Page 1

Global Economic Outlook 2nd Quarter 2013


Global Economic Outlook Q2 2013 Dr. Ira Kalish, Deloitte Research in the United States, Deloitte Services LP

T

he global economic environment shows signs of improving, but in fits and starts. Troubling events keep getting in the way of an unambiguously positive story. Still, the story appears to be getting better. Financial market stress in Europe remains at manageable levels despite the crisis in Cyprus. In the United States, a substantial contraction of fiscal policy appears to be offset by other positive factors. In Japan, a new monetary policy holds promise of better growth. Here are the highlights of this quarter’s Global Economic Outlook. We begin with Alexander Börsch’s analysis of the Eurozone economy. Alexander’s view for Europe is relatively optimistic: He continues to believe that the immediate risk of Eurozone failure remains low. In addition, he believes that the Eurozone will “return to feeble growth” in 2013. He worries, however, that Europe could be condemned to a prolonged period of low growth if it continues to experience low investment. Next, Patricia Buckley opines that the recovery in the United States is likely to accelerate. She says that fiscal austerity “will definitely dampen the rate of acceleration, but will not be sufficient to actually stop it.” Among the positive factors she cites are a revival of household wealth and unusually slow household formation. The latter has created pent-up demand for new homes. Patricia notes, however, that there remains uncertainty about future fiscal policy. In our next article, I offer my views on the Chinese economy. Specifically, the outlook seems mixed, with positive news about exports and investment but mixed news about the overall performance of the manufacturing sector. In addition, I discuss potential policy initiatives of the new government, including a possible dismantling of the much-maligned residency permit system.

2


Preface

Global Economic Outlook published quarterly by Deloitte Research Editor-in-chief Ira Kalish Managing editor Ryan Alvanos Contributors Alexander Bรถrsch Patricia Buckley Pralhad Burli

Next, I discuss the radically new policy of the Japanese government. This includes fiscal stimulus, monetary expansion, and freer trade. Although it is too Editorial address early to say whether the new policy will be effective, it is clear that it is already 350 South Grand Street having an impact on financial markets. Japanese equity prices have risen, and the Los Angeles, CA 90013 yen has fallen. The latter should ultimately be helpful to export growth. Tel: +1 213 688 4765 In our next article, Pralhad Burli offers a cautiously optimistic view on the ikalish@deloitte.com Indian economy. He suggests that the worst is over as the global economy shows signs of revival. He notes that business confidence is improving as a result of better global economic performance and anticipated economic reforms in India. Finally, in our last article, I offer some thoughts on the controversy over government deficits. Given that there are substantially different fiscal policies in the United States versus Europe, and dramatically different views among policy makers in both parts of the world, it is useful to consider the arguments. In this article, I look at the pros and cons of deficits, the theories underlying the arguments, and the lessons to be learned.

Dr. Ira Kalish Director of Global Economics Deloitte Research

3


Contents 6

Geographies Eurozone: A silver lining on the growth horizon?—|  6 For the Eurozone, 2013 will be a year of transition. Although the GDP fall in the Eurozone’s crisis countries has slowed down, short-term growth will likely be anemic rather than explosive.

10

United States: Poised for accelerating growth in the near term  | 10 Slowly improving employment, growing household wealth, and the limits placed on sequestration’s economic impact suggest that the United States is headed toward a period of accelerating growth.

China: A slow recovery | 16

16

Economic recovery from the slowdown in 2012 has been weaker than anticipated. Chinese leadership is hinting at possible reforms, and the government is beginning to revisit income distribution as segments of the population move from rural to urban areas.

Japan: A new regime | 20

20

Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party experienced a landslide victory, and its economy is improving dramatically. The Bank of Japan is planning to implement more aggressive policies. Fiscal stimulus and participation in a Trans-Pacific Partnership augur well for the country’s outlook.

India: Citius, altius, fortius  | 24

24 4

The Indian economy is showing early signs of a recovery, suggesting that the worst may be over. The government has laid out a fiscal consolidation plan that, coupled with a moderation in wholesale prices, gives the central bank flexibility to reduce interest rates in the near future. Furthermore, the buoyancy of equity markets and an uptick in portfolio investments underscore the return of investor confidence.


Special topic

30

Deficits: Why all the fuss? | 30 Most of the world’s rich countries are running large budget deficits; some are engaging in austerity measures, while others are not taking much action to bring the deficits under control. So should we worry about deficits, and, if so, why?

36 Appendix Charts and tables | 34 GDP growth rates, inflation rates, major currencies vs. the US dollar, yield curves, composite median GDP forecasts, composite median currency forecasts, OECD composite leading indicators

38

42

5


EUROZONE

Dr. Alexander Börsch is head of research, Deloitte Germany

Eurozone: A silver lining on the growth horizon? by Dr. Alexander BÖrsch

F

or a moment in the first quarter, it looked as if the euro crisis would raise its head again. Italy’s elections were considered the biggest risk for the stability of the Eurozone in early 2013. Indeed, their inconclusive results, along with the looming risk of paralysis in government formation and reform implementation, seemed to reinforce investors’ biggest fears. Nevertheless, markets got over it remarkably well. After a short jump in interest-rate spreads, they eased at a level well below last year’s peak. Also, the uncertainties and the policy confusion about the rescue package for Cyprus have not unsettled the financial markets in a substantial way. At the same time, other crisis countries could restore their access

6

to the capital markets. Ireland managed to issue a substantially oversubscribed 10-year bond in March, the first after its bailout in 2010. The financial markets’ indifference to potential crisis triggers and Ireland’s return to the capital markets support a point made in the last Global Economic Outlook: The immediate danger of the Eurozone’s breaking up has been fading to the background. True, there are scenarios in which the crisis could erupt again. However, this tail risk has shrunk substantially. Investors trust the


Eurozone

European Central Bank to prevent a breakup. The root factors of economic uncertainty have changed relative to the growth prospects of the Eurozone. Looking at the growth prospects of the Eurozone, 2013 will be a year of transition. The good news is that the GDP fall in the Eurozone’s crisis countries has slowed down. The worst is likely behind us. The bad news is

Geographies

that short-term growth will likely be anemic rather than explosive.

Return to feeble growth in 2013 Real GDP in the Eurozone in 2012 fell by 0.6 percent, and the Eurozone experienced a very weak fourth quarter with the recession deepening. In all, 2012 was a nasty year for the Eurozone economy. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the actual GDP was 3.7 percent below the potential GDP.1 Several factors have contributed to the dismal growth performance. The two most important were that the restrictive fiscal policy in the Eurozone reduced domestic demand, while the uncertainty about the future of the euro strained private investment as well as private consumption. Both factors will continue to influence the Eurozone’s growth in 2013. However, their negative impact will get weaker. Fiscal policy will be less restrictive than the year before, and, assuming no escalation of the debt crisis, uncertainty will decline and business and consumer confidence will recover.2 Exports in combination with the expansive monetary policy are the relatively bright spots for the Eurozone. Assuming accelerating growth in the emerging markets and a slightly higher growth in the United States, Eurozone exports will increase, helped by improved competitiveness. The shaky domestic economic situation will continue to constrain domestic demand and, by implication, imports, so that exports and the external balance should be the main growth driver for the Eurozone. In this scenario, the Eurozone should stabilize in the first half of 2013 and return to weak growth in the second half. Growth will be weak as the Eurozone continues to need to strengthen household, firm, bank, and sovereign balance sheets.

7


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

Early indicators indicate trend reversal The main early indicators and the stock markets anticipate this trend reversal. The Euro Stoxx 50 has gained around 30 percent since June 2012. While the main confidence in the Eurozone indicators went down the most part of 2012, in autumn the trend stopped and reversed. Confidence in almost all major sectors has been increasing, especially in industry and services, even if the upward trend is slow and bumpy (figure 1). Although overall economic sentiment is still in negative territory— the combined Economic Sentiment Indicator stands at 90, while a positive outlook starts at 100—this suggests that the Eurozone economy has bottomed out in the first quarter.3 This trend reversal is even more pronounced in the early indicators for the German economy. After a weak fourth quarter, with GDP decreasing by 0.6 percent, fears of a coming recession emerged but are likely exaggerated. The two most important confidence indicators, the Ifo Business Climate Index and

the ZEW Index, rose substantially. In February, the Ifo index increased the most since mid2010, rising, as did the ZEW index, the fourth time in a row. In March, both indices largely stagnated. However, given the strong increases before, this indicates stabilization of a basically upward trend. Correspondingly, the German stock index DAX broke the 8,000-point mark in early April, the first time since 2008.

Phoenix vs. Japan

While these signs are encouraging, they are no guarantee that this trend reversal indicates an accelerating and substantially higher growth trajectory beyond 2013. Recent economic history suggests two scenarios for growth performance after a financial crisis. One is the relatively rapid recovery of the real economy in the emerging Asian countries after the financial crisis in the late 1990s. The other is Japan’s lost decade following the burst of its housing bubble and the resulting banking problems in the early 1990s. Both analogies are not perfect, and starting points differ substantially, but they illuminate the range Figure 1. Eurozone economic sentiment indicator—components (net balance of broad paths conceivable positive-negative expectations) for the Eurozone. In a “phoe5 nix from the ashes” scenario, 0 the current crisis countries in Southern Europe would -5 emerge much leaner and more -10 competitive from the cur-15 rent crisis and could export -20 their way out of the crisis, similar to Germany a few -25 years ago. A stronger trad-30 ables sector, combined with -35 reforms in the service sectors, 3/12 4/12 5/12 6/12 7/12 8/12 9/12 10/12 11/12 12/12 1/13 2/13 3/13 would boost productivity and Industry confidence Services confidence Consumer confidence growth. A Japanese sceRetail trade confidence Construction confidence nario with no or low growth Graphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com would likely emerge with

8


Eurozone

Geographies

Figure 2. Growth-rate GDP components (%)

continuing uncertainty and absent reforms.

The Eurozone’s investment gap

35 30

2003–2007

30.1

2008–2012

25 20

16.8

16.7

15

The biggest danger for 10 7.6 4.7 the Eurozone to fall into a 5 low-growth trap comes from 0 a dramatic investment gap. -5 Longer-term growth and -10 employment prospects depend -12.0 -15 on investments. Looking at Gross fixed capital Government final Household final the main components of the formation consumption expenditure consumption expenditure Eurozone’s GDP shows that Graphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com investments have been the hardest-hit component during the crisis. As displayed in figure 2, the growth rates of government expenexpectations regarding the economic environditure and household expenditure declined ment, low uncertainty, and possibly effective substantially but continued to grow since the investment incentives would definitely help. onset of the crisis, compared to the preceding boom years. Outlook The most dramatic drop, however, took place in investment activity. While investThe worst part of the current downturn ments grew by 30 percent (in nominal terms) in the Eurozone seems to be ending, and it is between 2003 and 2007, they fell by 12 percent likely that a shaky recovery will set in. Exports between 2008 and 2012. Investments in 2012 are the main driver for this recovery, while were €220 billion below the 2007 value. At demand and investments do not lend support the same time, corporate cash holdings rose to economic growth. The Eurozone continmassively, indicating a grossly heightened risk ues to struggle with many growth-inhibiting 4 aversion on the part of companies. aftereffects of the financial crisis and the euro crisis, and with a deeply divided economic Jumpstarting private investment activity performance. Seen from this perspective, even is therefore one, if not the key, way to avert a a shaky recovery would be good news and Japanese-style scenario. Corporates seem to something to build upon. need some convincing to invest more. Stable

1. OECD, “Interim Economic Outlook,” Economic Outlook Annex Tables, March 28, 2013, http:// www.oecd.org/eco/outlook/economicoutlookannextables.htm, accessed April 15, 2013. 2. European Economic Advisory Group, The EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group, 2013. 3. European Commission, European Economic Forecast—Winter 2013. 4. “Iron enters the soul,” Economist, October 6, 2012. 9


USA

Dr. Patricia Buckley is director of Economic Policy and Analysis at Deloitte Research, Deloitte Services LP

United States: Poised for accelerating growth in the near term by Dr. Patricia Buckley

I

mproved economic fundamentals, as reflected in rising household wealth and a recovering housing market, have positioned the US economy on the verge of entering a period of accelerating growth. The spark igniting the acceleration will come as the slowly improving employment situation finally reaches a tipping point where it begins unleashing years of pent-up demand from people who have been prevented by economic circumstances from establishing separate living units. The combination of higher taxes— particularly the expiration of the temporary payroll tax reduction—and the fiscal austerity

10

measures known as “sequestration” will definitely dampen the rate of acceleration, but will not be sufficient to actually stop it.

If things are going so well, what happened in Q4 2012? Before moving to the outlook, an explanation of what happened during the final quarter of 2012 is needed. Although revisions moved Q4 2012 real GDP growth into positive territory, a reading of 0.4 percent would generally have observers worried that the United States was at risk of falling back into recession,


United States

notwithstanding the relatively solid growth seen earlier in the year. However, the strength of important subcomponents in Q4 2012 and the recognition that growth in Q3 2012 was artificially inflated by factors that were sure to be reversed kept concerns in check. Figure 1 shows a breakdown of the contribution of the various components of GDP growth in Q3 and Q4 2012. Although the 3.1 percent top-line GDP growth in Q3 2012 was much higher than the growth in Q4, the underlying fundamentals were stronger in Q4.

Geographies

Specifically: • Over half of the growth in Q3 was attributable to increases in the rate of inventory accumulation and government spending (primarily federal defense spending). Rising inventories take away from future production, and the bump-up in defense spending was not sustainable given the current budget environment. • In Q4, the economy more than gave back the inventory accumulation and the rise in government spending. These two declines

11


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

Figure 1. Contributions to percent change in real GDP Percentage point change 1.5

Q3 2012: 3.1% Q4 2012: 0.4%

1.0

0.5

0.0

-0.5

-1.0

-1.5

-2.0

Personal consumption

Business investment

Residential investment

Change in private inventories

Exports

Imports

Government spending

Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis Graphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com

shaved almost 3.0 percentage points off Q4 GDP growth. • Particularly problematic in Q3 was the very slow growth in fixed business investment, which was a drag on GDP growth. Business investment rebounded strongly in Q4, contributing 1.3 percentage points to GDP growth. • Personal consumption expenditures grew slightly faster in Q4 than in Q3. • The weakness of trade in Q4 at first looks a bit worrisome, but the decline in real exports reflects weakness in demand from US trading partners rather than falling US competitiveness. The decrease in real imports, which adds to GDP growth, is a

12

result of declining oil imports rather than an indication of a future slowdown in the US economy. Whatever the strengths and weaknesses of the composition of growth in 2012, it was clearly not sufficient to ignite strong employment growth. As shown in figure 2, employment growth over the course of both 2011 and 2012 was slow—averaging 175,000 jobs per month in 2011 and 183,000 per month in 2012. Total employment still remains well below its pre-recession peak. As a result of the slow growth in employment, the unemployment rate is coming down very slowly (figure 3), and 12 million people are continuing to look for work three and a half years after the end of the recession.


United States

The case for accelerating growth

Geographies

Figure 2. Changes in nonfarm employment Thousands 600

1

400

0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0

Ju n-

07 No v07 Ap r-0 8 Se p08 Fe b09 Ju l-0 9 De c09 M ay -1 0 Oc t-1 0 M ar -1 1 Au g11 Ja n12 Ju n12 No v-1 2

0.1

| DUPress.com

1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0

Ja n07 Ju n07 No v07 Ap r-0 8 Se p08 Fe b09 Ju l-0 9 De c0 M 9 ay -1 0 Oc t-1 0 M ar -1 1 Au g11 Ja n12 Ju n12 No v-1 2

Ja

n-

07

One of the most significant 200 improvements to the economic 0 fundamentals in the United -200 States has been the recovery in -400 household net worth. Not only -600 was current income impacted by the recession’s sharp uptick -800 in unemployment, but assets of -1000 households also took a major hit as home values plummeted, Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics leaving many homeowners with mortgage liabilities far Graphic: Deloitte University Press above the value of their homes. After reaching a peak in Q3 Figure 3. Unemployment rate Percent 2007, it took just a year and a 12 half for household wealth to drop by almost one-quarter. 10 Now, as shown in figure 4, 8 household wealth has almost returned to its pre-recession 6 peak on a nominal basis. 4 Significantly, the most recent increase in Q4 2012 coin2 cided with debt levels rising 0 for the first time since the recession, a sign of improving consumer confidence. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics As household wealth Graphic: Deloitte University Press continues to expand and rising employment contributes its aftermath, this process slowed considerincome, one of the factors ably. Rising unemployment and foreclosures holding growth in check—the lagging rate of took their toll, and people who would have growth of household formation—should begin otherwise formed an independent household to reverse. The recession and the weak recovery were forced by economic necessity to move have had a profound impact on social dynamback in or remain with parents, other relatives, ics in this country, as poor economic condior friends. tions have caused the rate of new household Figure 5 tracks the growth in population formation to slow dramatically. Households and household formation, setting both series form when a person or group moves into a to 100 in December 2004. In the period before separate living unit. During the recession and

| DUPress.com

13


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

Figure 4. Household net worth Trillions of $

2012Q3

2012Q4

Nov-12

2012Q2

Jun-12

2012Q1

2011Q4

Jan-12

2011Q3

Aug-11

2011Q2

Mar-11

2011Q1

Oct-10

2010Q4

May-10

2010Q3

Dec-09

2010Q1

2009Q4

2010Q2

Jul-09

Feb-09

2009Q3

Sep-08

2009Q2

2009Q1

Apr-08

2008Q4

Nov-07

2008Q3

2008Q2

Jun-07

Jan-07

2008Q1

Aug-06

2007Q4

2007Q3

Mar-06

2007Q2

Oct-05

2007Q1

Dec-04

14

May-05

million fewer households than it would have had if household 70 formation had kept pace with 65 population growth. The strengthening of the 60 housing market, visible in 55 the rise in household wealth, declining “for sale� inventories, 50 and rising home prices, are 45 strong signals that the United States is close to working 40 its way through the painful aftermath of the collapse of the housing bubble. The US econSource: Federal Reserve Board omy is approaching the tipping Graphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com point where even a slowly improving employment situation should be able to begin to Figure 5. Household formation and population unleash the pent-up demand 110 represented by over 1 million 108 additional potential households 106 currently waiting in the wings. 104 Not only will housing construc102 tion and construction employ100 ment be supported, but rising household formation should 98 also kick off a virtuous cycle 96 of rapidly increasing demand 94 for home-related goods and services, which in turn should Households Population 16 and over support additional employment and more new household Source: Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics formation. A household formaGraphic: Deloitte University Press | DUPress.com tion rate exceeding the rate of population growth is a formula for accelerating economic growth. the recession, the rate of increase in the popuLooking toward the construction sector, lation age 16 and above closely tracked the we are now seeing a sign that the resurgence is rate of increase in the number of households indeed underway: Housing is finally turning formed. With the onset of the recession in the corner. The uptick shown in figure 6 for the December 2007, net new household formation number of housing units currently under concame to a near standstill. Although the rate of struction correlates well with the contribution household formation has recently started to of residential investment to GDP. After being increase, the United States currently has 1.1


Geographies

United States

1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 600 500

Jan-12

Sep-11

May-11

Jan-11

Sep-10

May-10

Jan-10

Sep-09

May-09

Jan-09

Sep-08

Jan-08

May-08

Sep-07

May-07

Jan-07

Jan-13

400

Recent actions by Congress 300 and the White House in the name of deficit reduction will definitely result in slower Source: US Census Bureau growth than would otherwise Graphic: Deloitte University Press have existed in 2013. However, because the actions are being unwillingness to raise the debt ceiling, recesimplemented only in part and on a piecemeal sion would have been guaranteed. basis, they are more likely to slow the rate of The fiscal cliff deal muted the economic acceleration rather than stopping it or causimpact of these measures by allowing only a ing an actual contraction. The original fisportion of the expiration of the temporary tax cal cliff date of January 1, 2013, represented reductions to stand—the payroll tax rose two the combination of the expiration of a series percentage points to its former level, and taxes of temporary tax provisions—including the on the highest wage earners were allowed to Alternative Minimum Tax limits, the Bush tax return to pre-Bush tax cut levels—and delaycuts, and the 2 percent point decrease in the ing the sequester until March 1, 2013. The payroll tax—with the automatic spending cuts debt ceiling was also raised. Further, Congress provided for by the Budget Control Act of 2011 averted a federal shutdown by agreeing to a (the sequester). To complicate things further, spending plan before the March 27 expiration January 1 was also around when the Treasury of the existing Continuing Resolution, keepwould need an increase in the debt ceiling in ing spending at sequester levels. It remains order to pay bills already incurred. There is to be seen what the final resolution of the little doubt that if all the January 1 revenue budget battles will be, but from the actions increases and spending cuts had been allowed taken to date, the damage to the economy to take effect at once, the United States would appears limited. currently be in or near recession-level performance. If a default had occurred due to an

Sep-12

Political risk—muted temporarily

Figure 6. Residential units under construction Thousands of units, SSA

May-12

a drag on growth for several years, residential investment reversed its trend and began to contribute to GDP growth in mid-2011, and it was a small net positive for 2012.

| DUPress.com

15


CHINA

China: A slow recovery by Dr. Ira Kalish

T

here are indications that China’s recovery from the slow growth of 2012 is weaker than anticipated. Data for January and February—the two months are combined due to the Chinese New Year—showed that industrial production and retail sales increased more slowly than expected. Industrial production in the first two months of the year rose 9.9 percent from a year earlier, the slowest start to the year since 2009. Retail sales for the first two months of the year were up merely 12.3 percent. The slowdown in retail spending was partly due to an official effort to curtail spending on entertaining officials. At the same time, exports and fixed asset investment are growing strongly, suggesting that China’s expansion is reverting to the old pattern of exports and investment rather than consumer spending. In the long term, this is not a sustainable pattern for China. Fixed asset investment was up 21.2 percent in the first two months of the year. In addition, exports in February were up 21.8 percent from a year earlier, even though there were four fewer working days in February this year than last. Imports actually declined in February, raising concerns that domestic demand is lagging.

16

Particularly noteworthy was a 16.5 percent increase in exports to the European Union (EU). This was the third consecutive monthly increase in exports to the EU, the first time this has happened since 2011. Exports to the United States were up 15.7 percent, and exports to Japan were down 6.5 percent. Recent pessimism about the weak numbers for China’s manufacturing sector was offset, however, by more positive news. It was a relief to learn that a preliminary purchasing manager’s index for manufacturing was up. The index, published in March by Markit and HSBC, increased from 50.4 in February to 51.7, suggesting accelerating growth in the manufacturing sector.1 In addition, inbound foreign direct investment (FDI) into China rose in February for the first time in nine months, with a 6.8 percent increase from a year earlier. Outbound FDI was up as well and exceeded inbound


China

FDI. The increase in inbound FDI signals a possible revival of foreign business confidence in China’s outlook.

The future of government policy China’s new premier, Li Keqiang, made a surprisingly candid speech about what is needed for China to move forward. He said

Geographies

that he wants to reduce the power of the Chinese government and increase the role of the private sector in the economy. According to Li, “It’s about cutting power, it’s a self-imposed revolution. It will be very painful and even feel like cutting one’s wrist.”2 He backed up his statements by appointing an economic policy team composed of respected and experienced reformers. Li also made a strong statement about dealing with pollution: “We shouldn’t pursue economic growth at the expense of the environment—such growth won’t satisfy the people.”3 At a time when smog in Beijing and elsewhere is seen as a significant threat to public health, Li’s statement was welcome. In addition, the head of China’s central bank, Zhou Xiaochuan, indicated that he is worried about rising inflation, which reached 3.2 percent in February. He says that the bank’s policy is “no longer relaxed” and “relatively neutral.”4 Zhou said that “we will use monetary policy and other measures to hopefully stabilize prices and inflation expectations.”5 This statement comes at a time when China’s economy is showing signs of sputtering, with industrial production rising more slowly than had been anticipated. However, the central bank is concerned about consumer prices in addition to a possible housing bubble and the rise of non-bank sources of credit. Zhou also expressed concern that some loans to regional governments are not backed by revenuegenerating projects and are, therefore, at risk. The central bank set its money supply growth target at 13 percent, which would be the slowest rate of money supply growth since 2000. Zhou is the longest-serving head of China’s central bank and, despite reaching the age of 65, is widely expected to be retained after the mandatory retirement age. He has been instrumental in pushing the liberalization of credit markets. His comments suggest that he wants to stabilize prices and the financial

17


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

China’s new premier, Li Keqiang, made a surprisingly candid speech about what is needed for China to move forward. He said that he wants to reduce the power of the Chinese government and increase the role of the private sector in the economy. system before he departs. For the government, the challenge will be to keep growth going in the midst of a tighter monetary policy. Meanwhile, Moody’s chimed in with a warning that China’s local government debt is at risk of default. This follows the central bank’s assessment that there might be trouble. According to Bloomberg, local government debt issuance increased by 179 percent from 2011 to 2012 and accounted for 50 percent of corporate bond issuance in China in 2012.6 It is estimated that local government debt amounts to 18-30 percent of China’s GDP. As local governments cut back on borrowing, this could have a negative impact on economic growth. Another issue in China concerning credit growth has been the very rapid expansion of the so-called shadow banking system. This has involved the creation of credit outside the formal banking system, often using offbalance-sheet vehicles operated by traditional banks. The huge growth of this system played an important role in the country’s economic recovery after the global crisis of 2008–2009, but its large size and lack of supervision worry many observers. They are concerned that the system poses a risk to the economy. Consequently, the Chinese government recently announced that it will require fuller disclosure about off-balance-sheet vehicles operated by banks. It will also consider rules that would cap the size of such vehicles. Such rules could curtail credit growth.

18

Dealing with income distribution Finally, an important policy issue concerns the rising inequality of income in China. The country currently has a system of residence permits known as the hukou system. The permits indicate where people reside and whether they are urban or rural. Many rural migrants live in big cities, but they are not entitled to many of the services enjoyed by local residents because they are classified as rural. These services can include education and health care. As such, China has developed a two-tiered system that is a source of considerable tension and potential unrest. Now there is word that the new leadership intends to do away with the hukou system and replace it with a system of national residence permits. The idea is to end the two-tier system and to encourage more rural people to permanently settle in urban areas. Outgoing Premier Wen Jiabao says that promoting urbanization will assist with continued strong economic growth. The transition to a more consumer-led economy will require more urban dwellers with greater purchasing power. The challenge, of course, will be to fund the added government services that will become available to migrants.


China

Geographies

1. Chris Williamson, “Flash Manufacturing PMI rebounds to signal strengthening upturn,” Markit Economic Research, March 21, 2013, http://www.markit.com/assets/en/docs/commentary/ markit-economics/2013/Mar/China_flash_PMI_13_03_21.pdf, accessed April 15, 2013. 2. Bloomberg News, “Li urges paring state role to fuel 7.5% China growth,” March 18, 2013, http://www.bloomberg.com/ news/2013-03-17/china-s-li-vows-to-keep-7-5-growth-and-spread-wealth-benefits.html, accessed April 15, 2013. 3. Ibid. 4. Bloomberg News, “Zhou on high alert prompts swaps PBOC rise signal,” March 24, 2013, http://www.bloomberg. com/news/2013-03-24/zhou-on-high-alert-prompts-swaps-pboc-rise-signal.html, accessed April 15, 2013. 5. Ibid. 6. Kyoungwha Kim and David Yong, “Moody’s sees defaults as PBOC warns on local risks,” Bloomberg, March 18, 2013, http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-03-17/moody-ssees-defaults-as-pboc-warns-on-local-risks.html, accessed April 15, 2013. 19


JAPAN

Japan: A new regime by Dr. Ira Kalish

I

n the last Global Economic Outlook, we said that “the outlook for Japan is poor.” This is no longer the case. In fact, the outlook for Japan has changed substantially as a result of actions following the recent election. There is now a significant chance that Japan’s economic performance will be much better than almost anyone expected just a month ago. What changed? Following the landslide election of a government led by the Liberal Democratic Party, party leader Shinzo Abe promised to engage in substantially new policies. Specifically, there are three main elements to his plan. First, Abe intends to move the Bank of Japan toward a much more aggressive policy. He has already appointed new leadership to the bank, which intends to engage in unlimited asset purchases until it achieves its new target of 2.0 percent inflation. Currently, there is deflation, which means that prices continue to decline. The problem with deflation is that it causes consumers to delay purchases, which in turn discourages businesses from investing. In addition, declining prices increase real interest rates. Thus, the cost of capital is higher than the nominal interest rate suggests. Finally,

20

declining prices lead to an increase in the real value of debts. A combination of deflation and slow economic growth is the proximate cause of the huge increase in Japan’s sovereign debtto-GDP ratio. Thus, a policy of creating inflation makes sense. Whether it can easily be achieved remains a question. Yet, in anticipation of the new policy, the Japanese yen has dropped sharply in value. Plus, anticipation of the inflationary effects of the new policy has resulted in rising equity prices in Japan. Second, Prime Minister Abe intends to engage in more fiscal stimulus. This means he will not worry (as previous governments have) about the level of debt. Instead, he hopes to stimulate growth in order to eventually cause a drop in the debt-to-GDP ratio. He has announced the first tranche of what is expected to be several increases in spending.


Japan

Third, Abe intends to have Japan participate in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations aimed at creating a Pacific-area free-trade agreement. The main aspect of this would be freer trade with the United States. With the exception of agricultural products, most trade between Japan and the United States does not involve high-tariff barriers. Instead, there are non-tariff barriers, which often involve restrictive regulations. As such, freer trade between Japan and the United States would necessarily entail deregulation of many domestic industries in Japan—and that is the point. Abe’s push

Geographies

for freer trade is a way to achieve political support for market-opening reforms.

Early signs of progress Has the new policy regime made a difference? The answer is yes and no. The drop in the yen has not yet led to a boost in export growth. But it will, eventually. It usually takes some time for an exchange rate movement to have an impact on the volume of trade. Continued weakness in exports is reflected in continued weakness in industrial production. Yet again, this is likely to change when the effects of a

21


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

lower yen work their way through the economy. The increase in equity prices, combined with expectations of higher inflation, evidently had an impact on consumer spending, which increased at a healthy pace in both January and February. Given the fundamentals, this was not expected. In addition, the well-known Tankan Survey found an increase in business confidence, but capital spending plans remain static.1

What to expect Will the new policy regime work? It is not yet clear, but the reaction of financial markets is promising. Rising equity prices and a declining yen will likely bear fruit. The problem, however, is that the new monetary policy may not necessarily achieve higher inflation. Many observers are concerned that Japan’s economy is running so far below capacity that inflation of 2.0 percent cannot be achieved within the two years that the Bank of Japan

expects. The concern is that huge asset purchases by the bank will simply create asset price inflation (which is already happening) and will not result in the inflation needed to change economic behavior. On the other hand, consumer behavior has already started to change in response to a new policy regime. Moreover, the fiscal stimulus could bear fruit if implemented quickly. However, other obstacles to growth are lingering. Japan faces growing competition from companies in South Korea, Taiwan, and China in its core industries of electronics and automobiles. It also faces a relatively weak level of global demand, especially in Europe. Thus, the potential for export growth, even with a cheaper yen, is limited. The new policies will need to have a sustained impact on domestic demand in order to significantly boost growth. The early impact on consumer spending is a good sign, but it remains too early to tell whether the policy will succeed.

Will the new policy regime work? It is not yet clear, but the reaction of financial markets is promising.

1. 22

Bank of Japan, “Tankan,� http://www.boj.or.jp/en/statistics/tk/, accessed April 15, 2013.


Japan

Geographies

23


INDIA

Pralhad Burli is senior analyst at Deloitte Research, India

India: Citius, altius, fortius by Pralhad Burli

T

he Indian economy is operating in a difficult macroeconomic environment, part of which is due to a prolonged period of weakness in the global economy. Moreover, a host of domestic factors caused an economic deceleration. As a result, the Indian economy is experiencing one of its slowest periods of growth in nearly a decade. India’s GDP grew just 5.5 percent and 5.3 percent in the first two quarters of the 2012–2013 fiscal year, prompting the Central Statistical Organization to lower its growth estimate to a meager 5.0 percent for the year as a whole. While the Ministry of Finance’s and Reserve Bank of India’s estimates for GDP growth are slightly higher, the bottom line is that the Indian economy will slow down

24

considerably from a growth rates of 9.3 percent and 6.2 percent achieved during 2010–2011 and 2011–2012, respectively. Slower GDP growth is primarily attributable to a weakness in the industrial sector. The Index of Industrial Production grew a mere 0.7 percent between April and December 2012, down from 3.7 percent for the corresponding period in 2011–2012. Meanwhile, growth in the agriculture sector has been slow after an erratic start to the monsoon season, which likely caused lower growth in


India

allied sectors as well. Furthermore, cautious monetary policy and tight credit conditions put a lid on the possibility of an investment-led growth revival. However, India’s growth rate appears to have bottomed out, and the tide is likely to turn in India’s favor. The government and policy makers exude confidence that the economy will bounce back. In all likelihood, growth will be faster, investments will be

Geographies

higher, and the domestic economy will emerge stronger in the coming months. Based on current forecasts, the economy is expected to achieve a growth rate of 6.1–6.7 percent in the fiscal year beginning in April 2013.

Maneuvering monetary policy In its third-quarter monetary policy meeting held on January 29, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) cut its policy rate by 25 basis points. This marked the first instance where the central bank tinkered with policy rate since April 2012, as opposed to its reliance on consistent cuts to the cash reserve ratio in an effort to add liquidity and enhance credit availability in the markets. Meanwhile, inflation based on the wholesale price index (WPI) persisted around 7-8 percent through the most part of the 2012– 2013 fiscal year. However, WPI inflation fell to 6.6 percent in January 2013, its lowest level since December 2009. The declining trend in the WPI is certainly a positive sign for the economy, but a majority of the decline is due to a moderation in non-food manufacturing inflation. On the other hand, food prices remain elevated and are an area of concern. Unlike the previous year, when food inflation was mainly driven by higher prices of protein foods, the price of cereals has exerted upward pressure this year. An increase in the minimum support price for rice and wheat, coupled with supply-side bottlenecks, contributed to an increase in inflation for cereals. Rising food inflation has widened the gap between inflation measured using the WPI and the consumer price index (CPI) to over 4 percent in January 2013, primarily on account of the greater weight given to food items in CPI. India continues to witness double-digit CPI inflation, which stood at 10.8 percent

25


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

in January, following a reading of 10.6 in December 2012. So far, the RBI has adopted a cautious monetary stance in an attempt to maintain a balance between containing inflation and managing liquidity requirements to support growth. The RBI’s stance was also considered necessary amid deteriorating fiscal conditions and an uncertain global macroeconomic environment. However, a moderation in wholesale prices and the possibility of an improvement in the government’s fiscal situation give the central bank some flexibility to reduce interest rates in the near future. While the choice may not be easy, the RBI will certainly weigh the costs of slower growth against the possibility of an uptick in inflation.

expenditures on welfare programs; subsidies on food, fuel, and fertilizers; and a shortfall in tax and divestment receipts contributed to the government’s slipping fiscal projections in 2012–2013. Revised estimates peg the deficit at 5.2 percent of GDP, and the final level could be marginally lower. India ran the risk of its sovereign rating being downgraded to junk status in the absence of a clear fiscal consolidation plan. In his budget speech, the finance minister reaffirmed a commitment to continue on the fiscal roadmap laid out during the last year that would limit India’s fiscal deficit to 4.8 percent of GDP during the 2013–2014 fiscal year through measures that largely rely on expenditure cuts and disinvestment proceeds. However, the success of the fiscal consolidation plan is largely dependent on underlying assumptions, and the threat of a sovereign downgrade has not been entirely averted. The government was not able to meet its disinvestment target in the current fiscal year, and part of the reduction in the fiscal deficit in 2013–2014 assumes ambitious disinvestment revenues of nearly $10 billion. Furthermore, the government is anticipating an increase in non-tax revenues, a large proportion of which is expected to come from telecom spectrum proceeds. Meanwhile, non-tax revenues in the current fiscal were also lower compared to the initial target. On the other hand, plan expenditures are slightly higher because of low base effects,

The government and policy makers exude confidence that the economy will bounce back. In all likelihood, growth will be faster, investments will be higher, and the domestic economy will emerge stronger in the coming months.

A path to fiscal consolidation The Indian economy benefitted significantly from increased government spending in the post-financial-crisis era. However, central government fiscal deficits soared to 6.0 percent and 6.5 percent of GDP in 2008–2009 and 2009–2010, respectively. Fiscal consolidation began in 2010–2011, and a partial withdrawal of the fiscal stimulus and an economic recovery ensured that the fiscal deficit fell to 4.8 percent of GDP. However, GDP growth faltered in 2011–2012, and the fiscal deficit, once again, ballooned to 5.7 percent. Massive

26


India

Geographies

27


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

but the government subsidy bill is expected to decline. The deregulation of diesel prices and the limit on subsidized LPG cylinders will help in curtailing the government’s expenditure on subsidies. However, if global crude prices rise due to geopolitical tensions, the government will have to make some tough policy choices in the face of an upcoming election.

The other deficit Some experts contend that a persistent deficit on the current account poses a bigger challenge for the Indian economy. India’s current account deficit rose to 5.4 percent of GDP in the second quarter of the 2012–2013 fiscal year, taking the deficit to 4.6 percent for the first half of 2012–2013. Export growth fell faster than imports during the second quarter. Moreover, the import bill was partly buoyed

28

by increasing gold imports. As a countermeasure, the government increased the tariff on gold imports from 4 percent to 6 percent in order to make gold imports more expensive. However, gold imports are expected to decline significantly only when households find other investments more attractive. So far, the current account deficit has been financed without drawing down reserves. While foreign direct investments have declined in the first three quarters of 2012–2013 compared to the previous year, foreign portfolio investments have registered a healthy increase. Earlier, the government’s plan to implement the General Anti-Avoidance Rules (GAAR) increased concerns for foreign investors that led to substantial capital flight. After due consideration, the government decided to implement a modified version of the GAAR. A global recovery and an uptick in external


India

demand will likely support a revival in the export sector, which augurs well for the economy. However, India’s import basket, which consists largely of petroleum imports, will likely continue to exert pressure on the country’s current account.

Will India capitalize? India’s once-agrarian economy suddenly turned to the services sector in its pursuit of an ample growth engine. While its transition from agriculture to services led to high economic growth, it also left the manufacturing sector underdeveloped. More than half of India’s population engages in agriculture, and the high-productivity services sector is not creating enough jobs for a growing workforce. Currently, India has an opportunity to move a large proportion of its workforce from lowproductivity sectors such as agriculture to high-productivity sectors like manufacturing, and enhance agricultural productivity while reducing the number of people dependent on agriculture. In a recent economic survey,

Geographies

the chief economic advisor, Raghuram Rajan, highlighted that creation of productive jobs will be crucial for India’s long-term growth.1 Investments in education, skill building, and infrastructure, coupled with business-friendly regulations and labor laws, are levers that could potentially create an enabling environment that propels the Indian economy to higher growth. The Indian economy is showing early signs of a recovery, suggesting that the worst may be over. The purchasing manager’s index indicates an expansion, WPI inflation is on a downward trend, and the buoyancy of equity markets and portfolio investments underscore the return of investor confidence. Furthermore, the government hopes that its recent push for reforms will help trigger investments and jumpstart the economy. Overall, the Indian economy is expected to perform better in the coming year, which is a positive sign amid a host of macroeconomic challenges. If the global economic recovery surprises on the upside, India’s growth forecasts will likely be revised upward.

The Indian economy is showing early signs of a recovery, suggesting that the worst may be over.

1. Raghuram G. Rajan, “An introduction to the economic survey 2012–13,” Ministry of Finance, India, http://www.indiabudget.nic.in/es2012-13/intro_economicsurvey.pdf, accessed April 15, 2013. 29


Deficits: Why all the fuss? by Dr. Ira Kalish

T

oday most of the world’s rich countries are running rather large budget deficits. In some cases, the deficits are unusually large and have led governments to engage in painful austerity in order to bring the deficits under control. In others, such as the United States and Japan, little is being done to rein in deficits, and such inaction appears not to have done any harm. Thus, the question arises as to whether we should worry about deficits, and, if so, why? In what follows, we examine why some people hate deficits, others love them, and many simply don’t care.

Prehistoric deficits First, consider a little history. In the old days before the post-war era, deficits were generally seen as a bad thing. Certainly countries in recession ran deficits, but often, countries went to considerable lengths to avoid accumulating debt. Those that did not rein in deficits often were unable to service their debts, and defaults were not unusual. However, the experience of the Great Depression, in which

30

fiscal tightening was seen to worsen an already onerous economic downturn, led to new thinking about deficits. The Keynesian critique was that, when a country is producing below its capacity, a debtfinanced expansion in government spending would be a suitable way to boost output. Moreover, when the private sector hoards cash, the government could borrow that cash, spend it, and boost output. This view took hold of economic thinking in the immediate post-war era and found favor with policy makers in the 1960s. By the end of the 1960s, Richard Nixon was quoted as saying “we’re all Keynesians now.” Yet, the Keynesians seemed to have taken their views too far, believing that deficits could permanently increase growth. They could not.


Deficits: Why all the fuss?

The backlash By the mid-1970s, support for Keynesian stimulus abated as inflation became a greater worry. There was talk of “stagflation,” in which the economy stagnated but inflation endured. OPEC oil price shocks contributed to the inflation, but attitudes toward deficits changed. At that time, the main criticism of deficits was that they “crowd out” investment and slow economic growth. That is, when the government borrows in competition with the private sector, it drives up interest rates, hurts investment, and ultimately slows the economy.

Topic

There was debate about the degree of crowding out and whether it is a problem when the economy is operating below capacity. In any event, the theory of crowding out suggested that, in the long term, deficits could do much harm. Indeed, they were blamed by some for the stagnation of the 1970s. In the 1980s, Ronald Reagan came to power in the United States by attacking deficits. Yet he adopted a theory popular among some Republicans that tax cuts would pay for themselves by boosting work effort and investment. His large tax cut in 1981, followed by large increases in defense spending, wound

31


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

up resulting in very big deficits. Evidently, the tax cuts did not pay for themselves, but they did boost private sector spending in the way Keynes suggested. Yet, given that large deficits did not appear to be doing much harm, an old theory was revived, suggesting that deficits are not a problem. The old theory, known as “Ricardian equivalence,” was based on the work of 19th-century British economist David Ricardo, who said that when the government borrows, individuals will increase their savings in anticipation of higher future taxes needed to service the debt. The higher saving would enable continued funding of investment. As such, there would be no “crowding out.” At the same time, higher savings would mean that consumers would spend less. Consequently, there would be no Keynesian stimulus. In other words, the deficit would make no difference either way. Conservative Harvard economist Robert Barro adopted the Ricardian view and provided statistical evidence in support of this view. Even Reagan adopted the view, saying that it made no difference whether the government taxed or borrowed to fund spending.

Recent history Still, the world was not totally convinced. After Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton both implemented tighter fiscal policies (higher taxes, reduced spending) that ultimately led to budget surpluses. As Clinton’s Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin argued, fiscal probity would create a more stable financial market environment, boost business confidence, and allow for a strong economy. This turned out to be true in the late 1990s. On the other hand, under George W. Bush, the United States returned to structural deficits in the 2001–2008 period, and growth continued at a reasonable pace.

32

Where do things stand today? In Europe, governments adopted tighter fiscal policies, which are widely seen as having inhibited economic growth. The United States had a more neutral fiscal policy, and growth has been stronger. There has been no crowding out given that the private sector is hoarding cash. The government is clearly not competing with the private sector for scarce funds. This supports the Keynesian view. On the other hand, the fiscal stimulus in 2009–2010 was accompanied by a sizable increase in private sector savings and a less-than-expected boost to growth. This would seem to support the Ricardian view.

Where do we go from here? Few pundits, and fewer politicians, will say that we should not worry about deficits. The reality may be, however, that deficits are, at the least, harmless when the economy is weak and should be avoided when the economy is strong. For the United States, that probably means not focusing on the current deficit but attempting to do something now about future deficits. For Europe, it probably means slowing the pace of austerity and focusing first on restoring economic growth. Of course, very large long-term deficits should always be avoided. When interest payments become too large, deficits grow out of control, the debt-to-GDP ratio grows out of control, and either default or ruinous inflation becomes much more likely. Finally, when countries don’t control their own money supply (as in the Eurozone) or borrow in foreign currencies, the risk associated with their accumulation of debt is far higher, leading to high interest costs if financial markets become worried. Thus, their ability to engage in fiscal stimulus is severely limited.


Deficits: Why all the fuss?

Topic

33


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

Appendix GDP growth rates (YoY %)*

GDP growth rates (YoY %)*

8

15

6 10

4 2

5

0 -2

0

-4 -5

-6 -8

-10

-10 -12 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 07 07 07 08 08 08 08 09 09 09 09 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12

US

UK

Eurozone

-15 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 07 07 07 08 08 08 08 09 09 09 09 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12

Japan

Brazil

Inflation rates (YoY %)*

India

Russia

Inflation rates (YoY %)*

6

16

4

12

2

8

0

4

-2

0

-4 Jul 09

-4 Dec 09

US

May 10

UK

Oct 10

Mar 11

Eurozone

Aug 11

Jan 12

Jun 12

Jul 09

Nov 12

USD-Yen

1.7

100

1.6

95

1.5

90

1.4

85

1.3

80

1.2

75

Jun Sep Dec Mar June Sep 09 09 09 10 10 10

GBP-USD *Source: Bloomberg

Euro-USD

Dec Mar 10 11

Jun Sep 11 11

USD-Yen (RHS)

Nov 09

Brazil

Japan

Major currencies vs. the US dollar*

34

China

Dec Mar Jun Sep 11 12 12 12

Dec 12

Mar 10

Jul 10

China

Nov 10

India

Mar 11

Russia

Jul 11

Nov 11

Mar 12

Jul 12

Nov 12


Appendix Yield curves (as of March 14, 2013)* US Treasury bonds & notes

UK gilts

Eurozone govt. benchmark

Japan sovereign

Brazil govt. benchmark

China sovereign

India govt. actives

Russia‡

3 months

0.09

0.42

0.03

0.04

7.21

2.70

8.09

5.43

1 year

0.14

0.18

0.10

0.06

7.96

2.76

7.80

5.71

5 years

0.87

0.83

0.45

0.12

9.41

3.30

7.90

6.56

10 years

2.03

1.96

1.47

0.63

9.69

3.60

7.87

7.35

Japan

Brazil

China

Russia

Composite median GDP forecasts (as of March 15, 2013)* US

UK

Eurozone

2013

1.9

0.9

-0.2

1.2

3.35

8.1

3.4

2014

2.7

1.6

1.1

1.3

4

8

3.75

2015

2.95

2

1.5

1.3

3.55

7.9

4.3

Composite median currency forecasts (as of March 15, 2013)* Q2 13

Q3 13

Q4 13

Q1 14

2013

2014

2015

GBP-USD

1.53

1.52

1.52

1.53

1.52

1.55

1.57

Euro-USD

1.32

1.31

1.3

1.26

1.3

1.28

1.3

USD-Yen

94

95

95

95

95

100

102

USD-Brazilian Real

1.98

1.98

1.98

2

1.98

2.05

2.16

USD-Chinese Yuan

6.18

6.15

6.11

6.1

6.11

6.03

6

USD-Indian Rupee

54

53.5

53

53

53

50.5

50

USD-Russian Ruble

30.29

30.24

30.37

30.43

30.37

32.21

32.51

OECD composite leading indicators (amplitude adjusted)† US

UK

Eurozone

Japan

Brazil

China

India

Russia Federation

Mar 11

100.65

101.46

101.68

100.56

101.03

101.52

100.57

102.81

Apr 11

100.57

101.32

101.57

100.49

100.75

101.43

100.28

102.59

May 11

100.42

101.09

101.40

100.39

100.38

101.35

100.01

102.36

Jun 11

100.20

100.78

101.17

100.31

99.92

101.26

99.81

102.17 102.03

Jul 11

99.97

100.40

100.90

100.26

99.45

101.15

99.68

Aug 11

99.79

99.99

100.62

100.22

99.02

101.02

99.57

101.96

Sep 11

99.72

99.62

100.37

100.21

98.67

100.89

99.49

101.96

Oct 11

99.79

99.33

100.17

100.26

98.42

100.74

99.44

102.02

Nov 11

99.97

99.18

100.03

100.34

98.27

100.59

99.45

102.11

Dec 11

100.20

99.16

99.96

100.43

98.28

100.43

99.44

102.19

Jan 12

100.41

99.22

99.92

100.52

98.41

100.32

99.38

102.20

Feb 12

100.55

99.31

99.89

100.56

98.66

100.23

99.29

102.09

Mar 12

100.61

99.40

99.86

100.55

98.90

100.10

99.16

101.75

Apr 12

100.60

99.48

99.79

100.48

99.09

99.93

99.03

101.16

May 12

100.54

99.56

99.70

100.36

99.22

99.79

98.88

100.46

Jun 12

100.47

99.68

99.60

100.23

99.34

99.69

98.68

99.81

Jul 12

100.44

99.84

99.49

100.12

99.43

99.62

98.42

99.36

Aug 12

100.47

100.03

99.41

100.05

99.47

99.55

98.18

99.14

Sep 12

100.56

100.23

99.36

100.05

99.48

99.45

97.99

99.06

Oct 12

100.67

100.42

99.37

100.10

99.45

99.35

97.80

99.10

Nov 12

100.77

100.55

99.45

100.21

99.41

99.25

97.57

99.23

Dec 12

100.86

100.62

99.58

100.38

99.39

99.13

97.35

99.41

Jan 13

100.94

100.63

99.74

100.58

99.39

99.02

97.15

99.65

*Source: Bloomberg

‡MICEX rates

†Source: OCED

Note: A rising CLI reading points to an economic expansion if the index is above 100 and a recovery if it is below 100. A CLI which is declining points to an economic downturn if it is above 100 and a slowdown if it is below 100.

35


Global Economic Outlook: 2nd Quarter 2013

Additional resources

Deloitte Research thought leadership Deloitte Review Issue 12 Asia Pacific Economic Outlook: China, India, Myanmar, Philippines. Please visit www.deloitte.com/research for the latest Deloitte Research thought leadership or contact Deloitte Services LP at: research@deloitte.com. For more information about Deloitte Research, please contact John Shumadine, Director, Deloitte Research, part of Deloitte Services LP, at +1 703.251.1800 or via e-mail at jshumadine@deloitte.com.

36


Appendix

Contact information Global Economics Team

Global Industry Leaders

U.S. Industry Leaders

Ryan Alvanos Deloitte Research Deloitte Services LP USA Tel: +1.617.437.3009 e-mail: ralvanos@deloitte.com

Consumer Business Antoine de Riedmatten Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited France Tel: +33.1.55.61.21.97 e-mail: aderiedmatten@deloitte.fr

Banking & Securities and Financial Services Robert Contri Deloitte LLP Tel: +1.212.436.2043 e-mail: rcontri@deloitte.com

Pralhad Burli Deloitte Research Deloitte Services LP India Tel : +91.40.6670.1886 e-mail: pburli@deloitte.com

Energy & Resources Carl Hughes Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited UK Tel: +44.20.7007.0858 e-mail: cdhughes@deloitte.co.uk

Consumer & Industrial Products Craig Giffi Deloitte LLP Tel: +1.216.830.6604 e-mail: cgiffi@deloitte.com

Dr. Alexander Bรถrsch Deloitte Research Germany Tel: +49 (0)89 29036 8689 aboersch@deloitte.de

Financial Services Chris Harvey Deloitte LLP UK Tel: +44.20.7007.1829 e-mail: caharvey@deloitte.co.uk

Dr. Patricia Buckley Deloitte Research Deloitte Services LP USA Tel: +1.517.814.6508 e-mail: pabuckley@deloitte.com Dr. Ira Kalish Deloitte Research Deloitte Services LP USA Tel: +1.213.688.4765 e-mail: ikalish@deloitte.com

Life Sciences & Health Care Pete Mooney Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited USA Tel: +1.617.437.2933 e-mail: pmooney@deloitte.com Manufacturing Tim Hanley Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited USA Tel: +1.414.977.2520 e-mail: thanley@deloitte.com Public Sector Paul Macmillan Deloitte Touch Tohmatsu Limited Canada Tel: +1.416.874.4203 e-mail: pmacmillan@deloitte.ca Telecommunications, Media & Technology Jolyon Barker Deloitte & Touche LLP UK Tel: +44 20 7007 1818 e-mail: jrbarker@deloitte.co.uk

Life Sciences & Health Care Bill Copeland Deloitte Consulting LLP Tel: +1.215.446.3440 e-mail: bcopeland@deloitte.com Power & Utilities and Energy & Resources John McCue Deloitte LLP Tel: +216 830 6606 e-mail: jmccue@deloitte.com Public Sector (Federal) Robin Lineberger Deloitte Consulting LLP Tel: +1.517.882.7100 e-mail: rlineberger@deloitte.com Public Sector (State) Jessica Blume Deloitte LLP Tel: +1.813.273.8320 e-mail: jblume@deloitte.com Telecommunications, Media & Technology Eric Openshaw Deloitte LLP Tel: +1.714.913.1370 e-mail: eopenshaw@deloitte.com

37


38


39


Follow @DU_Press Sign up for Deloitte University Press updates at www.dupress.com.

About Deloitte University Press Deloitte University Press publishes original articles, reports and periodicals that provide insights for businesses, the public sector and NGOs. Our goal is to draw upon research and experience from throughout our professional services organization, and that of coauthors in academia and business, to advance the conversation on a broad spectrum of topics of interest to executives and government leaders. Deloitte University Press is an imprint of Deloitte Development LLC.

This publication contains general information only, and none of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, its member firms, or its and their affiliates are, by means of this publication, rendering accounting, business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or other professional advice or services. This publication is not a substitute for such professional advice or services, nor should it be used as a basis for any decision or action that may affect your finances or your business. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your finances or your business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser. None of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, its member firms, or its and their respective affiliates shall be responsible for any loss whatsoever sustained by any person who relies on this publication.

About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.com/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited and its member firms. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Copyright Š 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited

Geo 2013b  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you