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tribe

INTERNATIONAL CREATIVE  ARTS  MAGAZINE ISSUE  4

2009


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tribe

ISSUE 4 MAY 2012 WELCOME This month  it  has  been  my  pleasure  to  become  part  of  the  tribe  

EDITOR IN  CHIEF

team. The  past  couple  of  weeks  have  been  full  of  meaty  

Mark Doyle

conversations which  have  kept  my  mind  buzzing  long  after  the  end  of  

EDITOR

our meetings  and  a  constant  stream  of  original  and  thought  

Ali Donkin

provoking ideas  springing  from  every  member  of  the  team.  In  short,  

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

after having  spent  only  a  small  amount  of  time  with  everyone  here  at  

Tilly Craig

tribe I  have  no  doubt  that  we  will  be  producing  work  which  

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR  

continually provides  something  innovative  and  fully  explores  our   online  format  for  a  long  time  to  come. Talking  of  innovation,  tribe:write,  which  will  provide  a  platform  for   creative  writers  to  show  their  work  in  a  completely  fresh  format,  also   welcomes  a  new  editor,  Tilly  Craig,  whose  passion  and  expertise  will  

Pete Davey   CLIENT  DIRECTOR   Jean  Camp MARKETING  DIRECTOR   Steve  Clement-­‐Large   RESEARCH  

see that  tribe:write  will  be  unique.  Getting  recognised  and  published  

Hannah Doyle

can be  arduous,  but  we  hope  that  tribe:write  will  help  make  that  

COVER

processes a  lot  easier  by  creating  a  place  for  writers  to  take  their  

Rosalind Chad

work on  to  that  'next  step'  on  the  journey  to  publication.  The  beauty  

ART

of tribe  is  that  the  team  have  managed  to  introduce  so  many  ways  for  

Bex Edwards,  Abigail  Forster

creatives to  show  you  their  work.  Not  only  will  tribe:write  give  the  

PHOTOGRAPHY

opportunity for  writers  to  show  their  work  but  it  also  provides  a  stage  

Mark Doyle  [except  where  noted]

for illustrators  too.  The  future  of  tribe  holds  many  new  avenues  for  us  

CONTRIBUTORS

to work  with  and  promote  the  talents  of  up  and  coming  illustrators.   One  such  opportunity  can  be  seen  on  the  opposite  page.  Each  month   we  would  like  to  give  over  our  contents  page  to  an  illustrator  so  that   they  can  show  our  readers  their  distinct  style  and  imagination.  So   come  on  illustrators  -­‐  show  the  world  what  you  can  do! Ali  Donkin,  Editor

Glyn Davies,  Rosalind  Chad,  Jelle  Van  Hulle,  Kirsty   Ashford,  Jamie  House,  Caitlin  Karolczak,  Michael   Buckland,  Carlos  Ezquerra,  Chris  Kelley,  John  Scarratt,   Stephanie  Bunt,  Abigail  Forster,  Dawn  Sims,  Dora   Alden CONTACT To  submit  work:  tribesubmit@gmail.com To  say  hello:  tribequery@gmail.com

tribe is  a  submissions  driven  visual  creative  arts  magazine.  We   welcome  contributions  from  all  over  the  UK  and  the  world,  and  our   aims  are  to  showcase  the  very  best  in  visual  creative  arts  each  month.   If  you  are  a  creative  and  would  like  to  send  you  work  to  us  (either  art  or   an  article  you  have  written)  please  send  it  to:  tribesubmit@gmail.com

Full submission  details  can  be  found  on  our  website: www.tribemagazine.org/contact.html Artists  have  given  permission  for  their  work  to  be   displayed  in  tribe  magazine.  No  part  of  this  magazine   may  be  reproduced  without  the  permission  of  the   copyright  holder(s) tribe  magazine  is  produced  in  Plymouth,  UK  by   Trico  Creative  CIC,  company  no  7982933

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Phrases &  Philosophies  For  The  Use  Of  The  Young    ISSUE  4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 7


The Country  Doctor

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Momento Mori  I

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Res Ipsa  Loquitur  (The  Thing  Speaks  For  Itself)

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Emanation

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Le Bourreau

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Hedone

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The Martyrdom  Of  Saint  Agatha Caitlin  Karolczak studiosilenti.com    ISSUE  4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 17


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CARLOS EZQUERRA Carlos Ezquerra  is  a  legend.  Co-­‐creator  of  Judge  Dredd  and  Strontium   Dog,  his  work  has  a  huge  cult  following  across  the  world.  His  art  has  been   a  massive  influence  on  modern  comic  book  art  and  graphic  novels.  He   took  time  out  of  his  busy  schedule  to  talk  to  TRIBE.

How have  things  in  the  comic/graphic   novel  industry  changed  over  the  course   of  your  career?  Have  things  changed   for  the  better  or  worse?

characters, to  maintain  the  standards   expected  from  the  fans?  What  process   do  you  go  through  when  creating  a   new  story/strip?

Some things  have  changed  for  better,   but  in  general  I  think  for  worse  -­‐  young   people  don't  read  comics  like  before  as   they  are  more  into  video  games,  so  

                        It  hasn't  been  hard  because  those   characters  are  like  part  of  us,  so  they   came  out  quite  naturally.  When  I  am   with  a  new  story  I  try  to  imagine  it  like  

comics don't  sell  in  the  numbers  they   used  to. You  are  partly  responsible  (along  with   John  Wagner)  for  creating  two  of  the  

a film,  trying  to  match  the  look  of  the   characters  with  the  way  they  move  and   act,  trying  to  be  true  to  the  idea  that   the  face  is  the  mirror  of  the  soul.

most iconic  characters  in  British  comic   book  history:  Strontium  Dog  and  Judge   Dredd.  Has  it  been  hard,  over  the  time   you  have  been  involved  in  with  those  

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How do  you  feel  about  Dredd  as  a   character?  Both  Dredd  and  Strontium   Dog  strips  have  strong  political   undertones  -­‐  Dredd  about  state  control  

even more!  As  for  the  Strontium  Dog,   what  can  I  say?  Discrimination  is  a   close  part  of  human  nature;  sometimes   it  is  skin  color,  religion,  sexuality,  

and Strontium  Dog  about  alienation   and  discrimination.  What  social   themes,  if  any,  were  you  aiming  to   bring  out  through  these  characters?

languages, anything  that  is  different   can  be  considered  ‘a  menace’.

Those were  the  aims  when  we  started;   remember  both  characters  were   created  in  the  late  1970’s.  Margaret   Thatcher  was  in  power  and  it  was  the   time  when  real  state  control  was  

being portrayed  again  on  film?

There is  a  new  Dredd  film  out  later  this   year.  Were  you  nervous  about  Dredd  

Not at  all,  I  never  knew  it  was  going  to   be  a  film  until  I  read  it  in  the  press!

starting. Now  we  are  near  the  world  of   Dredd  which  we  never  dream  in  those   days.  Nowadays  even  the  riot  police   look  as  menacing  as  the  judges,  or  

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Why do  you  think  the  Dredd  strip  still   holds  such  an  appeal  in  2012? I  suppose  for  some  people  it  is  a  satire  

Comics  have  always  been  an  area  of   art  that  has  traditionally  been  seen  as   frivolous  and  of  low  cultural  value  by   many  literary  critics.  Are  comics  still  

about real  life,    but  I  think  mainly   because  the  scripts  and  the  artwork   are  so  good.  John  Wagner  has  been  the   creator  of  a  character  larger  than  life,   and  during  all  this  years  he  changed  

relevant?

Dredd from  being  a  two  dimensional   character  to  a  more  complex  one,   almost  human  being  or  as  human  as   Dredd  can  be,  naturally.  John  is  a   extraordinary  writer  and  the  fact  he's  

characters and  creations.  In  general   they  still  consider  the  comics’  creators   as  second  or  third  rate,  just  good   enough  to  use  their  creations,  and  not   always  used  well.

Comics still  are  seen  as  of  a  low   cultural  value,  even  if  the  film  industry   constantly  plunder  them  for  new  

been doing  most  of  the  scripts  ever   since  Dredd  first  appeared  makes  the   story  unique  and  a  complete  universe.  

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How does  it  feel  to  have  contributed  so   much  to  the  success  of  2000AD?   I  think  all  the  artists  who  worked  for   2000AD  have  contributed  to  the  look   of  it. What  are  working  on  currently?  Are   there  any  new  projects  on  the  horizon? I’m  just  finishing  a  story  of  Durham   Red,  the  vampire  girl    from  Strontium   Dog,  with  Alan  Grant.  Also  the  third   part  of  Tankies,  a  war  story  with  Garth   Ennis,  and  I'll  start  soon    another  part   of  the  Life  and  Death  of  Johnny  Alpha,   with  John  Wagner.

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Jelle van  Hulle  is  a  Belgian  video   armst.  He  received  his  masters  from   Sint  Lukas  Brussels.  His  art  pracmce   currently  involves  the  use  of  mixed   media,  video  smlls  and  short  films   that  have  been  selected  for  several   European  art  galleries  and  fesmvals,   including  the  internamonal  film   fesmval  Gent,  Brussels  and  Annecy.   Jelle’s  work  is  always  a  search  for  the   possibilimes  of  modern  graphic   techniques.  

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He produces  series  of  these  works  and   the  end  results  are  video  footage,   digital  photographs  and/or  inkjet   prints;  the  armst  breaks  and  replaces   serial  based  works  with  uniqueness   and  originality,  that  is  irreproducible. By  working  with  delicate  material:     used  paper,  old  fabrics,  collages  and   glue,  with  spots  and  errors,  he   explores  the  limits  of  prinmng  and   printmaking.      This  results  in  an  armsmc   texture  that  quesmons  the  usefulness   of  perfect  pictorials  in  today’s  digital   world. jellevanhulle.be

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MIchael Buckland buckart@hotmail.co.uk

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Kirsty Ashford anglesinflight.deviantart.com    ISSUE  4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 41


Jamie House Stranger:  Memories This  project  is  a  result  of  me  producing  images  of  other  people’s   memories  that  I  have  mined  from  the  internet  on  various  social  media   sites.  These  people  have  befriended  me  online  but  are  not  people  I   have  met  in  person. Each  image  is  produced  by  a  long  exposure  focused  on  a  computer   screen  while  browsing  a  stranger’s  social  media  images  he  or  she  has   posted  on  their  Flickr  and  Facebook  accounts.  The  resulmng  images  are   digital  landscapes  of  people  and  their  memories. I  have  access  to  people’s  memories,  vacamons  and  celebramons  which  I   record  in  one  single-­‐image;  a  portrait  of  someone  I  do  not  know. The  resulmng  images  are  layers  of  images  and  mme  within  someone’s   life.  This  project  invesmgates  how  we  disseminate  and  share  images  in   the  public  domain  and  makes  us  consider  issues  of  representamon  and   privacy. This  series  also  invesmgates  what  happens  to  people’s  online   memories  when  someone  dies.  What  are  the  implicamons  of  us   making  all  our  informamon  available  online?  Social  media  is  currently   popular  but  what  happens  if  this  ceases  to  be  the  case:  what  happens   to  our  memories  and  who  will  have  access  to  them?

jamiehousephotography.co.uk

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Dawn Louise  Sims sunriseart.co.uk

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THE LEOPARD PRINT SET Plymouth based designer Stephanie Demelza B showcases her latest designs

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DESIGNER: STEPHANIE DEMELZA B FASHION MODELS: BETH COLQUHOUN, SKY WEEKES STYLIST: SALLY BURNE ACCESSORIES: SUNDAE GIRL PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK DOYLE LOCATION: WHITE RABBIT, PLYMOUTH

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STEPHANIE DEMELZA  B  QUICK  INTERVIEW How  did  you  get  started  in  fashion?   I think my interest into fashion started when I was about 15. Being heavily influenced by rock music and alternative fashions I wanted to make myself outfit’s that nobody else was wearing and that couldn’t be bought in the shops. I remember the first item of clothing I made was a patchwork denim skirt. It was actually a really ugly skirt but when wearing it I got loads of compliments that inspired me to make and accessories more outfits.   Your  work  is  clearly  influenced  by  1940's  and  1950's  fashion.  Why  is  this  era  so  fascinating  for  you  as   a  designer?   My designs are very much inspired by music, alternative fashion and the idea of fantasy and fairy tales. For my very first collection I was inspired by the Japanese Lolita fashion and created girlie dresses that were very theatrical. Then for my next collection I researched into Science Fiction architecture, my designs were abstract and high fashion. Since then I have been working on a Gothic Glamour collection as well as commercial clothing for my shop. Can  you  describe  the  way  you  work?  How  do  you  take  your  ideas  for  an  outfit  and  make  it  real?   What  is  the  process?   When designing a collection I tend to think of a theme, and then create a scrapbook of mood boards, sketches, fabric samples and inspiration. Sometimes the fabric alone inspires me but I get better results when I take my time and research the subject.  I start sketching ideas, which then escalate in to bigger and more enhanced ideas. I research in to fabrics and pattern cutting techniques to add shape and distinctive details.

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Is fashion  capable  of  making  an  impact  and  meaningful  artistic  statement?   Of course! All fashion designers strive to be different and to make something that’s unique and that will stand out. Fashion is a different way of expressing creativity by producing wearable art. How  would  you  define  the  style  your  line  exemplifies? There are two styles to my fashion brand. There is my younger alternative side that wants to make fun, cutesy dresses infused with prints, ruffles and lots of lace! Then there are my mature designs, which have a sexy, high fashion feel. It all depends on what is inspiring me at the time. What  are  you  currently  working  on?  What  can  we  see  from  you  in  the  near  future? I am currently working on private commissions as well as a new collection that will be sold through my shop. Can’t say what you’ll be seeing from me in the future. I have so many ideas I’m not even sure where to start, so that will have to be a surprise for everyone including myself! If  you  could  collaborate  with  another  creative  on  a  clothing  line,  what  and  who  would  it  be?  What   would  the  finished  piece  look  like?   Well I have actually been talking with a talented fine artist and an awesome graffiti artist about collaborating. I don’t want to say too much but the concept of combining graffiti prints in to a collection could look awesome! <

stephaniedemelzab.bigcartel.com stephaniedemelzab.blogspot.co.uk

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John Scarratt johnscarratt.co.uk    ISSUE  4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 77


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Bex Edwards


Lo-Res Revolution glyn davies gets

pic: Jude Buffum

pixel-elated

Digital art   in   the   modern   era   has   much   to   recommend   it.     There   is   a   bewildering   range   of   graphical   and   artistic   tools   available   for   home   PCs,   often   as   freeware,   which   allows   even   talentless   laymen   such   as   myself   to   create   something   approaching   “art”.     Whatever   your   creative   discipline,   there  is   a   computer  program  or  app  which  will,   depending  on  your  point  of   view,  either   enhance  your  natural  ability   or  cover  up  your   complete   lack   of   talent.     Some  modern  painting  programs  allow  for  a  range  of  painting  styles,   and   will   even   simulate   textures   and   physical   brush-­‐strokes   for   that   added   note   of  realism.    Even   David  Hockney  uses  an  iPad  these  days,  for  god’s  sake.   >    

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Computer graphics   have  long  passed   the  point  of  photorealism,  so  much  so   that   they   can   now   be   inserted   seamlessly   into   movies   without   having   to   explain   the   third-­‐rate   CGI   by   setting   whole   thing   in   some   Tron-­‐like   neon   dystopia.    In  the   past,  CGI  has   succeeded   only   in   dating  a   film   to  a   specific   point  in  time,  whereas   more   ‘organic’  special  effects,  such   as  those   used  in   films   like   Close   Encounters   or   the   original   Star   Wars   trilogy,   seem   to   have   held  up  quite  well  over  the  years.    In  their  day,  these  were  real  “how  did   they   do  that?”  moments,  and  still  look  impressive  some  thirty-­‐five  years  on.     George   Lucas   might   have   thought   he   was   being   terribly   clever   and   oh-­‐so-­‐ cutting   edge   when   he   employed   CGI   extensively   in   his   trio   of   Star   Wars   prequels  a  decade  or  so  ago,  but  even  before  they  were   a  few  years  old,  CGI   technology   had   advanced   to   such   an   extent   that  Lucas’  effects   looked   little   better  than  you’d  expect  to  find  in  a  fairly  run-­‐of-­‐the-­‐mill  videogame.     Indeed,   modern   movies   are  looking   more  and   more  like  videogames,  while   videogames   themselves   have   long   looked   like   movies.     This   is   how   far   the   lines   have   blurred   between   the  two,   and   goes   some   way   to   explaining  the   number   of   blockbuster   films   that   are   now   based   on   popular   videogames,   when   in   years   gone  by,  it  used   to   be   the   other   way   around.     As   for   CGI  in   movies,   it   no   longer   impresses   us   the   way   it   used   to;   these   days   we   just   accept  it   as   a  normal  part   of  the  movie  experience,  if  we  notice  it   at  all.     We   know   how   they   did   it,   and   we   no   longer   care.     As   the  years   pass,   popular   culture   is   defined   more   and   more   by   the   march   of   technology   and,   eventually,   finds   itself   creatively   neutered   by   it.   Yes,   in   many   ways   technology  is  great.    It  allows  us  to   do   some  quite  staggering  things  relatively   cheaply   that   twenty   or   even   ten   years   ago   were   beyond   our   technical   or   financial  ability.    But  so  what?    >

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Sometimes, in  order  to   stay  in  touch  with  our  own  natural  abilities,  we  need   to  get  back  to  basics.    The  Luddites   understood   that.    Just  because  a  machine   can  do  the  work  of  ten  people,  that’s  not  necessarily   a  reason  to   install  it  and   make   nine   people   jobless   and   destitute   as   a   result.     Which   is   where   the   enduring   popularity   of   pixel   art   comes   in.     For   the   past   fifteen   or   twenty   years,  a  new  wave  of  technological  Luddism  has   been   worming  its   way   into   the   consciousness   of   a   public   that   has   been   completely   seduced   by   technology. Pixel   art,   and   in   particular   8-­‐bit   pixel   art,   celebrates   the   limited   graphic   capabilities   of   older   computers,   especially   those   that   ruled   the   1980s.     It   might  be  created  directly  on   said  old  computers  or   it   might   just  be  made  to   look   like  it  has   been.    Speaking  personally,  I  much   prefer  the   former  –   new   art  created   on   old  technology  has  added  authenticity,   and  it  takes  a  certain   determination  to  create   something  within   such  strict  parameters.    Creating  a   brand   new  piece  of   art  using   an   ancient  Commodore   64  and   a  copy   of   OCP   Art  Studio  is  definitely  hardcore  in  my  book.    But  that’s  just  me.    The  reality  is   that   8-­‐bit   art   has   moved   far   beyond   the   simple,  vibrant,  blocky   computer   graphics  that  inspired  it.    Today,  it  can  take  in   considerably  more  ancient  (or   ‘retro’,   if   you’d   rather)   artforms   such   as   sculpture,   embroidery   or   mosaic,   which   in   particular   lends   itself  perfectly  to  the  comparatively   low-­‐resolution   images  that  this  archaic  technology  produces. So  what’s  the  appeal? Nostalgia  obviously   plays   a  huge  part.     The   pixel   art  scene   runs   in   tandem   with   other  8-­‐bit   inspired   movements,  such   as   the   retrogaming   or   chiptune   scenes.     Retrogaming  is  self-­‐explanatory.    There  has  long  been  a  huge   market   for  old-­‐school   videogames,  either  on  their   original  platforms  –  physically,   or   emulated   on   a   modern   PC   or   console   -­‐   or   through   updated   versions   on   modern  platforms,  and  in  particular  mobile  phones.    >        

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Chiptunes, very  simply,   involve  musicians  creating  new   pieces   of  music   with   old  computers,  or  at  least  incorporating  these  old  computer  sounds  into   new   pieces   of  work.    The   Commodore  64,  which  for  its  time  had  a  very  advanced   sound  chip  that  was   basically   a  mini-­‐synthesizer,   and  which   had  a  sound   all   of   its   own,  not  to  mention   of   its   era,  is   particularly   popular  in  the   chiptune   scene.           The   popular   8-­‐bit   machines   of   the   1980s,   such   as   the   ZX   Spectrum   and   Commodore   64,   still   have   a   devoted   army   of   adherents   who   delight   in   pushing  these  ancient  computers   to  their  absolute  limits  in  terms   of  graphics   and   sound,  which   they   show   in   the   form   of   ‘demos’,   which   are  often   quite   impressive  (given   the  technology   used)  audio-­‐visual  programs   which  run  on   the  original  hardware  itself  or  an   emulated  version  of  it  on  a  PC  or  Mac.     The   ‘demoscene’,   as   it   has   become   known,   has   existed   for   almost   as   long   as   home  computers.    But  it  was   popularised  in  the  late  1980s  by  the  emergence   of  16-­‐bit   machines  such  as  the   Commodore  Amiga,  on  which  talented  teams   of   amateur   programmers,   graphic   artists   and   musicians   would   produce   demos   with   the  sole   purpose   of   showing  off   the   abilities   of  both  computer   and   coders.       This   in   turn   led   to   a   small   retrograde   demoscene   using   less   powerful   hardware,  which,  like  the  Amiga  scene,  also   still   exists   to   this   day.   So,  nostalgia   aside,   what  of  the  aesthetic  qualities  of  8-­‐bit   graphics?    On  the   face   of  it,  they  don’t  seem  to  have  a  great   deal  going  for  them:  blocky,  low-­‐ resolution   images,   often   indistinctly   defined   and   hampered   by   a   limited   palette  and  very   little  in   the  way  of   texture  or   shading.     Yet,  at  the  height  of   the   8-­‐bit   machines,   graphic   artists   managed   to   perform   a   range   of   minor   miracles   on   these   machines,   as   one   look   at   a   loading   screen   designed   by   David   Thorpe   or   Bob   Stevenson   will   confirm.     Often,   limited   technology   inspires  such  ingenuity.    >

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When 8-­‐bit  computers   were  succeeded   by   16-­‐bit   in   the   late   1980s,  it  took   the   new   generation   a   while   to   find   its   feet.     Spoilt   by   what   seems   like   unparalleled   graphical   capability,  games   developers  initially  neglected  to  add   anything  more  in  the   way  of   actual  gameplay,  something  that  has   continued   through   each   successive   generation   of   computer   technology:     the   product   looks  better,  but  all  too  often,  it  isn’t. This  is   why  gamers   of  a  certain  age  look  on  the  8-­‐bit  days  so  fondly,  and  why   the  era  continues   to  be  mythologized.    The  real   classics   from   that  era,   that   select  group  of  8-­‐bit  games  that  hold  up  well   even  today,  were  good  because   they  had  to  be,  because  programmers  didn’t  have  anything  approaching  the   bells   and   whistles   today’s   technology   gives   them,   including   the   ability   to   conceal   a  multitude  of   sins  behind  impressive  graphics.    There   was   dross  in   the   8-­‐bit   days   too,  of   course,  and   plenty   of   it.    But  most   of   the  bad   games   sunk  without  a  trace  and  were   forgotten  almost  immediately.    As  is   so  often   the   case   with   nostalgia,   it   is   only   the   good   things   about   a   given   era   that   remain   preserved   in   the   mind   –   and   indeed   in   culture   as   a   whole   -­‐   for   posterity. Despite   its   obvious   limitations,  the   8-­‐bit  graphics   style   does   have   a  certain   charm,  especially  in  the  hands  of  an  able  designer.     8-­‐bit  graphics  tend  to   be   associated   with   solid,   vibrant   shapes,   bold   primary   colours   and   above   all,   simplicity.     And  it  would  be  fair   to  say  that   some  of  these  simple  forms  have   proven   to   be   little  more   than   iconic.     Even   in   the   1980s,  non-­‐videogamers   could   recognize   the   outline   of   a   Space   Invader   or   Pac-­‐Man,   say,  and   know   what  it   was.     And,  of  course,  there   is  the  podgy  Italian  plumber   who  became   the   instantly   recognizable   mascot   of   a   certain   Japanese   videogame   corporation.     It’s  with   familiar   images   such   as   these,   along   with  many,   many   others,  that  computer   graphics   begin  to  enter   the   noisy  environs  of  pop  art.   >

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Indeed, the  8-­‐bit   style  lends  itself  perfectly  to  pop  art.    It  is   visually   striking,   sometimes   bordering   on   the  kitsch,   as   well   as   being  immediately   accessible   and   familiar   enough   culturally   to   survive   the   translation   from   computer   screen  to   more  tangible,   “physical”   media.    As   a   distinct  art  style   in  itself,  it   also  appears  to  be   able   to  survive  any  contextual  cauldron  the   artist  cares  to   throw  it  into.    8-­‐bit  inspired   imagery   has   found   itself   in   a  variety   of   media,   from  television  to  t-­‐shirts,  and  everything  else  in  between.     This  isn’t  a  new  phenomenon   either.    Thirty   years  ago,  the  computer  graphics   of  the  era  were   often  used  to   signify  something  “futuristic”  or  the  relentless   march   of   technology.     Today,   those   same   graphics,   or   representations   of   them,  are  used  knowingly   and   affectionately,  a  nostalgic  nod   to  a   time  when   almost   everything   electronic   we   interact   with   todaywould   have   been   pure   science  fiction,  bordering  on  witchcraft.    They  are  also  still  used,  bizarrely,  to   represent  generic   “computer   graphics”,  as   if   modern   computer  graphics   are   just   too  good   to   be  believable.    There  seems  to  be  something  lodged   in  our   minds  that   computer  graphics  are,  and  always  have  been,  garish   and  blocky,   and   we’re   damned   if   the   all   the   overwhelming   modern   evidence   to   the   contrary  is  going  to  convince  us  otherwise.       In  the  intervening  years,  pixel   art  has  emerged  as  a  genuine  and  very   popular   art  style,  as   well-­‐attended   exhibitions,  particularly  in  the  United  States,  have   demonstrated.     It’s   not   hard   to   see   why:   it’s   eye-­‐catching,   bright   and   colourful,   accessible   and   always   pertinent   to   popular   culture.     Pixel   art   is   rapidly   becoming  a  very  crowded  playing  field   but  some   genuinely  talented   artists   have   managed   to  rise  above  the  throng.     Jude  Buffum   stands   out  as   my  particular  favourite  pixel  artist  at  the  moment.  >

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His work  not  only  demonstrates  a  wry,  satirical  wit,  but  also  a  real  knowledge   and   understanding   of   8-­‐bit  videogame   culture,  performing   a  slick   balancing   act   between   romantic   nostalgia   and   cultural   commentary,   which   is   something  a  lot  of  pixel  artists   don’t  really   attempt  –   too  many  of  them   are   concerned   with  trying  to   be   “ironic”,  which   to   me   seems   to   be   missing  the   point  somewhat.     Far  from   being  ironic,  pixel  art  arguably  occupies  its   own   little   bubble  outside   irony.     It   is   fuelled   partly   by   nostalgia   and   partly   by   an   artistic   reaction   to   what   is   perceived   to   be   the   uniform   blandness   of   modern   computer   graphics,  however   realistic  they   may   look.     But   most  importantly,  it   is   –   as   perhaps   it   has   always   been,   even   in   its   8-­‐bit   infancy   –   a  very   genuine   and  

pic: Jude Buffum

exciting form  of  artistic  expression.    <  

You can see more of Jude Buffum’s marvellous work at judebuffum.com

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These Polaroid  Painmngs  are  created  using  the  chemicals  inside  of  the  Polaroid  film.  The  chemicals  begin   developing  the  second  they  are  squirted  up  from  the  white  frame  and  constantly  interact  and  change  over   the  course  of  months.  The  pictures  are  aging,  accident,  mme,  sex,  technology,  history,  nostalgia,  dissonance,   Rorshach,  the  female  body,  objectness,  chance,  horses,  loss  and  a  couple  of  other  things. Chris  Kelley facebook.com/chriskelleyart

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MIchael Buckland buckart@hotmail.co.uk

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VISUAL PROVOCATEUR Plymouth based photographer, designer and stylist Rosalind Chad talks to tribe about her varied work and career.

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Tell us  the  story  behind  the  cover  image  of  this  issue  of  tribe  and  how  that  came  about Its  a  collaboramon  with  Alien  Fox   designs  for  the  SenQent  Project;   this  shoot  was  enmtled  The  Bird.  The  designer,   Foxy,  specialises  in  custom  adornments  that  are  oven  influenced  by  animals  and  tribal  culture.  The   premise   of   the  project   was  based  in  the  distant  future  and  explored  the   idea  of  what  the  Earth  would   be  like  in  a  million   years  mme.  If  human  beings,  arguably  the  only  self-­‐aware  beings   on  this  planet,  were  to   change  and  we  were   wiped  out,  there  would  be  an  evolumonary  gap  at  the  top  of  the  food  chain.

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The senment  beings  are  the  animals  that   would  evolve   to   take  our  place;  The  first   being   is  the  huge   plumed   bird-­‐like   creature   -­‐   dismnctly   bipedal,   beaumfully   coloured   and   nimble.   We   worked   with   the   model   James   Francis  to  reflect   a  proud  and  noble  creature.  As  a  photographer   I   wanted  to  bring  an  otherworldly   quality   to   the  images,  using  gels  and  hard  lighmng  I  was  able  to  set  of  the  luxuriant  textures  and  the  myriad  colours  of  the   headdress  and  shoulder  piece  to  full  effect.  James  pracmces  marmal   arts,  so  he  is  naturally   very   flexible  and   disciplined  with  his  body  –  under  our  direcmon  he  brought  the  strength  and  prowess  of  the  SenQent  Bird  to  life   vividly.

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What are  you  currently  working  on? I  am  currently  working  on  a  set  of  images  exploring  the  idea  of  androgyny.  I  have  three  shoots  for  this  project  and  I  have   completed  two  so  far.  Society’s  boundaries  are  in  state  of  flux,  traditional  masculine  and  feminine  boundaries  are  blurred   and  this  has  been  increasingly  reflected  in  gender  crossing  fashion.  During  the  first  Androgyny  shoot  I  drew  heavily  on  the   concept  of  the  dandy,  the  archetypal  devotee  to  dress,  and  a  term  that  is  increasingly  applied  to  both  sexes.  The  styling   was  all  about  the  attention  to  detail,  refinement  and  eccentricity.  I  worked  with  the  model  to  try  to  produce  images  that   reflect  an  intellectual  and  nonchalant  demeanour  so  central  to  the  cult  of  dandyism.  Charles  Baudelaire  defined  the  dandy   as  one  who  elevates  aesthetics  to  a  living  religion,  and  as  a  photographer  this  is  something  I  can  certainly  identify  with. So  its  following  on  in  a  way  from  the  1920’s  aesthetic  of  women  wearing  trouser  suits  and  dressing  in  very  male  attire? Yes,  very  much  so.  Strongly  tailored  and  structured  clothing  has  a  wonderful  sculptural  quality  that  enhances  the  physique   of  the  wearer,  whereas  much  of  the  clothing  generally  available  seems  reliant  on  the  physical  form  of  the  wearer,   especially  in  women’s  fashion  where  many  designs  diminish  rather  than  flatter  the  average  wearer. I  have  long  been  interested  in  the  power  of  clothing  in  determining  our  perception  of  each  other,  its  ability  to  send   messages,  hide  and  reveal,  highlight  and  obscure.  In  the  Androgyny  Project  I  was  aiming  to  explore  the  subtle  ambiguity   and  delicate  confusion  that  androgynous  clothing  can  engender  in  the  viewer.  I  chose  highly  structured  garments  with  a   strong  emphasis  on  tailoring  and  detail.  A  sharp  suit  symbolises  power,  conformity,  hard  work  and  professional  conduct   and  is  essentially  masculine.  It  is  often  referred  to  as  the  battledress  of  the  business  man.  With  its  instantly  recognisable   sillhouette  and  credentials  it  was  the  perfect  garment  for  my  exploration  of  gender.  I  am  fascinated  by  its  subversive  power.   What  you  wear  effects  how  you  think  and  perform  and  this  phenomenon  is  referred  to  as  enclothed  cognition;  it’s   fascinating  to  see  how  the  clothing  can  instantly  affect  the  demeanour  of  the  models  I  work  with.  In  this  series  of  shoots  as   well  as  styling  them  I  am  also  researching  and  observing  the  differences  in  body  positioning,  demeanour,  poise  and  gesture   between  men  and  women.  Through  a  combination  of  my  observations,  their  application  and  the  styling  of  the  shoots  so  far   I  have  aimed  to  produce  images  that  would  not  be  gender  defined,  that  would  throw  different  signals  to  the  viewer  leaving   them  guessing.  I  think  androgyny  makes  us  question  our  sexuality  and  identity.  The  fashion  industry  is  captivated  by  the   androgynous  and  as  a  photographer  I  can  understand  why,  when  you  photograph  people  you  are  often  restricted  by   gender  conventions.  When  you  throw  these  ideas  out  it  allows  you  to  work  in  a  much  freer  and  more  creative  way,  I  don’t   think  you  necessarily  realise  how  influenced  you  are  by  convention  until  you  question  the  things  you  take  for  granted.  It’s   been  a  liberating  and  rewarding  creative  process.

100 TRIBE MAGAZINE      ISSUE  4


ISSUE 4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 101


102 TRIBE MAGAZINE      ISSUE  4


Photography is  often  a  collaborative  creative  process  -­‐  how  did  you  collaborate  on  these  projects? I  originally  developed  the  concept  of  the  Androgyny  project  in  collaboration  with  Jonathan  Habens,  who  was  also  the   model  for  the  first  shoot.  Jon  had  been  studying  the  concept  of  Androgyny  for  his  dissertation  for  the  final  year  of  his   illustration  degree.  Strong  influences  we  discussed  and  researched  included  Annie  Lennox,  Tilda  Swinton,  and  the  model   Andrej  Pejic.  Jon  had  captivating  epicene  looks  that  were  the  catalyst  for  the  whole  project. The  casting  for  the  second  Androgyny  shoot  was  vital  to  it’s  success,  I  was  looking  for  a  enigmatic  female  model  with   boyish  charm,  and  Maddison  Jett  with  her  lanky  physique,  cropped  hair  and  strongly  defined  features  matched  the  image   in  my  head  perfectly.  Both  models  had  such  great  enthusiasm  and  commitment  to  the  project.  Maddison  sourced  the   beautiful  suits  you  see  her  wearing  from  a  local  company  the  Fitzwell  Collection  in  Barnstaple  and  John  will  be  using  his   skill  as  an  illustrator  for  the  final  instalment  of  the  Androgyny  project  which  will  play  with  the  concept  of  Masquerade. Empowerment  seems  a  key  theme  of  your  work.   Yes!  As  well  my  personal  projects  and  commissions  I  also  offer  Get  Gorgeous  photo  shoots  which  are  available  through  the   Visual  Provocateur  website  and  are  held  at  The  White  Room  studio.  They  are  aimed  at  women  who  would  like  to  benefit   from  a  confidence  building  experience,  or  would  just  like  some  great  images  for  posterity.  I  photograph  and  style  the   shoots  and  work  with  a  professional  creative  team  of  make-­‐up  artists  and  hair  stylists.  I  work  closely  with  my  clients  to   make  them  feel  at  ease  and  so  they  can  enjoy  the  experience  of  being  thoroughly  pampered  and  preened.  I  guide  them   through  how  to  pose  effectively  for  their  shape  using  lighting  set  ups  that  sculpt  and  enhance  the  body.    My  aim  is  for  you   to  leave  the  studio  feeling  beautiful  with  a  set  of  inspirational  photo’s  to  prove  it.    I  know  from  experience  that  just  as  bad   images  can  really  knock  you  confidence  and  in  some  cases  lead  to  a  distorted  self  image,  a  set  of  great  images  can   empower,  enhance  self  esteem  and  boost  your  confidence  immeasurably. You’ve  also  been  working  with  sculptor  Philip  Wakeham  on  a  rather  interesting  concept... We  will  be  putting  our  heads  together  in  the  next  couple  of  weeks  and  working  on  stage  one  of  an  exciting  new  concept   named  the  Trinity  Project.  The  ethos  of  the  project  is  to  inspire  a  spirit  of  collaboration,  a  synergy  that  intends  to  reveal   how  the  pooling  of  creative  talent  and  resources  can  produce  work  that  emerges  as  greater  than  the  sum  of  it's  parts!  We   are  currently  looking  for  a  clothing  designer  to  complete  the  trinity!  <

CREDITS Sentient -­‐  The  Bird:  Headress,  body  paint  and  styling  Alien  Fox  Designs,  Model:  James  Francis Androgyny  Project:  Photography,  styling  and  make  up  Rosalind  Chad,  Models:  Jonathan  Habens,  Maddison  Jett Clothing  provided  by  Fitzwell  Collection,  Barnstaple

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 ISSUE  4      TRIBE  MAGAZINE 103


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104 TRIBE MAGAZINE      ISSUE  4

Tribe Issue 4  

International creative arts magazine; tribe accepts submissions from all over the world, showcasing the best in visual creative arts every m...

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