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LOUGHBOROUGH DESIGN SCHOOL

At Loughborough Design School we believe that good design makes for a better future. This better future will come from new generations of designers and ergonomists, and here is where they are prepared. The School is proud to be nurturing a vibrant, innovative and creative community of staff and students. With over 100 staff and 700 students from over 30 countries worldwide, we pride ourselves on our international community, bringing together ideas and experience from every corner of the globe. On the east of the University campus, the School is based within a £21million state-ofthe-art building, with a fully equipped environmental ergonomics laboratory based close by. This purpose built building has practical and theoretical teaching spaces at its heart, ensuring you are given a professional and inspirational experience. The powerhouse behind the School’s strong reputation and successes are the staff that are imparting their expertise and knowledge to successive generations of graduates now embarking upon careers all over the world. This expertise, built through research and industry experience, guides our students to understand and work to a high professional standard.


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LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY Based in the heart of England, with easy transport links to the rest of the UK and beyond, Loughborough University welcomes students from all over the world to experience something unique and life changing. The University provides a wealth of support, resources, activities and information to all its students to ensure that their experience is enjoyable and beneficial. Information about the University and these resources can be found on our prospectus website – www.lboro.ac.uk/ug


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CONTENTS 02

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School and University Introduction

Product Design and Technology course

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20

Sketching

Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) course

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26

Industrial Design and Technology course

Design Ergonomics course

32

Application process and portfolio guidance

34

CAD and rendering


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36

44

Placements and study abroad

Final Year Design Project – Dale Comley

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45

56

Design Week and other events

Final Year Design Project – James Molkenthin

Alumni: Rachel Bennett

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46

57

Degree Show

Facilities

Alumni: Richard Joseph

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50

58

Competitions and exhibitions

Industry connections

Careers support

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Final Year Design Project – Chloe Tuck

Research

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54

Final Year Design Project – Alex Margetts

Entrepreneurialism

Finance


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Course

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND T E C H N O L O G Y BA (HONS) Our Industrial Design and Technology course focuses on a highly usercentred approach to design and the creation of beautiful, technically viable products. The structure of the course combines the study of theoretical knowledge and practical skills appropriate to contemporary design practice. The course explores and develops your abilities in three-dimensional product-focused designing, using our outstanding workshop resources to enable you to make models and prototypes to help develop and present your creative ideas. Teaching intertwines an exciting range of practical and theoretical classes to engage you with the principles and practices of industrial design and their technological bases. Our aim is to help you combine our expert training, and support development of your imaginative and creative capabilities, to prepare you for a successful career.

Th e d if f erence betw een Product Des ign an d I n du st rial Des ign at L oughborough Both the BA Industrial Design and Technology and BSc Product Design and Technology courses share core content that delivers knowledge and applied skills appropriate to a contemporary designer, including the development and communication of ideas, ergonomics, interaction, the techniques of planning and costing, product styling, threedimensional designing, materials and processes, and the production of prototypes and finished artefacts. The modules, exclusive to the BA Industrial Design and Technology course, deepen the understanding of the creative form and aesthetics of manufactured products, the understanding of social trends and addressing user needs through the creation of desirable products.


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S TRUC T UR E

CAREE R PRO S PE CTS

This course can be studied over three or four years, with the four year option including a placement or study abroad period during the third year (this is called a sandwich course). Each year is divided into two semesters which normally run from the end of September/start of October until the end of January, and from the start of February until mid-June. There are two holiday periods during these semesters where you will have three weeks holiday around Christmas and four weeks around Easter.

Our approach to Industrial Design teaching and learning ensures that you will be prepared to enter the workplace with the skills and experience required. 88%# of our 2013 graduates are in employment or further study, with 93% of these in professional or managerial roles. A large number of companies contact us to recruit our students directly, with many holding interviews within the School. The broad nature of the course also supports a large number of other careers where there appears to be no direct relationship to design, such as financial services. A number of our students have also gone on to start their own businesses or to work freelance in a number of fields.

C ONT E NT All teaching and learning is divided into a number of modules. Each module covers a specific topic and is given a credit value depending on how intensive the module is. Each year you will study 120 credits in total. Some of the modules you will study are compulsory, and therefore must be studied by all students. These usually cover fundamental theory and knowledge vital to graduating from this particular course. You may also be able to study a number of optional modules, which you can choose from a list. Optional modules help you to tailor your degree to suit your chosen career path, or enable you to study a wide range of topics to keep your options open. Modules cover a range of topics for example: sketching, CAD, rapid prototyping, product styling, brand awareness, user-led innovation, materials/processes, the development/ communication of ideas, ergonomics, sustainable design, techniques of planning and producing models, prototypes and finished artefacts.

O PP ORT UNI TIES O VE R V I E W

Re c e n t g r a du a te de s ti n a ti on s f or th i s c o u r se in c l u de : Adidas, Marketing Intern; Alliance Boots, Assistant Buying Manager; Artform International, Prototype Designer; BskyB, Digital Designer; Bosch, Trainee Design Engineer; DCA Design International, Industrial Designer; Decathlon, Innovation Designer; Dyson, Industrial Design and Technology Graduate; Hornby Hobbies, Industrial CAD Designer; Joseph Joseph, Freelance Designer; Marks and Spencer, Product Technologist; Perkins Engines, Product Engineer; Proctor and Gamble, Industrial Design Manager; Rolls-Royce, Management Trainee; Sebastian Conran Associates, Product Designer; Unilever, Industry Designer; Vax, Product Designer.

COURSE INFORMATION

This course offers you a number of opportunities to enhance your skills and experience. You can find out more about these opportunities throughout this brochure. Opportunities for this course include:

A W A RD:

BA (Hons) BA (Hons) DPS*/ DIntS** (*Diploma in Professional Studies/ **Diploma in International Studies – please see page 36 for more information)

_ Year-long placement

U CA S C O D E :

H775 – 3 year course H776 – 4 year course with sandwich DPS/ DIntS year

_ Entrepreneurial support

D U RAT I O N :

3 years full-time for BA (Hons) 4 years sandwich for BA (Hons) DPS/ DIntS

_ Live industry project briefs

F E E S ( 2 0 1 5 E N T R Y ): £9,000

_ Industry speakers and lecturers

A D D ITI O N A L C O S T S F O R PRO G R A MME :

All costs for direct engagement in taught modules are included in the fees with the exception of costs incurred for individual projects which may have to be met by the student. Fees for the optional placement/ study abroad year are £800+ + for 2015.

U K/ E U E N T R Y R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

A-Level: ABB including grade B in A-Level Design and Technology or Art and Design IB: 32 points minimum including HL Design and Technology or Art and Design BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma: DDM Other: GCSE Maths grade C

IN TE RN AT I O N A L E N TRY R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

The international equivalent of the above UK requirements (please contact us for clarification, if necessary). For those whose first language is not English, an English language qualification is required e.g. IELTS minimum 6.5 overall score with not less than 6.0 in the individual listening, reading, writing and speaking tests. TOEFL – minimum 92 overall with reading and listening 21 and writing and speaking 22 minimum.

A PPLIC AT I O N P R O C E S S :

Please see page 32 for details

CO N TA C T :

E: dslearning@lboro.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1509 226900

_ Study abroad options

_ Competitions _ Degree Show _ Fieldtrips and visits _ Design Week This course is professionally recognised – _ You can become a member of the Chartered Society of Designers (CSD) _ The course is also accredited by the Institute of Engineering Designers (IED)

# of those available for work or study six months after graduation – DLHE 2013 + all entry requirements are for 2015 entry and may be subject to change ++ may be subject to change


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Y E A R TW O

MODULES

COMPULSORY MODULES BA DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLO GIES

Y EAR ONE

This module requires the completion of a project using injection mould tool design and CAD/CAM, to design an innovative low cost/high volume product.

DESIGN PRACTICE 1

DESIGN CONTEXTS

This module is centred around teaching you good working practices in design, bringing together everything you have learned from other modules and putting this into context. The module is based in the studio and workshops where you will be designing and building projects.

This theoretical module takes a look at the changing role of the industrial designer and how society, history and the design industry have different bearings on design. It also covers the significance of enterprise and the major design movements of the 20th Century.

Teac hing and lear ning: practical classes, workshops and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials, lectures and guided independent study

As s essment: 100% coursework – presenting your projects through drawn, written and oral presentations and folios, as well as displays of work

A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – an essay and group presentation/seminar

DESIGN PRACTICE 2 The primary aim of this module is to help you build on the skills and experience from the module Design Practice 1. You will be working both on individual projects and in teams to develop imaginative and creative solutions to the briefs set. You will also learn about the role of design in enterprise and learn how to use workshop machinery and tools safely. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework – assignments and a drawing assessment

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIES 1 This module aims to give you a basic understanding of product semantics and branding. You will also improve your appreciation of form, colour and texture of products. You will be conducting, analysing and presenting visual research and will be generating design concepts from a range of data and semantic concepts. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, tutorials and guided independent study As s essment: 60% coursework, 40% in-class test – one visual research exercise, one design exercise and a multiple choice test

ERGONOMICS AND DESIGN 1 This module looks at how ergonomics has a bearing on design in relation to the information and operation of an item, panel design, console and workplace design, tool design, seating, and musculoskeletal complaints and how these can be evaluated effectively. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, seminars and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t: 60% coursework and 40% in-class test – online anthropometry test, anthropometry practical, and group and individual submission of control panel coursework design exercise

PROTOTYPING FOR DESIGN This practical module introduces you to product prototyping strategies and 3D modelling techniques. It uses engineering drawings, existing and created by you, to successfully translate designs to understand the appropriate methods and tools to use in prototyping. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, demonstrations, guided independent study, practical classes, workshops and supervised time in the studio/workshop A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – submission of three completed artefacts and the associated logbooks completed during their creation and an engineering drawing task folder

COMPUTING FOR DESIGNERS 1

FOUNDATION TECHNOLOGY

This module will help you to gain a good understanding of essential software in the design process including, data management, 3D modelling, using 3D data in engineering drawing, 3D rendering and 2D graphics.

This module takes a look at electrical, electronic and mechanical systems and materials and how they relate to product design. You will learn how to produce schematics of electronic circuits, use electronic simulation tools to design circuits and use graphical methods to model mechanical force systems, amongst other things.

Teac hing and lear ning: practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework – computer based exercises

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials, lectures, practical classes, workshops, supervised time in studios, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of four individual pieces including a computer based materials assessment, CAD modelled design, a group report and a design folio

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIES 2 This module is a continuation of the module studied during your first year. It looks at advanced industrial design techniques, including social trends and environment analysis, user and brand research as well as learning techniques and strategies to enable industrial design activity at an enhanced level. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a group logbook, presentations and your research and design concepts

YEAR 2 DESIGN PRACTICE You will learn to manage a programme of industrial design, involving concept generation, design development and product presentation. This will include a focus on product form and user interface, as well as an introduction to the principles of eco design. A component of this module is Design Week. See page 38 for more information.

DESIGN COMMUNICATION This module aims to extend and enhance your industrial design modelling. This includes the uses and applications of solid surface modelling. You will also learn 3D modelling skills and modelling rationale, as well as computer image generation and manipulation using vector and bit-mapped graphics software. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – this includes the submission of a 3D CAD exercise and a design portfolio

OPTIONAL MODULES UNIVERSAL DESIGN This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : fieldwork, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – two presentations, a report and the creation of a webpage


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SUSTAINABLE DESIGN This module looks into the issues concerning sustainable design and how sustainable strategies can be implemented into design. Teach i ng and lear ning: seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 60% coursework and 40% exam – group seminar presentation, exam and design project

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN This module helps you to broaden your experience and skills around user centred design principles and screenbased product design and communication. This could include app development and development of other screen based products. Teach i ng and lear ning: tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% coursework – including submission of a prototyping and usability evaluation and a user experience design project

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products. Teach i ng and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study

FINAL Y E A R COMPULSORY MODULES FINAL YEAR DESIGN PRACTICE This module involves the accumulation of all your acquired knowledge to complete two projects, one over two semesters and one over a dedicated week. These are in essence your final year projects which will form a key part of your portfolio and demonstrate how much you have learnt and the journey which you have taken over your previous years at Loughborough. The outcomes of this module are normally what you display at our annual degree show. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures, tutorials, supervised time in the studio/workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – this includes the design week exercise and two reports

This module will teach you about appropriate modelling methods. You will learn how to carry out physical computing and prototyping, mechanical and kinematic systems and product function simulation. This will also include the use of electronic and mechanical systems into the design of your products. Teach i ng and lear ning: demonstrations, practical classes, workshops, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% coursework – including two laboratory reports, a project report and a presentation

UNIVERSAL DESIGN

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : fieldwork, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study

A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – two presentations, a report and the creation of a webpage

A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – 1000 word interim report and a 7500 word dissertation

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN STUDIES 3

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study

PHYSICAL AND VIRTUAL PROTOTYPING IN DESIGN

A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework

Your dissertation is comprised of an extensive report based on a subject of your choosing related to design.

TEACHING DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

As s es sment: 100% coursework

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, and workshops and guided independent study

DISSERTATION

This module is a continuation from Year 1 and 2. During this year you will use the previous years acquired skills to develop a project, which may also provide the opportunity to enter an international student design competition and build on your portfolio.

Teach i ng and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study

This practical module builds on the CAD/CAM skills you have developed during Year 1 and 2. During this module you will look into core and advanced modelling techniques, modelling strategy, 3D rendering, 3D CNC machine, virtual prototyping, rapid prototyping and the advanced use of CAD throughout the product design lifecycle.

This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population.

As s es sment: 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters

The purpose of this module is to give you an understanding of the nature and range of secondary school teaching in this subject area for those who might be interested in training to become a teacher.

COMPUTER-AIDED MODELLING AND MANUFACTURE

A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – this includes a proposal and research report

LIVE PROJ ECTS This module involves engagement in two projects which are short, intense exercises based on briefs generated by companies which simulate working to short deadlines – a skill frequently demanded of designers. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

OPTIONAL MODULES USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION This module is delivered by the School of Business and Economics and focuses on the nature of enterprise, innovation, the protection of intellectual property, business plans and government policy to support innovation.

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters

THE GLOBAL STUDIO This exciting module aims to prepare you for working in cross-cultural and geographically distributed groups. You will learn about the impact of distributed design, distance communications, cultural issues and concepts. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including reports, design process diary and group work

OPTIONAL PLACEMENT YEAR If you choose to study on our four year course then you will undertake a placement or study abroad for your third year. For more information about placements and studying abroad, please see page 36.

All modules are subject to change due to the evolving nature of the subject area. Please check our website for up-to-date information.


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P r o f i l e

Sebastian Beebee INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA FINAL YEAR

“My favourite part of the course has been learning how to design a product from start to finish, being able to take what I have learnt over the last 4 years to make something tangible at the end. The School has a wealth of knowledgeable lecturers, which is great as help is never far away. The facilities are top notch and the University is amazing – I would totally recommend studying at Loughborough Design School! My final year project is called Vela. It is a retro styled sailing helmet designed to create a desirable solution for people over the age of 40 who enjoy extreme sailing. It incorporates interchangeable attachments to allow users the freedom to adjust their helmet for different weather conditions.”

“The facilities are top notch and the University is amazing”


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01

02

01

Vela Retro styled sailing helmet by Sebastian Beebee

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Lumo Bedside light and projector for children with two homes by Eleanor Pendlebury

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Trezzex Safety device for outdoor adventurers by Jake Amies

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Vi Recycled plastic bicycle frame by Stuart Thompson

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Course

PRODUCT DESIGN A N D T E C H N O L O G Y BSc Our Product Design and Technology course takes a technologically innovative approach to the design and creation of beautiful, ingenious, functionally viable products. The structure of the course provides important fundamental theoretical knowledge to enable application appropriate to contemporary design practice, relative to a designer, whilst enabling you to develop your experience around your personal interests and aspirations. The course explores and develops your abilities in three-dimensional productfocused designing, using our outstanding workshop and lab resources to enable you to make models and prototypes to help develop and present your creative ideas on applied technology in relation to design. This course enables students to produce conceptual product design and apply existing and emerging technologies to provide innovative working solutions to real problems. Teaching intertwines an exciting range of practical and theoretical classes to engage you with the principles and practices of product design and their technological bases. Our aim is to help you combine our expert training, and support development of your imaginative and creative capabilities, to prepare you for a successful career.

Th e d if f erence betw een Product Des ign an d I n du st rial Des ign at L oughborough Both the BA Industrial Design and Technology and BSc Product Design and Technology courses share core content that delivers knowledge and applied skills appropriate to a contemporary designer, including the development and communication of ideas, ergonomics, interaction, the techniques of planning and costing, product styling, threedimensional designing, materials and processes, and the production of prototypes and finished artefacts. The modules exclusive to the BSc Product Design and Technology throughout the three years deepen the understanding of Mechanics, Electronics and Materials in a Design context encouraging and enabling the exploration of innovative applications of technology.


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S TRUC T UR E

CAREE R PRO S PE CTS

This course can be studied over three or four years, with the four year option including a placement or study abroad year during the third year (this is called a sandwich course). Each year is divided into two semesters which normally run from the end of September/start of October until the end of January, and from the start of February until mid-June. There are two holiday periods during these semesters where you will have three weeks holiday around Christmas and four weeks around Easter.

Our approach to Product Design teaching and learning ensures that you will be prepared to enter the workplace with the skills and experience required. 93%# of our 2013 graduates are in employment or further study, with 92% of those in managerial or professional roles. A large number of companies contact us to recruit our students directly with many holding interviews within the School. The broad nature of the course also supports a large number of other careers where there appears to be no direct relationship to design, such as financial services. A number of our students have also gone on to start their own businesses or to work freelance in a number of fields.

C ONT E NT All teaching is divided into a number of modules. Each module covers a specific topic and is given a credit value depending on how intensive the module is. Each year you will study 120 credits in total. Some of the modules you will study are compulsory, and therefore must be studied by all students. These usually cover fundamental theory and knowledge vital to graduating from this particular course. You may also be able to study a number of optional modules, which you can choose from a list. Optional modules help you to tailor your degree to suit your chosen career path, or enable you to study a wide range of topics to keep your options open. Modules cover a range of topics for example: sketching, CAD, rapid prototyping, product styling, brand awareness, electronics, mechanics, user-led innovation, materials/ processes, the development/ communication of ideas, ergonomics, sustainable design, techniques of planning and the production of models, prototypes and finished artefacts.

O PP ORT UNI TIES O VE R V I E W This course offers you a number of opportunities to enhance your skills and experience. You can find out more about these opportunities throughout this brochure. Opportunities for this course include: _ Year-long placement _ Study abroad options _ Entrepreneurial support _ Live industry project briefs _ Industry speakers and lecturers _ Competitions _ Degree Show _ Fieldtrips and visits _ Design Week This course is professionally recognised – _ You can become a member of the Chartered Society of Designers (CSD) _ The course is also accredited by the Institute of Engineering Designers (IED)

# of those available for work or study six months after graduation – DLHE 2013 + all entry requirements are for 2015 entry and may be subject to change ++ may be subject to change

Re c e n t g r a du a te de s ti n a ti on s f or th i s c o u r se in c l u de : Alliance Boots, Assistant Buying Manager; Apple, Graduate Manager; Decathlon, Design Consultant; Dyson, Product Design Engineer; Hornby Hobbies, Product Designer; Jaguar Land Rover, Engineer; Marussia F1 Team, Junior Model Designer; Puma, Marketing Executive; Proctor and Gamble, Technical Packaging Technician; Tesco, Junior Graphic Designer; Unilever, Packaging Designer; Vax, Product Designer; Wonder Vision, Director.

COURSE INFORMATION A W A RD:

BSc (Hons) BSc (Hons) DPS*/ DIntS** (*Diploma in Professional Studies/ **Diploma in International Studies – please see page 36 for more information)

U CA S C O D E :

HJ7X – 3 year course HJ79 – 4 year course with sandwich DPS/ DIntS year

D U RAT I O N :

3 years full-time for BA (Hons) 4 years sandwich for BA (Hons) DPS/ DIntS

F E E S ( 2 0 1 5 E N T R Y ): £9,000 A D D ITI O N A L C O S T S F O R PRO G R A MME :

All costs for direct engagement in taught modules are included in the fees with the exception of costs incurred for individual projects which may have to be met by the student. Fees for the optional placement/ study abroad year are £800+ + for 2015.

U K/ E U E N T R Y R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

A-Level: ABB including A-Level Physics or Maths and grade B in A-Level Design and Technology or Art and Design IB: 32 points minimum including HL Design and Technology or Art and Design and either HL Maths or Physics BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma: DDM Other: GCSE Maths grade C

IN TE RN AT I O N A L E N TRY R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

The international equivalent of the above UK requirements (please contact us for clarification, if necessary). For those whose first language is not English, an English language qualification is required e.g. IELTS minimum 6.5 overall score with not less than 6.0 in the individual listening, reading, writing and speaking tests. TOEFL – minimum 92 overall with reading and listening 21 and writing and speaking 22 minimum.

A PPLIC AT I O N P R O C E S S :

Please see page 32 for details

CO N TA C T :

E: dslearning@lboro.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1509 226900


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MODULES

Y E A R TW O PROTOTYPING FOR DESIGN

Y EAR ONE DESIGN PRACTICE 1 This module is centred around teaching you good working practices in design, bringing together everything you have learned from other modules and putting this into context. The module is based in the studio and workshops where you will be designing and building projects. Teac hing and lear ning: practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework – presenting your projects through drawn, written and oral presentations and folios, as well as displays of work

DESIGN PRACTICE 2 The primary aim of this module is to help you build on the skills and experience from the module Design Practice 1. You will be working both on individual projects and in teams to develop imaginative and creative solutions to the briefs set. You will also learn about the role of design in enterprise and learn how to use workshop machinery and tools safely. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework – assignments and a drawing assessment

DESIGN CONTEXTS This theoretical module takes a look at the changing role of the industrial designer and how society, history and the design industry have different bearings on design. It also covers the significance of enterprise and the major design movements of the 20th Century. Teac hing and lear ning: tutorials, lectures and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework – an essay and group presentation/seminar

ERGONOMICS AND DESIGN 1 This module looks at how ergonomics has a bearing on design in relation to the information and operation of an item, panel design, console and workplace design, tool design, seating, and musculoskeletal complaints and how these can be evaluated effectively. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, seminars and guided independent study As s essment: 60% coursework and 40% in-class test – online anthropometry test, anthropometry practical, and group and individual submission of control panel coursework design exercise

This practical module introduces you to product prototyping strategies and 3D modelling techniques. It uses engineering drawings, existing and created by you, to successfully translate designs to understand the appropriate methods and tools to use in prototyping. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, demonstrations, guided independent study, practical classes, workshops and supervised time in the studio/workshop A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – submission of three completed artefacts and the associated logbooks completed during their creation and an engineering drawing task folder

COMPUTING FOR DESIGNERS 1 This module will help you to gain a good understanding of essential software in the design process including, data management, 3D modelling, using 3D data in engineering drawing, 3D rendering and 2D graphics. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – two computer based exercises

ELECTRONICS FOR DESIGN Some fundamentals of electronics aimed at augmenting the designer’s tool kit are introduced. The aim of this module is for the student to explore issues relating to electronic systems relevant to industrial and product design. This module seeks to develop skills that will facilitate the capability to learn independently and apply theory to practical design scenarios. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – including an in-class test and log book submission

MECHANICS FOR DESIGN In this module you will be able to learn about newton’s law of motion, centroids, stability, stress and strain, and equilibrium of static force systems and properties of structural sections. You will also learn about the mechanical properties of materials, safety, frameworks and trusses, work energy and port and Hooke’s Law and springs. Simple machine theory, variable velocity ratio machines and mechanical devices in machines will also be covered. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study

COMPULSORY MODULES YEAR 2 DESIGN PRACTICE You will learn to manage a programme of industrial design, involving concept generation, design development and product presentation. This will include a focus on product form and user interface, as well as an introduction to the principles of eco design. A component of this module is Design Week see page 38 for more information.

DESIGN COMMUNICATION This module aims to extend and enhance your industrial design modelling. This includes the uses and applications of solid surface modelling. You will also learn 3D modelling skills and modelling rationale, as well as computer image generation and manipulation using vector and bit-mapped graphics software. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – this includes the submission of a 3D CAD exercise and a design portfolio

BSc DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES This module requires the completion of a project using injection mould tool design and CAD/CAM, to design an innovative low cost/high volume product. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials, lectures, practical classes, workshops, supervised time in studios, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of work including a computer based materials assessment, CAD modelled design, a group report and a design folio

FURTHER ELECTRONICS FOR DESIGN AND FURTHER MECHANICS FOR DESIGN This module will develop your knowledge on digital electronics. You will use this to become familiar with electronics CAD systems for application in design of products and systems. It also involves a practical look at the mechanics of solids, machines, fluids and thermodynamics. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 60% coursework, 40% examination - includes a programming project and group design, manufacture and evaluation of a project

A sse ssm e n t: 60% coursework and 40% in-class test

OPTIONA L M ODU L E S MATERI ALS AND PROCESSES FOR DESIGNERS This module provides an introduction to the materials available for designers to use, how to test their properties and how they can be fabricated.

UNIVERSAL DESIGN This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : fieldwork, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – two presentations, a report and the creation of a webpage


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SUSTAINABLE DESIGN This module looks into the issues concerning sustainable design and how sustainable strategies can be implemented into design. Teach i ng and lear ning: seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 60% coursework and 40% exam – group seminar presentation, exam and design project

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products.

FINAL Y E A R COMPULSORY MODULES FINAL YEAR DESIGN PRACTICE This module involves the accumulation of all your acquired knowledge to complete two projects, one over two semesters and one over a dedicated week. These are in essence your final year projects which will form a key part of your portfolio and demonstrate how much you have learnt and the journey which you have taken over your previous years at Loughborough. The outcomes of this module are normally what you display at our annual degree show. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures, tutorials, supervised time in the studio/workshops and guided independent study

Teach i ng and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study

A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

As s es sment: 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters

DISSERTATION

TEACHING DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study

The purpose of this module is to give you an understanding of the nature and range of secondary school teaching in this subject area for those who might be interested in training to become a teacher. Teach i ng and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% coursework

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

POLYMER PROCESSING AND APPLICATIONS This module provides a broad and deep understanding of polymers and provides practical skills related to the selection for manufacturing processes for polymer products.

Your dissertation is comprised of an extensive report based on a subject of your choosing related to design.

A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – 1000 word interim report and a 7500 word dissertation

If you choose to study on our four year course then you will undertake a placement or study abroad for your third year. For more information about placements and studying abroad, please see page 36.

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 70% coursework and 30% examination

THE GLOBAL STUDIO This exciting module aims to prepare you for working in cross-cultural and geographically distributed groups. You will learn about the impact of distributed design, distance communications, cultural issues and concepts. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including reports, design process diary and group work

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION This module is delivered by the School of Business and Economics and focuses on the nature of enterprise, innovation, the protection of intellectual property, business plans and government policy to support innovation

LIVE PROJ ECTS This module involves engagement in two projects which are short, intense exercises based on briefs generated by companies which simulate working to short deadlines – a skill frequently demanded of designers. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

APPLICATIONS OF MECHANICS AND ELECTRONICS FOR DESIGN This module seeks to extend students capabilities in the design and realisation of electromechanical products with embedded intelligence.

OPTIONAL MODULES USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN

OPTIONAL PLACEMENT YEAR

prototyping, rapid prototyping and the advanced use of CAD throughout the product design lifecycle.

This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

COMPUTER-AIDED MODELLING AND MANUFACTURE This practical module builds on the CAD/CAM skills you have developed during Year 1 and 2. During this module you will look into core and advanced modelling techniques, modelling strategy, 3D rendering, 3D CNC machine, virtual

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters

UNIVERSAL DESIGN This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : fieldwork, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – two presentations, a report and the creation of a webpage

RECYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES This module discusses the issues of importance for the protection of the environment including resource management and methods of waste management.

All modules are subject to change due to the evolving nature of the subject area. Please check our website for up-to-date information.


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“Lectures are very applicable, interesting and really prepare you to become a real designer� 01

02

01

02

03

04

Loope Bicycle helmet which divides to form a lock by Joseph Bunyan

Wosh Pod Portable washing machine by Jessica Rowley

03

Vero Power drill with integrated guiding runner and 3-mode detection system by Will Healey

VitaLung Emergency breathing system by Greg Taylor

04


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Pearl Pulges PRODUCT DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BSc FIRST YEAR

“My favourite part of the course so far has been the opportunity to explore different ways of creating a product, and learning how to make prototypes in the workshops using a wide range of techniques. I also really enjoy studying the different stages of manufacturing a product in depth so that you can truly understand how it works and its functionality and not just the appearance. I would say that studying product design at Loughborough is combining a balance of science and design together. We study how the product actually functions, the materials, electronics and mechanics aspects alongside the aesthetics of the design. I would definitely recommend studying in the School due to the wide range of facilities available and the knowledge you receive. Lectures are very applicable, interesting and really prepare you to become a real designer.�

P r o f i l e


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Course

ERGONOMICS ( H U M A N FA C TO R S D E S I G N ) B S c ( H O N S ) The field of ergonomics, otherwise known as human factors, looks at the interaction of individuals with each other, with facilities, equipment and with management systems and how they ‘fit’ with each other. In essence it is the study of designing equipment, devices and systems that fit the human body and its cognitive abilities. This course covers the areas of biomechanics, human biology, design, psychology, anatomy and physiology and is taught by world-leading experts in the field of ergonomics and related disciplines, ensuring that you are taught cutting-edge material to the highest standard. The course content is covered by theoretical and practical classes, giving you both an in-depth knowledge of the subject and hands-on experience.


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S TRUC T UR E

CAREE R PRO S PE CTS

This course can be studied over three or four years, with the four year option including a placement or study abroad year during the third year (this is called a sandwich course). Each year is divided into two semesters which normally run from the end of September/start of October until the end of January, and from the start of February until mid-June. There are two holiday periods during these semesters where you will have three weeks holiday around Christmas and four weeks around Easter.

Our approach to Ergonomics teaching and learning ensures that your will be prepared to enter the workplace with the skills and experience required. 95%# of our 2013 graduates are in employment or further study with an average salary of £25,500, more than the UK average for graduates. 100% of these graduates are in managerial or professional roles. A large number of companies contact us to recruit our students directly with many holding interviews within the School.

C ONT E NT

Re c e n t g r a du a te de s ti n a ti on s f or th i s c o u r se in c l u de : Atkins, Ergonomics Consultant; BAE Systems, Human Factors Engineer; Jaguar Land Rover, Human Machine Interaction Engineer; Mott MacDonald, Human Factors Engineer; Serco, Human Factors Consultant; Pirelli, Ergonomist.

All teaching is divided into a number of modules. Each module covers a specific topic and is given a credit value depending on how intensive the module is. Each year you will study 120 credits in total. Some of the modules you will study are compulsory, and therefore must be studied by all students. These usually cover fundamental theory and knowledge vital to graduating from this particular course. You may also be able to study a number of optional modules, which you can choose from a list.

COURSE INFORMATION

Optional modules help you to tailor your degree to suit your chosen career path, or enable you to study a wide range of topics to keep your options open.

O PP ORT UNI TIES O VE R V I E W This course offers you a number of opportunities to enhance your skills and experience. You can find out more about these opportunities throughout this brochure. Opportunities for this course include: _ Year-long placement _ Study abroad options _ Entrepreneurial support _ Live industry project briefs _ Industry speakers and lecturers _ Fieldtrips and visits This course is professionally recognised – _ Course is accredited by The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (IEHF)

# of those available for work or study six months after graduation – DLHE 2013 + all entry requirements are for 2015 entry and may be subject to change ++ may be subject to change

A W A RD:

BSc (Hons) BSc (Hons) DPS*/ DIntS** (*Diploma in Professional Studies/ **Diploma in International Studies – please see page 36 for more information)

U CA S C O D E :

J920 – 3 year course J921 – 4 year course with sandwich DPS/ DIntS year

D U RAT I O N :

3 years full-time for BSc (Hons) 4 years sandwich for BSc (Hons) DPS/ DIntS

F E E S ( 2 0 1 5 E N T R Y ): £9,000 A D D ITI O N A L C O S T S F O R PRO G R A MME :

All costs for direct engagement in taught modules are included in the fees with the exception of costs incurred for individual projects which may have to be met by the student. Fees for the optional placement/ study abroad year are £800+ + for 2015.

U K/ E U E N T R Y R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

A-Level: BBC IB: 30-32 points minimum including SL in Maths BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma: DMM Other: GCSE Maths grade C

IN TE RN AT I O N A L E N TRY R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

The international equivalent of the above UK requirements (please contact us for clarification, if necessary). For those whose first language is not English, an English language qualification is required e.g. IELTS minimum 6.5 overall score with not less than 6.0 in the individual listening, reading, writing and speaking tests. TOEFL – minimum 92 overall with reading and listening 21 and writing and speaking 22 minimum.

A PPLIC AT I O N P R O C E S S :

Please see page 32 for details

CO N TA C T :

E: dslearning@lboro.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1509 226900


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MODULES

Y EAR ONE

PHYSIOLOGY This looks at the physiological regulation in the human body and how these are implemented when the body exercises. You will also look at the effects of ageing, training and the ability of the body to adapt to environmental and physical stressors.

Teac hing and lear ning: lectures and guided independent study As s essment: 100% coursework including a presentation and essay

ERGONOMICS AND DESIGN 1 This module looks at how ergonomics has a bearing on design in relation to the information and operation of an item, panel design, console and workplace design, tool design, seating and musculoskeletal complaints and how these can be evaluated effectively. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, seminars and guided independent study

ERGONOMICS IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-USER SYSTEMS

A sse ssm e n t: 60% coursework and 40% examination including a report and assessed laboratory class

This module looks at awareness of ergonomic design principles from application to non-complex products to the very different approach needed for complex systems. It will also look at the challenge of designing to a budget and product price.

BASIC EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICE This will give you an understanding of the principle areas of cognitive psychology such as perception, attention, memory and problem solving. It will teach you about psychological experimentation leading to an understanding of the scientific study of human behaviour.

THE BODY AT WORK You will learn about physical activity and health, how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems respond to physical activity and the application of anthropometry and biomechanics with a focus on ergonomics issues. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

ANATOMY

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials and guided independent study

As s essment: 60% coursework and 40% examination including a written assessment and assessed workshop

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ERGONOMICS This module looks at how environments impact upon humans in terms of comfort, safety and performance. You will learn how to carry out a survey of an environment and suggest improvements on how these might be achieved. Teac hing and lear ning: seminars, lectures and guided independent study As s essment: 25% coursework and 75% examination

A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a presentation and report

COGNITIVE ERGONOMICS You will learn about how cognitive and psychological ergonomics relate to the design of products and systems. It will enable you to take a human inclusive view of systems and their operation. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including an essay and literature review

QUALITATIVE METHODS STUDY SKILLS

Teac hing and lear ning: practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study

A sse ssm en t: 85% examination and 15% coursework

As s essment: 80% coursework and 20% in-class test – online anthropometry test, anthropometry practical, and group and individual submission of control panel coursework design exercise

This module looks at the structure of the human body including, surface anatomy, bone structure, the axial and appendicular skeletons, joints, structure of muscles and nerves. You will learn these structures, their relationship to one another and the mechanical principles governing this structure. Classes will be theoretical and practical where you will be working with human participants.

COMPULSORY MODULES

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

INTRODUCTION TO ERGONOMICS This module will give you an introductory overview of Ergonomics. This will include a look at internal and external factors. You will also be carrying out an assessment of an ergonomic problem and presenting your recommendations on how to address it.

Y E A R TW O

This module looks at the critical skills required to study this degree. It will look at the different style of working to previous education and also how to find and access all the types of information needed for the course.

A sse ssm en t: 100% coursework including essays and literature reviews

ERGONOMICS IN THE DESIGN OF EVERYDAY ARTEFACTS In this module you will be learning about ergonomics principles in relation to everyday artefacts. You will also learn how to use progress sheets, Gantt charts, critical path analysis and design matrices in relation to the artefacts that you will be looking at.

This module looks at the wide range of qualitative methods available to ergonomists and how they can be used to collect and analyse a range of data types. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a 3000 word report

VISION This module provides an overview of human vision and the visual system in relation to the visual performance of a person. You will learn about how the eye and brain are involved in visual perception and how particular aspects of vision, such as colour vision, short sightedness, vision in the dark, happen. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : demonstrations, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study

A s s e s s m e n t: 50% coursework and 50% examination

A sse ssm en t: 100% coursework

THERMAL ENVIRONMENT

THE MIND AT WORK In this module you will learn about human cognition, perception and decision making from the perspective of human factors and ergonomics. This will include aspects of memory, perception, cognitive workload, human error, stress, risk taking and psychological factors. You will be using case study materials of real-life events to illustrate the cognitive aspects of designs and the influence these had on the events. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : project supervision, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework including online quizzes and project submission

This module looks at the fundamentals and practical implications of the human response to different thermal environments. This includes a look at the effects on health, comfort and task performance. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% examination


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ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR The aim of this module is for the student to understand the psychology and social psychology of people at work and the structure and function of organisations with special reference to the compatibility of human and organisational goals. Teach i ng and lear ning: practical classes, workshops, lecture, guided independent study As s es sment: 50% coursework and 50% in-class test

ERGONOMICS EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS In this module you will understand the theory and application of analysis and variance and regression in ergonomics. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : seminars, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

APPLIED VISION This module looks at the practical assessment of vision and visual performance. This will involve the measurement of sensation and thresholds. You will also look at this from a psychological perspective, understanding how this knowledge can be used in the assessment of human performance. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 25% coursework and 75% examination

HUMAN RESPONSE TO NOISE AND VIBRATION This module will look at the biological and psychological effects of noise and vibration on humans. You will also use different types of assessment and gain an understanding of how to calculate acceptable exposure for a variety of environments.

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN This module looks at user design principles and screenbased product design and communication, including app development and other screen based systems. Teach i ng and lear ning: tutorials, lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% coursework

ERGONOMICS AND DEVELOPMENT OF COMPLEX-SYSTEMS/ SER VICES In this module you will learn about complex systems and service development processes and how to apply various methods and tools at the different stages of the design process from an ergonomics perspective. Teach i ng and lear ning: tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% coursework including the submission of reports

ERGONOMICS OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION In this module you will learn about the design and evaluation of human-computer interfaces for interactive products and systems in order to create a good user experience. You will also look at design for particular contexts such as on the move, in a car, prototyping, user testing and design to include a wide range of people. Teach i ng and lear ning: demonstrations, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 50% examination and 50% coursework

OPTIONAL PLACEMENT YEAR If you choose to study on our four year course then you will undertake a placement or study abroad for your third year. For more information about placements and studying abroad, please see page 36.

FINAL Y E A R COMPULSORY MODULES SYSTEMS ERGONOMICS This module looks at systems within ergonomics and the key role played by humans. It covers methods for carrying out systems ergonomics, task analysis and allocation, accident and errors, applications in information systems, patient safety, interaction design and job design and teams. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 50% exam and 50% coursework including the submission of a systems analysis

PROJECT This module provides you with the practical experience of tackling real psychological and/or ergonomics problems. It will require you to research extensively an area of your choosing from a supplied list of project themes. The project will cover literature reviews, data collection and appropriate analysis with the production of a report. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

OPTIONAL MODULES DRIVER AND VEHICLE ERGONOMICS This module looks at the critical ergonomics issues in the design and use of road vehicles. You will learn how to complete a vehicle appraisal and assess ergonomic issues relevant to safety and performance. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – submission of a lab report and a group report

DESIGNING PRODUCTS FOR PE OPLE This module covers the design process including; the methods, tools and techniques used. You will cover case studies of design research and practice, design and emotion, and design communication techniques. You will also carry out a design project that involves inclusive design. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework including submission of a group poster logbook and a project

DISABILITY, AGEING AND INCLUSIVE DESIGN This module looks at how ergonomics can play a part in inclusive design of products, technologies, services and buildings for vulnerable users. It will cover disability and ageing issues in legislation, guidelines, standards and codes of practice. The module is taught in a theoretical and practical environment, where situations are demonstrated. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework

HUMAN PERFORMANCE AT ENVIRONMENTAL EXTREMES The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of how the human body copes with work in environmental extremes and how this stress can be assessed and controlled.

PSYCHOLOGY AND HEALTH This module explores psychological factors which influence the experience of health (e.g. placebo effects, pain perception), the personal management of health (through lifestyle choices, screening, complementary medicine, etc.) and the development and evaluation of cognitivebehavioural therapies.

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study

All modules are subject to change due to the evolving nature of the subject area. Please check our website for up-to-date information.

A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters


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“The staff are the best thing about the whole school, always helpful and friendly.”

Alfred Holmen ERGONOMICS BSc (HUMAN FACTORS DESIGN) FINAL YEAR 2014

P r o f i l e

“The course is very broad; it’s about how people interact with things. So on one project you could be working on how people interact with a cash machine, and how that object can be improved. In another project you could be working with a whole system of people and objects, an oil rig control room or a hospital ward. My favourite part of the course has been designing systems and services. This is how people, communication, infrastructure and materials can be organised and designed to improve quality in a system. This is what makes us different to the more product based design courses. Also, I really liked the anatomy modules we did. Learning how the eye works was mega-cool. There is always stuff going on in the School. You can walk around for days just watching other people’s work, because pretty much everyone is working on something interesting and cool. The facilities are excellent – 24 hour computer room, a café, and the comfiest chairs on campus. What more could you ask for? The staff are the best thing about the whole school, always helpful and friendly. Around second year you realise that lecturers are not to be feared and are actually interested in your work.”


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Piper Alpha

Power

Oil/Gas

Timeline

Oil/Gas

12:00

17:10

21:45

Work permits are filed for work on: Valve PSV504 Condensate Pump 2

2 Maintenance workers remove safety valve PSV504 and put in a metal seal in its place.

Final shift for the control room operators before going home to their families. The previous work on pump 2 and valve PSV504 has not been properly communicated to new shift staff.

Condensate pump 1 fails due to accumulation of ice in the system. An attempt to start it fails. It is a crucial pump for generating power for to the platform. This results in a scramble to find out if pump 2 can be started.

Both situated in Module C.

They don’t have time to finish the work on the pump

22:10

22:04

22:00

21:55

Oil from severed pipes drips down on to the diving deck and ignites. Divers had put out rubber mats on the grated floor, as it hurt their feet. Directly above the diving deck, a high pressure gas pipe carrying tonnes of gas slowly melts as the oil pools and ignites.

Oil from two other nearby platforms keeps the fire alive.

The relativeley small explosion that follows rips through the firewalls between production modules. Sheets of firewall debris shoot in to module B, ripping through several pipes, one of which is a LPG pipe full of high explosive natural gas

Only the permit for work on the pump is found. This work had not started yet, only the work on the valve connected to the pump has been started. This means that everyone thinks it is safe to start pump 2, even though it is not.

Emergency protocol dictates that crew should get in to lifeboats or meet in the cafeteria. The situation causes crew to either jump in to the ice cold sea or meet in the cafeteria.

Pumps

Module D Module C Module B Module A

Management Structure

07:45

22:20

22:45

15-30 tonnes of gas explodes. More than the annual household gas consumption.

In succession, the rest of the oil and gas reserves explode. Any attempt to extinguish the flames fails as the heat is too intense.

22:50-11:20

Department of Energy

The following explosion hits the control room, and emergency shut down is started, but the damage limits alarms and loudspeakers.

Pump 2 is started, resulting in a gas leak due to the improperly fitted metal seal.

Stop

ep Be eep B

Gas alarms go off.

The automatic deluge system doesn’t start, since it had been set to manual earlier in the day.

Failures

The fourth and final explosion causes Piper Alpha to start to disintegrate. Crew are either dead, in the water or in the cafeteria module. As the platform falls apart, the cafeteria falls in to the ocea together with module B and C.

Occidental Corporate Management

Plant Manager

Work permits and management system

Poor communication

Poor learning from previous events

Poor Regulation by the DoE

Poor training and emergency routines

Production Manager

HSE

Control Room

Process? Principles? Policies?

Production Operator

Profit over safety culture

Maintenance Staff

Piper Alpha disaster analysis map by Alfred Holmen

D IS S E R TAT I O N S U MMA RY 2 0 1 4 All finalists complete an extended essay, also known as a dissertation, in their chosen subject area. Here is an example summary from Alfred’s dissertation:

How do we present complex systems to outside stakeholders? A study on the usability of complex interactive diagrams.

Summary: System ergonomics, service design and systems oriented design all try to deal with the complexity of issues by tapping in to our human abilities for system representation and visual thinking to frame and understand design problems. These approaches incorporate similar tools to deal with the complexity in the systems at hand. Through visual thinking designers create system maps, journeys and process maps that all play a major role in the facilitation of exploration and understanding of these systems. The main goal of these mapping methods is to characterise the numerous information exchanges and interactions between humans and humans, humans and machines and machines and machines, to gain an understanding of the emotions, tasks and interactions involved in the system. But there is also a need to explore the subsystems and other systems that are connected. Understanding how a hospital ward within a hospital affects the hospital or how a control room within a refinery affects the refinery. The interconnectivity and interdependency of systems is nothing new, but the tools and processes to explore them are.

These interconnected systems within systems (multileveled) diagrams or maps are now shared within teams, and with outside stakeholders that may not be present at a meeting, workshop or presentation of a map, as part of the user centred design process. This forces a constraint on the system map creators, these diagrams must be easily understandable and easy to use. With the introduction of interactive tools such as Prezi, Adobe Edge Animate and MapsAlive, diagrams and maps are more easily made interactive, allowing the maps to be focused, zoomed and manipulated at will. This development is interesting, as it allows map/diagram makers to create narratives and contexts that have previously been hard to create. In an effort to explore this issue of shareability and usability of complex system maps, an experiment to investigate the usability of interactive multi-levelled maps was conducted.


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Course

DESIGN ERGONOMICS BSc (HONS) Our Design Ergonomics course focuses on the understanding of designing with a particular attention to physiological and psychological human needs. It is underpinned by a multidisciplinary approach of ergonomics theory and practical design application to take a user led approach to design. The course aids you in developing a range of conceptual, practical and professional skills, helping you to advance your creative and scientific abilities simultaneously. It will also train you in the ability to critically evaluate products and understand existing systems and products to determine how they could be improved for human use.


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S TRUC T UR E

CAREE R PRO S PE CTS

This course can be studied over three or four years, with the four year option including a placement or study abroad year during the third year (this is called a sandwich course). Each year is divided into two semesters which normally run from the end of September/start of October until the end of January, and from the start of February until mid-June. There are two holiday periods during these semesters where you will have three weeks holiday around Christmas and four weeks around Easter.

Our approach to Design Ergonomics teaching and learning ensures that you will be prepared to enter the workplace with the skills and experience required. As this is a relatively new course for the School we are having our first graduations in 2015 and therefore there is no current graduate destinations data, however possible careers include:

C ONT E NT All teaching is divided into a number of modules. Each module covers a specific topic and is given a credit value depending on how intensive the module is. Each year you will study 120 credits in total. Some of the modules you will study are compulsory, and therefore must be studied by all students. These usually cover fundamental theory and knowledge vital to graduating from this particular course. You may also be able to study a number of optional modules, which you can choose from a list. Optional modules help you to tailor your degree to suit your chosen career path, or enable you to study a wide range of topics to keep your options open.

O PP ORT UNI TIES O VE R V I E W This course offers you a number of opportunities to enhance your skills and experience. You can find out more about these opportunities throughout this brochure. Opportunities for this course include: _ Year-long placement _ Study abroad options _ Entrepreneurial support _ Live industry project briefs _ Industry speakers and lecturers _ Competitions _ Degree Show _ Fieldtrips and visits _ Design Week This course is professionally recognised – _ You can become a member of the Chartered Society of Designers (CSD) _ The course is also seeking accreditation by the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (IEHF)

+ all entry requirements are for 2015 entry and may be subject to change ++ may be subject to change

Designer with an ergonomics specialism working in a design consultancy; Ergonomist with a design specialism working in an ergonomics consultancy; Human Factors specialist for a range of industries – Automotive, Aerospace, Consumer goods etc; plus a broad and varied range of Design and/or Ergonomics positions. The broad nature of the course also supports a large number of other careers where there appears to be no direct relationship to design, such as financial services.

COURSE INFORMATION A W A RD:

BSc (Hons) BSc (Hons) DPS*/ DIntS** (*Diploma in Professional Studies/ **Diploma in International Studies – please see page 36 for more information)

U CA S C O D E :

J923 – 3 year course J922 – 4 year course with sandwich DPS/ DIntS year

D U RAT I O N :

3 years full-time for BSc (Hons) 4 years sandwich for BSc (Hons) DPS/ DIntS

F E E S ( 2 0 1 5 E N T R Y ): £9,000 A D D ITI O N A L C O S T S F O R PRO G R A MME :

All costs for direct engagement in taught modules are included in the fees with the exception of costs incurred for individual projects which may have to be met by the student. Fees for the optional placement/ study abroad year are £800+ + for 2015.

U K/ E U E N T R Y R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

A-Level: BBB including grade B in A-Level Design and Technology or Art and Design IB: 32 points minimum including HL Design and Technology or Art and Design BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma: DDM Other: GCSE Maths grade C

IN TE RN AT I O N A L E N TRY R E Q U I R E ME N T S + :

The international equivalent of the above UK requirements (please contact us for clarification, if necessary). For those whose first language is not English, an English language qualification is required e.g. IELTS minimum 6.5 overall score with not less than 6.0 in the individual listening, reading, writing and speaking tests. TOEFL – minimum 92 overall with reading and listening 21 and writing and speaking 22 minimum.

A PPLIC AT I O N P R O C E S S :

Please see page 32 for details

CO N TA C T :

E: dslearning@lboro.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1509 226900


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MODULES

Y EAR ONE

COMPUTING FOR DESIGNERS 1 This module will help you to gain a good understanding of essential software in the design process including, data management, 3D modelling, using 3D data in engineering drawing, 3D rendering and 2D graphics. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t: 100% coursework – two computer based exercises

DESIGN PRACTICE 1

PROTOTYPING FOR DESIGN

This module is centred around teaching you good working practices in design, bringing together everything you have learned from other modules and putting this into context. The module is based in the studio and workshops where you will be designing and building projects.

This practical module introduces you to product prototyping strategies and 3D modelling techniques. It uses engineering drawings, existing and created by you, to successfully translate designs to understand the appropriate methods and tools to use in prototyping.

Teac hing and lear ning: practical classes, workshops, guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, demonstrations, guided independent study, practical classes, workshops and supervised time in the studio/workshop

As s essment: 100% coursework – presenting your projects through drawn, written and oral presentations and folios, as well as displays of work

DESIGN PRACTICE 2 The primary aim of this module is to help you build on the skills and experience from the module Design Practice 1. You will be working both on individual projects and in teams to develop imaginative and creative solutions to the briefs set. You will also learn about the role of design in enterprise and learn how to use workshop machinery and tools safely.

A sse ssm en t: 100% coursework – submission of three completed artefacts and the associated logbooks completed during their creation and an engineering drawing task folder

INTRODUCTION TO ERGONOMICS This module will give you an introductory overview of Ergonomics. This will include a look at internal and external factors. You will also be carrying out an assessment of an ergonomic problem and presenting your recommendations on how to address it.

Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study

As s essment: 100% coursework – three assignments and a drawing assessment

A sse ssm en t: 100% coursework including a presentation and essay

DESIGN CONTEXTS

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ERGONOMICS

This theoretical module takes a look at the changing role of the industrial designer and how society, history and the design industry have different bearings on design. It also covers the significance of enterprise and the major design movements of the 20th Century.

This module looks at how environments impact upon humans in terms of comfort, safety and performance. You will learn how to carry out a survey of an environment and suggest improvements and how these might be achieved.

Y E A R TW O COMPULSORY MODULES UNIVERSAL DESIGN This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : fieldwork, tutorials, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – two presentations, a report and the creation of a webpage

YEAR 2 DESIGN ERGONOMICS PRACTICE This module will teach you how to effectively manage an industrial design project that involves; concept generation, design development and product presentation. There will be a strong emphasis on evidence based designing through continuous user testing of concepts and prototypes. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, seminars, studio and workshop tutorials, plus participation in Design Week (please see page 38 for more information) A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including presentations and submission of sketches and models

QUALITATIVE METHODS This module looks at the wide range of qualitative methods available to ergonomists and how they can be used to collect and analyse a range of data types. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a 3000 word report

COGNITIVE ERGONOMICS You will learn about how cognitive and psychology ergonomics relate to the design of products and systems. It will enable you to take a human inclusive view of systems and their operation.

Teac hing and lear ning: tutorials, lectures and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : seminars, lectures and guided independent study

As s essment: 100% coursework – an essay and group presentation/ seminar

A sse ssm en t: 25% coursework and 75% examination

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study

ANATOMY

A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including an essay and literature review

ERGONOMICS AND DESIGN 1 This module looks at how ergonomics has a bearing on design in relation to the information and operation of an item, panel design, console and workplace design, tool design, seating and musculoskeletal complaints and how these can be evaluated effectively. Teac hing and lear ning: lectures, seminars and guided independent study As s essment: 80% coursework and 20% in-class test – online anthropometry test, anthropometry practical, and group and individual submission of control panel coursework design exercise

This module looks at the structure of the human body including, surface anatomy, bone structure, the axial and appendicular skeletons, joints, structure of muscles and nerves. You will learn these structures, their relationship to one another and the mechanical principles governing this structure. Classes will be theoretical and practical where you will be working with human participants.

ERGONOMICS IN DESIGN OF MULTI-USER SYSTEMS

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

This module looks at awareness of ergonomic design principles from application to non-complex products to the very different approach needed for complex systems. It will also look at the challenge of designing to a budget and product price.

A sse ssm en t: 60% coursework and 40% examination including a written assessment and assessed workshop

Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a presentation and report


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HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

TEACHING DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

This module looks at the design and evaluation of humancomputer interfaces for interactive products and systems, in order to create a good user experience. This will cover design for particular contexts such as on the move, in a car and in the home.

The purpose of this module is to give you an understanding of the nature and range of secondary school teaching in this subject area for those who might be interested in training to become a teacher.

Teach i ng and lear ning: demonstrations, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework

As s es sment: 50% coursework and 50% examination

OPTIONAL MODULES VISION This module provides an overview of human vision and the visual system in relation to the visual performance of a person. You will learn about how the eye and brain are involved in visual perception and how particular aspects of vision, such as colour vision, short sightedness, vision in the dark, happen. Teach i ng and lear ning: demonstrations, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 50% coursework and 50% examination

HUMAN RESPONSE TO NOISE AND VIBRATION This module will look at the biological and psychological effects of noise and vibration on humans. You will also use different types of assessment and gain an understanding of how to calculate acceptable expose for a variety of environments.

THE BODY AT WORK You will learn about physical activity and health, how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems respond to physical activity and the application of anthropometry and biomechanics with a focus on ergonomics issues. Teach i ng and lear ning: practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 85% examination and 15% coursework

THERMAL ENVIRONMENT This module looks at the fundamentals and practical implications of the human response to different thermal environments. This includes a look at the effects on health, comfort and task performance. Teach ing and lear ning: lectures and guided independent study As s es sment: 100% examination

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN This module looks into the issues concerning sustainable design and how sustainable strategies can be implemented into design. Teach i ng and lear ning: seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study

OPTIONAL MODULES DISSERTATION Your dissertation is comprised of an extensive report based on a subject of your choosing related to design and/or ergonomics. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – 1000 word interim report and a 7500 word dissertation

OPTIONAL PLACEMENT YEAR If you choose to study on our four year course then you will undertake a placement or study abroad for your third year. For more information about placements and studying abroad, please see page 36.

FINAL Y E A R COMPULSORY MODULES FINAL YEAR DESIGN ERGONOMICS PRACTICE This module involves the accumulation of all your acquired knowledge to complete a major project. The course offers a flexible path that allows you to individually tailor the emphasis of their project more towards design or ergonomics, though all projects will contain a core application of ergonomics to design. This project will form a key part of your portfolio and demonstrate how much you have learnt and the journey which you have taken over your previous years at Loughborough. The outcomes of this module are normally what you display at our annual degree show. Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures, tutorials, supervised time in the studio/workshops and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – this includes portfolio work, prototypes, and two reports

COMPUTER AIDED ERGONOMICS This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products.

DRIVER AND VEHICLE ERGONOMICS This module looks at the critical ergonomics issues in the design and use of road vehicles. You will learn how to complete a vehicle appraisal and assess ergonomic issues relevant to safety and performance. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – submission of a lab report and a group report

SYSTEMS ERGONOMICS This module looks at systems within ergonomics and the key role played by humans. It covers methods for carrying out systems ergonomics, task analysis and allocation, accident and errors, applications in information systems, patient safety, interaction design and job design and teams. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : tutorials, practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 50% exam and 50% coursework including the submission of a systems analysis

DISABILITY, AGEING AND INCLUSIVE DESIGN This module looks at how ergonomics can play a part in inclusive design of products, technologies, services and the buildings for vulnerable users. It will cover disability and ageing issues in legislation, guidelines, standards and codes of practice. The module is taught in a theoretical and practical environment, where situations are demonstrated. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : practical classes, workshops, lectures and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework

Te a c h in g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A sse ssm e n t : 100% coursework – group and individual assessments including a written report, presentations and creation of posters

USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

THE GLOBAL STUDIO This exciting module aims to prepare you for working in cross-cultural and geographically distributed groups. You will learn about the impact of distributed design, distance communications, cultural issues and concepts. Te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g : lectures, practical classes, workshops, tutorials and guided independent study A s s e s s m e n t: 100% coursework – including reports, design process diary and group work

As s es sment: 60% coursework and 40% exam – group seminar presentation, exam and design project The list above represents only a sample of the options available. Please see our website for a full list. All modules are subject to change due to the evolving nature of the subject area.


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“I’m privileged that the course doesn’t tie me down to just designing products.” 01

02

03

01

02

03

04

Climb Rock climbing guide and training aid interface mockup by George Wardell

Golf training aid and information system by Michael McCormack

04 Examples of second year design ergonomics practice work

Diving monitor and information device by Charlotte Hodge

Poseidon Yacht wayfinding and information system prototype by Amil Malik


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Flora Macleod DESIGN ERGONOMICS BSc PLACEMENT YEAR (THIRD YEAR) “The course is a cross between ergonomics and industrial design. I really enjoy it because the products you create are designed with and for the user. We’re expected to carry out extensive research to ensure we are creating a viable product both in terms of technology and user requirements. It is a very broad subject area – you can try a bit of everything or specialise in a particular field. Personally, I’m really interested in service and system design and I’m privileged that really the course doesn’t tie me down to just designing products. I am currently on placement at Foolproof, a User Design (UX) company in London. I am based in the research team, supporting consultants and even leading on some projects. I’ve worked with lots of big names mostly in the financial fields, but also on some exciting projects with major consumer electronics companies. I’ve even travelled to Chicago to conduct research!”

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A P P L I C AT I O N PROCESS All of our applications for undergraduate courses are received through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) and follow the process as outlined below. Once we receive your application we endeavour to process it as quickly as possible.

7.

Make your firm choice of where you want to study via UCAS. You don’t need to make a decision on where you want to go until you have received all of your offers from all of the universities you have applied to. If you make Loughborough your firm choice before the end of July you will be guaranteed a place in one of our halls of residence

1. Order a prospectus and take a look at our website for information about the course

8.

If you narrowly miss your requirements of a conditional offer it may be possible to be offered a change of course or you could be offered a concessional place. Final decisions on places for all courses are then made when results are announced.

2. Attend an open day prior to starting your final year at college/school. You can find out more information about when these are on our website

4. Suitable candidates will receive an invitation to a special interview day at the School

PORTFOLIO GUIDANCE

a. Design applicants You will be sent a design exercise to complete before coming for interview. Remember to bring this along with your portfolio.

Applicants to our design programmes will be asked to present a portfolio of work to our staff. This is where you will show us what work you have been doing and will be reviewed and discussed at interview with you. It should demonstrate:

3. Apply for your place through UCAS

b.

Ergonomics applicants You are not required to bring any pre-prepared materials or portfolios. The interview will be a fairly informal discussion about you, your experience and why you want to do this course.

5.

Attend your interview – this is a fairly informal opportunity to meet staff and discuss your experiences and your aspirations. It is also an excellent opportunity for you to find out if you want to study here

6.

Receive notification via UCAS and post as to whether you have been given an unconditional offer, conditional offer, or have been unsuccessful in your application

_ Your ability to sketch and develop 3D form e.g. products, people, architecture, still life, design ideas and your decision-making processes etc. _ Examples of 3D work e.g. models, prototypes, sculpture, CAD etc. (although this is not a strict requirement) _ Applicants for the Product Design and Technology course may also wish to include examples of mechanics and electronics work


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Scal Activity specific prosthetic arm for rock climbing by Samuel Twist


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PLACEMENTS Placements are a specific period of time that you spend in a company gaining professional experience. As well as enhancing your CV, they also offer you the unique opportunity to put what you have learnt in your first and second year, into context. You will also be able to enhance your skills and understanding of real work issues and challenges. Many of our students have found doing a placement a great advantage to them when it came to completing their final year, and when securing their first job. At Loughborough, undertaking a placement is easy, with all of our courses offering a specially designed four year option, with a designated placement year during the third year.

DURAT I ON

GET T ING A JOB A F T ER WA R D S

Typically our students do a one-year professional placement with one company, although the placement year can comprise of up to three separate placements either in the UK or overseas.

A large number of companies use the placement as a kind of extended interview and assessment opportunity. On average a high number of our students are successful in obtaining full time employment with their placement company for post-graduation. This has the great advantage of taking the stress out of having to find a job during your final year.

WH AT YOU DO Doing a placement does not just involve making tea and coffee for everyone! We work closely with placement companies to ensure that you get the most realistic experience possible, however it is clear that each company’s needs and requirements of our students does differ. Usually you will start by spending a few weeks getting to grips with what the company does and how things work. Then progressively you will work on projects, taking on more and more responsibility as time goes on. In the past some of our students have impressed the placement companies greatly, having some of their ideas patented and developed into real life products and services.

DIP L OMA IN P R OF ESSIONAL ST UDIES A WA R D Students who complete the minimum of 45 weeks in employment, alongside the successful submission of a placement dissertation and presentation will be awarded a Diploma in Professional Studies in addition to their final degree award on graduation.

HEL P AND SUP P OR T

“The placement process at Vax not only benefits the students but also us as a company, as we have found that developing a mutually beneficial relationship represents the best way to work. On a fundamental level, it enables us to take another individual in to the business that embodies the Vax culture.

From the student’s perspective, the skills, values and experience that they acquire on their placement can also assist their final year portfolio. We therefore have the chance to assist in the development of keen and enthusiastic students early on in their career. It is also an opportunity for us to meet talented individuals who we may be able to hire once they have graduated.”

Within the School we have a dedicated member of staff who supports you in finding and applying for your placement. Although a large number of companies approach us directly with placement opportunities, it is ultimately the responsibility of each student to find and apply for their individual placement. We also support you before and throughout the duration of the placement, from providing portfolio surgeries to advice on CVs. You will also be allocated a placement tutor, who is an experienced member of academic staff from the School. Our Placements and Enterprise Education Officer is also always available to contact in relation to advice or assistance with your placement.

Jake Amies INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA FINAL YEAR P L A C E M E N T : G E A R 4 LT D “The placement helped to put together everything that I learnt in the first two years. I feel that doing a placement takes you from being a student designer to industry level.”

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STUDY ABROAD RE CE NT PLACE M E NT D ES TI NATIONS INCLUDE: RECKITT BENCKISER / UNILEVER / RGK WHEELCHAIRS / ADIDAS / PAVEGEN / ROLLS ROYCE / HORNBY HOBBIES / TESCO / DIAGEO / CRESSALL RESISTORS / ALLIANCE BOOTS / SHEFFIELD FORGEMASTERS / SEBASTIAN CONRAN ASSOCIATES / DEVOL KITCHENS / SIMTECH (SINGAPORE) / PUMA / KRAFT FOODS / MICROSOFT / VAX / JAGUAR LAND ROVER /

Some of our students choose not to undertake a placement for the whole year, but choose to combine studying abroad with a placement instead, through the ERASMUS+ scheme. In recent years we have fostered a successful partnerships with a number of universities. Choosing to study abroad for up to six months can help to give you a different perspective on your studies, providing unparalleled access to a different culture and way of doing things. Successfully completing half of your time studying abroad and half of your time on placement will lead to the award of Diploma of International Studies in addition to your degree award.

Kate Saunders INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA FINAL YEAR “For my third year I studied at Technical University Delft, in the Netherlands for 6 months. For the rest of the year I worked with Bosch Siemens in Munich. My year abroad was incredibly beneficial. I was able to move abroad independently, broaden my perspectives and gain confidence. Participating in the ERASMUS scheme is a privilege and a great chance to do something that will be of great value personally and professionally.”

SIEMENS BOSCH (GERMANY) / WONDER VISION / NISSAN / SMALLFRY /

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DESIGN WEEK Design Week is a special event which takes place every year around the end of January. Essentially the event is a ‘live brief’ design exercise, with real world design briefs set by industry. No other activities are timetabled for the design students who are participating, so they can work intensively on this one project for seven days. Five briefs are presented to the students from a range of companies, helping students to choose something they are personally interested in. The event is a fantastic opportunity to gain further work experience and insight into the real world design process, expectations and the way in which companies work. In the past we have had briefs from companies such as Samsung, Logitech, Diageo and iCandy. The companies are able to select up to five projects for which they can retain the design work, with the aim of commercialising the design concepts produced. This provides an excellent opportunity for students to have work commercialised before they leave the University.

HOW I T W OR K S

1.

Students attend a briefing session, during which each company presents their brief.

2.

Each student submits the rank order of their brief choices.

3.

If a brief has a sufficient number of students interested in undertaking it, it will be assigned to the students who have chosen it.

4.

The students generally brainstorm concepts with their peers, and then work independently to perform user research, technology research, concept generation and concept presentation content.

5.

Results of the work are brought together by the students and then submitted to the companies for consideration. Submissions can include extensive research, CAD drawings, sketching and models.

6.

The companies then review the responses which they have had to their briefs and decide if they would like to use the ideas. In the past, design concepts have been retained by the companies and developed into a real life product or service.


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E VE NT S As well as Design Week and the Degree Show, there are a number of other events which happen in and around the School that will involve our undergraduates. From year to year these may change, however, there is always something going on in the School and we pride ourselves on being able to offer our students more than just a degree. It is our aim to provide each student with the opportunity to engage with extra-curricular activities on a variety of levels, providing a truly engaging and enriching experience.

L U FB RA SER VIC E DE S I G N JAM This event is part of the Global Service Jam which takes place around March every year, across the world. The event is a non-profit activity organised by an international network of service designers who share a belief that collaborative tools and design processes can be used to create change for the better. The Loughborough event sees teams of students, staff, researchers and the general public come together over 48 hours to develop and prototype a completely new service inspired by a shared theme. Recent services created from the event include a service called ‘Flavour Finder’ aimed at bringing together community groups and cultures through food, and a directory of workshops for teachers to create a better experience in the classroom.

I N S T I TUTE OF E RG O NOMIC S AND HUMAN FA CTO R S C AR EER S DAY The School takes Ergonomics students to attend the annual careers day at the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors. This event sees ergonomics and human factors employers from all over the country come together to speak to those looking to start a career in the field of human factors and ergonomics.

TADA TADA, otherwise known as ‘That Awesome Design Association’, is Loughborough’s student design association, which is part of the Students’ Union. Although this is not a part of the School, we have very close links with it. It is a student run association, with a large number of our students as members. School staff regularly support the association at its events. Recent events include a ‘London Design Weekender’ where students went to London to experience the wealth of design on offer in the UK’s capital. The event included visits to leading design consultancies, creative workshops and museum tours.

R ESEAR C H SEMINAR S AND P UBLIC LEC TUR ES Throughout the year the School plays host to a number of special speakers and research seminars. In essence these are talks given by academic specialists and key industry figures from all over the world. These special lectures give an up-to-date insight into the world of design and ergonomics from different perspectives and often offer students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of key concepts covered in their academic work.


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DEGREE SHOW

The Degree Show is an annual exhibition showcasing our finalists’ work. It usually runs for five days in the middle of June each year. It is a fantastic opportunity for potential employers, friends, family, industry and members of the public to see design projects which have been produced by our finalists and speak to them about their inspiration, products and experience. The Show is accompanied by a book, website and app which highlights students’ work through photographs, CAD renders and text. The entire show is organised and created by a committee of final year student volunteers, working with members of staff, to produce something, which they feel, reflects their experience and the way in which they would like to promote their products. This is a fantastic way for our students to develop event organisation, marketing, sales and graphic design skills in addition to their academic work.


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P r o f i l e

EXHIB I T I ONS AND C OM P ET I T I O N S Alice Noble Our undergraduates regularly enter competitions and exhibitions both as part of academic modules and as an extra-curricular activity.

R OYA L S O C IET Y O F A R T S C O M P E TITIO N As part of the module, Industrial Design Studies, each student undertakes an entry for the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) competition. This competition sees the RSA formulate design briefs in collaboration with industry. This year’s briefs included ‘Tomorrow’s Workplace’, ‘Re-invent the Toilet’ and ‘Collaborative Consumption’. In recent years we have had a number of students win top place within their categories.

OT H ER COM PETITIONS Our students regularly enter other competitions. Recent wins and commendations include the European Union Women Inventors and Innovators Network Awards, PBS international awards, Car Design News – Interior Motives Design Awards, UNESCO Awards, Philips ‘Innovation Open’ awards, ‘Sort Your Trash Can International Challenge’ by Vestforbraending, a Vetrerie Dal Pain competition, and an Undercover MacBook Pro Customisation competition.

N E W D E S IG N E R S Every year the School exhibits a number of students work at the New Designers exhibition in London. This annual event attracts industry leaders from all over the world interested in seeing what the next generation of designers are doing, and looking for future trends of innovation and design.

Filament

by Tom Lawson and James Green

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA

“This is our light design which was chosen as one of five winners in a competition for Italian glass company Vetrerie Dal Pain. As part of the prize our design was exhibited at Milan Design Week last year, which we were both invited to attend. The whole process has been an incredible experience for us both.”

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA FINAL YEAR RUNNER UP: B&Q NEW TALENT SEARCH 2013 IN ASSOCIATION WITH ELLE DECORATION “In June, 2013, I was announced as one of the runners up for the B&Q New Talent Search – The brief I chose was set to innovate an Eco Garden Product, considering the use of sustainable design for mass manufacture. I had previously completed an additional module on Sustainability for Design whilst studying in my second year and thus considered entering. My answer to the brief was a Flat Pack Stool manufactured from Post-Consumer waste PET bottles. The design of the ‘Pall stool’ works like a Lego chair which customers can interact with. Made entirely from recycled bottles, the stool adds a quirky addition to garden furniture. I was tasked with creating a product for the garden that was made out of components that could be used again when the product reaches the end of its life; this is called ‘closed loop’ design.”


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FI NAL Y E AR D ES IGN PROJE C T

Chloe Tuck I N D US TRIA L D E S IGN AN D T ECH NO L OG Y BA

PRODUCT: KEMO-BE

Kemo-be is an MP3 player powered by a hand generated dynamo aiming to facilitate knowledge sharing amongst rural Zimbabwean farmers.

Ke y f e a t u re s: _ The device is modular allowing the dynamo to be separated from the MP3 so other devices can be charged using a wireless transmitter _ Wind up devices often feature easy to break cranks, this device has been designed to combat this flaw _ The device can still be used if the crank handle is lost or broken by utilising something as simple as a wooden stick instead _ The device is as dust and drop proof as possible _ Additional functionality enables users to make their own podcasts without the need to head to a central base

T he d e sig n p r o c e s s The design process I’ve followed has been a critical one. The design has been iterated many times from continuous evaluations. It has also been heavily research based as I’ve not been able to work with the user directly. I’ve not followed a strict plan but have created solutions for each hurdle. The prototype has been created using the in-house rapid prototyping machine to create a quick and accurate model. It has required a lot of hand finishing and tweaking to get the desired effects. Creating electronics that were appropriate and effective required a lot of trial and error testing to get a working prototype.


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FI NAL Y E AR D ES IGN PROJE C T

Alex Margetts PRO DUCT D E S IGN AN D T ECH NO L OG Y BSc

P R O D U C T : E -V OL V E

This is a revolutionary e-cigarette providing a pioneering form of nicotine replacement therapy. The device gradually weans the user off the drug every day requiring no user intervention, reducing the likelihood of relapse.

Ke y f e a t u re s: _ Product automatically delivers gradual reduction of nicotine over time which current nicotine replacement therapies do not _ Socially acceptable design _ App developed to support users

T he d e sig n p r o c e s s Initially the market was defined, this included understanding the demographic of the target market through identifying both their social and financial status. More subjective elements were then incorporated into the design process through recognising the markets generalised motives and potential pain points whist quitting. This information was compiled to create a brand that resonated with the market’s needs and desires. The second stage was more technical, identifying how the technology can work, considering all design for manufacturing constraints and ensuring costings were appropriate. Overall this aimed to create a strong brand whilst delivering a solution that was commercially and technically viable. As well as other processes, I have used 3D printing – SLS and SLA for the aesthetic model, electronics – miniaturised and printed on a PCB and modelling to work towards the creation of a working prototype.


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FI NAL Y E AR D ES IGN PROJE C T

Dale Comley I N D US TRIA L D E S IGN AN D T ECH NO L OG Y BA

P R O D U C T : E P ISO D E

Episode is an innovative auto-injector which treats anaphylaxis. The device provides a stable injection platform, utilising intuitive drug delivery to the patient quickly. It also has an audio guidance function for third party users and reminds users of drug expiration. This is encased in a socially acceptable design.

Ke y f e a t u re s: _ The device provides a stable injection platform _ Intuitive delivery of drugs to the patient quickly _ Audio guidance function for third party users _ Reminds owner of drug expiration _ Socially acceptable design _ Produces alert to owner if left behind

T he d e sig n p r o c e s s I believed it was important to actively involve primary users and industry experts throughout the design process to ensure the device would provide an unambiguous and pleasant user experience whilst achieving a quality technical design specification. This user driven approach generated hundreds of distinct concepts that underwent further refinement before a single design could be chosen. Preceding this the device was developed through the use of CAD, and design reviews which enabled me too logically and methodically develop the device through design development. In addition to this, several proof of principle prototypes where produced and tested to ensure certain functions would perform as intended before committing to final prototypes. These prototypes allowed critical user interactions and mechanical functions to be robustly tested, generating a list of improvement options to optimise the design for volume manufacture.


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FI NAL Y E AR D ES IGN PROJE C T

James Molkenthin PRO DUCT D E S IGN AN D T ECH NO L OG Y BSc

P R O D U C T : IU N GO C I R C L E

The Iungo Circle is a smart kettle removing the stigma of talking products for the blind by communicating with a smartphone and using its in-build accessibility to provide feedback to the user. The kettle can capture the water temperature and volume and send this information as a push notification to alert the user when the water has boiled. The app can turn the device on and off and displays usage stats.

Ke y f e a t u re s: _ It is part of a series of kitchen products with Bluetooth connectivity _ Can be controlled by a smartphone _ Can be turned on and off using the app _ Can provide usage stats

T he d e sig n p r o c e s s For prototypes I’ve used both a conventional kettle, retrofitted with electronics, and used SLS to 3D print a more aesthetic appearance model. For the final product, the main body is injection moulded, with highly considered split lines to fit in all detailing needing for the lid mechanism, whilst minimising the number of components. When starting the project, I was simply following an insight; that in family households with a blind member, ‘blind products’ were being kept to one side, hidden in a cupboard and shunned in favour of using normal products with custom modifications. After hours of primary and secondary research, the Iungo concept immerged, and the hero product, a kettle, selected after my empathy day experience. What was really exciting was that it showcased a wide range of my talents; insight driven innovation, product redefinition, user experience mapping, branding and communication and design for mass manufacture. For prototyping, I knew it would showcase my electronics and coding skills, model making talents and allow me to try creating and developing my own app.


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FA C I L I T I E S Knowledge and skills advancement are at the centre of everything we do, pushing innovation and creativity to its highest potential. Aiding us in our pursuit are our fantastic facilities. Industry specification machinery, purpose built teaching areas and specialist laboratories provide a state-of-the-art learning and teaching environment for all of our students. Space within the School covers both practical and theoretical teaching. Every space has been specifically designed to promote the sharing of ideas and information, emulating the work environment. As well as a lecture theatre, seminar rooms, meeting rooms, informal study areas and computer facilities, the School also has over 13 areas dedicated to the teaching/ learning of practical skills and the manufacture of products and systems prototypes. We have highly qualified and industry experienced technical staff supporting each of our practical areas. These staff provide a safe working environment, giving information, advice and professional training on all machines, tools and equipment.

01


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TECHNICAL TEACHING A N D R E S E A R C H FA C I L I T I E S Co m p u ter Aid ed D es ign/ M a nu factu r in g ( CA D /CAM) This area houses the machinery required to carry out CAD/CAM 3D cutting of metals and plastics. The equipment available includes industry standard XYZ Vertical Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines. You can use the machinery in this area to produce a wide range of complex engineered components for plastic vacuum forming/injection moulding patterns/moulds. Recently a model car chassis was made using this equipment. 03

Ra p i d p r o to typ in g area The School’s additive manufacturing 3D printers are located in this area. You can use this equipment by creating 3D CAD models and then print the parts to realise your design in a physical 3D plastic form. The parts created are more complex than can be achieved by conventional manufacturing techniques and can be used for a variety of solutions such as electronic product casings and medical equipment parts.

Ro ut er r o o m This space caters for the (CNC) 3D shaping of different sizes of rigid foam and wood prototypes and moulds. Recent work using this machine includes a concept wooden sewing machine base and vacuum forming moulds for custom motorcycle helmets. 02

E n g i neer in g m a c hin e w o r k sh o p This specialist workshop helps you to carry out precision cutting of metals and plastics. You can use the lathes, milling machines, drills and grinders within this area. Training can be supplied if necessary. The equipment is used for the prototyping of items such as can crusher mechanisms and injection moulding tools.

Wat erjet cut t er The waterjet cutter machine is able to carry out 2D CNC cutting of most sheet materials to 100mm thickness. In recent years the machine has been used to cut furniture and bicycle frames prior to assembly.

Met al f abricat ion works hop

01

This room is used for the fabrication, cutting, brazing/welding and assembly of metal prototypes. You are taught how to safely use hand tools, guillotines and brazing techniques to form and join sheet metal. A baby pram attachment to a wheelchair was one of the prototypes manufactured within this facility recently.

02

Wood preparat ion works hop Used by trained technical staff, to support students, this workshop is used to carry out the basic cutting and preparation of MDF, wood and foam for many projects. The wood machinery within this workshop includes dimension, board/cross cut saws and planers.

Wood machine works hop This workshop is used for the cutting and machine sanding of wood, MDF and plastics. You are trained to use band saws, hot wire cutters and sanders to create shapes, compound curves and finishes on both conceptual and functional models.

03


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FA C I L I T I E S TECHNICAL TEACHING A N D R E S E A R C H FA C I L I T I E S

M u lti m ater ials w o r k sh o p ( M M W )

Mechanics and s c ie nc e t eaching labora t or y

The MMW is used for the hand and machine modelling of artefacts and prototypes. The majority of the area comprises of 24 large workbenches used by students for wood and foam working. Other resources found in this workshop include vacuum forming machines, plastic welders/folders and drills. Example project outcomes include small hand-held digital device models, through to a large concept speaker system and ply wood bicycles.

Within this room you are taught mechanics and science. The mechanics area consists of equipment to practically test the properties of materials and structures under certain conditions. The results of this testing can be incorporated into any project to ensure that structures do not fail or material usage is optimised.

G l ass Rein fo r ced Pl a stic (GRP) Room This room can be used for fibre glassing over moulds and the resin vacuum casting of prototypes. A user-friendly wheelbarrow body was produced using this process.

S p ray b o o th This facility has 4 booths specially designed and ventilated for the spray painting of models to create a professional finish.

04

E l e ctr o n ics teac hing l a b o r ato r y Equipped for teaching electronics, this laboratory is also used by students to design and build and test electronic solutions to projects. The lab contains IT equipment/CAD software for drawing Printed Circuit Boards (PCB), modern PCB manufacturing facility including surface mount technology and test equipment. The outcomes from this process can be included in the many products that have electronic functions/controls such as lighting, movement sensors and sound.

The science area of this room has a fume cupboard, sinks and a gas supply along with equipment used for teaching mainly chemistry and physics.

Climat ic chambe r s These two climatic chambers are used to create artificial climatic conditions for experiments and research activity. As well as working between -30째C to +500째C they can also be used to simulate altitude, wind and radiation.

Mult i- zone t hermal manikin s These specialist manikins help us to measure body heat loss under a variety of conditions.

Vehicle s af et y la bor a t or y The School has a laboratory dedicated to research into road and vehicle safety. We also have a range of equipment which we can use to simulate driving, driving conditions and monitor drivers and equipment related to a number of vehicles.

04


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INDUSTRY CONNECTIONS We are very proud of our strong international industry connections. Our staff and students regularly work with and for a large number of multinational companies, bringing their ingenuity, innovation and expertise together to solve a number of problems and projects.

CU RRE N T CO M PA N IE S W E W OR K W IT H IN CL U D E :

ALLIANCE BOOTS / BOSCH / TRIUMPH / JOSEPH JOSEPH /

Our connections provide a number of benefits to our undergraduate students including:

NISSAN / DYSON / VAX /

_ Providing lucrative placement opportunities

CADBURYS / O2 /

_ Providing unique graduate job opportunities _ Live projects and briefs to provide hands on experience as part of our courses _ Industry speakers – providing up-to-date insight into the latest developments and industry thinking – recent examples include, tutorials on practical sketching and other technical aspects of design _ Sponsorship to fund particular projects

EAST MIDLANDS AMBULANCE SERVICE / DCA DESIGN INTERNATIONAL / MICROSOFT / ADIDAS / ASTON MARTIN / ATKINS / KRAFT FOODS / MICHELIN / NESTLE / NEXT / NHS TRUSTS /


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James Elderton and Joseph Thomas WONDER VISION DIGITAL CREATIVE AGENCY

“Working with the School has been very beneficial for E.ON. We have worked together on a number of projects and opportunities, and have found the staff and students most helpful and enthusiastic. We feel that the School is making a positive impact within industry and we look forward to growing our mutually beneficial relationship.�

James and Joseph are graduates from our BSc Product Design and Technology course, who set up their own London based, digital creative agency in 2010. Wonder Vision is a high-end creative agency specialising in offering a complete range of integrated solutions for digital productions. Renowned for their creativity and technical know-how, Wonder Vision deliver creative campaigns across CGI, design and digital for global brands and leading advertising agencies. Currently their company has strong links with the School through various employment and placement opportunities.

Fuse The product encourages sustained behaviour change and reduced energy consumption within the home by Ben Ilidge


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RESEARCH Research into transport safety

We are Britain’s top design school for World-leading research, as ranked in the UK’s latest Research Assessment Exercise. This is testament to our exceptional and varied staff expertise and the innovative work which is undertaken within the School. As well as having the potential to impact upon everyday life, our research is a very important part of the undergraduate experience, helping to mould our undergraduate courses to ensure that they are at the cutting-edge of design, technology and ergonomic developments. Research permeates undergraduate teaching in a number of ways. This can be in any form, from changing the fundamental curriculum to reflect latest developments, to providing the research opportunities students can undertake as part of their assessed academic work. The following case studies are a small sample of the research undertaken within the school.

CASE STUDY

Research into tools for the food safety culture – working with the Food Standards Agency Dr Patrick Waterson and undergraduate Ergonomics student, Charlotte Morrison This piece of work sees collaboration between a member of staff and a student, where the project stems from work carried out as part of Dr Waterson’s own research. A summary of the project can be found below: Asteoarthritis suit developed at Loughborough to better understand the challenges faced by elderly people or those with debilitating health concerns

Food safety culture (FSC) is an emerging concept in the area of food safety. Safety culture has already been debated and discussed by experts in other safety critical industries and those in food safety are now investigating its value in their domain. A tool to measure food safety culture has been developed by the Food Standards Agency, however it has yet to be trialled or evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the tool; is it appropriate to measure FSC? What are the weaknesses? And how can the tool be improved? The validity, reliability and usability of the tool will be considered and recommendations of possible improvements made.


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CASE STUDY

More effective New Product Development ( NPD ) Dr Mark Evans In the early 2000s, research undertaken within the Design Practice Research Group at Loughborough Design School, identified issues in the use of language and understanding of design representations as being significant barriers to effective NPD. Following extensive engagement with key stakeholders in product development that included industrial designers, engineers and educators, iD Cards were created. These fold out cards employ the research findings to identify 32 key types of sketch, drawing, model and prototype, plus, when they were used and for what types of information. They help facilitate more effective NPD through enhanced design methods, communication, team working and inter-disciplinary collaboration. Since the project’s inception, the Industrial Designers Society of America has supported, distributed and adopted the cards for use by its 3300 members worldwide. In addition to being a finalist in the 2011 International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA), the Design Practice Research Group continue to receive positive feedback from global organisations for whom the iD Cards have made significant impact. Following a print-run of 26000 iD Cards, demand for their on-going use is being met by a pdf download and the Principal Investigator, Dr Mark Evans, has recently translated the physical card format into a smartphone app to enable unlimited global dissemination.

Download it now p store: from the apple ap search – Loughborough s rd ca iD Design School

For more informati on about ou r researc h, it’s impact a nd what we are currently doing , ple ase see our w ebsite


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ENTREPRENEURIALISM At Loughborough Design School we support entrepreneurialism in a big way. We recognise that not everyone wants to work for a company and that many of our students have strong entrepeneurial aspirations. To help with this, the vast majority of our students are taught basic fundamental entrepreneurial skills through their courses. These skills include business planning, branding, patents, copyright and other legal issues, to name but a few. Further optional modules and extra-curricular activities, that we offer, can further develop these skills.

Current products and business from our graduates include:

J O S E P H J O S E P H see co-founder Richard Joseph’s article on page 57 LUMINO PURE WATER TECHNOLOGY ASAP PA V E G E N

A number of current UK and international businesses had their humble beginnings at Loughborough Design School. These may be businesses built upon products which started as part of a student’s undergraduate course or began as ideas that were inspired here and realised using the skills they had developed as part of their degree.

PA V E G E N

Laurence Kemball-Cook INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA GRADUATED 2009 “Loughborough Design School provided me with the confidence, support and innovation to explore the varying possibilities within the sustainability market, thus enabling me to discover a significant gap and create a product to combat it. The support I received at Loughborough has been extremely valuable and consistently beneficial in helping me achieve my goal. Without the support of the University, I would not have progressed so quickly with Pavegen’s conception, especially considering the barriers many start-up businesses face in the current economic climate.”

Pavegen is an innovative clean tech company, headquartered in London, who develop and manufacture flooring technology that converts the wasted kinetic energy from footsteps into renewable electricity. The company was founded in 2009 by Industrial Design and Technology graduate Laurence KemballCook. Laurence was recently part of a trade delegation to China, headed by Prime Minister, David Cameron. www.pavegen.com


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Ross Kemp INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA GRADUATED 2010

AS AP Asap is a power assisted water craft for lifesavers developed by Industrial Design and Technology graduate, Ross Kemp. The device is a cheaper alternative to a jet ski. It can be launched immediately by one person, and charged using solar energy. Ross recently featured on the BBC TV show, Be Your Own Boss, through which he met Innocent Drinks Co-founder Richard Reed, who introduced Ross to Sir Richard Branson. Branson offered to fly Ross to Australia to continue work on his craft saying, “I think the Asap watercraft is a fantastic invention and will be a wonderful success in Australia. Anything that can help lifeguards reach drowning casualties faster must be a good thing.”

“The course gave me everything I needed to design amazing products. Then The Studio taught me how I could turn this into a business, to sell around the world with a little seed funding to get started. What an incredible combination! Loughborough has, without doubt, shaped every success I have had so far. Not just the course and The Studio, but the Loughborough lifestyle. Students at Loughborough are very passionate, competitive and determined. Being part of this big family in the campus bubble becomes a way of life, which I think transfers into the work place and helps us graduates go on to build awesome businesses and careers.”

www.asapwatercrafts.com

P r o f i l e

THE STUDIO The University is currently home to a unique business incubation space called ‘The Studio’. This is an area designed to provide budding graduate entrepreneurs with the office space, support, knowledge and resources to help them develop their own sustainable businesses. Find out more: www.lboro.ac.uk/thestudio


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“I would recommend studying at the Design School, it is an excellent facility for learning and the courses have been developed to provide students with a good grounding in their discipline.”

ALUM N I Rachel Bennett ERGONOMICS BSc DPS 2007 – 2011 R O L L S - R OYC E Rachel Bennett is one of our many successful Ergonomics graduates. She studied Ergonomics at the School from 2007 – 2011 and is currently a Human Factors Engineer within Rolls-Royce Marine division.

Throughout her time at the Company, Rachel has gone from strength to strength in her career, crediting Loughborough with, “providing me with a good grounding in, and a familiarity with, my discipline.”

The nature of the course gave her an excellent introduction to her discipline and she describes the tutors as, “Always very helpful, for both projects and careers support.” Rachel’s favourite part of the course was the opportunity to undertake a year in industry. “The year in industry gave me an advantage over other job applicants who did not have previous experience,” she says.

Her experience has been positive, as well as helping her shape her career “I would recommend studying at the Design School, it is an excellent facility for learning and the courses have been developed to provide students with a good grounding in their discipline.”

When Rachel left Loughborough she began her career within the Human Factors Team at Rolls-Royce. The Company provides power systems and services for use on land, at sea and in the air. This includes aeroplane and marine engines, including systems for Royal Navy submarines. Rachel’s job sees her, “Providing human factors support for other teams and departments within Rolls-Royce Marine. This can include anthropometric assessments, reviews of concept design or human reliability assessment,” she says, “I also support the production of safety justifications and providing Human Factors training to personnel across Rolls-Royce.”


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Richard Joseph INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY BA 1994 – 1997 CO-FOUNDER OF JOSEPH JOSEPH Richard Joseph, co-founder of successful company Joseph Joseph, studied at Loughborough Design School from 1994 – 1997. His company designs and manufactures innovative kitchenware and household products, which are sold all over the world. Richard studied our Industrial Design and Technology course, securing a job at Dyson after graduation. Following a year at Dyson, Richard undertook a Master’s degree in business at Cambridge University. During his time at Loughborough, he emphasises how, “We were taught how to work on our own, how to manage projects and hit deadlines: all the essentials if you want to be successful in your career.” His favourite part of the course were the design projects, where he particularly enjoyed, “Creating product ideas, testing, prototyping and model making.”

Although his family history and entrepreneurial spirit have played a big part in his success, Richard explains that the School has also had a positive influence, “Teaching me to think creatively – a skill required by all entrepreneurs.” When talking about the Company, Richard describes how, “Problem solving and innovation is at the heart of what we do. Whilst many brands concentrate on just one aspect of a product, we focus on the whole user experience – creating products that work beautifully and are a pleasure to have around the home,” Joseph Joseph’s ethos echoes in many ways a number of strongly held beliefs of the School, perhaps demonstrating what a formative influence we are continuing to deliver.”

When discussing the relevance of the course in today’s design industry, he explains that, “It is a practical design course and prepares you well for a career in design,” His sentiments highlight its relevance and importance for those wishing to pursue a design career or set up their own business. Richard’s inspiration to set up his own company stems from his family history. His grandfather set up a business in 1936 producing everything from vehicle wing mirrors to fridge shelves. This quickly became the family business, and eventually diversified into making glass chopping boards. In the early 2000s his father approached Richard and his brother Antony, also a product designer, and asked them to re-design the chopping board range. After early success with their designs, the brothers decided to launch Joseph Joseph in 2003.

“It is a practical design course and prepares you well for a career in design.”


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CAREER S SUP P O RT As well as providing great careers preparation through our courses, the School and University also offer professional careers support for every student. The School is often approached by companies wishing to recruit our graduates for post-graduation. In many cases initial interviews are held within the School itself. We are also visited by a number of companies throughout the year who give talks about their companies and the job opportunities that they have available. All of our staff have worked in, or with industry, and are well placed to provide advice to students on careers and companies that a student may wish to research further.

CAREERS AND EM P L OYA B IL I T Y C E N T R E We are very fortunate to have a Careers and Employability Centre on the University campus. This centre provides a wide range of services to support students when it comes to starting their career. The School also has a dedicated careers advisor, based within this Centre, who specialises in the fields we teach. Services that this Centre provide include one to one advice sessions and drop-ins with careers advisors, lectures and workshops on career planning, selfawareness and job search skills, subject specific careers fairs and specialist employability and enterprise skills activities.

IND USTRIAL D ESIGN AND TECHNOLO GY B A 88% of our 2013 graduates are in employment or further study*

PRODUCT DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY B S c 93% of our 2013 graduates are in employment or further study*

ERGONOMICS ( HUMAN FACTORS DESIGN ) B S c 95% of our 2012 graduates are in employment or further study*

* of those available to undertake work or further study


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FINANCE F EE S Each of our courses has a fee of £9000 per year of study.* Payment of these fees can be arranged in advance of each year if you are wishing to pay up front, however, many students like to take advantage of the students loan scheme run by the government, Student Loans Company. Under this scheme you will not have to pay any fees upfront, but instead pay for your tuition as a tax on your earnings once you have graduated and are in employment which pays over £21,000 annually. Financial help from the Student Loans Company can also be sought to cover living expenses as well. For further information, please see our prospectus: www.lboro.ac.uk/study

M ater ials co sts The School provides a number of essential materials necessary for learning and teaching free of charge to all its students, including health and safety equipment. At times you may wish to use additional materials to realise your ideas and concepts. These can be ordered and purchased from our stores within the School building.

VISITING US Coming to one of our Open Days is the best way of sampling the Loughborough Experience and seeing the School for yourself. You will have the opportunity to meet lecturers and students from the courses you are interested in, attend talks, take a School tour, take a guided tour of our campus, view student accommodation, and check out the Students’ Union. Open days are usually held in June and September. To find out the latest dates and book your place, see our website – www.lboro.ac.uk/open-days

* Our placement year current has a fee of £800 for 2015. Fees stated for 2015 entry could be subject to change.

We have taken care that this brochure is as accurate as possible at time of going to print. It is intended as a general guide and forms no part of a contract. The University reserves the right to make changes or withdraw any of the courses, modules or facilities described. Editorial: Karen Roxborough, Design: Ian Jepson and Charlie Flemons, Design and Print Services, Photography: Phil Wilson, Design and Print Services and Andy Weekes


Lo ug h b o r o u g h D esign School Lo ug h b o r o u g h Un ivers it y Lo ug h b o r o u g h Le i c e ster sh ir e LE 1 1 3 TU UK

www.l boro.ac .uk/ld s T: +44 (0) 1509 226900

@lborodesign

57649 D&P June14

E: dslearning@lboro.ac.uk

Profile for Loughborough University

Loughborough Design School Undergraduate Taught Programmes  

Loughborough Design School Undergraduate Taught Programmes  

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