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(Read ebook) The Old Country

The Old Country From Roaring Brook Press ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook

#3591389 in Books 8.96 x .40 x 6.01l, #File Name: B005SMWSU0 | File size: 50.Mb From Roaring Brook Press : The Old Country before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Old Country: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. I recently recommended it for my cousin's summer reading and she loved ...By Laura GuerardI read The Old Country with my middle school students after reading it once myself and being quite taken with the twists and turns of the story. I recently recommended it for my cousin's summer reading and she loved it! This is a fast read that puts a light-hearted spin on a heavy topic. This novel is great for teaching foreshadowing, symbolism, imagery, and many other literary devices. The Old Country is magical!0 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Heavy-handed parable with a twistBy Wolf LahtiThe story begins in a familiar folk-tale format but transmutes into a parable that tries to walk the edge between a children's fairy tale and an adult allegory,


and it doesn't really succeed at being either. The political and racial proselytizing in particular got a bit heavy, especially for a fairy tale, and would have been better handled more tangentially. Though supposedly aimed at young children, it is more suited to the late elementary crowd--and it is a light, quick read for anyone who likes foxes. The overtly fantastic elements introduced in the latter half bothered me a little, but once I accepted the turn the writing had taken, I was able to get used to it.The ending, however, made up for any faults encountered on the journey. It was a satisfying conclusion, and I have to say that I did not see it coming.7 of 7 people found the following review helpful. A wonderful story...By MarzieIn the same vein as many of the original Hans Christian Anderson Tales, The Old Country provides an unexpected and often harsh view of a fairy tale existence. The story is not fanciful in a light hearted sense but offers the challenge of perceiving the paradigm of another existence. I loved the ending of the book, and thought that it offers, overall, a valuable message about our own assumptions of good and evil. It isn't necessarily suitable for the 3rd-6th grade mentioned on the Booklist Review, but would be a wonderful novella for children in middle school. From the winner of the 2004 Caldecott Medal comes a memorable new work, a novel of singular insight and imagination that transports readers to the Old Country, where "all the fairy tales come from, where there was magic -and there was war." There, Gisella stares a moment too long into the eyes of a fox, and she and the fox exchange shapes. Gisella's quest to get her girl-body back takes her on a journey across a war-ravaged country that has lost its shape. She encounters magic, bloodshed, and questions of power and justice -- until finally, looking into the eyes of the fox once more, she faces a strange and startling choice about her own nature. Part adventure story and part fable; exciting, beautifully told, rich in humor and wisdom, The Old Country is the work of an artist and storyteller at the height of his powers. From School Library JournalGrade 3-6Framed as an elderly immigrant's story, this overly ambitious tale transpires in a war-torn Balkanesque country in which various factions fight for possession of the land while everyone wishes to oust the Crags. When her brother is conscripted and goes off to war, young Gisella is left to hunt for and kill a chickenstealing fox that has terrorized her family. However, a trial is held among the forest animals and the fox is exonerated for her "crimes." In spite of her lifelong warnings, Gisella looks too long into its eyes and she and the fox trade shapes. War separates the humans from the now fox-girl and her animal companions, but they arereunited in prison. A shapeshifting woodland sprite and an enigmatic "owl person" appear to explain the human ravages on the magical world at a "crossroads," where animals can communicate with humans. Through them, Gerstein explores whether evil is inherent in the world, the costs of war, and the existence of magic. Elements of fantasy and traditional literature are threaded through the realistic and semi-historical horrors of war. This pastiche of theme and genre, tone and voice confuses readers' expectations and ultimately dilutes the story's power. Humor follows horror. Buffoonish royalty is overthrown by covetous generals, Gisella's blinded brother recovers his sight via some gruesome magic and leads the fight for a Crag homeland, and the baffling outcome of the fox/girl body swap may put off readers as well. This is a challenging burgoo of a novel and a rambling character-ridden tale that may have a difficult time finding and holding an audience.Susan Hepler, Burgundy Farm Country Day School, Alexandria, VA Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistGr. 7-10. In this fairy tale-like allegorical novel, Caldecott medalist Gerstein beckons readers to consider human versus animal natures, issues he first explored in his historical novel Victor (1998). Framed as a New World immigrant's autobiography, as recited to her skeptical but enthralled great-granddaughter, the narrative tells of a girl named Gisella who is tricked into swapping bodies with a wily fox. In her alien but exhilarating new form, she must travel through the war-ravaged Old Country (where "all fairy tales come from") to reclaim her original body and to rescue family members imprisoned by a ruthless, xenophobic emperor for being "Crags" (a beleaguered ethnic group). Though unassuming in length and brimming with references to familiar stories, including Alice in Wonderland, Gisella's adventure comes layered with troubling symbolism and a kind of muffled moodiness that constantly shadows her childlike hope for "the warm glow of a happy ending." Suggest this to older readers, as well as college-level children's literature students, perhaps alongside an examination of Maurice Sendak's Brundibar (2003), which is similar in theme and tone. Jennifer MattsonCopyright American Library Association. All rights reserved "With his exquisite sense of possibilities, Gerstein urges his readers to remember the tales of wonder that may not be written but are history, too."

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THE-OLD-COUNTRY  

THE OLD COUNTRY EUROPE , WHAT DOES THE OLD COUNTRY REFER TO , BACK IN THE OLD COUNTRY , THE OLD COUNTRY ITALY , THE OLD COUNTRY ENGLAND , TH...

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