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Rei  Bennett  Photography TRIBE MAGAZINE ISSUE 17

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Editor  In  Chief   Mark  Doyle mark@tribemagazine.org Commissioning  Editor  (Art) Ali  Donkin ali@tribemagazine.org Commissioning  Editor  (Writing) Tilly  Craig tilly@tribemagazine.org Marketing  &  PR Steve  Clement-­‐Large steve@tribemagazine.org Correspondents Aurore  Plaussu,  Hannah  Lewis,  Francesca  Didymus,  Jennie  Mika  Pinhey,  Alistair   Gardiner,  Becky  Mead,  Helen  Moore,  Sergey  Kireev,  Blake  Thomas Contributors Tami  Vibberstoft,  Niels  Gade,  Sandy  Wager,  Fred  Baier,  Rebecca  Glen,  Keita  Sagaki,   Ni.Co.La,  Carl  Melegari,  Kaiser  Kamal,  Lee  Conner,  Kev  Harper,  Luka  Basyrov,  Rei   Bennett Regular  Contributors Glyn  Davies,  Sarah  Ahmad Cover   Fred  Baier Inside  Cover

General  Enquiries contact@tribemagazine.org Submit  Work submit@tribemagazine.org Website www.tribemagazine.org Press  and  Media  Enquiries  to  Steve  Clement-­‐Large steve@tribemagazine.org

Artists  have  given  permission  for  their  work  to  be  displayed  in  tribe  magazine.  No   part  of  this  publication  may  be  reproduced  without  the  permission  of  the  copyright   holder(s)   ISSN:  2050-­‐2352

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Keita  Sagaki

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EDITORIAL

I’m  writing  this  editorial  a  few  days  after  being  appointed  as  a  Project  Manager  for  a  National  Trust   project  in  Devon  (UK  )  promoting  the  fact  that  the  Trust  recently  discovered  that  they  had  a   genuine  Rembrandt  self-­‐portrait  in  their  care  at  Buckland  Abbey.  It  is  the  only  Rembrandt  in  the   Trust’s  portfolio. During  the  preparation  for  the  interview  I  did  a  lot  of  background  research  and  reading.  Some  of   what  I  read  was  an  eye-­‐opener  for  me.  Rembrandt  was  a  practicing  artist  during  what  was  known   as  the  Golden  Age  of  Dutch  culture.  Painting  was  immensely  popular  –  and  there  were  literally   hundreds  of  artists  –  mainly  based  in  Amsterdam.  It  is  estimated  that  during  a  20  year  period  a   staggering  1.3  million  paintings  were  produced  for  the  consumption  of  an  insatiable  art-­‐market. Given  that  –  it  says  a  lot  for  Rembrandt  that  he  stood  out  from  the  crowd  and  was  regarded  as  the   premier  painter  of  that  era  and  is  still  regarded  as  the  towering  figure  of  17th  century  art.  In  many   ways  he  was  to  that  century  what  Picasso  was  to  the  twentieth.  A  transformer  and  a  challenger. What  was  different  from  Picasso  was  his  financial  and  business  acumen.  Rembrandt  was  reckless   and  feckless  –  earned  stacks  and  spent  it  on  art  and  memorabilia  and  died  potless  –  an  employee  of   his  own  son  and  his  dealer  (  the  only  way  he  could  legally  carry  out  his  trade  in  Amsterdam  at  the   time  ).  He  was  buried  in  an  unmarked  grave. The  most  interesting  aspect  of  that  side  of  him  was  the  fact  that  much  of  the  art  he  bought  –  it’s   alleged  –  was  his  own.  He  was  price-­‐fixing  to  maintain  his  market  value  and  keep  himself  in  the   premier  league  of  artists. That’s  an  accusation  levelled  at  some  current-­‐day  ‘megastars’  and  their  gallery  representatives  –   vehemently  denied  of  course.  Robert  Hughes  –  the  late  Australian  art  critic  described  art-­‐dealership   as  the  last  unregulated  market  outside  of  the  drugs  trade.   Financial  success  …..  transitory  –  we  all  end  up  the  same  way.   Still  as  Rembrandt  and  Picasso  prove  –  it’s  the  art  that  matters  in  the  end.   Steve  Clement-­‐Large

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FRED BAIER 8

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Fred  Baier  is  a  higly-­‐regarded  experimental  funiture  designer,  whose  work  is   characterised  by  radical  experiments  in  structure  and  form.  He  took  some  time   out  recently  to  talk  to  tribe  about  his  stunning  work.

Where  does  a  piece  start  for  you?  Can  you  

imagery  and  theories  that  might  help  me  

describe  your  creative  process?

develop  these  creations.  All  the  things  I   have  discovered  that  have  excited  me  are  

A  wood  machinist  I  use  is  proud  of  his  

the  elements  responsible  for  molding  my  

tattoos.  He  had  Love  and  Hate  done  on  the  

particular  palate.  I’m  still  looking,  

fingers  of  each  hand.  Recently  he  

improving  my  skills  and  adding  to  my  

unfortunately  lost  a  finger.  Now  they  read  

envelope  of  possibility.  I  try  to  be  in  the  

Love  and  Hat.

now  and  looking  forward.

Having  creative  ideas  is  a  complex  thing.  I  

How  does  working  on  a  commissioned  

think  art  colleges  are  much  better  at  

piece  differ  from  a  personal  piece?  Are  

teaching  this  than  they  were  when  I  was  

there  ever  any  creative  tensions  between  

learning.  You  need  to  observe  and  be  fired  

yourself  and  a  commissioner?

up  by  a  whole  cacophony  of  ingredients   from  disparate  places  and  cook  them  up  

Commissioned  pieces  are  my  life’s  blood.  

together  into  your  own  particular  recipe.  I  

I’d  say  a  good  two  thirds  of  the  dosh  I’ve  

was  always  keen  to  side-­‐step  what  other  

ever  made  has  come  from  commissions.  It’s  

people  were  doing,  looking  to  be  a  whacky  

the  British  way.    In  the  States  people  prefer  

individual  rather  than  a  member  of  a  

to  buy  what  they  see.  It’s  less  risky  .  .  .  

movement.    

more  like  shopping.  That  way  they  feel  they  

My  role  model  might  be  more  of  an  

can  be  a  patron  without  being  patronising.    

inventor/explorer  than  an  artist/designer.  

When  I  work  for  a  client  I  try  to  please  

I’m  trying  to  come  up  with  new  forms  and  

them  through  flexing  my  abilities.  The  

compositions  in  the  creative  furniture  

budget  and  the  brief,  which  I  help  a  

arena  and  looking  out  for  processes,  

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customer  to  define,  sets  the  parameters  of  

functional.  My  lines  come  from  drawing,  

how  experimental  I  can  be.

either  what  I  see  or  what  I’m  thinking,  and  

People  usually  want  a  bit  of  Fred  Baier  so  it  

my  shapes  develop  through  all  the  different  

works  out  fine  and  I’m  not  aware  of  any  

ways  you  can  draw  things.  

dissatisfied  customers.  Being  professional  is   what  keeps  things  sweet.  In  between  these  

What’s  the  most  difficult  part  of  the  

commissions  or  if  there’s  holdup  for  some  

creative  process  for  you?

reason  we  work  on  personal  pieces,   experimenting  and  trying  things  out,  

I  do  fine  but  I’m  not  great  at  selling.  I  still  

creating  objects  that  need  making  and  

get  my  costings  wrong,  mostly  through  

which  will  go  in  exhibitions.    

being  over  ambitious  and  I’m  slow  because   I  often  bite  off  more  than  I  can  chew.  I  

How  would  you  describe  your  work?  There  

always  make  things  better  than  the  

are  so  many  influences  in  the  lines  and  

minimum  required  to  get  the  point  across.

shapes  you  use,  but  they  are  very  much  of  

So  the  most  difficult  part  is  making  loads  of  

your  style.  How  did  that  originally  come  

money.

together? Which  materials  do  you  like  working  with   My  work  is  attention  seeking.  I  intend  that  

the  most?  What  properties  do  you  like  in  a  

it  promotes  itself  because  people  find  it  

material?  

interesting,  inspiring  and  uplifting.  I  bring   issues  from  other,  unexpected  realms  into  

The  studio  is  kitted  out  to  work  in  wood  

furniture  world.  I’m  not  a  fine  artist  but  nor  

and  that’s  what  we  predominantly  use.  

am  I  a  designer.  I  make  arty  furniture  

When  I  specify  other  materials,  metal,  

statements  that  lie  somewhere  in  the  

glass,  plastics  and  composites  that  work  is  

margins  of  both  art  and  design.  There  are  

subcontracted  to  people  who  will  allow  me  

not  many  who  work  like  me  so  the  

to  observe  and  discuss  how  they  work  and  

competition  isn’t  too  fierce.  I  love  

even  be  there  when  they  are  working  on  

craftsmanship  but  avoid  harping  back.  My  

my  piece.  This  is  important.  I  need  to  

mantra,  ‘Form  swallows  function’,  subverts  

understand  their  processes  and  play  to  

Bauhaus  philosophy  although  my  pieces  

their  skills.  In  the  last  year  we  have  used  5  

are  always  well  made  and  appropriately  

axis  CNC  milling  and  spark  eroding  

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machines,  folded  10  mm  thick  steel  and  

the  confusion  comes  from  comparing  my  

electro-­‐plated  various  metals.  One  piece  

work  to  normal  manufactured  furniture.  

involved  bubble  jet  printing  of  anodising  

I  think  of  them  as  museum  pieces  and  in  fact  

dyes.

many  pieces  have  been  purchased  for   museum  collections.  They  are  rarified  

How  often  does  a  design  change  when  you  

objects  that  embody  more  intentions  than  a  

are  making  a  piece?  Is  everything  followed  

commercial  tool  for  living.  I  hear  comments  

to  the  letter  from  design  to  end  product,  or  

like  “surprisingly  comfortable”  or  “can  you  

do  you  also  allow  for  an  element  of  

actually  use  it”  so  I  often  feel  the  need  to  

impromptu  development?

explain  that  because  they  are  pieces  of   furniture  as  well  as  art  objects  they  do  have  

Every  piece  is  it’s  own  adventure  and  no  two  

to  be  perform  their  function  successfully.  

jobs  are  alike.  With  commissions  some  

When  I  was  teaching  at  the  RCA  I  was  

people  are  happy  to  trust  me  to  detail  up  

accused  by  some  of  my  students  of  

what  may  be  only  a  sketchy  idea  of  the  piece  

pandering  to  the  bourgeoisie  which  in  some  

they  want.  Others  find  this  too  risky  or  

senses  is  true.  So  my  way  of  absolving  any  

unsettling  and  need  every  ‘t’  crossed  and  ‘i’  

guilt  in  that  is  to  seek  out  publicly  funded  

dotted  before  implementation.  Either  way  

projects  to  create  objects  for  public  spaces.  

and  also  on  my  own  pieces  there  are  often  

Seating  compositions  for  a  high  street,  

moments  during  manufacture  where  it  

reception  desks  for  museums,  time  capsule  

becomes  obvious  that  the  initial  approach  or  

cabinet  for  a  hospital  atrium.  I  hear  reports  

intention  is  better  served  by  a  change  of  

from  my  commissioners  that  these  pieces  

tack.  

attract  positive  attention  and  are  well  used  

How  do  members  of  the  public  react  to  your  

What  are  you  currently  working  on  and  

work?  What  kind  of  reaction  are  you  looking  

what  does  the  future  hold  for  you?

to  get  from  people  with  your  public  pieces? My  wife,  Lucy,  and  I  are  working  on  an  Art   Usually  people  are  complementary  and  

Trail  in  a  town  in  North  Wales  called  Ruthin.  

admire  the  craftsmanship  but  are  perplexed  

The  idea  is  to  link  the  towns  internationally  

as  to  who  my  customers  might  be.  I  suppose  

renowned  Craft  Centre  which  attracts  a  lot   of  visitors  with  St  Peters  Square  up  the  hill  in  

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the  centre  of  town.  We  have  proposed  an  

an  experimental  construction  technique  

array  of  street  furniture,  figures  hidden  in  

that  has  lots  more  potential.

the  roofscape  and  facades  of  public  

This  year  the  Gordon  Russell  Scholarship  

buildings  and  a  series  of  myths,  memories  

fund  and  the  Quenington  Sculpture  Trust  

and  legends  portrayed  in  cameos  seen  

have  funded  an  internship  for  a  college  

through  spy-­‐holes  in  the  towns  walls.  After  

leaver  to  come  and  work  in  the  studio.  We  

several  months  of  public  consultation,  

were  inundated  with  applicants  and  the  lad  

development  and  refinement,  a  committee  

who  got  the  gig  is  making  some  very  

has  now  approved  our  ideas  and  we  are  

interesting  things  under  my  guidance.  <

about  to  make  and  install  them  all.  I  am   also  making  a  couple  of  plant  stands  for  a   woman  in  Hong  Kong. Hopefully  the  future  holds  more  of  the   same.  I  have  been  asked  to  consider  ideas   for  another  stair  banister  and  I  recently   made  a  table  commission  which  included  

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www.fredbaier.com

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Kaiser  Kamal kaiserkamal.com

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"Let them eat cake"

Photographer: Rei Bennett Photography Location: Rei Bennett Photography studio, Derby Stylist: Falcieri Designs Models: Alexa Jay and Peggy Soo MUA: Kelly Odell Hairstylist: Flawless by Sangeeta Clothing Designer: Lovechild Boudoir TRIBE MAGAZINE ISSUE 17

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"Let  them  eat  cake" Take  yourself  back  to  a  past  era.  Imagine  the  18th  century,  born  into  wealth,  royalty,  being  the   woman  that  men  desired  and  the  woman  all  women  wanted  to  be.  This  was  a  Fme  of   opulence,  precious  jewels,  lavish  embellished  costume  and  over  indulgence  in  every  sense  of   the  word. Marie  AntoineIe  was  the  'it  girl'  of  her  Fme  -­‐  Archduchess,  Dauphine  and  Queen.  A  woman   whose  life  was  draped  in  expense  and  decadence  at  every  turn.  She  parFed  hard,  spent   recklessly  and  was  the  epitome  of  extravagance.  She  exuded  richness  everywhere  she  went,   from  her  perfectly  powdered  and  polished  appearance  to  her  sheer  power.  Whatever  Marie   wanted,  Marie  got. Sickly  sweet  and  innocent  with  her  doll  like  features,  she  has  another  side  to  her  -­‐  sultry,  sexy   and  screaming  spoilt  brat.  These  were  exciFng  Fmes  -­‐  greedy,  excessive  and  full  of  tantrums.

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The  drawings  that  I  produce  under  the  Ftle  Weirdfolk  are  constructed  via  two  very  different  drawing   techniques.    The  iniFal  drawing,  or  skeleton,  is  drawn  completely  blind  unFl  I  can  sense  that  the  main   details  have  been  put  onto  the  paper.    This  is  followed  by  the  details  being  added  in  a  much  more  careful   way  looking  at  the  paper  and  the  subject/source. The  combinaFon  of  the  wild  abandon  of  the  blind  drawing  and  the  careful,  meFculous  details  is  a  process   that  I  find  very  saFsfying.    I  believe  that  it  fulfills  my  various  impulses  as  an  arFst  to  draw  in  this  way.    The   tension  between  freeness  and  control,  insFnct  and  deliberateness  and  imperfecFons  and  correcFons  are   all  contained  in  a  single  drawing.    The  acFon  of  'fixing',  or  almost  trying  to  jusFfy  the  iniFal  blind  drawing   is  the  main  driving  force  behind  the  process. In  terms  of  subject  maIer,  I  am  drawn  to  found  images  which  sFr  something  in  me  emoFonally,  and  I  try   to  be  insFncFve  in  this.    The  contemplaFve  Fmes  when  alone  and  the  intensity  of  love  are  something  that   I  try  to  capture  in  my  images.    The  acFon  of  embracing  imperfecFons  is  something  that  feels  poignant   considering  the  numerous  ideals  in  modern  society.           Rebecca Glen weirdfolk.carbonmade.com

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Sandy  Wager artbysandywager.com

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comprising of duo tami vibberstoft and niels gade,

apperaat

apperaat are a vibrant creative force covering audio, photography, film making, performance art, installation and music. one thing is for sure, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do dull.

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Having  looked  through  your  website  and  reading   your  bio's,  its  hard  to  describe  exactly  what   Apperaat  is  -­‐  how  would  you  describe  yourselves  to   a  new  audience? Tami:  Apperaat  is  an  art  act.  We  make  music,   photos,  performance,  films,  music  videos,   decorajons,  installajons  and  more.  Many  arjsts   work  with  one  specific  type  of  art  but  we,  on  the   other  hand,  do  not  separate  the  different   disciplines.  Instead  we  try  to  make  use  of  all  our  

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competences  and  combine  them  in  one  big   project,  namely  Apperaat. Niels:  Our  philosophy  is  to  create  everything  in-­‐ house.  We  do  everything  in-­‐house...  Our  visual   expression  is  not  affected  by  a  different  video   director,  the  music  is  not  altered  by  another   producer.  We  are  not  saying  we  are  fantasjc,  but   we  have  some  competences..  and  that's  what  we   make  use  of  in  Apperaat.


Where  does  the  creaFve  process  start  for  you? Niels:  Actually  everywhere  and  24/7  –  more   precisely  we  both  get  new  ideas  all  the  jme,  Tami   in  Utrecht,  or  wherever  she  is,  and  me  in  Aarhus.   These  ideas  can  be  thoughts  or  words,  but  also   sound  clips,  photos,  video  clips  etc. Tami:  the  big  ideas  are  created  face  to  face  with  a   glass  of  wine  (or  several)  accompanied  by  endless   talking.  Or  in  the  car  where  we  on  the  contrary  

somejmes  nourish  the  silence  for  hours.  Silence   doesn't  mean  we're  not  thinking.  We  are  very   good  in  coaching  each  other  too.  In  our  business   meejngs  where  we  have  to  propose  a  certain   solujon.  One  of  us  says  a  word,  the  other  one   replies  with  a  sentence  and  in  the  end  it's  a   complete  solujon. Niels:  we  are  quite  good  at  improvising.

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Can  you  tell  us  about  your  working  relaFonship    -­‐   how  do  you  work  together?  How  do  you  spark   each  other's  creaFvity?   Niels:  We've  known  each  other  for  many  years  and   done  smaller  projects  together.  Then  for  about  a   year  ago  we  were  having  a  cup  of  coffee  at  the   Women's  Museum  in  Denmark,  where  we  enjoy  to   come.  Here  the  idea  of  collecjng  all  our  arjsjc   competences  in  one  box  started.  And  that  is   indeed  what  Apperaat  is  about.  (Apperaat  is  by  the   way  spelled  with  as  many  errors  as  possible,   because  we  like  to  work  with  mistakes). Tami:  Because  of  the  distance  between  us  (Aarhus/ Utrecht  700  km)  Apperaat  is  naturally  an  online   project,  in  which  our  projects  take  shape  in  a  never   ending  wave  of  file  sharing.  When  we  are  together,   which  is  quite  onen,  we  finish  off  the  projects  for   instance  when  we  have  to  record  my  vocals  on  a   track.  We  do  finish  some  projects  separately   though.  This  goes  for  ambient  music  and   instrumental  tracks  as  well  as  music  videos,   installajon  videos  or  online  videos.  When  the  raw   material  is  shot,  I  finish  the  visual  part  while  Niels   finishes  the  audio.  And  BAM!  There  you  go! Niels:  We  regard  this  online  concept  as  an  effecjve   and  creajve  advantage,  which  we  would   recommend  to  other  people  as  well.  We  have  no   fixed  roujnes  or  rehearsal  days.  We  both  work   in  Protools  and  administrate  the  creajve  processes   separately:  song  wrijng,  video,  and  photographic   producjon,  performance  producjons,  recordings   and  mixing.   Tami:  By  splipng  up  the  producjon  process  I   believe  we  give  room  for  experiment  and  risk   within  our  field  and  I  think  we  avoid  some   potenjal  conflicts  too. Are  there  any  conflicts? Niels:  No  not  really.  Not  big  ones  anyway  –  you   might  think  that  the  age  difference  would  cause   conflicts,  but  we  never  regarded  it  as  a  problem..   rather  the  opposite.  But  when  you  know  each   other  as  well  as  we  do  and  both  have  an  arjsjc   mind,  there  are  obviously  moments  where  we  can   be  a  bit  bitchy  towards  each  other.  But  it's  only  

cool  with  some  dynamics.  Pain  can  be   construcjve.  If  it  doesn't  hurt  every  now  and  then   it's  not  art,  right? Tami:  Or  maybe  it  just  doesn't  maser  enough  to   you.  And  then  it's  also  not  art,  I  guess.  Luckily  we   are  both  Libra,  so  basically  we  are  both  pleasers   and  perfecjonists. Niels:  Our  only  real  problem  is  when  we  don't  see   each  other  for  a  long  jme  and  there's  an  issue  we   want  to  discuss.  In  this  case  it  can  be  problemajc   even  though  we  have  online  meejngs. You  work  with  corporate  clients    -­‐  what  sort  of   reative  work  do  you  do  with  them?   Niels:    It's  different  every  time.  We've  made  wall   art  for  offices,  video  installations  and  online   videos.  We've  created  exhibitions  and  arranged   photography  workshops.  We  would  however  like   to  emphasize  that  we  choose  carefully  and  only  for   the  things  we  find  exciting.  And  this  is  not  to  be   cocky  but  it's  a  question  of  time  and  about  using   our  resources  right. How  did  you  get  started  in  that  area?       Tami:  In  my  opinion  the  artist  has  to  employ   himself  and  always  look  for  ways  to  do  so.  Not   meaning  that  he  or  she  should  sell  out.  The  young   talented  artists  have  to  get  out  into  the  real  world.   Out  of  the  safe  box  or  the  white  cube.  In  Apperaat   we  both  like  confronting  the  predictable  and  we   love  being  challenged.  That's  why  we  took  the   chance  to  make  wall  decoration  for  a  company. What  was  the  attraction?     Tami:  I'm  constantly  looking  for  challenges  and   ways  to  express  myself.  I  can  never  get  enough.   That's  why  I  started  bands,  that's  why  I  travelled   and  moved  around.  That's  why  I  thought  I  could   take  a  fresh  look  at  my  art  practice  and  bring  it  a   step  further.  The  projects  we  do  with  corporate   clients  have  broaden  my  view  on  communicative   and  collaborative  art.  It's  motivating  because  they   provide  you  with  a  platform  and  an  audience  and   in  return  you  get  a  big  but  exciting  responsibility.            

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Niels:  That  was  to  make  a  company  dare  to  enter   something  unknown.  The  most  logical  thing  for  the   company  is  to  focus  on  the  well  known  and  safe.  In   this  sense  it  was  an  innovative  risk  from  their  side.   Beside  this  I  think  we  should  have  much  more   innovative  and  unpredictable  business  relations.  I   believe  this  is  a  good  way  for  young  artists  to  enter   the  market  and  a  lot  of  companies  and  institutions   appreciate  this  collaboration.  But  you  have  to  go   search  for  it  yourself  because  they  are  not  coming   to  you. Personally,  I'm  most  taken  with  your  music  -­‐  do  you   see  yourselves  as  musicians  first,  visual  artists   second,  or  do  you  make  no  such  distinctions?  How   do  you  see  the  relationship  between  audio  and   visual  creativity? Niels:  Basically  I'm  more  musician  and  Tami  is  more   the  visual  artist.  Already  from  the  beginning  this   seemed  to  merge  very  well  together.  Tami  is  of   course  in  charge  of  the  visual  part  and  me  of  the   music.  We  know  our  strengths  and  use  them  well.   But  we  constantly  cross  over  each  other's  fields  of   competence  and  provide  the  other  with  ideas  and   critique.  We  can't  do  without  the  other. How  do  you  see  the  relationship  between  audio  and   visual  creativity?   Niels:  It's  a  beautiful  relationship. Tami:  I  believe  me  and  Niels  have  the  same  kind  of   brain.  And  that  goes  for  all  creative  heads  out   there.  We  are  like-­‐minded.  It  doesn't  make  a   difference  if  you  express  this  creativity  with  sound,   shape  it  in  wood  or  perform  it  in  dance.  That's  why   it's  great  to  combine  the  disciplines  as  well  as   challenge  their  definitions.   How  has  the  internet  and  social  media  changed  the   way  you  work  and  interact  with  an  audience? Niels:    In  fact  it  hasn't  changed  anything  for  us  since   we've  worked  with  it  all  the  time,  but  the  internet   and  social  media  are  very  important  for  us.  It's  our   mean  of  communication  with  the  outside  world  

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and  possible  fans.  This  way  we  have  been  featured   on  several  international  blogs,  we've  got  airplay..   and  american  radio  stations  are  asking  for  our   album.  It's  as  well  the  way  we  got  in  contact  with   you  guys.   Tami:  If  the  internet  was  gone  tomorrow  we  were   done.  We  are  completely  depending  on  it..  scary   actually.  But  true.  So  why  not  just  get  the  best  out   of  it? In  regard  to  your  film  making,  what  area's  or   subjects  interest  you  the  most?     Tami:    When  making  a  film  my  main  focus  is  to   make  a  simple,  clear  expression  with  as  few  means   as  possible.  I  like  the  pure  version,  the  music  video   that  has  a  touch  of  home  video  in  it,  the  interview   which  is  down  to  earth.  It's  about  being  accessible   and  relatable  while  giving  the  viewer  a  surprise,   something  fresh.                                 Niels:  As  with  all  kinds  of  art,  for  me  it  has  to  be   interesting.  It  has  to  say  me  something.  It  has  to   want  something.  There  are  too  many  artists  who   are  making  art  they  only  understand  themselves  -­‐   what's  the  purpose?  But  I'm  not  picky.  I  like  the  nice   short  film,  music  video,  documentary  or  feature   film.  If  it  has  something,  if  it  does  something,  if  it   want  something. What  do  you  see  as  being  wrong  with  creativity  in   the  mainstream?  Are  we  living  in  perhaps  too   sanitised  a  creative  environment?   Niels:  I  think  too  many  people  want  the  same..  not   enough  people  dare  to  take  chances.  Too  many   people  want  to  become  artists,  but  they  don't  have   the  talent  and  they  will  never  become  anything.   Besides  this  the  new  generation  of  artists  are   obviously  affected  by  the  reality  wave  and   mainstream  wave,  and  I  think  it  weakens  their   ability  to  relate  critically.  It  makes  them  waste  their   time  with  work  which  simply  doesn't  have  the   quality.  Concentrate  on  what  you're  good  at,think   differently,  create  the  unpredictable  networks  and   knock  the  illogical  door.  <


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Carl  Melegari carlmelegari.co.uk arushagallery.com

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KEITA SAGAKI Japanese illustrator Keita Sagaki has a distinctive style of illustration. He talked to us recently about this unique take on his art.

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How  would  you  describe  your  style  of  illustraFon? The  concept  of  my   root  of  creajng  it  is  the  [whole  and  part].  And  I  can  express  it  in  other  words  with  "life  and   death",   "a   microcosm  and  macrocosm   ",""individual  and  universe".   Specifically,   look   at   the  following  arjst   statements;  all  things  are  composed  of  whole  and  part.  For  instance,  the  human  body   is  built   from  60   trillion   cells.   Moreover,   every   maser   is   formed   by   an   atom   or   a   molecule.   When   all  people   live   in   this   world,   everybody   belong   to   some   organisajon   such   as   a   family,   school,   company   and   najon,   even   if   we   are   unconscious.   Let’s  broaden  your   horizons.   Your   country   is  part  of  najons  all  over   the  world.  And,   the  solar   system  including  our  planet  is  a  part  of  the  Galaxy.  however,  the  concept  of  “  whole  and  part”   is  not   fixed.  It’s   in  flux.   If   we  interpret   from   a  different   viewpoint,   the  wholeness  which  we  defined   is  converted   into  the   parjalness.   Domain  in  the  relajons  of   both,   it   never   ends.   The  concept   of   my   creajon  is  the   relajons  of   borderless  “whole  and  part”.  As  I  draw  a  picture  in  this  concept,  I  want  to  express  conflict  and  undulajon from  relajons  of  “whole  and  part”,  amd  cannot   be   measured  in  addijon  and  subtracjon  (the  whole  in  the   grand  total  of  the  part,  and  the  part  by  the  whole  division) 私の絵のコンセプトは「全体と部分」です。また、それは「生と死」、「ミクロコスモスとマクロ コスモス」、「個と宇宙」と言い換えられるかもしれない。詳しくは以下のアーティストステート メントをご覧ください。 世界に存在する万物はすべてにおいて全体と部分で形成されているといっても過言ではない。 人体は約60兆にも及ぶ細胞によってできているし、すべての物質は原子や分子という部分的な 要素の構築によって成り立っている。また、私たちが生きている世界を考えていくと、意識してい ようがしていまいが、私たちは家族、学校、会社、国家といったように何かしらの組織に属しなが ら生きている。さらに視点を拡大すると、日本は地球上にある世界の国々の一部分であるし、そ の地球は太陽系に属していて、その太陽系は銀河系に属している。しかし、そのような全体と部 分の概念は固定的ではなく常に流動的である。全体性として捉えられていたものは、見方を変え るだけで部分性として捉えることができるように、両者の関係における領域にはきりがない。私は そのようなボーダレスな全体と部分の関係をコンセプトに制作活動をしていく中で、部分の総和と しての全体でも、全体の分断による部分でもない、足し算や引き算では図りきれない、せめぎや うねりのようなものを表現していきたい。

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Where  does  a  piece  start  for  you?  Can  you  describe  your  creaFve  process? I   begin  to  usually   draw  it   from   the  corner   (leaning   to  the  len   or   the   lower   len)   of   the  canvas.   Anerwards,   earnestly,   I  muljply  a  character  to  totally  cover  the  paper.  I  don’t  dran  (and  rough  sketch)  when  I  draw  detail   of   my   works  (doodle  character).   I  use  pen  and  ink  from  the  beginning   when  I  confront  white  canvas.  I  do  not   know  what  kind  of  character   is  born  unjl  I  begin  to  draw  it.   The  reason  is  because  momentary  inspirajon  and   improvised  drawing  are  very   important   for   me.   The  pen  can  copy   my   inspirajon  into  paper   with  preserve   freshness,   and  I  gradually  draw  detail  of  picture.  It  seems  to  totally  erode  over  paper.   This  process  can  take  an   excessive  amount  of  jme. 私は主に画面の角、左上か左下から描き始めます。その後はひたすら紙を侵食させるようにキャラ クターを増殖させていきます。私の制作のプロセスを説明すると、まず私は下書きをしません。直 接ペンで描いていきます。どんなキャラクターが描かれるのかは描き始めるまでは私自身も分かり ません。その理由としては、私にとってその瞬間瞬間のインスピレーションと即興性が大切だから です。ペンという道具は私の感性を直接、最短距離で紙に写すことができます。私の絵のプロセス はとても時間がかかります。 You   have   reinterpreted   many   famous   works;   how   do   you   think   the   likes   of   Hokusai   would   view   your   interpretaFons? First  of  all   the  reason  why   I  chose  Hokusai  as  is  that   it  is  a  famous   picture.  When  many   people  watched  a   picture  from  far  away,  they  recognize  that  it  is  a  picture  of  Hokusai.  However,  they   nojce  that   it   is  aggregate   of  doodles  when  they   get  closer  to  a  painjng.  The  gap  is  important.   There  is  not  the  reason  to  be  parjcular   about  only  Hokusai.  It  is  important  that  I  use  a  famous  picture.  However,  Hokusai  is  one  of  the  arjsts  whom  I   respect. 北斎の作品を使用する一番大きな理由は彼の絵が世界的にも有名だからです。多くの鑑賞者は絵を 遠くからみたとき北斎の絵だと認識します。しかし、じょじょに絵に近づくと、それが多くの落書 きの集合体であることに気付くと思います。その鑑賞者が離れた時と近づいた時に感じるギャップ がなにより重要なのです。なので北斎のみにこだわっているわけではなく、世界的に知られている 絵であるということがなにより重要なのです。もちろん北斎は私がリスペクトする画家の一人で す。

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What  has  been  the  impact  of  digital  technology  on  the  art  of  the  illustrator? I  think  that  many  arjst  or   illustrators  are  more  or   less  affected  by  digital  technology.  When  the  person  himself   does  not  nojce  thanks  to   a  digital  technology,   we  can  easily   work   hard  to  polish   our  works.   We  can  thereby   examine  much  possibility.  In  the  case  of  myself,  I  think  about  composijon  and  a  hue  on  a  PC.  In  addijon,  it  is   the  masterpiece  series  and  the  ukiyoe  print  series  I  use  with  the  PC  -­‐  at  first  I  print   a  picture  of  the  exact   size   level  from  a  PC.  Then,  I  perform  tracing  of   rough  abozzo  and  shadow  from  there.  I  use  only   a  pen  anerwards.   A  PC  is  the  tool  which  is  important  for  the  base  of  the  picture.   I  use  only  a  pen  and  ink  anerwards.  However,  I   use  the  PC  in  a  preliminary  stage  of  the  creajon. 多くのアーティストやイラストレーターは多かれ少なかれデジタル技術の影響を受けていると感じ ます。それは本人が気付いていない場合でさえです。デジタル技術のおかげで私たちは作品の推敲 が容易になりました。可能な限り作品をやり直し検討することができます。私の場合、絵の構図や 色合いをPC上で考えます。いわゆる設計図みたいなものです。また、名画シリーズや浮世絵シリー ズでは、まずはじめにPCで実寸大に拡大し印刷します。それを元に大まかな輪郭線や陰影をキャン バスに付けていきます。そのあとの作業は完全にアナログで、ペンとインクのみです。デジタル技 術は私の作品の下準備の段階でとても重要なツールです。私はペンとインクを主に使用します。し かし、制作の準備段階ではコンピューターも使います。 Is  there  anything  that  inspires  you  to  create?  What  are  your  main  influences? I  was  greatly   influenced  from  the  following   two  things;   first  one  is  a  mandala.  It   was  when   I  was  eight  years   old  that  I  went  to  a  village  set   in  a  mountain  with  my  father.  I  saw  a  mandala  for   the  first  jme  in  the  village-­‐  a   mandala  is  a  religious  painjng  of  Buddhism  and  the  esoteric  Buddhism.  When  I  saw   it,  I  felt  that  it  was  very   psychedelic  painjng  (its  muljplying  Buddha  and  gorgeously  coloured,  pictures  depicjng  hell)  I  felt  excitement   and  a  mixture  of  fear   and  pleasure.  The  minute  drawing   and   informajon   content  of  my   works  comes  under   an  influence  of   a  mandala.   Furthermore,  I  drew  a  mandala  with  some  inijal  works.  That  much,   mandala  is  an   important  mojf  for   me.  The  second,  is  comics!  The  reason  why  I  use  comics  and  doodle  for   it  is  one  of  the   most   familiar   items  to  me  from   childhood.   I've  dreamed  of  being  a  cartoonist   since  I  was  a  child.   I  drew  a   comic   every   day   in   the   days  of   an   elementary   school.   My   textbook   or   examinajon-­‐paper   was   full  of   my   doodles.  It's  not   too  much  to  say   that  these  doodles  are  roots  of  the  current  my  works.  It's  my  early  intenjon.   Those  two  elements  are  the  deepest  roots  of  my  work 私は2つの大きなものに影響を受けました。 まず一つ目は、曼荼羅です。曼荼羅は仏教や密教の宗教画で、私は子どものころ父親に曼荼羅を見 にある村へ連れていかれました。そこで初めて曼荼羅を見たのですが、それはとてもサイケデリッ クな体験でした。極彩色で、仏像が無限に増殖していく感覚、地獄の光景のようにも感じました。 私は恐怖と快感を感じました。その体験はとてもトラウマになっています。 私の絵の細密な描写と情報量は曼荼羅の影響です。また実際に曼荼羅を描いた作品もあります。そ れくらい曼荼羅は私の中で重要な要素なのです。 2つ目はマンガです。私は作品の中でマンガや落書きのような絵を描きますが、その理由はそれらが 子ども時代から一番身近なものだったからです。私は子どもの時はマンガ家になることが夢でし た。なので、私は小学生の時から毎日のようにマンガを描いていました。さらに私の教科書は常に 落書きで満たされていました。それらの落書きは私の今の制作のルーツといっても過言ではありま せん。それは私の初期衝動のようなものです。これら2つが私が影響をうけたものです。

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NI.CO.LA

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Ni.co.la  is  an  Illustrator  and  theatrical  set  designer  based   in  London.  Aner  graduajng  in  Illustrajon  from  Plymouth   University  she  developed  her  passion  for  3D  design  and   theatre  work,  which  led  her  to  go  on  to  work  with  clients   such  as  The  Theatre  Royal,  Plymouth  and  The  Barbican   Theatre.  She  talks  to  tribe  about  her  work.

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Your  patterns  are  beautifully  intricate  and  captivating   to  behold.  What  goes  into  the  process  of  making   them?  To  what  extent  does  your  work  with  pattern   provide  inspiration  for  theatrical  set  design? For  my  patterns,  I  start  with  thorough  research  into   historical  art  as  there  are  many  invaluable  techniques   to  be  learnt  from  the  past  when  creating  something   individual  for  the  future.  I  absolutely  adore   eighteenth  century  art  styles  like,  'Rococo',  which   have  a  great  influence  on  most  of  my  patterns.So,   after  some  intense  research  and  once  my  creativity  is   sparkling  with  inspiration,  I  produce  many  intricate   little  drawings  with  black  ink.  I  then  actually  use  the   Adobe  Creative  suite  to  combine  all  the  highly   detailed  drawings  together  to  create  my  desired   compositions,  as  opposed  to  drawing  it  as  one  large   image.  I  guess  the  influence  my  pattern  work  has  on   my  set  designs,  is  my  fascination  with  dazzling  my   audience  with  a  type  of,  'spectacle  and  attention  to   detail'.  I  really  like  my  audience  to  engage  with  my  

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work,  to  study  it  for  some  time  and  take  in  something   they  may  not  have  seen  before.  The  set  sketches  I   have  worked  on  have  been  drawn  out  in  a  very   similar  way  to  my  patterns,  disjointed  and  playing   around  with  many  elements  to  create  an   atmosphere.  All  my  sets  to  date  have  an  Illustrative   nature  about  them,  which  in  their  own  way  have  also   created  a  type  of  'Tableau  Vivant'. Does  having  a  degree  in  illustration  prove  to  be   advantageous  when  designing  sets  for  clients? I  believe  so.  It  is  a  creative  discipline  in  which  I  learnt   to  research  and  sketch  successfully,  getting  to  know   my  boundaries  and  pushing  them.  I  always  took  risks   while  studying  for  my  degree,  this  allowed  me  to   develop  a  unique  style  and  to  experiment  with  the   world  of  theatrical  set  design.  The  experience  and   knowledge  I’ve  gained  through  studying  my  degree  in   Illustration  has  enabled  me  to  progress  into  theatre   set  design,  running  successful,  creative  team  


meetings  and  creating  visuals  that  have  been  well   regarded  by  clients.

technique  in  a  short  theatrical  costume  course  at   Central  Saint  Martins,  London).  

What  has  been  the  most  enjoyable  aspect  of  you   work  thus  far?

Theatrical  history  also  has  a  significant  influence  on   all  my  designs,  again,  there  is  an  incredible  amount  of   inspiration  to  be  taken  from  past  techniques  and   reviving  them  through  modern  designs.  I'll  often  be  in   an  old  library  or  museum  to  find  solid  research  for   designing  my  sets.

That  is  a  difficult  one  to  answer  as  there  have  been  so   many  enjoyable  moments  in  all  the  projects  I  have   worked  on;  but  I  have  to  say,  nothing  can  beat  that   feeling  when  the  theatre  is  in  darkness  and  suddenly   all  your  hard  work  has  paid  off  when  the  stage  is   suddenly  lit  up  and  your  work  is  brought  to  life! What  influences  your  designs  for  a  theatrical  set? It  is  the  nature  of  the  script,  the  way  it  is  written,  and   the  way  it  begins  to  take  form  when  performers  begin   auditioning.  I  will  always  start  by  making  notes  and   drawing  the  relationships  between  characters  and   the  feelings  and  emotions  evoked  through  the  spaces   created  (I’ve  learnt  how  to  successfully  perform  this  

Since  leaving  university,  what  has  been  your   involvement  in  set  design? For  months  after  I  graduated  I  was  involved  in  a   fantastic  site-­‐specific  production  called,  'The  World  At   Your  Feet'.  It  was  part  of  the  Cultural  Olympiad  to   raise  awareness  of  the  positive  impacts  of  migration   in  a  city  and  to  challenge  racism.  My  role  involved   working  as  the  assistant  set  designer  for  the   production,  and  as  it  was  my  first,  'site-­‐specific'   production  with  a  cast  of  eighty,  it  had  to  be  designed  

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with  care  and  intelligence  to  ensure  consistency  and   successful  interaction  with  the  audience.  It  was  such   a  fantastic  success  and  had  great  press  coverage. What  do  you  aspire  to  be  doing  in  three  years  from   now? Working  for  myself,  full-­‐time,  producing  artwork  for   clients  and  of  course  designing  more  sets  for  theatre   companies.  Another  passion  of  mine  is  also   rejuvenating  old  furniture  with  my  patterns  and   selling  them  on...perhaps  that  will  lead  onto  running   my  own  business,  'NI.CO.LA',  which  is  the  ultimate   dream!  

In  your  aspiration  to  run  your  own  business,  I  am   interested  if  you  are  influenced  by  the  highly   recognisable  mass  produced  prints  of  Cath  Kidston? Based  on  my  last  answer,  i'd  say  definitely  yes!  She   has  her  patterns  on  so  many  objects  and  fabric.  I'd   love  to  be  in  the  position  one  day  to  print  my   patterns  onto  things!  Owning  a  shop  one  day  will  be   the  goal.  I  can  connect  to  set  design  through  visual   merchandising  as  well  as  designing  the  shop  windows   and  inside  and  so  on.  < www.ni-­‐co-­‐la.com

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