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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016

OFFSHORE

SUPPORTING THE AFRICAN OIL AND GAS SECTORS INFRASTRUCTURE: South Africa facilities and services

www.maritimesa.co.za

TRAINING: South Africa as an offshore training hub

SAOGA: Niall Kramer discusses the future of oil and gas

NEWS: Company news and announcements


Subtech was contracted to assist the dive team on Perenco’s FSO Massongo with a UWILD Survey in Cameroon during 2015. Subtech’s Subsea Division offers world class services, leveraged off an extensive African track record and local country knowledge, throughout the African continent. Subsea currently enjoys access to permanent dive teams in Namibia, South Africa and Mozambique and an operating footprint that extends to Angola, Cameroon and the Ivory Coast. The Division also maintains an extensive database of contract personnel that includes qualified offshore engineers, IMCA certified supervisors and divers, ROV pilots and NDT personnel for project mobilisation purposes.


Contents 2

A FOCUS ON THE FUTURE: ÎÎ The focus to invest in the future of port infrastructure to assist

marine engineering is beginning to gain momentum and all prospects show that South Africa’s port infrastructure and facilities are being substantially improved to service rig and offshore associated contracts of the future.

10 GAME CHANGERS & STRATEGY: ÎÎ Niall Kramer, CEO of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance

(SAOGA) believes that the current feelings of doom and gloom in the oil and gas industry need not overwhelm suppliers, service providers and other industry stakeholders.

12 FLEXIBLE PLATFORM FOR MARITIME NEEDS: ÎÎ The introduction of the SML 1200 to the market place

attracted interest from a wide variety of sectors and helped put the modular platform firmly onto the maritime map.

15

SOUTH AFRICA: OFFSHORE TRAINING HUB? ÎÎ With the appropriate accreditations in place, training institu-

tions in South Africa could help position the country as an offshore training hub for the oil and gas sectors. ÎÎ OPITO accredited institutions in Africa ÎÎ Developing human capital for the oil and gas sectors ÎÎ Nigeria puts oil and gas workers safety on the agenda

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RIGS OFFSHORE AFRICA: ÎÎ The active rig count offshore Africa for the last 10 years.

22

EVENTS: ÎÎ Oil and Gas event calendar

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INFOGRAPHIC: ÎÎ LNG and LPG fleet (African OPEC countries) ÎÎ OTC African exhibitors (2015 and 2016) ÎÎ TEN Fields in numbers ÎÎ Safety culture slips ÎÎ Gabon rejoins OPEC ÎÎ Local content

ADVERTISERS IN THIS SUPPLEMENT ÎÎ C-Doc

15 5 ÎÎ Hytec 8 ÎÎ Marine Data Solutions OFC ÎÎ Offshore Maritime Services 9 ÎÎ Paul Coxon 18 ÎÎ SAMTRA 20 ÎÎ Seascape 3, 7 ÎÎ Sloane Marine 13 ÎÎ Smit Amandla Marine 19 ÎÎ SAOGA OBC ÎÎ Underwater Surveys 6 ÎÎ Dormac


INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES  A focus on the future

A focus on the future: Investing in infrastructure for the future

growth from public procurement. The Phakisa strategy aimed to set targets to address these issues within the Marine Manufacturing Laboratory. In the Final Lab reports from 2014, ambitions to attract 900 additional vessels for refurbishment a year within 10 to 20 years are articulated. At the time it was anticipated that ship and oil rig repair and refurbishment would significantly drive marine manufacturing growth. It is now an unfortunate reality that oil prices literally plummeted towards in 2014, turning many of the aspirations into wishful thinking as far as attracting lucrative offshore-related refurbishment projects were concerned.

The downturn in the oil and gas industry has had a significant impact on the marine manufacturing and engineering sector that had, to a large extent, become reliant on the rig refurbishment work being attracted to some of the South African ports. At the time the industry had already begun to emphasise the need for investment in port infrastructure and facilities that could further boost the sector and Government was beginning to take notice. Now the focus is beginning to gain momentum and all prospects show that South Africa’s port infrastructure and facilities are being substantially improved to service rig and offshore associated contracts of the future.

T

he realisation that the marine manufacturing sector ticks the boxes that Government requires for job creation, skills development, industrialisation and beneficiation means that it has gained traction at an official level and even more so since the launch of Operation Phakisa two years ago.

Big fast results a little tardy In 2014, the launch of Operation Phakisa identified that South Africa’s ability to service the offshore sector was compromised by outdated, insuffficient and expensive infrastructure; inadequate artisinal and professional skills as well as limited support for market

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector

Although Operation Phakisa promised to deliver big fast results based on a model imported from Malaysia, the projected timelines were, from the start, overly ambitious. But now, as some of the projects are beginning to come online or show more strategic movement, it is possible to see that infrastructure and facilities within specific ports are benefitting from attention and investment. Transnet National Ports Authority’s (TNPA) General Manager for Strategy, Nico Walters, outlined the authority’s progress at a business forum hosted by TNPA in partnership with the Cape Chamber of Commerce and Industry in August this year.

Cape Town The Port of Cape Town has been earmarked as one of the important hubs for the delivery of Operation Phakisa and at least R615 million will be invested here over the next five years. Of this, at least R140 million is being invested to refurbish and rehabilitate the Sturrock drydock, while another R60 million is being spent on repairs at Robinson drydock. The Sturrock drydock’s water circulating pumps have been repaired and are currently undergoing commissioning tests. Further repairs are scheduled at the facility. Ten cranes for ship repair are being replaced at a cost of R365 million. TNPA is also refurbishing the Syncrolift facility that is situated in the Victoria


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INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES  A focus on the future

Operator operates commercially with Transnet granting exclusive rights to the project site and general access to port infrastructure and access roads against the payment of a concession fee. The RFP has taken into account the changed oil and gas environment since the drop in oil prices. According to the documents: and Alfred Waterfront Precinct at a total cost of R50 million.

TOP RIGHT: The 900 ton outer caisson of the Durban graving dock was refurbished in 2015 to bring the asset back into full service. The caisson was in severe structural disrepair. All main frames, angle stiffeners, gussets, deck platework, cross channel stiffeners, tank platework and stiffener members showed corrosive damage. TOP LEFT: An artistic impression of what the new proposed Berth 205 for rig repair could look like at the Port of Saldanha Bay. ABOVE: The Saldanha Bay Offshore Fabrication Facility - a privately held lease within the Port of Saldanha Bay.

Operation Phakisa’s plans under investment in existing facilities also include the widening and lengthening of the ship repair quay in Cape Town. The quay is currently 458 m in length and 18 m wide with an alongside depth of -11.8m. Medium port plans (to 2044) show a significant lengthening of the quay with the reclamation of land in the vicinity of the current yacht basin. This will effectively provide a substantial laydonw area to the town side of the Sturrock drydock for marine engineering activities.

Saldanha Bay But as Walters says: “The biggest Operation Phakisa investment is purpose-built oil and gas infrastructure at the Port of Saldanha planned to come on stream in 2019. It includes an oil and gas supply base, a new Mossgas quay as well as a rig repair berth. This R10 billion investment is expected to generate 25,500 jobs.” He said the request for proposals for the offshore oil and gas supply base had gone out to market in April 2016 with bids closing in September 2016. The expression of interest in the Mossgas and Berth 205 projects went out in May 2016 and have already closed. The Offshore Oil and Gas Supply base is structured as a 20-year concession to a Facility Operator (FO) to operate according to an agreed scope of service on a multi-purpose basis. The general principle is that the Facility

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector

“The concept which appears viable at this stage is that of a wider scope of services than those originally envisaged for the OSSB. The wider scope of services that the Facility Operator would provide includes generalist and specialist services in accordance with market demand. These services have been categorised as Anchor Services, Core Services and the Authorised Services, with the view that the facility will evolve into an offshore supply base to support local offshore oil and gas activity in the future as the market demand develops.”

Bidders were encouraged to propose other services and operations that were not explicitly mentioned in the RFP. These developments will be supported through the industrial development zone adjacent to the port. The jetty at the Mossgas quay is due for completion in 2018. While development at Saldanha is certainly gaining momentum, there is still much that needs to be clarified. Overall, however, the plans represent a strong focus on future development that could benefit South Africa when the oil and gas sector improves. It is interesting to note that in the port plans released by TNPA, Saldanha’s Berth 205 is allocated to marine engineering in the short term (to 2021), but reverts to dry bulk usage in the medium term layout (to 2044). Currently Berth 204 has been reallocated to marine engineering following


REPAIR FACILITIES IN SOUTH AFRICAN PORTS

Saldanha Bay

Richards Bay

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Quayside Repair Facilities

Quayside Repair Facilities

at Repair Berth

Slipway

-8m

-15m

at Berth 204

Durban

Cape Town

East London

2

1

Dry docks

1

Syncrolift

1

Slipway

Dry dock

Mossel Bay

1

Slipway

1

Ngqura

-12m at A Berth -11.8m at the Repair Quay -10.7m at Quay 502 -10.5m to -11.8m

Quayside Repair Facilities

-16m

Port Elizabeth

at Berth C101

1

-18m

Slipway

3

Floating docks

1

Slipway

Quayside Repair Facilities

Slipway

Quayside Repair Facilities

at Multipurpose quay

1

Dry dock

at Berth B100

-6.1m at Repair Quay 24 -6.1m at Dept Repair Jetty -8.5m at Ship Repair Jetty -8m at Dormac Repair Quay

-8m at EBH Repair Quay

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector 5


INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES  A focus on the future for Richards Bay.

its release from duty as a manganese terminal.

Richards Bay Plans to replicate some of the thinking relating to development plans in Saldanha have been mooted for Richards Bay, which also offers a deep water port as well as an adjacent Industrial Development Zone. Speaking at the launch of the Dormac 1 floating dock in Durban at the beginning of September, Minister Rob Davies confirmed that they would “look closely” at this option. In a presentation to the inaugural Durban Maritime Summit earlier this year, Nico Walters highlighted an estimated R900 million investment requirement

LEFT: Dormac Marine and Engineering’s acquisition of a floating dock for the Port of Durban will substantially increase the port’s ability to accommodate ship repair and maintenance work.

This could include a floating dock or fixed drydock facility to accommodate ship and rig repair. “TNPA wants to adopt a flexible and exploratory approach to allow private sector to grow the market,” he said.

Previous private investment Private sector investment in infrastructure and facilities has been ongoing and maintained where feasible. Most notably was the investment made in facilities in the Port of Cape Town and the Port of Saldanha Bay by Ferromarine. As the lease holder of the 47,180 m2 A-Berth facility in Cape Town, Ferromarine Cape (FMC) has invested heavily in cranage, workshops, office space, medical facilities and personnel facilities including a canteen, ablutions as well as lockers. The facility is earmarked as an oil and gas service hub to facilitate rig repair as well as other oil and gas related work. Bookings are handled by FMC via an

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector

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A-Berth in the Port of Cape Town has been earmarked as an oil and gas service hub.

A-Berth has hosted a number of projects over the last few years including the DPDS-2 (2015/2016), Endurance (2015), DSV Vinnice (2014), and the Scarabeo 7 (2013 and 2014). In the Port of Saldanha Bay, Ferromarine Africa is the landlord to the Saldanha Bay Offshore Fabrication yard that includes a 35 m load out quay with -8m draft alongside. The facility offers quayside access, wet repair facilities, workshops and a lay-up area. These facilities represent existing infrastructure that is already available to the offshore as well as to the marine engineering sector.

New investment

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Dormac Marine and Engineering recently took delivery of a multi-million rand composite floating dock to meet the demand for ship repair in the Port of Durban. The 175m drydock represents the first brand new ferro concrete dock to be brought into use in Africa.

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Dormac Managing Director, Chris Sparg, anticipates that the asset will provide the capacity for an additional 45 dockings per annum. In preparation for the dock, Dormac invested in a purpose-built quay to allow the floating dock to submerge to 12.3m. With a hard standing back of quay laydown area of 7,200m2, Sparg believes that the area is ideal for offshore fabrications, conversions, equipment laydown and as support to the east coast oil and gas projects.

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INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES  A focus on the future The cantilever jack-up platform, Endeavour, Spirit of independence, has been ready-stacked in the Port of Saldanha Bay for some time.

by November this year.

Working together Acquisitions of this nature highlight the need for Government and the private sector to align their investment objectives to ensure that future growth is an attainable objective. Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies highlighted available tax incentives for greenfields projects such as the Dormac floating dock. Introduced in 2010, The 12I Tax Incentive is designed to support Greenfield as well as Brownfield investments. The incentive offers support for both capital investment and training. The window period for applications under this programme was extended from 31 December 2015 to 31 December 2017. The objectives of the incentive programme are to support the following: ÎÎ Investment in manufacturing assets, to improve the productivity of the South African manufacturing sector; and ÎÎ Training of personnel, to improve labour productivity and the skills profile of the labour force. By early 2015, the Department of Trade and Industry had approved qualifying projects to a value of over R46 billion. Indeed the Operation Phakisa initiatives that call for private investment highlight a recent shift to include PPP models in the ports to a much greater degree. Walters of TNPA has highlighted this on a number of occasions at conferences emphasising that future port facilities offer private sector opportunities as well as supplier development opportunities.

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector

Operation Phakisa is essentially delivering on its mandate to bring Government, State Owned Enterprises, Industry, Labour, Civil Society and Academia together to collaborate in unlocking the potential of South Africa’s oceans.


SAOGA  Insight and advocacy

Speaking about game changers, strategy and opportunities The South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA) has a new man at the helm who believes that the current feelings of doom and gloom in the oil and gas industry need not overwhelm suppliers, service providers and other sector stakeholders who now have an opportunity to help shape an industry that is more productive, more profitable and has a broader spread. Niall Kramer, CEO of SAOGA since March this year, remains upbeat and spoke to Colleen Jacka recently about the Alliance’s strategic outlook.

trained technicians. SAOGA works with a number of training institutions; places people in companies and helps to vet the standard of work they deliver,” he says.

R

These initiatives will continue, but Kramer admits that the future for the industry needs to be mapped out more carefully. He says the value for SAOGA’s members must centre around getting insights into the opportunities that are on the approaching horizon. “Providing a concrete vision to our members is hugely valuable and we are beginning to sketch out what is happening so that companies can identify where the potential opportunities are for them to position and get ready for,” he explains.

eferring back to his time spent with Chevron in the early 90’s when the company first entered South Africa, Kramer links the current status of the oil and gas industry to the situation in the country at the time. “We were reinventing ourselves; creating and shaping a future. Those were incredibly exciting days. It was a time when business was repositioning itself to shape a new country,” he says highlighting how this relates to an industry battling the effects of low oil prices. He refers to his move into the CEO seat at SAOGA as an opportunity and confirms the Alliance’s position to form a concrete vision for the industry. It is a vision that goes well beyond the initial scope eyed by the founders of SAOGA (initially the Cape Oil and Gas Initiative (COGSI)) that focused more specifically on the potential for marine engineering companies to attract rig and offshorerelated vessels to South African ports for maintenance and repairs. For Kramer, it is a vision that seeks compatibility with the South African government’s decision to pursue gas-topower options that will see over three

gigawatts of power being imported via the ports of Saldanha Bay, Ngqura and Richard’s Bay. “It is a clear and present opportunity, but there is a little bit of time and now is the time for businesses to pause in order to position themselves. So, the work we in SAOGA need to do is to map out what that opportunity is and to make that vision concrete,” says Kramer who explains that the magnitude of importing 1 million tons (or 1 gigawatt of power) per annum equates to the handling of one standard sized tanker every 24 days in a port. “If this is what will be turned around in two or, in time, even three ports, there is significant opportunity in that. This industry will have an opportunity to supply infrastructure and direct services required to sustain these port visits,” he says.

Training is key Kramer highlights that these opportunities will only be properly realised if the industry undertakes appropriate training. “For this industry to take off in South Africa, we are going to have to have more trained artisans and

“It is a clear and present opportunity, but there is a little bit of time and now is the time for businesses to pause in order to position themselves. So, the work we in SAOGA need to do is to map out what that opportunity is and to make that vision concrete.” 10

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector

According to Kramer, there are approximately 400 people in this training system presently. “This takes a significant amount of supervision and verification. They are mentored, trained, materials are referenced and workplaces are checked to ensure that the trainees are performing and that the employers are using them correctly,” he explains.

Mapping the opportunities

“In addition we can offer a conduit for them to provide their views on policy that is reported back to policy-makers.” Part of SAOGA’s long-term strategy in this regard is to focus on a national membership and regional opportunities, and to map out plans for Saldanha Bay, Ngqura and Richard’s Bay. “We are essentially an economic development agency in the oil and gas space with a focus on the services,” he says adding that the plausibility of attracting funding is boosted by the very certain economic potential of the sector. “There is going to be a lot of large scale economic benefits and there is interest from the rest of the world in seeing how this oil and gas industry is going to shape up in South Africa,” says Kramer who confirms a shift in focus from international players who visiting, assessing the opportunity and are eager to engage locally. “There is definitely an up-swell of demand for information about what is going on in this part of the world. They want an overview of the industry and how it operates. They want to know how they need to interact, for example,


on the BEE side of things as well as what kind of services and opportunities are available in the country and what they will need to do,” he says. “But we want South Africans and South African businesses to benefit from this interest. We want to link these companies through networking occasions and help develop the skills that are going to be needed.” Kramer is realistic that not all of the perceptions relating to doing business in South Africa and on the continent are positive, but adds that high tech industries such as this, that require big capital outlay, are known to be frontier industries with an appetite for working in a variety of jurisdictions. “We need to assist to give certainty to the investors and to the policy makers. The reality is that there are investors out there who have come to see us. They want to be a part of the future of the industry.” Gas is the game changer For Kramer, the game changer is the amount of gas available on the global market. This is part of the message that the CEO wants to deliver to the SAOGA membership base. “We need to provide a concrete vision to our membership that underscores this. A vision that maps out what the opportunity is,” he says adding that, while the operational rig count may be half of what it once was and the oil price low, the need to find a wider base of feedstocks provides access to different types of opportuni-

ties, especially in the LNG market. Here he speaks about the viability of deploying skills from the declining mining industry. “They (the mining industry) have skills, they have capital and they have equipment. How can we retrain and redeploy this into the oil and gas sector?” he asks. He also speaks about the prospects for developing a more robust research sector in the industry where existing skills and equipment could be used for academic purposes. Talking about the need for research to enable informed relevant data-led decisions relating to exploration, Kramer, says that this type of research could be facilitated with a skills focus to help “pivot existing skills into a new industry”.

Managing the conversation For Kramer, SAOGA is perfectly positioned to act as a conduit through which people and groups can talk to each other, but cautions that sensible conversation can only occur where there is a shared understanding. “A research focus could therefore also provide the empirical data that is rel-

evant and validated for South Africa. If it is produced by unbiased academics, it becomes data about which we can start having those discussions,” he says. “I think that SAOGA could play a role in facilitating a fact-based discussion that takes the emotion out of it,” he says pointing specifically to some of the environmental sensitivities around oil and gas exploration and production. He maintains that there is a need to understand that the oil and gas sectors are not against the green or renewable industry. The future, according to Kramer, is about understanding that traditional and new energy resources should complement each other. The future, therefore, is about gaining a better understanding of all the energy sectors, but Kramer is determined to see the prospects inherent in the industry being taken advantage of across the value chain. “This is a trigger for the economy – a catalytic opportunity around which many other industries can develop,” he says.

Gas Industrial Unit to promote gas-based industrialisation

cation,” he says.

T

With a short, medium and long term goals in place, the GIU will initially will drive LNG imports to deliver cheaper gas prices over the next five years. This will include the development of the necessary port infrastructure to facilitate the import of gas via bespoke terminals. Richards Bay, Ngqura and Saldanha Bay have been identified for this purpose.

he Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) has formed a working group that includes DTI personnel, academic advisors and key independent industry experts to investigate and promote the development of gas-based industrialization in South Africa. Niall Kramer, CEO of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA), has been included within the working group to represent oil and gas services as well as to help coordinate the mapping of South African capacity. According to Kramer the aim is to identify opportunities and to make the country an oil and gas services hub in the region. “The GIU will work towards leveraging natural gas a both a soure of power generation and a driver of industrial diversifi-

“The vision of the Gas Industrialisation Unit is to build on the momentum of gas to power developments,” he adds.

In the medium term, the aim is to push for larger scale imports of natural gas from sources on the continent – drawing on recent gas discoveries off the east coast of Africa including Mozambique, Kenya and Tanzania. A longer term view will aim to explore the potential of domestic gas reserves both in the Karoo and from offshore field development.

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Supporting the offshore sector 11


PROMOTIONAL ďƒ¨ SML 1200

Flexible modular platform fulfills a variety of maritime needs Sloane Marine Limited (SML). The platform has been designed with more than one end-user in mind and is aimed at providing a cost effective vessel for pollution control, the salvage sector, dive sector and offshore logistics. Sloane believes that the effective uses for the workhorse are significantly varied and adds that the vessel offers stability with a variety of payloads. Members of the maritime community were invited to view the vessel at the Oceana Power Boat Club (OPBC) in Cape Town. Demonstrating its lifting capacity at the event, the side-mounted crane easily coped with its off-centred positioning to lift and load a weighted package on deck. Sloane confirms that stability testing undertaken by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA), proved that the rugged boat could perform even under rigorous conditions.

The formal introduction of the SML 1200 to the market place at a launch function in Cape Town attracted interest from a wide variety of sectors and helped put the modular platform firmly onto the maritime map.

T

he vessel is the brain-child of Captain Nicholas Sloane, who gained fame and helped promote the image of the maritime industry during his endeavours to parbuckle the Costa Concordia. He joined forces with Kelly of XTreme Projects to develop a multi-purpose modular workboat under the banner of

Ambitions to offer a light and robust hull with a shallow draft and ability to carry a significant payload as well as provide beaching capacity and versatility have been realised in the SML 1200. The portable platform manoeuvres under its own power in shallow waters; is a cost-effective platform and can be modularly transported via road or larger vessel to any destination. The SML 1200 is constructed in independent modules and supplied as fully constructed marine catamaran platform finished up to deck level. The modular design allows for construction, assembly and factory acceptance inspections being concluded prior to disassembly, packing, loading and shipping to the their intended launch site by using standard ISO containers, or normal load trucking contractors. It also allows SML to construct standard sponsons, which can be held

The SML 1200 is constructed in independent modules and supplied as fully constructed marine catamaran platform finished up to deck level. The modular design allows for construction, assembly and factory acceptance inspections being concluded prior to disassembly, packing, loading and shipping to the their intended launch site by using standard ISO containers, or normal load trucking contractors. 12

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector


Launch of Versatile Platform:

The SML 1200


PROMOTIONAL  SML 1200 as stock items at the manufacturer’s facilities to be married to suitable superstructures for clients, at a vastly reduced lead time, from receipt of order, to shipping.

working in seas of up to State 5.

To achieve his vision, Sloane partnered with T-Craft, a specialist aluminium builder with an international track record. The result is a design that is based on their MODCAT platform suitable for

Choosing an aluminium specialist, the SML 1200 is constructed from 5000 Series Marine Grade Aluminium and weighs just over three tons, yet is capable of handling a specified payload of 10,000 kg on its generous deck area that allows for a variety of configurations to host diverse cargoes. The SML 1200 has been certified

SML 1200 SD General Specifications and Dimensions Hull Design: Sponson Design: Length (LOA): Beam: Deck space: Weight (Lightship): Internal Sponson Volume (Both): Buoyancy Material Lift Capacity: Displacement: Fuel Capacity - Standard Built in tanks: Integral Motor Mount (6 mm): Payload (SWL): Passenger Capacity: Electrical Systems: Propulsion (Twin Sponson mounted): Freight Envelope (Lightship): Trailerable:

Planing Asymmetrical 11.8 metres 4.9 metres 56 m² 3,300 kgs 28.6 m³ 4 m³ - 4000 kgs 4,600 kgs 300 litres YES 10 000 kgs (SWL) 40 passengers @ 82.5kgs pp 12 vDC, 24 vDC and 220v AC 2 x 60 - 100 hp. 1 x 6m and 1 x 12m ISO Containers Yes

by the South African Maritime Safety Authority for commercial as well as passenger transportation. Both sponsons are divided into four watertight compartments for sufficient approved buoyancy in the unlikely event that either or both suffer damage as a result of a collision. Additionally, each of the eight watertight compartments is fitted with a 600 GPH (gallon per hour) automatic bilge pump units centrally controlled from the wheelhouse. With unpainted surfaces, the SML 1200 requires no maintenance and repairs can be easily undertaken in remote locations with ready-to-weld replacement panels being easily provided.

Recently a SML 1200 OPL Platform, after being inverted, remained afloat with two 5 ton mooring blocks secured to the deck, and needed only electrical repairs to resume service within a week.

Offshore & Ship Repair Golf Day 2016 22 SEPTEMBER | Durbanville Golf Course Enter your Four Ball today or sponsor a hole! SPONSOR A HOLE: R2,000 Promote your company and entertain our golfers at the same time. Research shows that potential clients are far more likely to strike up relationships with companies that are able to show a personality at these types of events. Only limited number of holes available. For our more exclusive sponsorship opportunities, see below.

EVENT SPONSORSHIP

ENTER A FOUR BALL: R3,800 Each member of the four ball receives Half-way house meal, prize-giving meal and a prize. PLATINUM SPONSORSHIP R16,000 1. Company gets 2x four-balls 2. Company gets two holes to brand (first and tenth hole) 3. Company gets to hand out first prize 4. Company can brand prize giving area and entrance GOLD SPONSORSHIP 1. Company gets 1x four ball 2. Company gets two holes to brand 3. Company gets to hand out second prize 4. Company can brand prize giving area and entrance

R11,000

SILVER SPONSORSHIP 1. Company gets one hole to brand. 2. Company gets to hand out third prize. 3. Company can brand putting area

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Play against your colleagues in the industry to see who the top golfer is. A portion of monies raised will be allocated to our charity: DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS CONTACT:

Sean Jansen 073 212 2882 | seanj@dcd-ebh.co.za

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 2016: Supporting the offshore sector


With the appropriate accreditations in place, training institutions operating in South Africa could help the country position itself as an offshore training hub for the oil and gas sectors. Training courses are traditionally expensive and, if undertaken in Europe or the United Kingdom, are additionally compounded by currency exchange rates especially when accommodation and meals need to be factored into the equation.

A class of offshore hopefuls at Amandla Offshore Oil and Gas Education and Training Centre in Montague Gardens, Cape Town.

South Africa: a hub for offshore training?

A

study undertaken by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) a few years ago highlighted the gap between the quality and level of training provided locally and the requirements within the workplace for this industry. The report highlighted that many South African companies were flying employees to the United Kingdom to be certified to OPITO standards in an effort to ensure that the local industry became

competitive in the offshore oil and gas industry. A focus on developing internationallyaccredited training institutions in South Africa, will therefore benefit locals and local companies who will not have to fund international travel to undertake recognised training – and international offshore oil and gas workers could equally benefit from a destination learning experience that is easier on their pocket. A focus too on ensuring

that local standards are benchmarked against international standards will also assist training institutions who apply for international accreditation. Apart from offering an economic advantage, South African training institutions are generally set up to instruct in English and are located near to or in major centres making them accessible and attractive to local as well as international → trainees.


TRAINING  Training for the offshore sector Good news is that under Operation Phakisa and within the Oil and Gas focused pillar of the Phakisa strategy, cognizance is being given to establishing a plan to address the training needs. Input from the South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA), the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI), the Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA) and others are at the

Explaining that, while many want to complete courses that are recognised internationally, the reality of the current economic situation in the oil and gas sector is that they may not initially find employment offshore, but are wellequipped to work locally within the marine or port sectors to gain additional experience.

forefront of driving this development.

OPITO accreditation Gary Concar of Offshore Africa Training Centre believes that one of the first steps should be the recognition locally of OPITO accredited courses. “I am currently in talks with the DA Government in Cape Town to try to get OPITO recognised in South Africa,” he says.

“One of the reasons that OPITO is recognised worldwide is that it prevents this need for duplicate training. If it is recognised internationally – why not in South Africa?”

Concar suggests that the current obligation for these workers to undertake additional training that is locally accredited is a disservice to them as it means that duplicate training is forced upon

OPITO

network of OPITO training providers in Africa ANGOLA

CONGO

OMITC: Operatec Marine & Industrial Training Centre

Servtec

OPITO is the accepted international body for providing training standa require personnel to be trained by an OPITO-approved training provid Since publishing the list of African OPITO network of training provider on the continent has expanded once again and new facilities have bee EGYPT Maritime Safety Institute

Petrolift

BOAT BOSIET

GHANA

BRIDGE

NIGERIA

SMTC Ghana in association with Regional Maritime University

Charkin Maritime and Offshore Safety Centre

Falck Prime Atlantic

Falck Prim Atlantic and Resources L

BS1 BS3 BS4 CA-EBS

EBS

FOET

H2S

HUET IMIST

MEMIR

MIST

OERTM

OIM

R1 R3 R4 TBOSIET

TFOET

THUET

KEY TO TRAINING COURSES

16

BOAT: Travel Safely by Boat BOSIET: Basic Offshore Safety Induction and Emergency Training BRIDGE: BOSIET Bridging Elements BS1: Banksman and Slinger Training - Stage 1 BS3: Banksman and Slinger Training - Stage 3 BS5: Banksman and Slinger Training - Stage 5

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Supporting the offshore sector

CA-EBS: Compressed Air Emergency Breathing Initial Deployment Training EBS: Emergency Breathing Systems FOET: Further Offshore Emergency Training H2S: Basic H2S Training HUET: Helicopter Underwater Escape Training IMIST: International Minimum Industry Safety Training MEMIR: Major Emergency Management Initial Response Training


them. “One of the reasons that OPITO is recognised worldwide is that it prevents this need for duplicate training. If it is recognised internationally – why not in South Africa?” he asks. In addition – he points to the potential of a local offshore sector operated by international players. “They will want workers who are trained to OPITO standards. That will set our own workforce back and again we will be flying in plane loads of foreign workers,” he warns. The reality is that OPITO has become the industry standard in training for the

oil and gas industry. The organisation continues to identify requirements for new and improved training standards; and holds their approved training providers accountable to deliver courses in compliance with these standards. Working with industry stakeholders, OPITO aims to ensure that their standards are current, robust and relevant to the needs of the industry. In February this year, for example, a new training standard was introduced. The CA-EBS (Compressed Air Emergency Breathing Apparatus) standard has

already been introduced into the course curriculum into a Nigerian and a Ghanaian training institution. “There has been a growing demand for CA-EBS training globally. This demand means that there is now a requirement for CA-EBS training on an international scale, and not only within the UK. Various multinational operating companies have an aim to introduce CA-EBS on their flights globally and require a standard which can be readily recognised from a global perspective,” says OPITO. →

ards to the offshore sector across the globe. Most offshore companies der and offshore workers are listed on the OPITO register. rs in our OFFSHORE SUPPLEMENT last year, the list of courses available en added in Nigeria.

A

me d EC Ltd

SOUTH AFRICA JC International

Tolmann Allied Services

Offshore Africa Training Centre/ Safer Training

Survival Offshore Training

TUNISIA International Training Centre

Yassine Marine Services

 

ABOVE: Gary Concar of Offshore Africa Training Centre in Bellville Cape Town. They are OPITO accredited for eight courses.

BELOW: Project Maritime Survival Offshore Training Centre is OPITO accredited to present three courses for the offshore industry.

   

OERTM: Offshore Emergency Response Team Member OIM: OIM Controlling Emergencies R1: Rigger Training - Stage 1 R3: Rigger Competence - Stage 3 R4: Rigger Competence - Stage 4 TBOSIET: Tropical Basic Offshore Safety Induction and Emergency Training TFOET: Tropical Further Offshore Emergency Training THUET: Tropical Helicopter Underwater Escape Training

17


TRAINING  Training for the offshore sector

Countries currently offering OPITO training: ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ

Angola Australia Azerbaijan Belgium Brazil Brunei Darussalam Canada China Congo Denmark Egypt France Germany Ghana India Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Kazakhstan Korea (Republic of) Libya Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mexico Myanmar Netherlands New Zealand Nigeria Philippines Qatar Romania Russian Federation Saudi Arabia Singapore South Africa Spain Thailand Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States of America Vietnam

While all of the major South African players in the training arena are SAMSA certified (mostly STCW), the move to seek the international accreditation that is required for training providers targeting those who specifically want to join the international offshore industry is still in its early phases by many. Over the last two or three years, however, two South African companies have attained OPITO-accreditation and it is understood that more are planning to do so. But perhaps more impetus is needed. Nigeria, for example, has added three new training facilities’ to the list of OPITO-accredited institutions since 2015 and now offers the most OPITO courses on the continent. That the OPITO accreditation process is a stringent one ensures that the network of training providers trains to the same high level on a global basis.

Training appetite Despite the downturn in the oil industry and the subsequent loss of jobs in the sector, the appetite for training still remains strong. According to OPITO, over 250,000 people train to OPITO standards across the globe annually. That’s a significant number of potential clientele that South African institutions can market to. Consider too that some courses need to be repeated on a regular basis to be revalidated and it is clear that an opAchieving OPITO Technical Approval Training Providers looking to apply for Technical Qualifications approval are required to follow our simple approval process which consists of two stages: Application and desktop submission – where we will verify that the training provider has the required resources to conduct assessment and a management system in place that complies with our Technical Qualifications approval criteria. An onsite audit – where an OPITO audit team will visit the training provider prem-

portunity exists for institutions to train to OPITO standards. Gary Concar of Offshore Africa Training Centre, which runs a number of OPITO accredited courses, says that although the levels have dropped off slightly over the last two months, the Centre had a busy start to the year. “I have started to get enquiries from companies in West Africa as word gets out that there is an OPITO approved training centre in South Africa,” he says adding that OATC provides a local alternative for international companies operating locally to send delegates to for local development. Newer to the training environment, Amandla Offshore Oil and Gas (AOOG) Education and Training centre, situated in Montague Gardens, has seen interest in training growing. “We have attracted a large sector of the market and the interest is growing daily from all sectors of the offshore and maritime industry as well as land based sectors,” says Shaun George, who believes that the approach to offer a wide variety of training courses under one roof and the location of the centre will help AOOG grow in the future. Bridget Thomson, CEO of Seadog Training in Saldanha, who specialise in not only commercial diving training, but also in more technical course such as medical and refresher training to promote health and safety and prevent skills attrition says that she has not seen ises and audit the capability of the facility against the Technical Qualifications criteria and relevant OPITO standards Institutions offering OPITO training have the added benefit of offering their trainees access to their Central Register, which maintains the training records of all delegates who have successfully completed OPITO training, assessments and programmes. It is a register that is accessed by potential employers internationally providing immediately verifiable up-to-date information on potential personnel.

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18

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Supporting the offshore sector

In addition as the Deputy Registrar for Maritime Cook Islands in Africa we provide ship and yacht registration services through the Cook Islands Yacht Squadron and the Cook Islands Ship Owners Association.


a significant downfall in training. They are fortunate, however, to be supported by a stable base of industry clients. “For offshore oil and gas there is a slow down in demand, but this has been offset by needs for training in other fields of commercial diving,” she explains.

Finding work “Students very seldom get the opportunity to move directly into the offshore field as they are required to gain some experience first. They do however find opportunities in the marine civils projects, many of them in support of oil and gas and in oil rich countries such as the UAE an Saudi Arabia,” says Thomson who adds that the South African workforce is well liked due to their ability to manage workloads. Highlighting that the diving training they offer prepares candidates for more than just the offshore industry, she says that other areas of opportunity include the diamond mining industry, research sector, aquaculture, the salvage industry as well as the bourgeoning renewable energy sector.

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“Focus should be on what the trainees’ ambitions are,” she says adding that career guidance that provides optimal

250,000

But AOOG’s Shaun George agrees; “Our vision is to create a forum where all training providers and stakeholders can sit around the table to establish the industry’s weak points across the spectrum. This is not just about money – but about the quality of training being delivered to the industry.”

exposure and an understanding of the opportunities that exist across the broad maritime spectrum should be given. George, Concar and Thomson agree, however, that most of the trainees end up in West Africa, the Middle Eat and Asia.

“South Africa needs to be more proactive in the marketing of itself on the international market as it is financially beneficial for the international students and companies to get their training done here,” adds George.

According to OPITO, over 250,000 people train to OPITO standards across the globe annually.

The way forward While there seems to be a drive at Government level to plug gaps in the training landscape for the offshore oil and gas industry, a disconnect between existing training providers and the powers-that-be should not scupper the sector’s chance of positioning itself as a training hub. “I think we need to form a network that works together so that government will take note,” says Concar of OATC who says that there seems to be a bit of a reluctance to do so.

Seadog is one company that is actively involved in attending, exhibiting and presenting at international events. Thomson is member of the South African Diving Advisory Committee and actively participates in international work groups Thomson sees the development and upgrading of training standards and the new QCTO project driven by TETA as being positive for the future of training. Although there definitely seems to be some traction with regard to the development of training for the offshore landscape, more visibility and cohesion seems necessary to truly position South Africa as a training hub. ∆

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19


TRAINING  Training for the offshore sector

Developing human capital for the oil and gas sectors

Nigeria puts oil and gas workers safety top of the agenda

S

More than 70 attendees attended a one-day seminar in Nigeria recently organised by the industry’s international skills organisation OPITO in a drive to make the country’s burgeoning energy sector a safer place to work. Oil and gas training providers looking to become OPITO-approved centres heard how they can train workers in Basic Offshore Safety Induction and Emergency Training (BOSIET) and International Minimum Industry Safety training (IMIST), two of the OPITO standards used by major international and national oil and gas companies in 45 countries globally. Nigeria is Africa’s largest oil producer and employs around 12.5% of the region’s labour pool. OPITO, whose safety training standards are recognised as the best in the world with more than 250,000 people taking them every year, was approached by the Nigerian government, prominent oil and gas producers as well as in-country training providers looking to improve the skills of local workers and develop the technical competence required to carry out their roles safely. OPITO’s group chief executive David Doig said: “There is an increasing awareness in Nigeria of the value in ensuring the competency of the offshore workforce and the benefits of improving the levels of safety for each individual.” A number of companies signed up for the workshop showing that there is a real commitment for change in the country to adopt OPITO standards.

AMTRA, along with key industry role players, is currently developing training programmes to serve growth of human capital in the oil and gas sector.

Recognising that human capital includes a stock of productive skills, talents, health and expertise in the labour force, SAMTRA is commited to the development of investment in a life-cycle approach to training and is directly involved in career path guidance and assistance from recruitment to graduation. The Academy assists in negotiating and creating workplace experiential learning and further skills enhancement training programmes and has established itself as a trusted, innovative training solutions provider in the mainstream shipping sector and an active advocate of maritime education and skills development. SAMTRA participates in maritime education and training (MET) development strategies and programmes and is committed to identifying gaps in the market and establishing partnerships which create education opportunities with an innovative and collaborative approach toward MET, always with the objective of maintaining the highest standards possible. This is achieved through investing in the appropriate training resources – such as simulation training, which provides the most realistic, yet safe, learning environment – a proven tool to help candidates improve skills, knowledge and leadership resulting in a more confident seafarer. SAMTRA provides its products and services to the offshore sector in Angola, Nigeria and other African countries and further extended its footprint through the recent acquisition of Seatrain Consulting, whose scope aligns with SAMTRA’s trainee administration and management service offering. Having more than tripled their course offerings since their establishment, SAMTRA has also been accredited by Voith as the sole Voith propulsion tug simulation training provider globally. Other achievements include a SAMSA award for the contribution to maritime skills development through the cadet training project as well as their subsequent appointment as a key project partner in the National Cadet and Rating Training Project. In addition SAMTRA developed and managed the onboard training programme for the retired SA Agulhas training vessel. The Academy’s reach into various maritime sectors is being strengthened through collaboration with Stavanger Offshore Tekniske Skole, Professional Yachtmaster Training, Seatrain Consulting and Safeship Tanker Safety Consultants.

Since its inception, SAMTRA has evolved from a maritime simulation training centre into a training solutions provider that has trained more than 13,000 trainees. SAMTRA remains committed to provide MET services to clients throughout the region as well as to specific national organisations such as the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) and the National Skills Fund in support of Operation Phakisa. The Academy participated in the Human Resource Development Council’s Maritime Task team for addressing human capital development requirements and aims to continue to engage with key role players to this end.

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20

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Supporting the offshore sector


10 YEAR OFFSHORE RIG COUNT FOR AFRICA

Lowest recorded offshore oil rig count in January 2010

Dec

16

16

Dec

18

35

May

31

Apr

Feb

Source: Baker Hughes

35

Mar

33

26

Dec

29 28 29

Oct Nov

23

24 23 23 25

Jul Aug Sep

23

26

May Jun

29

Mar Apr

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Jan Feb

Dec

Oct Nov

Jul Aug Sep

34

Jan

27 26

Dec

24

Oct Nov

26

Jul Aug Sep

21

Mar Apr

Jan Feb

22

24

May Jun

29

28

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

16 15

Oct Nov

11

14 13

Jul Aug Sep

16 17

May Jun

12

14

Mar Apr

17

Jan Feb

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

2016 30 31 31

13 14

2014

15 15 14 13 12 13 13 12 14 11

May Jun

15

Mar Apr

Dec

Oct Nov

Jul Aug Sep

12

Jan Feb

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

16 15 15 16

Oct Nov

14 14

Jul Aug Sep

11

May Jun

16

Mar Apr

Dec 20

Dec

18 17 18 18

2015 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

12

2013

16 15 16 14 15 13 14 12

May Jun

18 18

Mar Apr

Jan Feb

16 16

12 13

16

Oct Nov

Dec

9

13

2012 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

2008

2011

Jul Aug Sep

12 11

13

17

Mar Apr

13

20

Jan Feb

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

17

Oct Nov

15

Jul Aug Sep

12 13

May Jun

14

17

Mar Apr

13

17

Jan Feb

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

2010

May Jun

2009

15 16

Oct Nov

13

18 19

Jul Aug Sep

18 16 17

24

21 20 20

May Jun

18

Dec

Nov

Oct

Sep

22

2007

Mar Apr

27 28 27

Aug

Jun

Jul

24 25

22

May

25

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Jan Feb

2006

Apr

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Jan Feb

Highest recorded offshore rig count in June 1986


UPCOMING EVENTS 2016

2nd annual South Africa: Gas Options Meeting 2016

Oct

SOUTH AFRICA, Cape Town: The Westin Hotel

3-5

Backed by the South African IPP Office, this meeting takes a detailed look at the opportunities available for gas developers and private sector investors as a result of South Africa’s growing power demands. Participants will debate solutions to the challenges of raising finance, delivering an efficient transmission infrastructure and the supporting industry, and the global LNG trends. www.energynet.co.uk 2016

4-6

Oct

SPE African Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Social Responsibility Conference and Exhibition GHANA, Accra: Movenpick Ambassador Hotel

This year’s SPE (Society of Petroleum) African Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Social Responsibility Conference and Exhibition is focused on leveraging diverse industry expertise to better understand the emerging futures of oil and gas opportunities and to build capacity while addressing the daunting operational challenges faced by the industry. www.spe.org/events

2016

15-17 Nov

The 4th East Africa Oil and Gas Summit & Exhibition (EAOGS) KENYA, Nairobi: Kenyan International Convention Centre

EAOGS is firmly established as the most prestigious oil and gas conference and exhibition in East Africa. Now in its 4th year EAOGS once again has the official endorsement of the Ministry of Energy & Petroleum Kenya and this year EAOGS will build on the success of the 2014 Summit which welcomed over 450 delegates from 380 regional and international companies and 30 different countries. www.eaogs.com 2016

15-16 Nov

SPE Workshop: Deep Wells Challenges in a Challenging Condition EGYPT, Cairo

This SPE workshop is aligned with the mission of SPE: to collect, disseminate, and exchange technical knowledge concerning the exploration, development, and production of oil and gas resources also to related technologies for the public benefit, and to provide opportunities for professionals to enhance their technical and professional competences. www.spe.org/events

2016

Infrastructure Gas Projects Mozambique 2016 - The Complete Project Picture

2016

SPE/AAPG Africa Energy and Technology Conference

Oct

MOZAMBIQUE, Maputo: Radisson Blu Hotel

Dec

KENYA, Nairobi: Safari Park Hotel

24

Infrastructure Gas Projects Mozambique 2016 brought to you by the organiser’s of Rovuma Basin Market Briefing. Briefings on domestic anchor projects, development plans, subsea development plans, midstream opportunities, existing infrastructure and value chain linkages. www.africaninfex.com

23rd Anniversary Africa Oil Week/Africa 2016 31 Oct Upstream Conference 2016 - 4 Nov SOUTH AFRICA, Cape Town: International Convention Centre The Conference in 2016 highlights Africa’s upstream world, Independents from around the world engaged in Africa, the expanding Africa-wide gas-LNG and energy game, emerging unconventional ventures in shale and diverse hydrocarbons, the fast-growing class of “Born in Africa” companies, Africa’s state oil firms and foreign national oil companies, leading exploration technologies, geoscience/technical ideas, local content policies and players, plus Young Professionals in Africa, with debate and discourse on Africa’s oil and gas future – these elements together now shaping Africa’s vast hydrocarbon game, and with the service and supply industry deploying state-of-art E&P technologies to build the future for the oil/ gas/energy industries from Cape-to-Cairo. 2016

15-17 Nov

First Africa Oil and Gas Lcoal Content conference and Exhibition ANGOLA, Luanda: Epic Sana Hotel

This inaugural event will be organised by the Ministry of Petroleum, Angola, African Petroleum Producers Association, AME Trade Ltd and Access Events LDA. With the recent oil and gas finds throughout Africa, local content development has been highlighted as an area that should be focused on to improve skills development across the supply chain and benefit the local economies. ALC 2016 has been designed to find solutions to challenges of meeting localisation requirements and building the local skills set across the hydrocarbon industry. The event will include a two day conference with a co-located trade event, pre-event technical visits and training, as well as a plethora of social networking functions. www.ametrade.org

5-7

The American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) and the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) welcome you to the inaugural Africa Energy and Technology Conference in Nairobi, Kenya. The conference programme will encompass topical panel discussions and technical sessions composed of research-based presentations, with the objective of exchanging knowledge, best practices, and experience among participants as well as networking with colleagues. The event will be regionally focused, and we invite proposals from across the African continent as well as globally. www.spe.org/events 2017

Nigeria Oil & Gas Conference & Exhibition

27 Feb NIGERIA, Abuja: ICC - 2 Mar Now in its 16th year, NOG is established as the largest annual gathering of existing and new players in the Nigerian oil and gas industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. At this crucial time for the industry, NOG is the perfect place to find out about government plans, receive updates from major industry players, network with key decision makers and identify business opportunities. www.cecnog.com 2017

27-29 Mar

East Africa Oil and Gas Week KENYA, Nairobi, Safari Park Hotel

A special focus on Mozambique, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, South Sudan, Somalia and Madagascar www.eastaffricaogs.com

2017

6-8

Jun

Offshore West Africa NIGERIA, Lagos: The Eko Suites Hotel

Offshore West Africa has over the past years become the premier event for the oil and gas industry within the West African region and features a three‐day exhibition of both prominent local and international organisations, a dual‐track conference programme and a successful Youth Empowerment Programme (in collaboration with Lonadek and the Energy Institute Nigeria). The 2016 event drew over 2,700 visitors and delegates from more than 40 countries around the world www.offshorewestafrica.com


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Offshore & Ship Repair | GOLF DAY 2016 22 SEPTEMBER | Durbanville Golf Course Enter your Four Ball today or sponsor a hole! R2,000 SPONSOR A HOLE: Promote your company and entertain our golfers at the same time. Only limited number of holes available. Contact us for more info.

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OFFSHORE Africa overview “The African continent still offers significant opportunities in the oil & gas sector, albeit delayed by the low oil price environment. The current opportunity for host governments that want to attract oil & gas investors lies in offering an attractive environment by reforming their regulatory, fiscal and licensing systems. There seemsto be an increased level of realisation on the part of some governments and policymakers that they have to play their part in enabling projects to go ahead as soon as possible.” PwC Africa Oil and Gas Review 2016

African OPEC countries’ fleet LNG CARRIERS

LPG CARRIERS ANGOLA:

TEN FIELDS OFFSHORE GHANA

In August 2016 the first oil flowed from the Tweneboa, Enyenra, Ntomme (TEN) fields offshore Ghana to the FPSO, Prof John Evans Atta Mills.

TULLOW IS THE OPERATOR OF THE FIELD

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Joint Venture Partners:

Tullow - 47.175%

LIBYA: 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Andarko - 17% Kosmos - 15%

NIGERIA: 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

GNOC - 15% PetroSA - 3.875%

79%

OTC

Of Eni’s workforce Africa is local.

African exhibitors at OTC 2015 2016

48 38

NIGERIA: 2015 2016 20

SOUTH AFRICA 2015 18 2016 16

ANGOLA 2015 2016

1 1

LIBYA 24

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT: Supporting the offshore sector

2016

1

29


OPEC sees oil demand increasing by around 17 million barrels a day between now and 2040, reaching close to 110 million barrels a day by then. And in terms of oilrelated investment requirements, these are estimated to be around $10 trillion over this period.

SAFETY CULTURE SLIPS

TEN PROJECT Keyfacts

FPSO facility capacity 80,000 bopd Gas processing Compression capacity 170 MMscf/d

According to PwC analysis (Oil and Gas Review 2016), under factors likely to impact business in the next three years, SHEQ (Safety Health Environment and Quality) fell from the number one position in 2014 to position 23 in 2016!

Gabon rejoins OPEC after 20 years Gabon to rejoined OPEC, effective July 1. The country was a member from 1975 to 1995. The history of Gabon’s oil and gas industry is a venerable one, dating back to early prospecting efforts of 1931. With investments, technical know-how and ingenuity and determination, the country was able to tap into and benefit from the massive petroleum deposits along the coast, as well as offshore. In time, these activities helped the country develop a healthy treasury, and the country found formidable new opportunities as a major oil producer and trading partner.

Water injection 132,000 bwpd Oil reserves being developed 240 mmbo Gas reserves being developed 60 mmboe Water depth 1,000 – 2,000 metres Wells 10 wells at First Oil; Up to 24 wells for full field development

The likelihood of future crude oil discoveries has certainly offered foreign investors the promise of tremendous opportunities in the country. But more importantly, investors know that they have also been contributing to the development of the Gabonese economy — and to an expansion of opportunities for the country’s people. Whatever the case may be, the benefits to both international oil companies and to the country and its people, have been significant.

78

Flowlines 70 km

Of Nigeria’s 159 oil fields are located in the Niger Delta region.

Umbilicals 60 km

OPEC proven crude oil reserves at end of 2015 compared to 2014

Risers 40 km

2014 Venezuela Saudi Arabia IR Iran Iraq Kuwait UAE Libya Nigeria Qatar Algeria Angola Ecuador

Download OPEC’s statistical report

in

LOCAL

CONTENT The percentage of expatriates represented in the total oil and gas workforce in Africa has increased from 2015, but decreased from 2014.

2015 299.95 266.58 157.53 143.07 101.5 97.8 48.36 37.07 25.24 12.2 8.42 8.27

Venezuela Saudi Arabia IR Iran Iraq Kuwait UAE Libya Nigeria Qatar Algeria Angola Ecuador

300.88 266.46 158.40 142.5 101.5 97.8 48.36 37.06 25.24 12.2 9.52 8.27

Level of expatriates in the workforce

Total Workforce

2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 Source: PwC Oil and Gas Review 2016

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SAOGA: Your partner in Africa The South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA) is a central point for connecting companies to each other and to opportunities. SAOGA relies on its links with local and international industry companies and a network of global partners to carry out its mission. Companies wanting to work collaboratively with others to develop the South African upstream and midstream industry, are invited to consider joining the Alliance.

www.saoga.org.za

Contact us: info@saoga.org.za +27 21 425 8840 Membership: bwilliams@saoga.org.za Skills & Training astrydom@saoga.org.za

Offshore supplement 2016  

Supporting the African Oil and Gas sectors

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