Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of His might. Put on the whole armor of God that you will be able to stand.

H

ave you ever observed the mighty eagle in a vicious storm in a mountainous area? Suddenly, high amid the mountain crags and threats, the heavy storm strikes. It seems that the mighty and proud eagle will be dashed against the boulders and huge trees. But the extraordinary bird wheels into the storm, tilts its wings and lets the fury of the gale lift him upward until he soars high above the swift winds that might have destroyed him.

Our living faith in our Blessed Lord is the tilt of our wings. Our Lord God has given us faith wings and a vibrant living hope. He has endowed us with an inner life and disciplines—a soul. We are made to soar in heart and mind. We are made for storms and storm centers. As we deeply remember and honor our faithful Patriots our Comrades who have fallen in combat of wounds and the Wounded Warriors who succumb to

AMERICANISM DISTILLED

A

s a transplant to the fair Commonwealth of Kentucky it has been my pleasure to enjoy the many distinct avors of Kentucky’ s second nest export, Bourbon. Having now fuller appreciation for the ‘distillers art,’ I can see it is more than mere high-end squeeze’ns over moonshine in mason jars. It is the essence of the individual’s craft; unique as each

November / December 2008

practitioner. What’s that got to do with MOPH Americanism Programs, you ask? Stick with me. Not withstanding the average American citizen and distiller’s natural disdain of the “revenuers,” each must select their own ingredients and apply their craft to reap the best fruits of their intended labors. The result of the distilling process is an application Purple Heart Magazine

O

O

O

O

age—no matter how—as we bless them and remember them—we are walking on ‘Holy Ground’—yes, we are to soar into a life with our Living God and all the company of heaven. We will not be spared the storms. In fact, the higher we go, sometimes the winds are stronger. No storm or difculty need crush us. Tragedy, hurt, pain and death faced in bold and victorious faith may actually strengthen and deepen the splendid qualities and experiences of life now and forever. This is carried out in noble form with wings of our souls and the trusting tilt of steadfastness and faith. It is our Living Lord who makes this a reality. He never leaves us alone without His presence. He is nearer than the air we breathe, as we follow Him. He, by His work, forgives our sins, lls our hearts with His kind of Peace to a living hope. He gives us zest for His kind of life and love in the midst of storms and storm centers. Yes, He lets us mount up with wings like eagles! A most joyous and meaningful Thanksgiving, Advent, Hanukkah, and Christmas Season to the entire Military Order of the Purple Heart family. Blessings in abundance.O of high-energy [heat] to the chosen ingredients, where the end product is a pure distillate of uncompromising delight. Each patriot must apply a similar principle to achieve their own purestform of a successful Americanism Program. No one person can dictate your program’s ingredients or recipe. Suggestions are plentiful. We can agree, however, that the amount of energy dedicated to your process will go a long way to ensuring its success. Since the 1929-30’s when national commanders of four veterans organizations adopted a common denition of Americanism: “…an unfailing love of 47


O

O

O

O

Country, loyalty to its institutions and ideals, eagerness to defend it against all enemies, individuals allegiance to the Flag; and a desire to secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”A better denition has yet to appear. Our goals at Chapter, Department and Region must reect our individual approaches to foster love of the United States, promote patriotic principles, teach the history of American heritage, proper ag etiquette: demonstrate the proper care of the U.S. Flag, encourage a proper salute, respectful recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, and responsible ag display. Your local program’ s ingredients are as individual a choice as the ‘shiners’pick of rye, corn, wheat, or barley. The essence of your program, your goal, should be the purest form of accomplishing the principles of the Americanism denition highlighted above. Can’t tell you one fool-proof secret of how to do it; but encourage you to apply your talent to nd your own method. Patriots seeking assistance through Americanism products, packaged programs and presentations to promote

O F F I C E R S’

C A L L

Citizenship and Americanism need look no farther than the resources of their local Americanism Ofcer who, in turn, will ensure national-level products and items are available to assist in local programs. National is aggressively editing, updating, printing and distributing professional four-color booklets: (Old Glory pamphlets, America’s Quest for Freedom—History of U.S. Con icts), folders, cards: (Pledge of Allegiance, America the Beautiful, God Bless America song, National Anthem), bookmarkers, book covers, windshield cards, applications and new products to reect the Order’ s dedication to fellow veterans and this great country. No national Americanism Officer should tell you how to conduct your program; only ask, “…how may we help you execute the best Americanism program for your community?” If you will permit, suggestions of prior successful techniques, tips, and easy methods will be forwarded to aid your chapter program. If you have ideas that you wish to share/brag to other patriots; well let us know.

O

O

O

O

Tip one: get inventory of your ingredients. What you get out of you program depends on what you put into it. Note, National supply of some items are “out of stock” until the new printings arrive. Go on-line or call in an order for the items currently in our Supply Room. While you wait for their arrival, plan out your program. What is the desired effect of your Americanism Program? What is your specic target audience. Basic is best. We all want grand, intricate, complex, and impactive programs; “KISS.” Build your unit program on a series of small successes. Connect with local grade/ high/home schools, scouting clubs, civic organizations, and churches; they are the bedrock of our American historys—and its future. While it would be impolitic to divulge my favorite Kentucky distillate, know I’ve never turned away an invitation to try local “ avors.”Let us each enjoy and share the spirit(s) of American for the betterment of our country and the next generation. Light the ame, we got another batch to bottle. O

Purple Heart Memorial Committee Chairman Clayton “Chip” Chipman and his wife Alice were relieved to see their mission accomplished. Getting the memorial through to completion Purple Heart Memorial dedication May 26, 2008 at the Milwaukee County, was a lot of hard work on the park Wisconsin, War Memorial Center Veterans Court. Unveiling the memorial are of the chairman and members of the Department of Wisconsin. Patriots Greg Jacobs and Clayton Chipman. Photos provided by Patriot Chipman

48

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


A

ON ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIPS MILITARY ORDER OF THE PURPLE HEART

ccording to our National Bylaws, the purpose of Associate Membership is to assist in furthering and perpetuating the objects of the Military Order of the Purple Heart of the U.S.A., Inc., as set forth in Article III of the Constitution of the National Corporation, with particular reference to “assisting, comforting, and aiding all distressed members and their dependents.” An Associate Member shall be without a vote and may not hold an elective ofce but may hold an appointed position except that of Department and Chapter Adjutant. To be eligible for Associate Membership, the applicant must be a spouse (male or female), parent, sibling (brother or sister) or lineal descendant (children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc.) of either a living or deceased Purple Heart recipient. Children shall include

legally-adopted children. If the Purple Heart recipient is not a member of MOPH, a copy of DD-214, DD-215, WD AGO 53-55, or General Orders showing the award of the Purple Heart must accompany the application. Documentation of relationship (birth certificate, adoption papers, or marriage certicate) to the Purple Heart recipient listed above MUST accompany the application. Certication of the relationship by a member is no longer accepted. For example: If the applicant is a grandchild of an MOPH Member, a legible copy of applicant’s parent’ s birth certicate and a legible copy of the applicant’ s birth certicates must be submitted showing the names of the birth parents in order to establish the relationship. The National Adjutant will make the nal determination on eligibility. Only life membership is available and the life dues are $50.00. The life

membership dues can be paid in full by check, credit card, and money order, or by Partial Payment Plan. The Partial Payment Plan requires an initial payment of $25.00 and second payment of $25.00 within 24 months of the application date. A member who fails to complete the nal payment will forfeit the initial payment of $25.00 and lose active membership status. Reinstatement of membership will require a new $50.00 dues payment. Please note that at this time, the MOPH National Bylaws restricts life membership to applicants ages 18 or over. The National Bylaws committee will be reviewing the bylaws and propose all necessary amendments in order to accommodate the recent change in eliminating annual membership and offering only life membership. O

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP CONVERSION TO LIFE MEMBERSHIP ttention all Patriots and associate members with annual membership. As a result of the August 2008 National Convention, membership dues are now simplied. Annual membership has been discontinued. Only life membership is available for a one time cost of $50.00 regardless of age or disability level. Life membership dues may be paid in full by check, credit card, and money order, or by Partial Payment Plan. The Partial Payment Plan requires an initial payment of $25.00 and a second payment of $25.00 within 24 months of the conversion date. You have 60 days grace period from your expiration date to convert to life membership before your membership is dropped from the active roll. We need you among us, so please don’t forget. Your continual membership in the Order is essential to all of us. If you have any questions, please contact the membership department at memberships@purpleheart.org or 703-6425360.

A

Credit Card Type: ( ) Visa

( ) Master Card

( ) Discover

( ) AmEx

Credit Card Number _________________________________

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP CONVERSION

Member Dues: $ ___________Expiration Date: ___________

CONVERSION DUES:$50.00

____________________________ Date of Birth: __________ Authorization Signature Required

o

Enclosed is my full payment of $50.00

PLEASE MAKE ADDRESS CORRECTIONS Member ID: _____________________________________________ Name: _________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________ City/State/ZIP: ___________________________________________

o

Enclosed is my initial payment of $25.00. The nal payment of $25.00 will follow within 24 months.

November / December 2008

Purple Heart Magazine

49


O O O O

B O O K

R E V I E W S

PURPLE HEARTS— BATTLE SCARS

NORMANDY Breaching the Atlantic Wall From D-Day to the Breakout and Liberation By Dominique Francois Zenith Press (an imprint of Quayside Publishing Group) Hardcover: 10 ½” x 12” 304 ppgs: 100 color, 400 b/w photos, 100 diagrams ISBN: 978-0-7603-3327-3 Pub. Date: Oct. 15, 2008 ith these words, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower launched one of history’s most iconic battles: “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.” Now, over sixty years later, Dominique Francois’ new illustrated history chronicles the complete story of Normandy in WWII—from pre-war life to invasion and occupation to liberation. In June 1940, the French defeat at the hands of a German military began a period of occupation, shame, repression, and deprivation. Four years later, the dawn landings of Allied forces on the coastal beaches of France began the epic Battle of Normandy, rekindling hopes for liberation which French citizens, including the grandfather of Joseph Francois dreamt of revenge, of washing away the stain of the French defeat, and of freedom. But he did not live to see that long-awaited day, the day his country was liberated from the Germans. Ten years of writing and research went into this exceptionally comprehensive work. The WWII veteran of the Normandy landings will learn what was happening on his right and left ank; the history buff will get one of the most comprehensive views of what really occurred during this epic battle. This ne coffee table size presentation would make a great Christmas gift for the WWII veteran, or as a presentation to your local school library. An outstanding history and a hearty Well Done to the author and the publisher. The Author: Domonique Francois is a French military historian specializing in D-Day and the Normandy campaign. This is his ninth illustrated military history book related to D-Day and Normandy. He lives in France.O

W

50

O O O O

Memories from the Forgotten War By John Schneider Forward by LtGen. Bernard E. Trainor, USMC (Ret.) 200 pages, 17 photos Available thru Amazon.com he Korean War has the misfortune of being labeled “The Forgotten War.” It certainly has not been forgotten by the families of the 136,826 who were killed, wounded or missing from its start until its unsatisfactory cease-re three years later on July 27, 1953. As most followers of the news know, the war remains under a cease re and the North Koreans have proven to be a stubborn adversary even today, mostly at the expense of the people who must live under this oppressive regime. A recent satellite night shot of the Korean Peninsula reects a well lighted South Korea with only a spot of light over the North Korean capital city of Pyongyang. The Korean War exploded onto the scene in June, 1950, when the tense border between post-WWII South and Communist North Korea, along the 38th parallel, was rent by the North’s assault against its southern borders. The United States, under the ag of the United Nations and under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander, Far East, went to the aid of its South Korea ally. Initial setbacks that included the initial push of the North Korean Communist forces, the historic Chosen Reservoir campaign, the entry of Chinese forces into the war, and the WWI trench-style warfare that ensued on both sides of the 38th parallel, which ultimately led to a teneous peace treaty signed at Panmunjom. The gist of Purple Heart–Battle Scars is a tale of a young Marine assigned to a weapons company, detached to an infantry unit along a trench line within killing distance from the enemy on the opposite side of “no-man’s land.” This descriptive word picture provides a ashback into the very soul of a Marine’ s life in a combat unit in Korea, ghting and surviving in the cold that was at times in conditions under 30 degrees below zero. His vivid recollection of events and in being hit by a fragment from an enemy 82mm mortar that resulted in his “medevac” to the U.S. Navy Hospital Ship Repose in Inchon Harbor and his ultimate transfer to Japan where he served for two years as an armorer provides a glimpse of what military life was like in the 1950s. This obviously difcult piece of writing provides a great contribution to the history of the Korean War. It is a snapshot of what it truly was like from the standpoint of the individual GI. While it should be a best seller, in this era that has forgotten the value of history, it will not swell the coffers of Amazon nor the author. Purple Hearts-Battle Scars is a heartwarming read and I recommend it to anyone who has an interest in life of the GI in the “Frozen Chosen.” O

T

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O F R O M

T H E

H E A R TO

Advertisement

A unique Purple Heart Monument was dedicated on August 13, 2008, which was attended, despite a heavy rain, by some 500 people from the Beaufot / Parris Island, SC, area. The monument will be seen by the approximately 3,000 visitors who come weekly to graduation ceremonies, as well as by thousands of Marine recruits who pass through Parris Island Marine Recruit Depot. Submitted by Col. Charles W. Stockell, U.S. Army (Ret.)

Advertisement

November / December 2008

Purple Heart Magazine

51


O

O O O

S P E C I A L

O O O O

The Partnership for Veterans Health Care Budget Reform Representing America’s Veterans Historic Legislation To End Delays in Veterans Health Care Funding New National Poll Shows Large Majority Supports Funding Reform

N

ine of the nation’s largest veterans service organizations, representing a combined 8 million members, on September 18, 2008, praised Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee Chairman Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii), House Veterans’Affairs Committee Chairman Bob Filner (D-Calif.), and a group of bipartisan cosponsors for introducing legislation to reform the budget process to assure sufcient, timely and predictable funding for veterans’ health care programs. The Partnership for Veterans Health Care Budget Reform (www.fundingforvets.org), which worked closely with the bill sponsors in drafting the legislation, is comprised of AMVETS, Blinded Veterans Association (BVA), Disabled American Veterans (DAV), Jewish War Veterans (JWV), Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH), Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), The American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), and Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA). “For almost two decades, veterans health care funding has either been

insufcient or late, and usually it is both,” said PVAPresident Randy Pleva, speaking on behalf of the Partnership. “While funding bills have increased in recent years, especially the last two years, they are still consistently late. We must reform the funding system if we are to assure comprehensive and timely health care services for current and future generations of veterans,” he said. American Legion National Commander David K. Rehbein, also speaking for the Partnership, praised the bill’s bipartisan cosponsors, Senators Olympia Snowe (R-ME), Russ Feingold (D-WI), and Mary Landrieu (DLA), and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Congressmen Walter Jones (R-NC), Michael Michaud (D-ME), and Phil Hare (D-IL). “We applaud all of the bill’s sponsors who have taken the lead in Congress to create a lasting legacy for our veterans by reforming the budget process to ensure that veterans health care funding is sufcient, timely and predictable,” Rehbein said.

Sgt. Stephanie A. Roberts of Quincy, Illinois (left) is the frst woman in Quincy Ch. #138 and the fourth female member of the Department of Illinois. She received her wound while on foot patrol with three other soldiers in Baghdad when an IED exploded killing one civilian; one soldier was seriously hurt and she and two other soldiers received minor injuries. She received the Purple Heart, and later in Germany, LtGen. Ramond Odierno is shown presented Sgt. Roberts with a bronze star.

The new legislation, called the “Veterans Health Care Budget Reform Act”, would authorize advance appropriations for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care programs one year in advance of the start of the scal year, an idea favored by more than 80 percent of American voters, according to a survey released today by the Disabled American Veterans. The Veterans Health Care Budget Reform Act would also require the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to audit VA’s budget forecasting model and report to Congress and the public on the integrity and accuracy of the model. With these estimates in hand, Congress would be greatly enhanced in their ability to develop and enact sufcient funding levels for VA health care. The Partnership for Veterans Health Care Budget Reform P.O. Box 71084 Washington, DC 20024 O

slenderacquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends.

A

—George Washington

Submitted by Daniel T Finn, Department Commander and Christina Finn, Department President, Dept. of IL

52

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O O O DEPARTMENT Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Asia Pacic California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Nebraska Nevada New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina N. New England Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas The Carribean Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

D E P A R T M E N T NAME BYRON W WHITE RON SIEBELS ROBERT J PUSKAR EMANUEL S LAWBAUGH JACK SANTOS SHIMIZU JOHN A LOGAN PHILLIP J WILLIAMS STEPHEN J KUPECKY JOHN PATRICK LITTLE JAMES G HOLLAND III JEFFREY L LEAR THOMAS Y TANAKA ROBERT E LENIGAN DANIEL T FINN ORBEN E BENNETT JR JERRY L MEEK RAYMOND L RHODD JOHN R BURCH RICHARD L GARNER JAMES A HONTZ JR WILLIAM C TAYLOR II LINO B PRETTO RICHARD L JENKINS SR NEWTON F RONCALI CARL A DIETRICH CARL G MARKS DAVID M PERELMAN RAYMOND H TAYLOR PETER J COMSTOCK RUBEN R PRATTS JESUS (JESSE) G TORRES COLIN H CARTER ROBERT W BURR JAMES D PUMPHREY WILLIAM N WALKER VANCE H CARTER THOMAS J KENNEY JR WALTER S LABAN PAUL A SERCHIA FEDERICO REY JOSE L RIVERA FRANKLIN D MAUGHAN JOHN P KEITH JR GARY J YEAGER TROY L VARNEY RICHARD A CHERONE BARRY D GASDEK

November / December 2008

C O MM A N D E R S

PHONE OFFICE / CELL (205) 637-0585 (907) 562-4254 (480) 922-3161 (480) 363-0140 (479) 442-8132 (671) 632-1011 (671) 777-0895 (707) 528-3120 (707) 479-0750 (303) 772-8232 (860) 872-2508 (610) 268-1621 (302) 888-1074 (850) 668-5203 (850) 410-5298 (770) 591-4581 (404) 277-8235 (808) 988-2820 (208) 286-0730 (708) 499-0685 (773) 535-5271 (574) 256-2171 (574) 286-0565 (515) 222-1748 (785) 271-9886 (785) 640-8751 (859) 624-8908 (318) 746-5724 (301) 577-0878 (978) 318-8084 (517) 694-5923 (651) 459-6446 (662) 754-5519 (662) 754-5310 (417) 882-9282 (417) 864-0192 (402) 782-8752 (702) 395-7177 (702) 755-1957 (732) 636-3167 (505) 270-4689 (718) 643-0689 (919) 241-4109 (919) 923-5846 (802) 525-3430 (740) 369-0652 (405) 769-3040 (405) 641-8300 (541) 601-4032 (814) 454-4809 (401) 847-6751 (843) 524-8007 (423) 282-1085 (423) 534-2633 (512) 339-8034 (512) 567-6862 (787) 856-2062 (787) 501-2891 (801) 782-7005 (703) 781-1727 (703) 704-1084 (509) 235-8588 (304) 752-6555 (262) 786-9663 (262) 786-5663 (307) 745-6030 (307) 399-0545 Purple Heart Magazine

O O O

EMAIL ADDRESS thegrunt@hotmail.com ronakph@gci.net rjpuskar@cox.net sonjal61@aol.com mcposhimizu@yahoo.com phjeep1@sbcglobal.net williams_4040@comcast.net grunt1967@aol.com little4j@aol.com jholl44122@aol.com jll4041@yahoo.com tyt24div@yahoo.com lenigan2@bigskytel.com nndan@yahoo.com usmc_army@sbcglobal.net major-meek@msn.com raymond.rhodd@us.army.mil

rbgarner@bellsouth.net hontz1@hotmail.com bud@wct2.com prettolin@aol.com jenksgrace2001@usfamily.net sonny_r@att.net carldietrich@att.net carlgmarks@aol.com uh1p@cox.net rayandsusan@verizon.net pjc26@mac.com usmcph@yahoo.com torres1144@aol.com cartermoph@vtlink.net rburr11@columbus.rr.com jimpumphrey@yahoo.com vetsrst@yahoo.com

pbserch@aol.com ferey@austin.rr.com Rive74@aol.com dragoonb26@msn.com jpkeith67@yahoo.com gjyeager@aol.com rvarney@excite.com racherone@yahoo.com bgasde@state.wy.us 53


O O O O

V E T E R A N S

VA, DOD ELECTRONICALLY “HAND OFF” RECORDS OF WOUNDED PATIENTS

O

n September 25, 2008, Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James B. Peake annonced that instant electronic medical information from the Department of Defense (DoD) about severely wounded troops soon will be transferred to four De- The Honorable partment of Veterans Affairs (VA) special James B. Peake, treatment centers. The two departments Secretary of completed a successful pilot project shar- Veterans Affairs ing patient information between Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Polytrauma Unit at the Tampa, FL, VA Medical Center. The pilot’s expansion will share enhanced data between VA’s four polytrauma centers in Tampa, FL; Richmond, VA; Minneapolis; and Palo Alto, CA, and all Army medical treatment facilities. The patient information to be shared between DoD and VA involves electronic notes on the patient’s situation and background, an assessment of his or her condition, and recommendations for future care. This uniform, standard method of communicating patient information will ensure veterans receive high quality care immediately after being ransferred and the information is available and accessible at all times. “I’m proud to announce the launch of this partnership,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James B. Peake. “Because it is targeted at severely wounded veterans transferring directly from DoD to VA, it enhances their care.” The VA-funded project is the result of collaboration among VA and DoD nurses and information technology professionals. The departments are working to make all of their electronic patient records interoperable. Peake said the announcement represents a signicant step forward in those efforts. O

The issue is not war and peace, rather, how best to preserve our freedom. —General Russell E. Dougherty

54

AFF A I R S

O O O O

VHA AUGMENTS RESOURCES TO PROVIDE TREATMENT FOR SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS

T

he Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is strengthening its programs for substance use disorders by adding counselors to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) teams at medical centers nationwide, increasing intensive outpatient treatment programs and conducting specialized training for providers. Under Secretary for Health Dr. Michael J. Kussman has approved augmenting PTSD teams with drug and alcohol treatment specialists so that both problems may be addressed more effectively and efciently. “This integrated approach puts treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders under Dr. Michael one roof and should improve mental health J. Kussman outcomes for patients who suffer from both,” said John P. Allen, PhD, VHA’s Associate Chief Consultant for Addictive Disorders. Professionals will assess PTSD patients for substance use disorder and provide treatment in coordination with the PTSD intervention. The treatment will include continuing care and case management for patients suffering both problems and will offer preventive education to veterans with PTSD who may be at risk for developing such problems later. Allen said substance use disorders cannot cause PTSD, and PTSD does not cause substance use disorders. However, there are advantages to addressing both disorders within the same treatment planning process. The initiative enhances PTSD services provided to Global War on Terror veterans, as well as veterans of all eras. Adding substance use disorder clinicians to PTSD teams will cost about $13.3 million per year. The enhanced teams should be in place at all VA medical facilities by Oct. 1, 2008. A second recently announced initiative will provide approximately $17 million per year to establish Intensive Outpatient Substance Use Disorder Programs at 28 additional medical centers, bringing the total number of facilities with these programs to 105. These units provide a minimum of three hours of treatment services per day at least three times per week to veterans who have substance use disorders that may be too severe to be successfully treated in less intensive ambulatory care settings.

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O O O O

V E T E R A N S

AFF A I R S

O O O O

Research has strongly demonstrated the effectiveness of these programs. They also will feature more involvement of family members and signicant others than is often possible in less intense ambulatory care programs. A third initiative will provide specialized training for a minimum of two physicians in each medical facility to deal with substance use issues such as withdrawal, detoxication and the use of medications in treatment. Other steps being taken to bolster substance use disorder services include providing an additional 40 substance use disorder therapists to high volume Community-Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), and assuring that each large mental health residential rehabilitation treatment program has at least one substance use disorder specialist on staff. “These initiatives represent important efforts by VHA to more effectively address the needs of veterans who suffer substance use disorder problems and do so in manner that is most convenient for them,” said Dr. Kussman. O

neurological impairments. These abnormalities may all be transient, but more prolonged or even permanent problems with a wide range of impairment in such areas as physical, mental, and emotional/behavioral functioning may occur. More than 90 percent of combat-related TBIs are closed head injuries, with most servicemembers sustaining a mild TBI or concussion. Difculties after TBI may include headache, sleep difculties, decreased memory and attention, slower thinking, irritability, and depression. To view the entire regulation published today in the Federal Register, go to: www.federalregister.gov/OFRUpload/OFRData/2008-22083_PI.pdf. For more information about VA disability compensation, go to www.va.gov or call 1-800-827-1000. O

VA ANNOUNCES CHANGES TO THE DISABILITY RATING SCHEDULE FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES AND BURN SCARS

VETERANS’ COMPENSATION COST-OF-LIVING-INCREASE ANNOUNCED

Increased Compensation Possible For Some Veterans he Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced on September 23, 2008, changes in the way VA will evaluate traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and burn scars for purposes of determining the appropriate level of compensation veterans receive for these injuries. “These important regulatory changes will allow VA decision makers to better assess the consequences of these injuries and ensure veterans are properly compensated for their residual effects,” stated Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James B. Peake. VA has revised the Disability Rating Schedule in light of current scientic and medical knowledge in order to provide VA employees with more detailed and up-to-date criteria for evaluating and compensating veterans with these injuries. Two groups of veterans may be affected by these changes. The rst group includes veterans who will be awarded disability compensation for TBI and burn injuries in the future. The second group includes veterans already receiving compensation for these injuries whose disabilities are reevaluated under the new criteria. The effects of blast injuries resulting from roadside explosions of improvised explosive devices have been common sources of injury in the conicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and appear to be somewhat different from the effects of trauma seen from other sources of injury. As of September 2008, there are more than 22,000 veterans being compensated for TBI, of whom more than 5,800 are veterans of the conicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Traumatic brain injuries result in immediate effects such as loss or alteration of consciousness, amnesia and sometimes

T

November / December 2008

5.8 percent increase effective December 1st

E

ffective December 1, 2008, veterans’disability compensation, among other benets, will be increased by 5.8 percent, to respond to the increasingly high cost-of-living in the United States. This increase was secured by an Act of Congress, authored by U.S. Senator Daniel K. Akaka (D-HI), Chairman of the Veterans’Affairs Committee. The exact percentage increase of 5.8 percent was determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, corresponding with the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). O

PREPARING IN ADVANCE FOR FINAL ARRANGEMENTS ll ofces of the Department of Veterans Affairs are prepared to assist next of kin in making arrangements for that day of nal departure from this world. For Burial in a VA National Cemetery Gravesites in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) national cemeteries cannot be reserved in advance; however, reservations made prior to 1962 will be honored. Families are encouraged to prepare in advance by discussing cemetery options, collecting the veteran’s military information including discharge papers, and by contacting the cemetery where burial is desired. For Burial in a Private Cemetery The VA suggests that if burial will be in a private cemetery and a Government headstone or marker will be requested for the veteran’s grave, that the family complete VA Form 40-1330, Application for Standard Government Headstone or Marker for Installation in a Private or State Veterans’ Cemetery, in advance and place it with the veterans military discharge papers for use at the time of need. O

A

Purple Heart Magazine

55


O O O O

L A D I E S’

A U X I L I A R Y

Ladies’ Auxiliary National President Jane Stoel

I

hope everyone attended their Region Conferences and took back pertinent information to your Units. Department Presidents, please share your information with any Units in your Department that were not represented. I had the honor of attending and addressing the National Commander’s Staff Meeting in Washington, DC the morning of September 12. Cy Kammeier, Editor of the National Purple Heart Magazine, has asked for more input and photos from the Auxiliary. So ladies, here is your chance to let the rest of the membership know what you are doing. Be sure to check out our new Auxiliary Website at www. LAMOPH.org. Do you have something you would like to share on the Website? Contact A.J. Herran, our Webmaster at ajh_dac@hotmail.com (under stroke _between H and d) with your information. The afternoon of September 12, I attended the Memorial Ceremony at the Nurses Memorial Auditorium at Arlington Cemetery honoring all Military Nurses, which was dedicated to the memory of U.S. Army Captain Maria I. Ortiz, who was the rst female Army nurse to be killed in the Iraq conict. On July 10, 2007, she was hit by a mortar round in Baghdad’s Green Zone. Captain Ortiz has been posthumously awarded the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Iraq Campaign Medal, National Defense Service Medal and the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal. She put herself in harm’s way by volunteering for duty in Iraq, and, according to friends, had looked forward to serving in Iraq because she felt she could make a difference. Thank you Captain Ortiz, you have made a difference. We were honored to have Major General Deborah C. Wheeling as our guest speaker. She also presented a slide presentation along with her remarks. Immediately following we went to the Nurses Monument in Arlington Cemetery for the wreath presentation. When I looked out and saw all the nurses in uniform from the Army, Navy and Air Force coming down the hill to the monument, it was one of the most beautiful and awesome sights I had ever seen. These brave men and women giving so much to our Servicemen and women and willing to sacrice their lives if need be. Following the wreath presentation, we were bussed back to the Nurses Memorial building for a lovely reception put on 56

O O O O

by the MOPH. It was great to get to talk personally with our great military nurses. I was privileged to meet some of our nurses from World War II and hear of some of their experiences. For some of our “old timers,” I had the privilege of meeting and talking with Martha Downing formerly from Florida, who was the National Region IV President in 81-82. She misses you all and sends her love. Veterans Day is November 11. Contact your local schools and see if your Chapter and Auxiliary could come in and talk about Veterans Day and also have the Veteran bring along his Purple Heart Medal. Most children don’t even know about the Purple Heart Metal or what it means, let alone seen one. Contact National Headquarters for Americanism material you can pass out to the students. “Together we can make a difference” in the lives of our students. Don’t forget about our great $50.00 life membership in honor of our 75th anniversary. With Christmas coming up, what a great gift to give to your loved ones. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to become a life member of the greatest organization, the Ladies’ Auxiliary Military Order of the Purple Heart. My very best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving and a most Blessed Christmas and joyous and healthy New Year. God Bless You, God Bless Our Troops, and God Bless America!

General Orders 1. Remember our Veterans who are hospitalized during the holidays. A visit, a smile or a card can mean so much. 2. Continue to support our troops with your care packages, cards and especially your prayers. 3. Check to see if there are any families of our servicemen and women that are in need of help in your area. 4. Plan to participate with the MOPH in the “March On The Hill this spring.” This is the time when you can meet with your Congressional leaders.¤

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O O O O

L A D I E S’

A U X I L I A R Y

O O O O

National Senior Vice President Gwendolyn Gilliard

CELEBRATING OUR 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF OUR LADIES’ AUXILIARY

I

Members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) and its Ladies’ Auxiliary paid special tribute to military nurses in a wreath laying ceremony and reception on Friday, September 12, 2008. An initial gathering in the Women in Military Service to America Auditorium at Arlington National Cemetery included remarks by MajGen. Deborah C. Wheeling, Deputy Surgeon General for the Army National Guard. Her remarks and the assembled members of the Order and Army, Navy and Air Force nurses, paid special tribute to Captain Maria Ortiz, who was killed in Iraq and among her awards posthumously awarded were the Purple Heart. The wreath laying was at the foot of the Nurses Memorial at Arlington Cemetery, Section 21, honoring the service of all nurses who served and the many who lay in permanent rest in their special section of Arlington Cemetery. The photo at the memorial includes principal guests Navy Captain Colleen K. Gallagher, Head, Nurse Intern Program, Navy Nurse Corps; Chaplain Conrad Walker, Nat’l Chaplain, MOPH; MajGen. Wheeling; Jeff Roy, Nat’l Commander, MOPH; Jane Stoel, Nat’l President, Ladies’ Auxiliary, MOPH. Not pictured is Col. Gloria Twilley, U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps. MOPH photo by Cy Kammeier

It is not how much you do, but how much love you put in the doing.” —Mother Theresa November / December 2008

t was pure joy to see so many of you at National Convention 2008 and the 75th Anniversary Celebration of the Ladies’ Auxiliary Military Order of the Purple Heart in Las Vegas. The entire event was awesome! Abundant “kudos” to the MOPH and LAMOPH Department of Las Vegas for being one of the nest host/hostesses encountered. The hotel and their services were as beautiful as our host/hostess Department—service always with a smile-to all.—Thank You! Congratulations to the new slate of ofcers for the MOPH and LAMOPH 2008-2009—both elected and appointed, and a hearty thank you to now the past ofcers. As we have already taken off into this new scal year, I look forward to working with you on behalf of our veterans and their families, as well as for the good of the order of MOPH and LAMOPH, enthusiastically and with pleasure. Most of you are aware by now, that the LAMOPH adopted the “$50.00 Life Membership Fee” at National Convention 2008—(whoopee!!)—and has been approved for this 2008-2009 membership year in honor of our National Organization of the LAMOPH 75th Anniversary. What this now means for all of our Ladies is found inclusive of the LAMOPH Bylaws, Article I under Membership Eligibility that states: “Membership in this Ladies’ Auxiliary shall be limited to: mothers, wives, widows, sisters, daughters, stepdaughters, granddaughters, direct lineal female descendants and legally adopted female descendants, from birth, of persons who were awarded the Purple Heart, and, women who have been awarded the Purple Heart in their own name.” Please note that this new fee is a great savings of up to $75.00. Also, if a member has already paid $20.00 for the 2008-2009 Annual Membership Year, she can now send in an additional $30.00 for conversion to a Life Membership and no more annual fees. In one of the previous articles I wrote as the National Junior Vice-President, I chose the acronym of TEAM which means Tasking (asking) Each Active Member. We need each other and this new gift now offers our Ladies an opportunity of opportunities to actively pursue contributing and supporting our organization as a TEAM to increase and enhance our membership. This also presents us with an opportunity to rekindle friendships and camaraderie with those Ladies who

Purple Heart Magazine

57


O O O O

L A D I E S’

have not renewed their membership or attended a meeting in a while—a good means of networking and reaching out. What a grand way to embrace each other and our newer recipients of the Purple Heart spouses and female family members, to not only express our support and pride of our Patriots but to include them. With this being said the membership drive is on and Pat Richard, National Membership Ofcer, is on standby and ready to serve. I encourage you to get involved, step out boldly, strengthen our organization, give a legacy (makes a great gift), take up the challenge of

O O O O

recruiting at least two new LAMOPH Life Members. Remember, it’s a good thing that we can do and if it’s gonna’ be—it’s up to us–you–me—the TEAM—National, Regional, Departments and Units. Thank you—thank you very much! On a final note, with the holiday season (Hanukah, Christmas, and New Year) upon us, let us not forget those who have paid, and those are paying the price for our freedom. Please remember it is a blessing to give and I hope and pray your celebrations are awesome! As always, I am so humbly grateful for all that you do in service to our veterans,

L A D I E S’

O O O O

A U X I L I A R Y

their families, our troops and our great nation. As we pursue our goals and common missions, my prayer is for you to stay beautiful, be blessed, and may God continue to bless America and may America bless God. ª

A U X I L I A R Y

O O O O

NATIONAL OFFICERS 2008-2009 PRESIDENT JANE STOEL (Clarence) 1984 Rambling Rose Rd Waukesha, WI 53186 262 542 0081 janelamoph@earthlink.ne t SR. VICE PRESIDENT GWENDOLYN GILLIARD (Isaac) 102 Norland Ave New Orleans, LA 70131 504 391 1127 cell 504 481 1003 gwen.gilliard@gmail.com JR.VICE PRESIDENT KAREN HALTINER (Robert) 19138 Bedford Dr Oregon City, OR 97045 503 657 7085 Rhaltiner7085@msn.com CHAPLAIN A. J. HERRAN (Jeff Roy) PO Box 414 Longmont, CO 80502 720 494 1106 ajh _dac@hotmail.com (understroke between H_d) SECRETARY SHARON CARLTON PNP 14363 Amapola Circle Ft. Pierce, FL 34951 772-489-8176 cell 772 332 1374 shcarlton@aol.com TREASURER NANCY LEE BIRSCHBACH (Paul) PO Box 72 Mount Calvary, WI 53057 920-753-6172 pnlbirschbach@yahoo.com MEMBERSHIP OFFICER PAT RICHARD PO Box 567 New Castle, OK 73065 405-392-4445 oklamoph@yahoo.com

58

REGION 1 PRESIDENT MARSHALL ELIZABETH (Betsy) ROBBINS (Jesse) CHARLOTTE DUNN 50 Mahoning St. #411 213 E Main Milton, PA 17847 Weatherford, OK 73096 Cell 580 471 4393 570 713 7846 Cell 570 713 7846 lashgram@cox.net or charlotte s dunn@gmail.com fax 570 524 0898 betsy@dejazzd.com PATRIOTIC INSTRUCTOR MARGARET A. SCHIPPER (William) REGION 2 PRESIDENT 2225 NW 25 BARB CHERONE (Rick) Oklahoma City, OK 73107 12880 Wimbledon Dr 405 524 5749 cell 4058 203 6250 New Berlin, WI 53151 262 786 9663 INSPECTOR cell 262 424 4379 JEANNE HELLARD (Danny) racherone@yahoo.com 14 Maple Circle Sand Springs, OK 74063 REGION 3 PRESIDENT 918 242 3390 cell 918 695 3325 DORIS MONSON cjmunns@aol.com 608 SE Sumner St Camas, WA 98607 360 834 6770 cell 360 450 9390 dmonson42@juno.com REGION 4 PRESIDENT EDITH SHOWN (Sid) 3428 Glen Raven Rd. Cedar Hill, TN 37032 615 696 2133 TNMOPH@aol.com REGION 5 PRESIDENT ELAINE REY (Fred) 4903 Transit Circle Austin, TX 78727-5144 512 339 8034 eerey@austin.rr.com REGION 6 PRESIDENT ELLEN BISHOP (Arthur) 2910 American River Dr Sacramento, CA 95864 916 359 2910 Cell 916 600 0096 bi shio p@wi nrst.com PARLIAMENTARIAN DONNA POULTER (Tom) 2178 Warwick Dr Santa Rosa, CA 95405 707 576 0513 cell-Tom’s 707 479 5051 Fax 707 546 9778 mopheagle@comcast.net

SGT- AT-ARMS JEANETTE MOSLEY (Jack) 208 NE 85TH #20 Newcastle, OK 73086 405 735 9808 Cell 940 367 5226

COMMUNITY SERVICE Evelyn Carter (Colin) 2038 E Albany Rd West Glover, VT 05875 evmcarter@vtlink.net

VAVS DEPUTY Rhunette Haywood (Henry) 1733 Smyrna Rd Elgin, SC 29045 803 438 1779 cell 803 260 7778

HISTORIAN Gloria German (Larry) 9101 Barrington Terrace Brooklyn Park, MN 55443 763 424 4055 designedbyu@comcast.net

VIOLA Elaine Kemper (Don) 617 So. 51 Ave Omaha, NE 68106 402 553 4769

LIAISON TO PUBLICATIONS Ann Turner (Del-Bulldog) 105 O’Hara Dr Albertville, AL 35950 256 891 0592 oat35950@aol.com LIAISON TO NATIONAL SERVICE OFFICE Janet Sullivan (Tom) 1016 Sullivan Ln Crystal Springs, MS 39059 601-892-3384 fax 601-892-0334 tsulliv4@dedac.com

SECURITIES AND FINANCE JUDITH SPAULDING PNP (Leroy) 85 Michael Blvd Frankfort, KY 40601-9032 502 223 0564 cell 504 229 1099 judiaspald@aol.co m

CO- LIAISON TO NATIONAL SERVICE OFFICE Edith Shown (Sid) 3428 Glen Raven Rd Cedar Hill, TN 37032-5104 615 696 2133 TNMOPH@aol.com

SECURITY AND FINANCE JOAN WALSH PNP 4716 Rohrway NW Massillon, OH 44647 330 837 2907 cell 330 309 3907 fjwal@netlink.net

MUSICIAN Linda Jackson (Kerry) 6221 S. 53rd St #9 Lincoln, NE 68516-3282 402 423 6005

APPOINTED OFFICERS AMERICANISM Alice Martha Lash (Gene) 2400 Kyle Robert Lane Moore, OK 73160 405 735 9808 almarastylz@cox.ne t COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Shirley Kopshinsky (Charles) 2012 S East Ave #13 Waukesha, WI 53189 263 5842 1656

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS COMMITTEE Nancy Lee Birschbach (Paul) PO Box 72 Mount Calvary, WI 53057 920 753 6172 pnlbirshbach@yahoo.com Jan Knapp (Tom) Elaine Rey (Fred) Donna Poulter (Tom) PAGES Lisa Carstensen WI Val Ortiz VA Lorraine Irman MN WEB MASTER A.J. Herrian (Jeff) PO Box 414 Longmont, CO 80502 ajh_dac@hotmail.com under stroke _ between h and d

PUBLICITY Maxine DeLaPena (Gilbert) 4804 N Diana St Fresno, CA 93726-0232 559 224 3895 gilmax@sbcglobal.net VAVS REPRESENTATIVE Mary Margaret Martin 5619 East Third St Tucson, AZ 85711 520 745 2144 fax 520 571 1068 mmmartin1@aol.com

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O O O O

F R O M

T H E

National Junior Vice Presidnet Karin Haltner COMMUNICATION—THE KEY TO MAKING A DIFFERENCE hank you so very much for your vote of condence in electing me to be your National Jr. Vice President of the LAMOPH. Also my sincere congratulations to all those who also were elected to their National MOPH and LAMOPH Ofces. I am looking forward to working with each and every one of you for the betterment of our great organization. Remember we must communicate, communicate and communicate. Also if we work together we can get things done. We “can make a difference,” whether it is with our Unit, State or National Ofcers or our veteran’ s and their families. Also if you see a returning Iraqi/Afgan Soilder (man or woman), reach out and help. Remember we are here to help all not just us. God bless you and God bless America. ª

T

National Secretary

Sharon Carlton, PNP

H E A R T

O O O O

as money) with someone less fortunate than you. It does not take much to put a smile on a lonely persons face. If you are looking for a group to send a care package to and no one you know has a loved one away ghting for our country, why not adopt a unit of your National Guard or Reserve unit. Most states have units that have been activated, and wouldn’t they enjoy news from home in the form of goodies and needed items. I am sure your local National Guard or Reserve Unit would be delighted to give you necessary information on getting packages to your troops. Do not forget our female soldiers who can use feminine items and something a little frilly. Yes we all know they are tough, but most have a soft side. When you are going to a veterans home or nursing home, what they do not need is another doo daad. Why not take a box of cards, put a stamp on all the envelopes (a purple heart stamp, or course), and if they need help, address the cards for them. We seniors are easy to please. Rank or the lack of it has no place in our meetings. How many times have I heard, “my husband was a colonel, my husband was a captain or major.” Well heck, my husband was a corporal when his legs were blown out from under him. I am sure the bullets and bombs did not have a rank stamped on them, so let us remember we are here to help one another, be a friend, be loyal. We are blessed for what we have; let us remember others that have not. ª

THE HOLIDAYS ARE UPON US

W

e have completed our Region Conferences; they are a school of instruction. The Region presidents should be letting the ladies in their Region know what was accomplished during their meeting. Sharing of information is a help to all. Presidents and Secretaries, when you receive communication from your Department or National, this is not information for just you, it is to be shared with your ladies. Communicate, communicate communicate! These words should always be foremost in our minds. The Holidays will soon be upon us. Veterans Day is November 11. Let us honor those who are and have served. Marine Corp Birthday is November 10. Remember all branches for their service—Army, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard. With Thanksgiving just around the corner, I nd I have much to be thankful for. I also remember those who do not have enough to eat or a warm place to sleep, our service people around the world, all can use our caring. Christmas, Hanukkah, and any other day you may celebrate. Remember others. Do you have a Veterans hospital near to you, a Veterans Home, a Nursing Home? So many are away from their families or no longer have families near by. Share your time and wealth (no that is not meant November / December 2008

The Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Military Order of the Purple Heart rcently received $500 from the proceeds of the 2007 Harp (Grocery Chain) Charity Golf Tournament. The Ladies’ Auxiliary Unitwas founded in 1958, and is comprised of the female relatives and the direct lineal descendants of veterans who were awarded the Purple Heart for wounds incurred in battle. (l.-r.) Mike Thurow, vice presiddent of Harp’s Store Systems; Judy Henbest and Brooke Henbest, both of the Ladies’ Auxiliary at the presentation of the check. The funds will be used to defray expenses of the Unit in conjunction with veterans assistance programs.

Purple Heart Magazine

Photo provided by Judy Henbest

59


O O O O

D E P A R T M E N T

O F

D E F E N S E

O O O O

DOD REVISES PURPLE HEART ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA TO ALLOW AWARD TO POWS WHO DIE IN CAPTIVITY

O

n October 6, 2008, the Department of Defense announced it has expanded the Purple Heart eligibility criteria allowing prisoners-of-war who died in captivity to receive the award. The revised department policy presumes, for service members who die in captivity as a qualifying prisoner-of-war, that their death was the “result of enemy action,” or the result of wounds incurred “in action with the enemy” during capture, or as a result of wounds incurred as a “result of enemy action” during capture, unless compelling evidence is presented to the contrary. The revised policy allows retroactive award of the Purple Heart to qualifying prisoners-of-war since December 7, 1941. Posthumous award will be made to the deceased service member’s representative, as designated by the secretary of the military department concerned, upon application to that military department. Each military department will publish application procedures and ensure they are accessible by the general public. Family members with questions may contact the services: Army: Military Awards Branch, (703) 325-8700; Navy: Navy Personnel Command, Retired Records Section, (314) 592-1150; Air Force: Air Force Personnel Center, (800) 616-3775; Marine Corps: Military Awards Branch, (703) 784-9340. For further information, media representatives should contact Eileen Lainez, (703) 695-3895, eileen.lainez@osd.mil.

NATIONAL PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE – 2008-2009 ROBERT LINDEN (CHAIRMAN & 3-year Mbr. 3367 Virginia Street Atwater, CA 95301-2032 Phone: (209) 357-1462 purpleheartdad@peoplepc.com JEFF R OY (Ex-Ofcio wi th vo te ) National Commander 1342 Terrace Drive Longmont, CO 80501 H: (303) 702-1956 Cell: (720) 320-9099 jroy@vw-du.net NICK MCINTOSH (4-year Member) 4112 Chapel Lane New Albany, IN 47150-9611 H: (812) 944-3562 nnnrmc@insightbb.com; nnnrmc@aol.com RICK CHERONE (2-year Mbr.) 12880 Wimbledon Drive New Berlin, WI 53151 H: (262) 786-9663 racherone@yahoo.com TONY RIVERA, JR. (1-year Mbr.) 1647 William Street Fort Lee, NJ 07024-2624 Phone: (201) 585-8026 FAX: (201) 585-8026 captaintony@nj.rr.com CYRIL L. KAMMEIER (Non-voting) Editor 10 Tocoma Court Inwood, WV 25428 Cell: 571-218-5235 (H) (304) 229-7445 Fax: (707) 897-2637 cykamm@verizon.net BOYD BARCLAY (Non-voting) N ation al Fina nce Ofce r 820 N. E. 63RD Oklahoma City, OK 73105-6442 O: (405) 842-1971 FAX: (405) 842-1972 CELL: (405) 517-6826 caphookvmo@sbcglobal.net JACK LEONARD (Non-voting) National Adjutant 5413-B Backlick Road Sprin gel d, VA 221 51-3 960 O: (703) 642-5360 Fax: (703) 642-1841 jpalagyi@purpleheart.org ANN TURNER (Del) (Non-voting LAMOPH Liaison) 105 O’Hara Dr. Albertville, LA 35950 H: (256) 891-8592 oat35950@aol.com

60

Purple Heart Magazine

November / December 2008


O DE P A R T M E N T

O F

D E F E N S E O

PRESIDENT James M. Blaylock P.O. Box 308 Tucker, GA 30085-0308 First Vice President R. Louie Spinelli 17 Seventh Street New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Vice President Frederick A. Taylor 4213 Raccoon Loop New Port Richey, FL 34653 Treasurer William A. Wroolie 111 Lakeview Lane Brainerd, MN 56401-2174 Secretary Al Silvano 20 Lady’s Walk Lady’s Island, SC 29907 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (Acting) Greg Bresser 7008 Little River Turnpike P.O. Box 49 Annandale, VA 22003 Email: GBresser@purpleheartfoundation.org (703) 256-6139 DIRECTORS Frank A. Athanason 12205 Candlelight Circle Ft. Washington, MD 20744 Boyd Barclay P.O. Box 5276 Edmond, OK 73083 John M. Duchessi 42 Lincoln Avenue Amsterdam, NY 12010 James Durkin 42 Whitebank Lane Bluffton, SC 29909 Carl A. Falkowski 653 Belland Avenue Vadnais Heights, MN 55127 John L. Hammel 2752 Lake Forest Park Drive Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 Joseph R. Hems 1271 Stockton New Brunswick, NJ 08902 Tom Poulter 2178 Warwick Drive Santa Rosa, CA 95405-8373 James D. Randles 344 Brookshire Drive Lilburn, GA 30047-2106 Thomas F. Sharpe 170 Bloomingrove Drive Troy, NY 12180 Louis C. Tebbe P.O. Box 976 Gaylord, MI 48735

1,215 U.S. servicemembers from all over Iraq re-enlisted during a ceremony in the Al Faw Palace rotunda at Camp Victrory in Baghdad, July 4, 2008. Multinational ForceIraq Commander Army Gen. David Petraeus led the ceremony. Photo by MNF-I Public Affairs

S

ervicemembers from all over Iraq gathered in the Al Faw Palace rotunda on Camp Victory, to re-enlist and celebrate America’s Independence Day on July 4, 2008. All 1,215 servicemembers celebrated by raising their right hand and pledging to continue defending the ‘land of the free’ in what is the largest re-enlistment ceremony since the all-volunteer force began in 1973, according to the Multi-National Force—Iraq Command Sergeant Major, Command Sgt, Maj. Marvin L. Hill. “Volunteering to continue to serve our nation, while deployed—is both noble and inspiring,” said Gen. David Petraeus, commanding general, Multi-National Force-Iraq. “It is, as award citations often state, in keeping with the nest traditions of our military services.” Petraeus presided over the ceremony and led the airmen, Marines, Sailors, and Soldiers in their oath to defend their country against all enemies both foreign and domestic on this day of celebration of America winning its independence. “ We recognize the sacrices they make and the sacrices their families and communities make as they serve in Iraq,” Hill said. “These servicemembers know the cost of war and they are still re-enlisting.” All together, the servicemembers pledged more than 5,500 years of additional service to their country. “It makes me feel proud to serve this great nation,” said Spc. Zackary Cunningham, mechanic, 602nd Maintenance Battalion, Tactical Base Balad, who plans on making the Army a career. The re-enlistees have every right to feel proud, according to Petraeus. “You and your comrades here have been described as America’s new greatest generation, and, in my view, you have more than earned that description,” Petraeus said. “It is the greatest of honors to soldier here with you.” O

November / December 2008

Purple Heart Magazine

I

do not mean to exclude altogether the idea of patriotism. I know it exists, and I know it has done much in the present contest. But I will venture to assert, that a great and lasting war can never be supported on this principle alone. It must be aided by a prospect of interest, or some reward. —George Washington 61


O

O

O

O Name

Name

Service Dept Ch. .

ABROMEIT, ARTHUR M ADAMS, THOMAS D ADDY, LARRY C AHMED, ALI A ALLISON, CALUPH W ALLSBROOKS JR, CHARLES D AMSTUTZ, WILLIAM W ANDERSON, CLIFFORD C ANDERSON, R STANLEY ARIE, JAMES E ARTERBEY, PHILLIP C ASMOND, LEONARD H ATENCIO SR, JUAN P ATKINSON, CARL R ATKINSON, WILLIIAM P BABCOCK, IRADELL B BAGGETT, ALONZO T BAKER, STEWART L BARNS, JAMES J BASHAW, EDWARD T BEEAN, CLARE JOHN BELL, JOSEPH R BENTON, JAMES V BETHEL, EDWARD VOLEN BOOZE, RAYMOND E BOOZER JR, WILLIAM A BOYD, JOHN W BRAUNS, TIMOTHY J BRAY, MARCUS BRENNAN, JAMES BRONTMIRE, GEORGE C BROPHY, ROBERT T BROWN, LONNIE BROZEK, JOHN W BRUNO, SABINO A BUNKERS, PHILIP C BUSE, HOWARD L BUTTRICK, ALLEN W BYRD, ARDEN F CANNON, WILSON E CARLUCCI, KENNETH C CARMOUCHE, ASHTON J CARTER, LOYD H CASTILLO, INES G CASTLE, LUTHER T CHAFFEE, EDWIN E CODER JR, JAMES B COHEN, IRVING J COHEN, MARCUS COLLEY, ROBERT L CONKLIN, LLOYD E COOPER, WILLIAM B CORDEIRA, ERNEST F CORWIN, WILLIAM D COSTA, JAMES COTTRIEL, FRED COUTURIER, ALFRED L CROOK, MORGAN CYR, RAYMOND J D’AGOSTINO JR, JOHN DALMAN, HAROLD L DAVIS, ROBERT L DAY, FRANLKIN D DELAHORNE, LLOYD J DEVITT, JOHN A DICKSON, FRANK L DILLOW, EVERETT H DOESECKLE, PATRICK F DONOGHUE, DANIEL J DOWD, WAYNE F DOWLING, LEO E DOYLE, JOHN R DUCHESSI, PNC 1976, JOHN M EICHFELD, TIMOTHY J FIRENZE, MICHAEL S FLORY, JOSEPH L FLOWERS, J C FLYNN SR, RICHARD P FRABER JR, JOHN W FREDERICK, CLYDE G FREEMAN, ARTHUR E FRETWELL, CHARLES E FRY, HAROLD E GARRAMONE, JOSEPH THOMAS GIDEON, SCOTT E

62

AR MC AR MC AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AR MC AF MC NV AR AR AR AF MC NV AR AR AR AR AR AR AR NV AR AR NV AR AR AR AR AR AR AR NV AR AR AR AR AR AR MC MC AR AR MC AR AR AR AR NV AR AR AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AR AR

CO IN TX VA TX AL KS MN ID IA CA NJ NM OH AL NE FL MI OH MI MI MS IN FL MO SC KY PA IN NY NY WI TX NY MN NE PA TX WV KY NY LA SC NM OH NN NJ FL TX MI IL AZ CT PA NN CA NN GA NN CA MI NE OH TX TX TX KY MD NJ CA TX PA NY NJ NY NY TX WI FL OH NC MI TX NY TX

0375 0720 1919 0353 1919 2203 0684 0308 0509 DML 0002 0036 0372 0743 2204 0632 0535 0110 0590 1976 0037 0690 0720 0087 0621 0402 0585 0992 1916 0405 0264 0096 1919 0264 0194 0632 1983 1919 0697 0585 0187 1955 1948 0773 0671 0614 0701 0717 1919 0075 0175 0472 0552 0034 0395 0604 4570 0425 2699 0049 0091 0200 0620 1919 0723 1836 0591 2222 0033 0729 0612 0063 0118 0116 0406 0394 1919 0096 0524 0643 0638 1818 0553 0490 1919

O

T A P S

Service Dept. Ch.

GOETZ, MILTON L GORE, JAMES F GRANATO, JAMES J GRENEVICKI, JOSEPH J GRIBBLE, RAYMOND L GRILLS, WILLIAM A GUIDRY, HENRY W HAGEL, WARREN I HAINES, ALBERT P HALL, JOHN L HALLIDAY, CLEMENT D HAMANN, KENNETH C HAND, RICHARD D HARMON, FRED M HARNISH, JOHN L HARPAIN, WALTER W HARTMAN, ROBERT K HATFIELD, HAROLD A HAYHURST, CLYDE S HAZLEWOOD, QUINCY A HEBBLETHWAITE, ROY V HEIM, JACK W HERNANDEZ, ANTHONY B HICKERSON, ARLISS T HILL, DUANE S HILL, JOHN F HILT, RALPH E HOEGH, HAROLD B HOLBROOK, LLOYD J HOLTEN, JOE T HOPWOOD, EVERETT J HOUSE, RALPH HOUT, MARVIN J HOWARD, ELLIE WESLEY HUGHES, BILLY H HUGHEY, THOMAS M JARDELL, PRESTON E JIMENEZ, JOSEPH W JOHNSON, DALE L KEFFER, DENNIS K KENT II, ROLAND J KIRSCHENHEUTER, RAYMOND E KISHMAN, GERALD L KITCHEN, LARRY W KLOOTE, ROGER J KNOLLINGER, RICHARD W KOSCINSKI, CHARLES J KRUEGER, KENNETH R KRUPA, FRANCIS L KULL, KENNETH C KUNKEL, JOHN E LANDIS, MAX E LARSON, MICHAEL LEONARD LARSON, NORMAN K LARY, ROBERT W LATALL, RAYMOND F LAWLOR, JOHN J LEWELLEN, LUTHER L LEYBA, LUIS LITZAU, ROBERT W LOIACONO, E L (LUCKY) LONDON JR, FRED LUCAS, JACKLYN H MAIO, TONY P MALYSKA, JOHN S MANN, CHARLES E MATHERN JR, LOUIS G MATOUSHEK, MARTIN A MATTOX, RALPH A MATUSKO, MICHAEL E MATZKIW JR, WILLIAM MCBEE, ROBERT C MCCLENDON, CARL MCCONNELL, WILLIAM F X MCDONALD, CURTIS J 0677 MCDONALD, DONALD R MCLANE, STANLEY S MCMASTERS III, THOMAS A MCMILLAN, BRUCE F MEDLEY, WELMER B MEEKER, ROBERT C MELORE, THOMAS O MENTIER, WAYNE J MERSKI, EDWARD C MEUTH, BERNARD A MILLER, ABRAHAM MITCHELL, DUANE E MONCADA, HENRY MONTGOMERY, RADFORD S MORSE, FRANCIS D MOUTON, SALVADOR M MUNCH JR, PAUL O MURKEY, MURRELL F MURPHY, ROBERT E

NV AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR NV AR NV AR AR AF AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AF NV AR AR AR AR NV AF AR MC NV AR AR AR AF MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AF AR AR AR AR AR MC NV AR AR AR NV AR AR MC MC AR AR

FL AR NJ PA TX AR CA MN PA TN NJ IL TX SC FL CA MI MI FL TX MO PA CA CA ID OH OH IA KY TX OH MI MD SC TX FL TX NV NJ NE NV NJ MI TX MI WV NC WA MI MN OH IA MN MN MI VA TX IN NM MD MD NY MS WI NJ TN AZ WI MI MN CA MS TX AZ

0466 0678 0336 0654 1876 0678 0002 0268 0190 0457 0336 0175 1836 0402 0400 0106 0091 1985 0466 0612 0621 0455 0379 0379 0509 0625 0148 0777 0769 0740 0148 0091 2222 0402 1919 0087 1991 0726 0027 0260 0719 0026 0091 1919 0091 0709 2226 0470 0482 1977 0620 0462 0194 0268 0110 0353 1836 0720 0559 0122 0122 0021 0690 0096 0702 0457 0572 0165 0035 0268 0493 0771 0612 DML MS

AR MC AR MC AR AF AR AR AR MC AR AF MC AR MC AR AR MC AR

MI AK MI NN MI NY NY MI NJ TX NY IA TX GA FL LA NM MD MO

0482 0830 0035 0395 0075 0394 0417 0609 0010 1876 0003 0777 1919 0425 0524 1955 1966 0577 0125

Purple Heart Magazine

O

O

O

Name

Service Dept. Ch.

NAKANO, STANLEY S NASH, KENNETH R NAUMCZIK, JOHN NEESON, VERN J NELSON, LAWRENCE I NELSON, NODELL T NETT, ROBERT B NICKELL, C DUANE NISTLER, GERALD M NORRED, EARL A NORRIS, HAROLD GLENN NORWOOD, JOSEPH E NOVAK, ANDREW H OKAMURA, PAUL OLIVA, CHARLES J O’REILLY, JOHN V OSTICK, CHARLES OTT, WILLIAM H PACHOLSKI, CHESTER PAPPAS, HARRY J PARKER, ROBERT C PARKER, THOMAS D PARYS, JOSEPH PETITTI, LARRY A PETROVICH, ANDREW PIERCE, JAMES H PIERCHALSKI, CHESTER E PIGOTT, CHARLES W POLNIK, EDWARD POPHAM, DAVID E POWLUS, JAMES C PRATHER, FRED VOGEL PRUITT SR, ROBERT S QUINLAN, JACK A RADONICH, PETER J RAYMOND, GROVER F RAYMOND, STEPHEN E REMSTER, GEORGE L RICCIARDI, WILLIAM G RICE, LEONARD E ROBINSON, FRED W ROPER, EDWIN ROSENKRANZ SR, JOHN J ROSVOLD, MARVIN J RYAN, ROBERT E SALAMONE, PAUL F SAMPLES JR, GUY SANTUCCI, PETER F SCHAFER, ROBERT JOHN SCHNUG, EDWARD SCHULTHEIS, JOSEPH R SELLERS, RICK G SGOMBICK, JOHN W SHAFFER, RUSSELL E SHIFLET, FOEY M SHIPP, HAROLD G SHUPP, LEONARD E SILVA, RICHARD R SINGLETON, GEORGE SINSKI, WILLIAM J SMITH, CHARLES K SMITH, ELMER W SMITH, GORDON L SMITH, RICHARD W SMITH, ROWLAND SNOPEK, JOSEPH E SOUTHWORTH, EARL SUCOFF, MARTIN SWAFFORD, L C TAPIA, JOHN G THOMAS, ELDER M THOMAS, JACKSON R THOMES, DELBERT C TODD, MARION R TORRES, RALPH Q TROUT, HAROLD C TYLER, RICHARD D VAN PEURSEM, CECIL P VAN SCOTER, BERNARD VOOGD, EDWARD J WALLS, FRANKLIN M WARD, JAMES D WEAVER JR, ERNEST S WENDELL, DONALD F WENKER, ROBERT G WHEAT, KENNETH E WHITE, JOHN H WIDEROE, EDWIN I WILSON, WILLIAM R WIMPEE, LEALON C WINN, CHESTER WINTTER, JACKSON E WOLFE, CHESTER WOOD, CHARLES N YORK, WILLIAM T

AR AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AF AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AS* AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AF AR AR AR MC NV AR AR AR AR AF AR AR AR AR AR MC AR AR AF AR AF AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR AR AR MC AR AR AR AR AR MC MC AR AR AR AF AR AR MC AR AR MC AR AR

MO OH TX MI MI MT GA KY MN TX OH WV IL HI NJ MO GA OH WI IL MI MN MI PA FL OH PA CA NJ ID PA AR PA KS CA MI FL NJ NM TX NN AL WV NE MI NY OH MN MN VA OH TX NJ MD TX PA PA CA AL NJ TX WV AZ IA TX PA MI FL AR AZ TX MO FL TN TX IN PA FL OH MI WV FL WV CA MN WV LA CA VA CA IA AL PA GA MO

0621 1984 1991 0035 0091 0343 0492 0585 0005 1919 0625 0579 0575 0489 0522 0125 0531 0156 0764 0575 0110 1977 0041 0455 1980 0765 0519 0729 0246 0509 0529 0436 0529 0684 1850 0482 0776 0336 0559 1919 2699 2202 0646 0681 0075 0394 0148 0005 0745 0353 3620 1919 0036 0577 1937 0034 0190 1850 2202 0336 4077 0698 1958 0861 0393 0654 0091 0674 0460 0442 1991 0115 0087 0457 0393 1922 0170 0717 0031 0110 0697 0524 0697 0049 0987 0646 1955 0729 0607 1850 0777 2202 0529 0525 0621

November / December 2008


The author, John M. Reed, a near 90 year old World War II veteran fought in Africa, Sicily, Italy, Southern France, Battle of the Bulge, Battle for the Rhine and who served in every Army in the European Theater except the 1st Army. He made two amphibious landings in Europe and proudly wears the Purple Heart, three Bronze Stars, two Arrowheads and seven campaign stars. He resides in Windfall, Indiana.


Purple Heart  

Nov -Dec 2008

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you