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SHIPPING FISHING MARINE MINING MARINE ENGINEERING SHIP SUPPLY STEVEDORING

EDITOR: Colleen Jacka Email: editor@maritimesa.co.za SUB-EDITOR Natalie Janse Email: natalie@maritimesa.co.za ADMIN & ACCOUNTS: Lesley Jacka Email: admin@maritimesa.co.za ADVERTISING SALES: INTERNATIONAL & NATIONAL Email: admin@maritimesa.co.za Tel: 021 914 1157 Fax: 021 914 3742 WESTERN CAPE: Louise Hyam Email: capesales@maritimesa.co.za Tel: 082 881 7099 NAMIBIA: Nelle du Toit Email: namibia@maritimesa.co.za Cell: +264 (081) 683 3542 CONTRIBUTORS: Steve Saunders, Brian Ingpen, Shaheen Moolla, Claire Attwood, Natalie Janse, Michael Heads, Nelle du Toit, Lt Cdr Glenn von Zeil, Dave Japp. LAYOUT & DESIGN: Marilise Engelbrecht OFFICE: Tel: 021 914 1157 Fax: 021 914 3742 POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 3842, Durbanville, 7551 COPYRIGHT: No content published in Maritime Review Africa may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the editor. Inclusion of any products in features or product news does not indicate their endorsement by the publishers or staff. Opinions expressed in the editorial are not necessarily those of the publishers, editors or staff of the magazine. Every effort is made to check content for errors, omissions or inaccuracies, but the authors, publishers and contributors connected with the magazine will not be held liable for any of these or for consequences arising therefrom.

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CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2015 IN DEPTH IS PHAKISA A LIFELINE 6 Launched last year, Operation Phakisa aims to open up the ocean economy and has, as one of its focuses, the marine manufacturing sector. Will the “non negotiable� time lines for infrastructure delivery meet the needs of the industry?

COLUMNS: FISHY BUSINESS 08 Shaheen Moolla weighs in on the latest developments in the rights allocation process that will see exemptions rolled out over a number of fisheries. THROUGH THE LENS 11 Claire Attwood discusses November’s Gauteng High Court ruling that set aside a moratorium on the catching of red steenbras that had been declared in 2012. CASTING THE NET BACK 13 Dave Japp and Claire Attwood collaborate to compare ideas and understanding of fisheries management from 100 years ago with contemporary knowledge. The series of articles is based on an almost complete set of Marine Biological Reports dating back to 1904 authored by South Africa’s first marine biologist, John Gilchrist and others, and purchased by Japp at an auction recently.

MARITIME MEMORIES 46 Brian Ingpen follows the rise and fall of a Dutch shipping line synonymous with trade into and out of South Africa.

FEATURES HYDROGRAPHY 16  Survey work boosts business for marine services company  Zambezi survey investigates feasibility of opening up waterway transport to Malawi and Zambia  Developing sustainable hydrography in Africa  Massive investment in acoustic equipment for use in Africa  Custom-built survey vessel to tackle the African coastline SHIP REPAIR AND BOAT BUILDING 24  Creative energy drives expansion at Cape Town shipyard  R15 million available for research and development  Africa’s largest trailing-suction dredger under construction  Steel manufacturer attains global recognition  Keeping river waterways navigable in Nigeria  Abnormal lift catches the tide

for patrol vessel launch cluster responds to changing market  Load test facility meets industry needs  Developing skills and jobs for continued growth  Reviewing the environmental impact of ship repair  Nigeria eyes investment in new drydock facilities

 Marine

MARITIME NEWS AFRICAN NEWS 35  Unsafe ports and berths  Increase in stevedore damage claims in Mozambique  Innovation in East London  Nigerian investment in port equipment  Competition court paves way for fishing rights acquisition  R9 million in a new laydown area  DAFF meets with fishing industry OFFSHORE NEWS 41  Understanding the impact of the low oil prices  Ghana’s oil hub gains momentum  Joint agreement expands company’s opportunity set in West Africa


ON THE COVER  Offshore flare-out milestone for Nigerian offshore field

INTERNATIONAL NEWS 43  PEMA highlights results of port equipment survey for 2013  Schedule reliability ends 2014 with a decline  Maritime thesaurus and ontology tool developed  New guidelines for rescue of migrants at sea  IMO emphasises importance of training for sustainability of maritime sectors  Online library to provide a source of best practice for maritime industry  International briefs

PEOPLE AND EVENTS NEWS 42  SA Navy standby diver statue unveiled  Lawhill celebrates achievements of learners  Management appointment  New offices bring members together  Marine sector fuels grand achievements for chess player  Strategic restructuring  Legal appointment  Board appointments

 Promotions strengthen port of Durban’s engineering department  CSI project impacts on Hout Bay schools  Appointment of Cape Town terminals manager

GREEN MARINE NEWS & DEBATE 51  Scientists capture stunning images of the seabed  Waddling to raise awareness  Madagascar aims to triple marine protected areas  Celebrating an independent spirit  Annual meeting boosts resource management  Red tide strikes Elands Bay  Ensuring fish have a life worth living

Custom-built survey vessel to tackle the African coastline The recently launched, custom-built survey vessel, Fugro Frontier, will substantially enhance Fugro’s sea-going operations in Africa. As the only new survey vessel operating in African waters she is set to tackle a variety of work along the sub-Saharan coastline. Speaking to Helle Els, commercial manager in Fugro’s Cape Town office, it is clear that the staff is excited to welcome the modern vessel into the fleet. Els explains that a team of Fugro experts has had input into the vessel’s design and capabilities. “This input has resulted in a greatly improved platform for both our crew and our clients,� she says. The Fugro Frontier has been delivered on the back of a good year that follows several years of growth for the company in South Africa. “Eight years ago we had an office complement of 42 – today we are 95. We are continuing to grow,� she says adding that they are employing new staff and creating new positions within the branch. “We met our goals for 2014, but the current oil price is presenting us with new challenges,� she adds, explaining that much of their survey work is undertaken for clients in the oil and gas industry. Read the full story on page 22


COMMENT

EXPRESSIONS

 EDITOR’S CHOICE: RECOMMENDED READS: 100 YEARS OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT: See the launch of a new column on page 13 that compares current fisheries management to records from a century ago.

 ON THE WEB: www.maritimesa.co.za: Industry news and headlines.

www.maritimematters.net: Our editor’s blog

 CONTACT: We look forward to receiving your company news. Please send your press releases to us or invite us to visit your company: editor@maritimesa.co.za

2

Comments from the editor

A

lot has been said about Operation Phakisa since it was launched last year July. That’s already a good half a year ago and, according to a cabinet briefing in February this year, all is on track with the implementation of the programme to fast-track the ocean economy. Why then are we hearing rumblings and seeing a few small holes in what is supposed to be a water-tight plan?

I

n the article: Can Operation Phakisa provide a lifeline to the marine manufacturing sector? - we take a look at just one of the pillars associated with the programme and investigate whether the long-endured status quo is being challenged and rectified. While we understand that there will always be those detractors who aim to derail processes for whatever reason, the reality in this case is that - detractors aside - there are holes (at worst) or miscommunications (at best) relating to South Africa’s ability to re-ignite its marine manufacturing sector. But what of the rest of Africa? It is, after all, the beginning of the Maritime Decade on the continent - as proclaimed by the African Union last year. That must surely herald some sort of opportunity for the industry? Well let’s be honest. Irrespective of the creation of this label, Africa’s growth is uniquely coupled to the growth of the maritime economy - be it through an improvement in port infrastructure; increased sea-borne trade (both to and from the continent); development of a robust support sector or the realisation of a sustained offshore oil and gas industry. There is a huge opportunity, but governmental constraints that have hindered this need to be recognised and addressed. Likewise private sector enthusiasm - especially by international firms - needs to be tempered by a willingness to up-skill and develop an African workforce; thus working within an African paradigm that on one hand acknowledges the challenges, while at the same time questions this very paradigm and breaks stereotypes. It’s a difficult time too as the world both commiserates and celebrates the major drop in the oil price. According to Thalma Corbett of NKC Independent Economists, oil equates to some 60 percent of Africa’s exports and it therefore goes without saying that a free-falling oil price will have significant impact on the oil exporting economies of Africa. That said - she noted that there are also a good number of countries on the continent that rely on oil imports and they will surely find reasons to celebrate the current sub $60 a barrel prices. Opinion abounds about where the price will find itself during the course of 2015. Most seem to agree that we are looking at a $50 to

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

$60 price per barrel for the year. There are, however, those who have stuck their necks out and predicted a further more drastic fall in prices for the year ahead. Online commentators to media predictions weigh in with numbers ranging from those who believe there is a possibility of prices plummeting to $10 a barrel with others suggesting that 2015 could host an increase to the $100 mark. Interestingly the latest offshore oil rig count for Africa released by Baker Hughes in February shows an increase in the rig presence reflected against the same time last year before the oil price began dropping. And so it is not surprising that the race to establish offshore oil and gas support hubs continues. In a presentation at the Break Bulk Africa congress in Johannesburg, Paul Runge of Africa Project Access listed such initiatives in Mozambique, Tanzania, Ghana (see page 41 for more information on this development), Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Nigeria, Angola and South Africa (see our comments on this development in our article on Operation Phakisa starting on page 6). Let’s face it the offshore oil and gas sector is likely to retain its celebrity status albeit a slightly tarnished one. It will retain its groupies and fans and continue to spawn a machinery of support industries to maintain OILYWOOD beyond the current price slump. Takings at the box office may be less and certainly there will be some casualties, but in the long term this is certainly not the final curtain call. What would interest me at the start of this African Maritime decade, however, would be the establishment of a baseline study of what the current African maritime economy actually looks like. How is it valued and what would that value be? How many Africans does it employ? What are the truly African companies operating within these sectors? How many multi-nationals are in the market? What are our current port capacities? What enabling maritime legislation exists? Only with this information at our fingertips will we be able to look back at the end of the decade and quantify whether any progress has been made and whether our so-labelled maritime decade has been a success. Here’s to wishing you a successful year ahead. Colleen Jacka, editor


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EXPRESSIONS

Quay Quotes

KEEL HAULED& APPLAUD The maritime community will surely understand the concept of being keelhauled and we have reinstated the practice, which was allegedly instituted by the British Navy as a way of “severely rebuking a subordinate”. But at the same time we will also applaud those individuals and companies in recognition of significant achievements.

KEELHAULED The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) kicks off our keelhauling list for 2015 given the latest developments in the FRAP farce. At the same time we also keelhaul Eskom for very obvious reasons.

APPLAUD We applaud Fugro South Africa for their decision to invest in a new-build for the African coast - adding capacity in Africa. The Fugro Frontier will have additional space for training initiatives in the hydrographic sector.

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

QUAY QUOTES:

who is saying what in the maritime industry

“But to implement this advice will mean recognising that the 2015 rights allocation processes will need to be shelved for at least two to three years as mentioned by the Molebatsi report while the illegal decisions of 2013 are reversed and remedied. And of course, there is the small matter of dealing with the strife of setting aside all those rights that were granted to the politically connected and others for the first time,” writes Shaheen Moolla on page 8. “Instead, the Department was careless and arrogant. It simply ignored the matter and in-so-doing insulted a group of fishermen who take their sport very seriously. Who can blame them for hiring a lawyer? If one good thing is to come out of this case it might be to teach the Department that it has to comprehensively and clearly justify it’s scientific recommendations – not just to the minister who signs them into law, but to the people who are going to be affected by them,” writes Claire Attwood on page 13. “It (loadshedding) is a disaster, especially in our case where we are now working three shifts and so even if you turn the power off at night, it is going to affect us,” says James Fisher on page 26. “Missing the optimal launch time of 04.30 am on a Friday morning could have meant a 28-day delay before the next opportunity, so there was no lee-way for any holdups or errors,” says Vanguard’s project engineer Roland Cumings on page 29. “The shipping market is, of its nature, very cyclical – characterised by periods of intense activity around projects; and then times which are quieter. It is therefore vitally important to study international trends very carefully before investing in infrastructure or adding capacity,” says Gerry Klos, Managing Director of DCD Marine Cluster on page 30.

es in a port prior to a vessel’s arrival just in case the circumstances have changed and the vessel needs to proceed to another port in order to deliver the cargo,” writes Michael Heads on page 36. “TPT is excited to implement this new method of transporting cars in the region, which will provide our clients with access to new export markets and innovative supply chain solutions. In addition, this project will boost the much needed volumes for the auto sector, building foreign direct investment confidence for East London,” says operations manager at the East London Car Terminal, Prince Mangayi on page 38. “Over half of our canned pilchards are currently imported from 12 canneries we have established internationally. We now want to look at replacing some of these imports by using Foodcorp’s pelagic fishing rights,” says Oceana Group’s CEO, Francois Kuttel on page 39. “It is further possible that maintenance work for marine drilling or production rigs can also take place in this designated area, so closely situated to the Port of Ngqura. In fact IDZ’s are designed in part to offer such back-of-port services,” says Linda Sityoshwana, Coega Development Corporation’s trade solutions project manager on page 40. “The shipping industry fully accepts its humanitarian obligation to assist anyone at sea whose vessel is in distress. But the scale of the crisis involving thousands of people attempting to get to Europe in craft that are neither fit for purpose nor seaworthy has raised real concerns about the safety and health of ships’ crews that may be involved in rescuing as many as 200 people at a time, ” says ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe on page 44.

“We increased the staff by some 30 percent during 2014 and intend to expand this by another 60 percent this year,” says Chief Commercial Officer of South East Marine Services, Marc Petring on page 32.

“Effective standards of training remain the bedrock of a safe and secure shipping industry, which needs to preserve the quality, practical skills and competence of qualified human resources,” says IMO Secretary-General Koji Sekimizu on page 46.

“Circumstances change very quickly in shipping and an initially safe berth can be rendered unsafe simply, for example, by change in weather conditions. It is therefore imperative that a charterer makes prudent enquiries regarding circumstanc-

“We are strengthening the engineering department by filling the gaps in order to gear ourselves up for all the port maintenance as well as capital work that is on the cards,” says Durban Port Engineer, Sibusiso Nhlabathi on page 50.


IN DEPTH

Operation Phakisa - a lifeline for marine manufacturing?

Can Operation Phakisa provide a lifeline to the ship repair and building sector? Marine manufacturing has been identified as one of the four pillars of Operation Phakisa, but can this initiative really pick up the slack of more than a decade of talking with little action? With pronouncements being made aimed to bolster the shipbuilding and repair, rig repair and refurbishment as well as boat building sectors – will Operation Phakisa need to ditch the lifeboat and opt for a superhero outfit in order to deliver what the industry needs?

W

e launched Maritime Review in March 2002 with an indepth article on the state of facilities available to the ship repair sector. The article focused on Cape Town’s facilities and highlighted issues of cranage, industry cooperation, lack of quayside facilities and the encroachment of the V&A Waterfront. At this time the possibilities of A-Berth were still being mulled over and we ran a separate article on the birth of the Cape Oil and Gas Initiative (COGSI – now the South African Oil and Gas Alliance) where Saldanha Bay was already being pushed as a future offshore refurbishment centre. In the ensuing 13 years some things have changed and there have been some developments, but the overall state of infrastructure for this sector in Cape Town, Saldanha Bay, Durban and other South African ports has not lived up to the needs of the sector. And while some may be tempted to point fingers of blame at the declining oil price for the recent spate of retrenchments being undertaken – this does not paint a truly reflective picture.

Existing facilities need attention A successful and robust marine manufacturing sector should be a given for South Africa with drydocking facilities in Cape Town, Durban and East London as well as some quayside facilities and floating dock options. But existing facilities have needed attention for some time and a call for proposals from industry to become involved in the maintenance and operating of state owned structures came to nought some years back. In fact, it was a process that still has some licking their wounds. At a meeting between Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) and industry at the beginning of February this year, the state of facilities was discussed in the

6

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

light of timelines identified by Operation Phakisa. The need to maintain and refurbish existing facilities is listed as Initiative 5 amongst 18 initiatives outlined to industry under this programme. TNPA is set to provide the investment for refurbishment and maintenance of existing facilities in Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth, Mossel Bay and Cape Town. (See table for list of projects and the scheduled timelines on page 34). While the drive from TNPA has been described as positive by industry members who attended the meeting, the consensus is that industry needs to be able to provide some input on the timelines and prioritisation of projects. “The impression that I got was that the Operation Phakisa team have been given a directive that this cannot fail no matter what. It is very encouraging that port infrastructure challenges are being addressed and that there is a clear agenda to work towards. The

concerns expressed are that the execution timelines are currently too long and that the order of priority will need a reshuffle from an industry perspective,” said one stakeholder after the meeting. Industry plans to come together to discuss the points raised by TNPA and reshape the timelines provided to better address their needs. Initiative 5 is long overdue and the cynical will no doubt adopt a “wait and see” approach. Considering that, anecdotally, money has been allocated to graffiti removal in Sturrock drydock at the expense of more pressing maintenance, it’s not surprising. Indeed over the years we have reported many attempts by industry to engage on this particular subject. The dismal state of these facilities even drew the attention of mainstream media when shipping correspondent for the Cape Argus tackled the subject in 2004. Then in November 2004 things started to look more promising as TNPA and Continued on page 34 


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FISHY BUSINESS

Shaheen Moolla discusses the fishing sector

Is the Future of South African Fisheries Management Exempted? On 15 December 2014, the Fisheries Department summonsed certain “CEO’s” of fishing companies to a meeting to discuss a number of management issues, including the ongoing silent calamity afflicting the illegal and illegitimate 2013 fishing rights allocation process (FRAP) as well as the impending calamity facing the various fishing rights set to expire in 2015. The forgotten abalone rights allocation process (FRAP 2014?) was conveniently ignored.

T

he short summary of the 15 December meeting is that DAFF did not seem to have a clue what to do about FRAP 2013. The public explanations ranged from being ready to implement a non-existent settlement agreement with the South African Commercial Linefishers Association to waiting for a senior counsel opinion on the implementation of the findings of the Harris Nupen Molebatsi internal review, which was incidentally made public in April 2014.

Flawed response First, let us be crystal clear about the fact that there is and never has been a settlement agreement with the SA Linefishers Association. To this very day, neither the Fisheries Minister nor Mr Stevens in his capacity as the delegated authority responsible for the 2013 FRAP farce, have filed a single word on oath defending the FRAP farce. SACLA has instructed its lawyers to obtain a court date for the matter to be heard and to obtain an order as applied for. Secondly, it is unclear what, if any, senior counsel advice is required in order to implement the findings and recommendations of the Harris Nupen Molebatsi report. And, given that the Molebatsi report was published back in April 2014, can we honestly believe that counsel has been delaying and labouring on crafting an implementation opinion for the past 10 months? The only plausible senior counsel advice that can be offered is that the Minister is duty-bound to apply to the Western Cape High Court for an order setting aside the decisions taken by Mr Stevens (his delegated authority) and then re-commence the rights allocation process from scratch.

8

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

But to implement this advice will mean recognising that the 2015 rights allocation processes will need to be shelved for at least two to three years as mentioned by the Molebatsi report while the illegal decisions of 2013 are reversed and remedied. And of course, there is the small matter of dealing with the strife of setting aside all those rights that were granted to the politically connected and others for the first time.

Still not meeting the sector’s needs Which brings us to the meeting held by the Fisheries Minister at the very swanky Taj Hotel in the Cape Town CBD on 10 February 2015 with members of the FishSA executive committee. The Minister decided to meet with representatives of some of the larger South African fishery sectors, importers and exporters a mere 18 days before the expiry of ten-year fishing rights in yet another sector – the tuna long line fishery. The department’s failure to plan and implement a rights allocation process for this multi-million rand fishery is the second such failure in a matter of months after the ten-year long abalone rights were allowed to expire without providing for a re-

allocation process back in July 2014. However, the failure to plan and implement a proper fishing rights allocation process in such a capital-intensive and international fishery is extremely worrying. The failure is even more perplexing given that the Fisheries Department saw fit to spend an inordinate amount of time and resources motivating to Parliament last year why the South African government should ratify a number of regional tuna fishery management organisation (RFMO) agreements which would grant South Africa full membership status of these international fishery management bodies. What is the point of being members of costly tuna RFMOS, when we are not able to allocate fishing rights to exploit the tunas? The avalanche of and chaos caused by missed and unlawful rights allocations are not being missed by investors, financiers and of course possible international partners. One of the four big South African banks has just made it clear to a client that although the bank had initially approved a multi-million rand loan facility for a fishing vessel “in principle”, they have now reversed their decision given the unacceptable risk profile of the fishing industry. And just consider the number of tuna long line fishing rights that have been activated, confirming the acute lack of interest from local and international vessel owners in investing in this sector.

Exemptions And so on 10 February 2015, the Fisheries Minister announced that “… he will exempt all right holders whose rights are due to expire in 2015 from section 18(1) of the Act.” The Minister further stated in his press statement that “[t]his exemption will grant an extension for a period of one year.” Well, if we are to be honest, then not really. The extension of “one year” will apply only to the tuna long line fishery. The exemption periods granted to the lob-

But to implement this advice will mean recognising that the 2015 rights allocation processes will need to be shelved for at least two to three years as mentioned by the Molebatsi report while the illegal decisions of 2013 are reversed and remedied. And of course, there is the small matter of dealing with the strife of setting aside all those rights that were granted to the politically connected and others for the first time.


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FISHY BUSINESS

Shaheen Moolla discusses the fishing sector

ster and toothfish fisheries are essentially six and four months, respectively. The remaining five sectors have been granted a two month exemption period (except the fish processing establishment sector where no exemptions were granted and it is therefore unclear why this sector is included in the table published by DAFF).

Exemptions a fact of life What is discernable from the table, is the following. First, fishery management by exemption is clearly back with us for the foreseeable future (like Eskom’s load-

shedding and the nine years of “interim relief� lobster quota exemptions). Given that over the past 14 months the Fisheries Department has not been able to remedy the 2013 FRAP and nothing has been done to re-allocate fishing rights to abalone quota holders whose rights expired in July 2014 and now we have added a further nine fishery sectors to the pot of exemption uncertainty, management by exemption is certainly here to stay for at least the next three to four seasons (at least).

The exemption granted is effective from 28 February 2015 to 29 February 2016 and applies to the following fisheries:

Large Pelagics

10 yrs

01 Mar 05 28 Feb 15 29 Feb 16

West Coast Rock Lobster

10 yrs

15 Nov 05 31 Jul 15 29 Feb 16

West Coast Rock Lobster

10 yrs

15 Nov 05 31 Jul 15 29 Feb 16

Patagonian Tooth Fish

10 yrs

12 Jan 06 30 Oct 15 29 Feb 16

Hake In-shore Trawl

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

Horse Mackerel

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

Seaweed

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

KwaZulu-Natal Beach Seine 10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

(Tuna and Swordfish Longline) (Offshore)

(Nearshore)

Net Fish

Fish processing establishment 15 yrs 01 Jan 02 31 Dec 16 31 Dec 16  Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (Press Statement issued 11 Feb 2015).

Remember, cumulatively we are talking about fixing rights allocation processes covering 18 of the 22 commercial and small-scale fishery sectors! These sectors account for some 2,690 (90 percent) of the 3,000 fishing rights that were allocated back in 2005. Second, it remains a complete mystery why fishing rights in the patagonian tooth fishery and lobster sectors were extended until 29 February 2016 given the duration of fishing voyages, seasonality and economic realities in these sectors. Why did the Fisheries Department and the Minister not first consult with individual fishery sectors before publishing what is clearly an ill-advised set of extended expiry dates? What is unfortunately apparent from past experience is that the fishing industry can expect a number of extensions to the present set of exemption deadlines and management by exemption is going to be a part of fisheries management for some time to come.

It remains a complete mystery why fishing rights in the patagonian tooth fishery and lobster sectors were extended until 29 February 2016 given the duration of fishing voyages, seasonality and economic realities in these sectors. Why did the Fisheries Department and the Minister not first consult with individual fishery sectors before publishing what is clearly an ill-advised set of extended expiry dates?


A wide-angle perspective on commercial fishing

THROUGH THE FISH EYE LENS

Setting a dangerous precedent for fisheries management

T

he background to the case is ably summed up by Jessica Greenstone, WWF-SA marine fellow at the University of Cape Town’s Marine Research Institute. Writing in the Daily Maverick, Greenstone put it this way: “… the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria ruled in favour of a group of recreational fishers (the Border Deep Sea Angling Association) and against the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) … Although the scientific data suggests that the existing stock of red steenbras is less than 5 percent of its historical population, the court concluded that the department had not substantially justified the moratorium.” Greenstone reasonably suggests that the red steenbras case might set a dangerous precedent. “The business of managing fisheries is a messy one,” she writes. “In order to recover and maintain vulnerable stocks, it is necessary for the department to exclude some users from the resource. Now, such disgruntled fishers may be emboldened to try their luck in court.”

DAFF deserved pounding After reading the judgement and chatting to a number of marine scientists with knowledge of the case, I would have to say that DAFF richly deserved the pounding it took in the Gauteng High Court. But, that doesn’t detract from the fact that setting aside the moratorium on catching red steenbras is almost certainly bad for the long-term prospects of the species. My contention that DAFF deserved this judgement is based on the fact that the Border Deep Sea Angling Association (BDSAA) tried for FOUR years to get answers from the Department. Even before the moratorium was declared in 2012, the Association repeatedly asked DAFF for the reasons why it was contemplating a national ban on the catching of the red steenbras. To begin with, these requests were com-

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries received a drubbing in the Gauteng High Court in November last year when Judge Sulet Potterill set aside a moratorium on the catching of red steenbras that had been declared late in 2012. The “greens” say the ruling has serious implications, not only for the CITES-listed red steenbras, but also for the future management of vulnerable stocks. Recreational fishermen say hunting and fishing is their right. With fear and trepidation, Claire Attwood wades into the debate. pletely ignored. It was only after the Association applied for the information under the Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA) that it made a little progress. As you read the judgement, you can almost feel the frustration of the BDSAA mounting as it tried to get sensible answers (or any answers at all) out of the Department.

Communicating is key Ironically, I believe that there is no shortage of data to support the idea that the red steenbras stock is in dire straights. Some of DAFF’s scientists (and those they collaborate with) are widely acknowledged to be at the top of their game, but bizarrely these specialists were never asked to provide the analyses necessary to bolster the Department’s defence. As a result, the science behind the moratorium was poorly communicated, with disastrous effects for DAFF. In fact, better communication between DAFF administrators and scientists, and between scientists and fishermen, might have averted the costly lawsuit altogether. The Border Deepsea Angling Association apparently has a good track record of working with the government to protect biologically diverse areas – it played a key role in the declaration of the Pondoland Marine Protected Area. A little creativity might have encouraged the members of the Association to, for example, participate in an experiment that

Instead, the Department was careless and arrogant. It simply ignored the matter and in-so-doing insulted a group of fishermen who take their sport very seriously. Who can blame them for hiring a lawyer? If one good thing is to come out of this case it might be to teach the Department that it has to comprehensively and clearly justify it’s scientific recommendations – not just to the minister who signs them into law, but to the people who are going to be affected by them.

compared catches from a reef closed to fishing to one that was open. Instead, the Department was careless and arrogant. It simply ignored the matter and in-so-doing insulted a group of fishermen who take their sport very seriously. Who can blame them for hiring a lawyer? If one good thing is to come out of this case it might be to teach the Department that it has to comprehensively and clearly justify it’s scientific recommendations – not just to the minister who signs them into law, but to the people who are going to be affected by them.

Stakeholder involvement is critical In the framework of the ecosystem approach to fisheries, in which South Africa purports to be a leader, stakeholder involvement in the management of fisheries is no longer “nice to have”, it’s absolutely critical. One scientist I talked to lamented the fact that the South African Marine Linefish Management Association (SAMLMR), which was set up to promote communication between recreational and commercial linefishers and the scientific community, fizzled out in 2011. SAMLMR might have provided an opportunity for the parties to communicate and improved communication might have averted the court action. Which brings us to one of the key problems that is highlighted by this judgement: the complexity of managing a linefishery that is shared by commercial operators and recreational fishermen whose interests are downright incompatible.

Court ignores management complexities I would argue that the judgement failed to take these complexities into account and largely ignored the regional and sectoral characteristics of the fishery for red steenbras – almost certainly to the detriment of the species and the long-term future of

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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THROUGH THE FISH EYE LENS

A wide-angle perspective on commercial fishing

For one thing, the scientists I spoke to all agreed that the Border Deep Sea Angling Association and its members are fishing on the remnants of the red steenbras stock. They are fishing in the area where red steenbras aggregate to breed. And, they are catching the biggest and the best fish for fun; these are the big, old, fat and fecund fish that we know are critical for the survival of the species. the commercial linefishery. As I understand it, red steenbras is widely distributed along the east coast of South Africa (from midway up the coast of KwaZulu-Natal to Cape Point) and yet it aggregates and breeds in the Eastern Cape. Whereas small fish may be caught in shallow water, large, sexually mature fish are caught in deep-water, from about 50m down to 160m. As a result of its wide distribution and the different depths at which adult and juvenile fish live, the fisheries for red steenbras are regionally distinct. For example, in the former Transkei (where large fish aggregate to breed) red steenbras are mainly targeted by recreational fishers who hunt for the very big fish. They can grow to over 50kg and in this region recreational fishers are after the trophy fish. However, in the Western Cape, it’s entirely different: the fish are smaller and are caught for food or for sale. In recent years a raft of restrictions have been put in place to curb the commercial catch of red steenbras, but the species was once a highly valued member of the commercial linefish catch, especially on the south coast, around Stilbaai and Arniston.

Recreational vs commercial fishing In a letter to the Daily Dispatch, John Rance – a member of the Border Deepsea Angling Association and one of the individual litigants in the red steenbras matter – argues very convincingly that the demise of the red steenbras is the result of overfishing by the commercial fishery and that “no species in the world is in danger of extinction through recreational hunting or fishing”. To bolster his point, Rance draws an analogy with recreational hunting. He writes: “To some people prejudiced against hunting or fishing this seems a contradiction. A scientist involved in this debate once pub-

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

licly stated ‘you can’t protect something which you want to kill.’ But that’s where they are so wrong. It’s precisely because recreational hunters and fishermen want to hunt or fish for species that we protect them.”

red steenbras. In the former Transkei, red steenbras live in deep water and are difficult to catch; in the Western Cape (where there are more fishermen) the species is far more accessible and illegal fishing is a major problem.

Let me say that I am prejudiced against trophy hunting because I just don’t like the idea of killing animals for fun, but more than that I am skeptical about the hunting analogy and whether it really does translate to fishing.

A moratorium on fishing for red steenbras – that applies to recreational and commercial fishermen across the entire range of the species – is just simpler to enforce. As it stands, the judgement has caused confusion: who exactly is allowed to catch red steenbras? And if recreational fishermen can catch the species, why can’t commercial fishermen too?

For one thing, the scientists I spoke to all agreed that the Border Deep Sea Angling Association and its members are fishing on the remnants of the red steenbras stock. They are fishing in the area where red steenbras aggregate to breed. And, they are catching the biggest and the best fish for fun; these are the big, old, fat and fecund fish that we know are critical for the survival of the species. Secondly, hunting and fishing for trophies can only be enjoyed by a few individuals with the resources to pursue these activities. (I am told that even if the Capebased commercial fishery was permitted to fish for red steenbras, it is no longer economically viable to do so – it takes too much fuel and too much time.) I would argue that, by driving home their right to catch red steenbras as a trophy fish, the Border Deep Sea Angling Association has prejudiced a possible resurgence of the red steenbras stock, which might ultimately result in better catches for commercial fishers. In a country that is so driven by poverty and inequality, I just can’t see how the right to catch fish for fun outweighs the right to feed people and generate economic activity in the future.

Finally, there is one thing about the red steenbras that is very pertinent and which, to my mind, has not been given nearly enough attention: it is an endemic species (this fish quite literally, occurs nowhere else on earth) and it has been listed by the IUCN as “critically endangered” on the strength of the fact that unsustainable fishing has reduced the population by an estimated 95 percent. Surely that puts it in the same category as the king protea, the blue crane or the Brenton Blue butterfly, all of which are protected species? Call me sentimental, but as South Africans, do we really want to allow the killing of red steenbras to continue? Claire Attwood writes in her personal capacity and not as a representative of any organisation.

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Illegal fishing Another issue to consider is the regional characteristics of the illegal fishery for

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100 Years of fisheries management

CASTING THE NET BACK

Saving the big, the old, the fat and the fecund For crustacean biologist, Professor Johan Groeneveld, senior scientist at the Oceanographic Research Institute in Durban, one of the most remarkable lines in this excerpt is: “A female at the zenith of its reproductive powers is the most valuable from the point of view of the preservation of the species”.

Even by today’s standards, the idea of preserving the largest females is very advanced,” said Groeneveld.

Today, 100 years after Gilchrist published his report, evidence is mounting that big females not only produce more eggs, but their eggs are also more likely to survive. In fact, this theory is becoming so widely accepted in fisheries science that it has earned an acronym: BOFF − for big, old, fat and fecund. When you’re a fish, BOFF is not an insult.

For example, studies of marine and freshwater teleost (ray-finned) fishes have demonstrated that BOFFs produce far more, and often larger eggs that may develop into larvae that grow faster and are able to better withstand starvation2. The authors of this particular study also noted that BOFFs may survive periods that are unfavourable for reproduction and be ready to spawn abundantly and enhance recruitment when favourable conditions return. “A growing body of knowledge dictates that fisheries productivity and stability would be enhanced if management conserved old-growth age structure in fished stocks, be it by limiting exploitation rates, by implementing slot limits, or by establishing marine reserves, which are now known to seed surrounding fished areas via larval dispersal,” write Hixon et al in the ICES Journal of Marine Science. According to Groeneveld, the BOFF theory certainly holds true for rock lobster. Not only do large female rock lobster carry more and bigger eggs, but they are also able to carry more than one batch per year, he said. Interestingly, in South Africa’s west coast rock lobster fishery, there are few big females left. Whereas in 1912, Gilchrist captured and recorded

female rock lobster with carapace measurements of up to 6 inches (15.24 cm) off Woodstock Beach, Groeneveld said that the fishery of today is essentially a “male only” fishery. This is not by design; it’s just that there are very few females that grow bigger than the minimum size of 7.5cm carapace length (for commercial fishers; the size limit is slightly larger for recreational fishers – 8.0 cm).

Similar management strategies in place For Groeneveld, Gilchrist’s 1912 report also demonstrates how the west coast rock lobster fishery is managed in moreor-less the same way that it was 100 years ago. For instance, today’s closed fishing season, which broadly spans the months of October to June3, still corresponds with the period in which male rock lobster are moulting in deep-water (“the males cannot readily be got and are unfit for canning,” writes Gilchrist) and the females are still carrying eggs. Even if they are caught during their moult, the animals are generally too weak to export live and when cooked, their flesh is unappetising. The lobsters are “thin” because they are putting all their energy into moulting and growing. “There is a very sound biological reason behind the closed season,” said Dr Andrew Cockcroft, senior scientist at the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF). “The closed season protects the females in berry. It’s absolutely non-negotiable.” Scientists now know that when females in berry are caught, their eggs may be damaged by exposure to light. Even if they are

Today, 100 years after Gilchrist published his report, evidence is mounting that big females not only produce more eggs, but their eggs are also more likely to survive. In fact, this theory is becoming so widely accepted in fisheries science that it has earned an acronym: BOFF − for big, old, fat and fecund. When you’re a fish, BOFF is not an insult.

In this new series, Dave Japp and Claire Attwood collaborate to compare ideas and understanding of fisheries management from 100 years ago with contemporary knowledge. The series of articles is based on an almost complete set of Marine Biological Reports dating back to 1904 authored by South Africa’s first marine biologist, John Gilchrist and others, and purchased by Japp at an auction recently. The first article in the series looks at the fishery for west coast rock lobster (at the time known as “Crawfish”) which is described in some detail in Marine Biological Report No. 1 for the year ending 31st December 1912 and for the year ending 30th June, 19131. Dave Japp is a fisheries scientist who consults broadly on fisheries matters relating to science and management. He has an intimate knowledge of most fisheries in southern Africa and, prior to 1997, worked for the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Claire Attwood is a writer with a special interest in fisheries. She is a regular columnist for Maritime Review Africa. FOOTNOTES: 1 Union of South Africa. Province of the Cape of Good Hope. Marine Biological Report No. 1. for the year ending 31st December 1912 and for the year ending 30th June, 1913. P42−45. Hixon, M.A.; Johnson, D.W. & Sogard, S.M. 2013. BOFFFFs: on the importance of conserving old-growth age structure in fishery populations. ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi:10.1093/ icesjms/fst200.

2

The closed season is staggered according to fishing area. In the northern area (Zone A), the season opens on 15 October and closes on 30 April; in the remaining zones, the season opens on 15 November and closes on 20 June. In deepwater Area 8, the season is extended to the end of September.

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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CASTING THE NET BACK

100 Years of fisheries management

returned to the sea (as the regulations prescribe), the female may lose her batch of eggs. And, just as they were in 1912, size limits are an essential feature of the west coast rock lobster fishery’s management. In fact, they are a classical management measure used in lobster fisheries around the world, in spite of the fact that – in keeping with the ecosystem approach to fisheries – theoretical fisheries science may be shifting away from size limits and towards the “balanced fishery theory.” According to this theory, unselective fishing may be healthier for the ecosystem because it keeps trophic levels in balance (the trophic level of a fish is the position it occupies in the food web.)

Creating balance

Excerpt from Marine Biological Report

Groeneveld points to the south coast rock lobster fishery as an example of a “balanced fishery”. There is no size limit for this deep-sea fishery, partly because catch rates are so low and for economic reasons the fishery must retain its entire catch, and partly because the rock lobster live at great depths and there is concern about the survival rate of under-

Groeneveld points to the south coast rock lobster fishery as an example of a “balanced fishery”. There is no size limit for this deepsea fishery, partly because catch rates are so low and for economic reasons the fishery must retain its entire catch, and partly because the rock lobster live at great depths and there is concern about the survival rate of under-size animals, were they to be discarded. size animals, were they to be discarded. (Catch rates are low because the rock lobsters are distributed patchily over a large area and, unlike their west coast cousins, don’t aggregate on the seabed). However, even though fishing is not regulated by a size limit, it is considered to be sustainable. “Apart from the years in which Hout Bay Fishing was fishing the stock illegally, this is actually a very successful and sustainable fishery,” said Groeneveld. Although the basic life history of west coast rock lobster has been fairly well understood since the time when Gilchrist was penning his Marine Biological Reports, Cockcroft points out that the influence of the environment on marine species and marine fisheries is given a much higher priority by modern-day marine science.

Preservation of the Crawfish We have seen that the close season, which has been adopted with a view to the protection of the Cape Crawfish, corresponds to the months in which the males are in deep water engaged in casting their shell and in a sickly condition. They do not take the bait readily at this time and are unfit for commercial purposes. The females are at this time in shallow water, some still carrying their eggs, but most having got rid of them. This is therefore the most favourable season for the fishermen and the factories to suspend their operations, but it is doubtful if the “protection” thus afforded by such a close season is of any considerable value. The males cannot readily be got and are unfit for canning, so that fishing operations for the factories would be confined to females, but the females which have spawned in this season are just those which presumably could best be spared and the catching of which would do the least harm. As the females which have just given rise to progeny are of less value economically than those about to do so, the most effective close season would cover the months just previous to the time at which they get rid of their eggs. However suitable this close season may be therefore for the fishermen it cannot be held to be the most effective for preventing overfishing and damage to the supply. A second means adopted for the preservation of the industry was to impose a size limit of 3 inches (measured from the base of the eyestalk to the end of the carapace or shield). It was enacted that no crawfish below this size should be caught. This however protected, it is to be noted, three different classes of crawfish: first, the very small forms (males and females) such as were of commercial use as a delicacy; second, the adolescent and sexually mature males; and thirdly, the adolescent and secondly mature females. We have adduced reasons for believing that the first are particularly liable to the attacks of such natural enemies as the octopus, and nature

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Heightened awareness of climate change and the impact it is having, and will have, on fishing, means that scientists and environmentalists are paying more attention to environmental variables than ever before. Gilchrist meticulously recorded information but did not have the benefit of more than 100 years of experience fishing for “Crawfish”. He used simple but wellconsidered logic in much the same way as Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace did when thinking about evolution. The benefit these early scientist did have, however, was much higher (undisturbed) abundance levels of species such as rock lobster and hake. Today the west coast rock lobster stock is estimated to be about 3 percent of its pristine stock size. Do you think if we had responded sooner to the ideas of Gilchrist our rock lobster stocks would be in the state they are today?

has made special provision for a natural drain on these forms by their large numbers so that the damage caused by man is probably insignificant as compared with the normal mortality at this season. With regard to the second, the protection of young adolescent males, these it would appear are just the forms which can most readily be dispensed with, being the least valuable form from the point of view of the preservation of the species. An analogous case is that of seals, where the young males or “bachelors” are found to be those that can be killed off with least damage to the industry. In both cases the animal is polygamous, and there will probably always be a sufficient number of males to fertilise all the females. With regard to the third it would seem that the young female, reproducing, or about to reproduce its kind, should be the object of special care. Without doubt this protection does considerably safeguard the continuation and multiplication of the species, but it might be suggested that later stages, in which the female may be more fertile and capable of reproduction, should be the object of still more special care. A female at the zenith of its reproductive powers is the most valuable from the point of view of the preservation of the species. It would appear that as a matter of fact (though it is a point still to be investigated more fully) this period in the life of the female is between 2½ and 4 inches, so that the strict preservation of these forms would be the best means of safeguarding the industry. It could not, however, perhaps be found practicable to enforce such a regulation. The fish are caught in nets and promptly tumbled into the boat, often in the dark of early morning, when there is neither time nor opportunity for readily separating out and throwing back into the sea females between 1½ and 4 inches long. The difference between male and female are, however, as has been pointed out, well marked, and are seen by the experienced fishermen at a glance, and if any relaxation of the restrictive measures be contemplated in the future, in view of stricter protection of the females, it might quite well be in allowing the capture of young males.


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Hydrography and underwater surveys

Survey work boosts business for marine services company After a busy 2014, the Subtech Survey Division headed into the New Year finalising deliverables on a high-profile feasibility study for port development in KwaZulu Natal consisting of a bathymetry and geophysical survey.

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he acquisition phase of the project was completed in early January and the project consisted of over 300 hours of operations and 1,250 km of survey lines. The final project deliverables will be submitted in the first quarter of 2015. Subtech has an established hydrographic survey capability which includes single beam, multibeam, side scan, magnetometer and sub-bottom survey experience, together with services such as water level monitoring, current and tidal analysis, sound velocity and water property measurements. Subtech Survey Division can also of-

fer supplementary and complementary surveys through its established network of professional survey companies, LiDAR surveys, 3-D scanning, topographic, mining and engineering surveys. 2014 was a busy year for the survey division with projects including

Beach and bathymetry surveys supporting port development in the Western Cape;

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surveys supporting jetty construction and logistical access in Mozambique for the Subtech Project Division;

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provide relevant information for the construction of a jetty extension in Mozambique;

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hazard identification for oil rig access at various ports in South Africa;

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environmental impact assessments and engineering feasibility studies for infrastructure development in Mozambique;

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identify and recover lost containers and to ensure safe, effective and efficient removal by the Subtech Diving Division;

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support, measure and monitor dredging and construction projects in the Port of Durban by the Subtech Construction and Marine Divisions;

Bathymetric surveys to monitor and assess effluent pipeline conditions and support dredging and maintenance operations by the Subtech Marine Division;

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beam surveys using a jet ski and paddle ski to determine water levels for Local Government Water Authorities.

Subtech Survey owns two multibeam survey systems, one of which is permanently fitted to IMCA and SAMSA certified survey vessel Subtech Odin, which can be containerised and shipped worldwide and supported by an experienced survey skipper and survey personnel. “Our systems deliver and produce accurate and repeatable results through our continual equipment optimisation, instrumentation software and firmware upgrades, preventative and planned maintenance routines, regular calibrations and training of personnel in the current and optimal use of equipment, resources and vessels,� says Neil Scott-Williams of Subtech who adds that their goal is to meet or exceed the International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO) most stringent Special Order accuracy standards and deliver to the client a product which is professional, comprehensive, compliant and relevant. Subtech can offer a total solution for on-shore, near-shore and transitional zone hydrographic and geophysical surveys through global partnerships in the industry. “We have comprehensive skill

 Left above: The Subtech Survey vessel,

the Odin, undertaking a multibeam survey to support salvage operations during phase one of the Smart Wreck Removal in northern KwaZulu-Natal

 Left: Survey vessel Subtech Odin surveying in Cape Town harbour with graphical representation of multibeam swath on the seafloor.

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015


Hydrography and underwater surveys

FEATURE

sets and experienced personnel used to working in the land, marine, engineering, mining and geophysical environments. We have extensive experience in providing survey support for marine construction, port development, civil engineering, dredging, EIA projects, feasibility studies, verification and validation surveys and audits, hazard identification, salvage operations and geophysical surveys,� he says. The in-field survey teams use a range of industry standard, world-class survey equipment and are supported by a dedicated shore management and competent technical team. With proven survey experience throughout Africa and their personnel has also worked on projects from Europe to the American Continent. The survey teams are experienced and receive regular technical training to keep them up to date on hydrographic software and equipment. “Our core survey team are registered with survey professional bodies such as PLATO, IMarEST, SSSI and the HSSA. The Survey Division is a corporate member of the HSSA.� The Subtech Group has specialised

in the provision of marine and subsea service throughout sub-Saharan Africa since 1995. The headquarters are based in Durban, but they have operational bases in Walvis Bay, Cape Town, Maputo, Beira, Nacala, Pemba, Dar es Salaam and Mauritius. “Our wealth of industry experience together with our geographical reach and range of services enables us to offer clients a comprehensive solution to all their marine related requirements. Backing up our operational experience is

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The Subtech Group, in operation since 1995, specialises in the provision of world class marine services throughout Sub-Saharan Africa. We are based in Durban, with operational bases in Walvis Bay, Cape Town, Maputo, Beira, Nacala, Pemba, Dar es Salaam and Mauritius. Subtech has a wealth of invaluable industry experience, which together with our geographical reach and range of services enables us to offer our clients comprehensive solutions to all their marine related requirements. Backing up our operational experience is our ISO 9001:2008 certification as well as full membership with the International Maritime Contractor’s Association (IMCA). Our services cover most aspects of diving and marine related requirements, both above and below water, and are incorporated within the following Divisions: • Offshore • Marine • Marine Construction • Salvage • Inspections • Subsea Cable • Diving • Survey • Logistics

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17


FEATURE

Hydrography and underwater surveys

Zambezi survey investigates feasibility of opening up waterway transport to Malawi and Zambia

by the company is immense and Potgieter is inclined to believe that the project will run to 18 months to complete. He is also circumspect about the feasibility of using the waterways as a viable transport corridor citing the need for costly dredging and challenges of hyacinth removal in some areas. As a sequel to the hydrographic and hydrologic studies, recommendations with regard to vessel-types suitable for the transport of goods on the river are likely to be made. These need to be consistent with the recommendations of an environmental impact assessment.

In a year-long contract, Cape Townbased, Underwater Surveys is working with a team of international experts to determine the feasibility of opening up the Zambezi river as a transport waterway to provide access from Mozambique to Malawi and Zambia. Funded by the African Development Bank and Comesa (Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa) via the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the project aims to study the opening of the Shire River in Malawi and Zambezi River in Mozambique for navigation in order to demonstrate its technical, economic, financial, social and environmental viability and sustainability. Working under main contractor, Hydroplan of Germany, Ephan Potgieter of Underwater Surveys confirms that they are the only local sub-contractor that was selected after a tender process that saw them shortlisted and then officially appointed. Describing the work scope, Potgieter highlights some of the challenges faced by the team of about 30 currently involved

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

in the project. Operating in undeveloped areas along the river, the team needs to be self-sufficient and aware of dangers posed by the likes of crocodiles and even violence. “It’s a challenging environment to work in. There is no infrastructure to speak of – we had to take absolutely everything with us,” explains Potgieter adding that the project kicked off with the challenge of getting the four vessels involved to the river via the sometimes very poor road infrastructure. Their scope of work includes the completion of hydrographic and hydrological surveys as well as Lidar surveys and an investigation into the river’s dredging requirements. The hydrographic surveys are intended to determine the navigability of the waterway and will include both wet and dry season bathymetric surveys. The hydrological surveys are required to compile river flow data of the Shire River and the Zambezi River as well as the combined flow from the confluence of the two rivers to Chinde on the Indian Ocean. The full brief of requirements received

Port infrastructure development options to ensure the efficient transportation of goods on the waterway, including facilities at Nsanje, Chinde and smaller intermediate ports along the waterway accessible to populations along the river are also to be investigated. The investigations will include options for river-going vessel types as well as combined river and sea-going vessel types that could transport goods directly from Nsanje to bigger ports on the Indian Ocean such as Beira or Quelimane. In addition, the planning and preliminary designs of dredging and river training works that need to be undertaken to optimise the navigability of the Shire-Zambezi waterway consistent with social and environmental impact assessment, will be concluded. According to Potgieter, the vast scope of work that needs to be completed is contained in a 80 plus page document that highlights the importance of working towards the goal of establishing this vital transport corridor for the people of Mozambique, Malawi and Zambia. The overall objective of the project is to contribute to the provision of an efficient transport system, with affordable costs and reliable modes for the countries sharing the Zambezi River namely: Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia by opening up the Shire and Zambezi Rivers for navigation to the Indian Ocean.


FEATURE

Hydrography and underwater surveys

Developing sustainable hydrography in Africa Planning for Hydro 2015 is well underway with aims to attract the international and particularly the African Hydrographic community to meet in Cape Town from 23 to 25 November this year.

A

ccording to the chairperson of the Hydrographic Society of South Africa, the organisation that has taken on the task of hosting the exhibition and conference, there is already significant interest from the industry with a number of stands already booked. “We would like to see as much African content in the technical programme and exhibition as possible,” says chairperson, Steve Smith, who adds that this would speak to the theme of the conference, which is “Defining the extent and ownership of maritime real estate for development in Africa” whilst still “Developing Sustainable Hydrography in Africa”. Smith adds they would like to promote the services of the African Hydrographic

sector and gain knowledge and insight from the rest of the international community. With the prospect of keynote speakers such as Capt Robert Ward, who is yet to be confirmed due to a diary conflict, of the International Hydrographic Organisation, the conference will debate relevant issues such as those posed by the claiming of Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ’s) and the importance of due diligence in this regard. The possibility of new oil and gas reserves being found off the African continent make debates such as these significant and Smith noted that there are already some regions where claims and counter claims are being lodged. “The oil and gas sector is one of the major sources of revenue for the Hydrographic industry and therefore issues such as the oil price will obviously come to bear on discussions at the conference,” he said, adding, however, that the falling price per barrel had not had a major influence on the survey sector. Other developments such as those of port infrastructure within Africa will also be relevant to the topics included in the conference pro-

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

gramme. Smith describes the continent’s Hydrographic sector as robust and points to the growth of the Nigerian Hydrographic Society as a key indicator of this. He adds that the Russian Hydrographic Society has expressed an interest in developing ties with the continental bodies. The local committee is pursuing these and other developments including investigating the courses and training available with a view to promoting hydrography as a career option. Smith believes that the team of volunteers on the committee ensures the continued success of the Hydrographic Society of South Africa. Confident of the success of Hydro 2015, Smith anticipates a growth in the society’s membership ahead of the event because members in good standing, together with students, will benefit from discounted rates. “We look forward to welcoming not only the local hydrographic community, whose support for the event we strongly encourage, but also all our neighbouring African and international communities from around the world,” he concludes.

“The oil and gas sector is one of the major sources of revenue for the Hydrographic industry and therefore issues such as the oil price will obviously come to bear on discussions at the conference.”

Massive investment in acoustic equipment for use in Africa

£

1million worth of Sonardyne 6G acoustic positioning technology is headed for West Africa to support the survey and construction phases of a major new field development project. Sonardyne International Ltd, UK, has announced that Seatronics, is to take delivery of the equipment that includes multi-functional Compatt 6 transponders and Ranger 2 USBL (Ultra-Short BaseLine) positioning systems. The Ranger 2 systems are being supplied with Sonardyne’s high performance Gyro-USBL transceiver. Unlike a conventional USBL transceiver, GyroUSBL can be set to work without the need for a time-consuming calibration procedure to determine the alignment of the ship’s motion sensors to the acoustic transceiver prior to use. Its easy installation and setup features ensure it is always in high demand in the offshore rental market where it is frequently supplied for short-term use on vessels of opportunity.


FEATURE

Hydrography and underwater surveys

Custom-built survey vessel to tackle the African coastline COVER STORY

“The Fugro Frontier has station-keeping capabilities, which will provide improved performance. She is new, she is faster and she meets the highest considerations for safety and the environment.� on the back of a good year that follows several years of growth for the company in South Africa. “Eight years ago we had an office complement of 42 – today we are 95. We are continuing to grow,� she says adding that they are employing new staff and creating new positions within the branch.

FUGRO FRONTIER SPECIFICATIONS: Classification:

Germanischer Lloyd

Flag State:

Bahamas Maritime Authority

Builder:

Damen Shipyards

LOA:

53.7 m

Beam:

12.5 m

Draft:

3.1 m + 0.25 m blister

Tonnage:

1400 gt

Deck area aft:

250 m²

Deck load:

60 t

Propulsion:

2 x Azimuth thrusters

Bow thrusters:

1 x tunnel thruster

Cruising speed:

10 knots

Maximum speed:

12 knots

DP System:

Imtech DP-0

Radar:

Hagenuk Bridgemaster

DGPS:

1 x Koden KGPGZ0 / 2 x Fugro Starpack

Navigation:

Fugro Starfix Suite

Acoustic positioning:

Kongsberg HiPap 501

Motion Reference:

Applanix Pos MV/Coda Octopus F175

Echosounder:

Simrad EA400

Draft monitoring:

2 x Rosemount Pressure Sensors

The recently launched, custom-built survey vessel, Fugro Frontier, will substantially enhance Fugro’s seagoing operations in Africa. As the only new survey vessel operating in African waters she is set to tackle a variety of work along the sub-Saharan coastline.

S

peaking to Helle Els, commercial manager in Fugro’s Cape Town office, it is clear that the staff is excited to welcome the modern vessel into the fleet. Els explains that a team of Fugro experts has had input into the vessel’s design and capabilities. “This input has resulted in a greatly improved platform for both our crew and our clients,� she says. The Fugro Frontier has been delivered

“We met our goals for 2014, but the current oil price is presenting us with new challenges,� she adds, explaining that much of their survey work is undertaken for clients in the oil and gas industry.

New vessel meets new needs “In the last five years survey projects have become more complex and have required a more versatile approach. In the past we would be required to undertake just a geophysical survey, but today our clients expect geophysical and geotechnical surveys as well as some ROV (remotely operated vessel) work,� says Els, adding that the new vessel is better equipped to meet these needs than her predecessor, the Geo Endeavour. “The Fugro Frontier has station-keeping capabilities, which will provide improved performance. She is new, she is faster and

Multibeam echosounder: R2Sonic 2026 / Reson 7160 Side Scan Sonar:

Edgetech 4200

Sub Bottom Profiler:

Edgetech 3200 Chirp 4 x 4 array

Boomer:

Applied Acoustics CSP 1500 with AA200 single plate towed catamaran

Magnetometer:

Geometrics G-882

Seismic Compressor:

2 x Wartsila Water System

 Fugro staff celebrate the launch of the Fugro Frontier in Romania. 22

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015


Hydrography and underwater surveys she meets the highest considerations for safety and the environment.� The diesel electric propulsion, specially designed hull, resilient engine mounts and rudder propellers maximise stationkeeping and navigational control while ensuring acoustically quiet running at survey speeds. The 53 metre-long vessel is prepared for dynamic positioning and equipped with state-of-the-art survey equipment.

FEATURE

 Impi 2, the per-

manently mobilised 8-metre survey launch, pictured with Alexandre Vouillot (Managing Director of Fugro Survey Africa) and Gazelle Faure, Fugro Frontier’s godmother.

At over 7 metres longer than Geo Endeavour, the Romanian-built Fugro Frontier can accommodate more staff, including two trainees. “We are very pleased that we can also provide more onboard space for our clients,� Els remarks. The eagerly anticipated vessel also offers comforts that include an onboard gym. Fugro Frontier will enable the survey teams to provide a more versatile service and undertake more complex projects that are not possible from a charter vessel. Her limited 3-metre draft and permanently mobilised 8-metre survey launch adds to her operational capabilities in both shallow and deep water. The survey launch, the Impi 2, can be fully mobilised with its own survey equipment, allowing the two vessels to operate simultaneously. The South African-built Impi 2 is deployed via an integrated slipway and provides an ideal platform for surveying up to beach breaks or in any other limited draft environments. Currently bidding on work contracts in West Africa, Els says the Fugro Frontier is likely to make a pit stop in Cape Town en route to the survey area. Although keen to see her for the first time, she expects the vessel to spend very little time in the port, preferring that she proves her capabilities in the field. The delivery of the Fugro Frontier will enable Fugro to meet client demands in the deepwater, coastal and renewables industry sectors and is part of the group’s global programme to replace older tonnage with new, innovative and efficient vessels.

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

23


FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

Creative energy drives expansion at Cape Town shipyard Nautic seems to have created a successful playbook that is delivering on strategic goals for the company within the shipbuilding as well as maintenance sectors. Editor, Colleen Jacka, sat down with James Fisher to discuss recent milestones and achievements that have impacted on Nautic’s overall ability to achieve high scores in this niche sector.

D

escribing himself as an inventor, Fisher explains that he enjoys being creative and has always been driven to initiate new projects. “I want to take some credit for actually starting to build a category of vessel in this country that was not being considered by the existing boat builders,� he says adding that when he was told that it could not be done here he became even more determined. “That sort of thing drives me.� “It has been a challenge for me to develop what was essentially just an idea, into a serious business that now boasts a R1 billion orderbook employing approximately 500 people in various locations,� says Fisher highlighting recent achievements such as their ISM & ISO accreditation and the acquisition of Veecraft Marine. Following the successful purchase of Veecraft Marine late last year, Fisher confirms that the company is actively pursuing further acquisitions as well as agreements with agencies to strengthen their position in the market. Fisher adds that they have been contracted by various well-known companies to service and support their brands in Africa. “As we deliver more vessels into Africa we realise that the more we are able to control, in terms of servicing and supporting the brands we put onto the vessel, the better the pricing and service we can offer our clients,� he says.

Increased production With a growing order book for both Nautic and Veecraft, Fisher says that the extra orders have added a few “headaches� in terms of premises and people. “We had hoped that the Veecraft acquisition would provide some additional capacity, but in fact it brought in more orders,� says Fisher, who admits that it is not a bad headache to bear.

24

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Nautic has currently completed three specialised dive support vessels for Unique Hydra. 

“We are struggling to find good project managers, with the right sort of experience and skills,� he says indicating that training is becoming a priority. “We are aggressively looking at intern apprenticeship training programmes to try to fast track the lower skilled fabricators and welders.�

completing sea trials,� he says explaining that the process was completed on their recently updated software system within seven months.

Having just landed an order from the South African Navy for six boarding boats, Nautic is also keen to participate in Navy’s Project Biro, which is due to be awarded during 2015. Space to accommodate bigger building projects such as this is becoming an issue and Fisher confirms that they will look at opportunities offered by areas such as the Saldanha Bay IDZ. He cautions, however, that a sustained business model consisting of large projects is required for such a move.

Highlighting the potential of the African market, Fisher confirms that the company has a team stationed in Nigeria and Ghana with members rotating between the offices. Nautic also sells and operates in other African countries.

In the meantime they have recently completed a third vessel for Unique Hydra. “This was quite an exciting project for us. This sort of highly specialised project is what Nautic is all about,� he says. “Working closely with Unique, we have created a totally integrated dive daughter craft vessel for use for shallow diving operations. It has been an amazing success from the time we sketched out the plan right up to delivery on the water and

“I see this product becoming a sustainable line for us and we hope to be able to do more work with Unique in order to create more bespoke diving related vessels.�

Servicing and support Following their successful involvement with the Department of Forestry and Fisheries’ (DAFF) vessels in bringing them back into class, Nautic has concentrated on growing their services and support division. “We have our marine superintendents actively deployed on contracts in Africa and we have developed an effective business model that aims to lower overheads and provide better service delivery,� he says. This division has recently completed the servicing and repainting of the Geomansi for the Council of Geoscience. “We also serviced the engine and will be look-

“Working closely with Unique, we have created a totally integrated dive daughter craft vessel for use for shallow diving operations. It has been an amazing success from the time we sketched out the plan right up to delivery on the water and completing sea trials,� he says


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FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

ing into offering a maintenance plan for the vessel,� says Fisher. He adds that the plan is to start a Nautic Maritime Training Academy within this division and to have it accredited by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA). “The aim is to start training for vessels of 10 m or less and we have already employed someone to set this up,� he explains adding that they do not intend to offer courses that are in conflict with already available options, but focus on areas where the greatest demand exists for its existing client base.

R15 million available for research and development S

ubmissions for the Marine Manufacturing Industry Innovation Fund closed mid-February after a just three-week period that gave the marine manufacturing industry the opportunity to apply for some of the estimated R15 million that is likely to be available.

“Obviously a lot of this demand stems from our own vessels. We need to train crews on our own vessels and we are quickly realising the health and safety issues related to sending vessels into Africa without the correct training.�

Vanessa Davidson, CEO Marine Industry Association South Africa (MIASA), spent time in January presenting to the industry on the launch of the Marine Manufacturing Industry Innovation Fund and its application process.

Challenges and opportunities

The presentations were attended by representatives from various tertiary institutions, as well as other interested parties within the maritime industry. The fund has been created through a public/private partnership between MIASA and the Department of Science and Technology (DST).

Highlighting the potential of governmental programmes such as Operation Phakisa as well as the Innovation Fund being driven by the Marine Industry Association of South Africa (MIASA), Fisher says that there is currently “a nice ground swell� of energy within the maritime sector that needs to be harnessed. Commenting on the relative weakness of the rand against currencies such as the euro and the American dollar, Fisher explains that the strong dollar coupled with a weaker rand against the European currency has helped maintain reasonable margins in order to remain competitive against other yards worldwide. But then there are issues such as load shedding that will continue to put a dampener on growth for South African companies. With plans to build, Fisher is keen to see any new premises coming off the grid completely, but is also pursuing a proposal to get their harbour premises linked to the port’s, which is seen as critical infrastructure and therefore not affected by power outages. “It is a disaster, especially in our case where we are now working three shifts and so even if you turn the power off at night, it is going to affect us,� he says. But it is the ability to move nimbly between the challenges and opportunities that has made the business work. “We’ve got a great team around our table,� says Fisher who admits that he continues to be driven by an entrepreneurial spirit and a desire to implement creative ideas.

26

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

With broad objectives to encourage growth in research and development (R&D) as well as innovation, the aim is to close the gap between research institutes and industry and to encourage investment. The fund, which is governed by the IP Act and NIPMO, is valued at R15 million over a three-year period; and has its primary focus, R&D innovation. There is an 80 percent contribution from MIASA and the remaining 20 percent is to come from the applicant in the form of either cash or in kind, to be assessed on a case-by-case basis. DST are looking at the following gains from this fund:

The involvement of high level research graduates

Interns Publications Researchers employed in industry Commercialisation of project results

Employment growth Export growth and maintenance Localisation, and Market penetration. OPERATION PHAKISA During her presentations Davidson

highlighted the importance of Operation Phakisa to the development of the maritime industry emphasising its abilities to “fast track a focus on the ocean economy�. “The maritime industry makes an estimated R1.5 billion contribution to the economy and yet up until Operation Phakisa there has been limited positive focus by government on the development within the industry,� she said. She, however, admitted that there are still many challenges faced by industry, including:

the cyclical nature of boat building and fluctuating demand

lack of infrastructure competition versus collaboration labour rates and productivity cash flow issues transformation skills and enterprise development, and

lack of investment in R & D. The fund has been established in response to these and other challenges.

OVERSIGHT The Marine Manufacturing Industry Innovation Fund (MMIIF) committee will be taking on the role of oversight and adjudication of the fund. The committee is made up of representatives from MIASA, SA Boat Builders Export Council, Department of Science and Technology, SAMSA, the Department of Trade and Industry and three universities: MMU, Stellenbosch and University of Cape Town. MIASA is a non-profit industry association established in 2011. It is headed by its CEO, Vanessa Davidson along with an executive committee, a technical committee, skills committee, MMIIFF committee and members of the International Council of Marine Industries Association (ICOMIA). Through the establishment of this fund it is hoped that there will be an increased focus on scientific research and innovation and this will ultimately translate into increased investment and increased global competitiveness. By Natalie Janse


Ship repair and boat building

FEATURE

Africa’s largest trailing-suction dredger under construction

C

onstruction of Transnet National Ports Authority’s (TNPA) Dredging Service’s third new dredger is underway following the keel laying ceremony performed jointly by TNPA and IHC at their shipbuilding yard in Rotterdam during January.

During the TNPA/IHC ceremony a Mandela coin was symbolically placed underneath the keel of the dredger. When construction of the dredger is complete the coin will sail to Durban with the dredger and be returned to TNPA.

The not yet named 5,500 cubic metre trailing-suction hopper dredger will be the largest in Africa and the third to be built as part of a more than R2 billion programme to renew the dredging fleet. The contract for its construction was awarded to IHC in 2014 and it will replace the 2800m3 Ingwenya. The launching ceremony is planned for May and an earlier than expected delivery is set for the end January 2016. The dredger is the largest in Africa and is self-sufficient in that it comes with its own workboat. The workboat, among its many tasks, will be used as hydrographic survey boat. This trailing suction dredger will be fitted with the latest technology and the estimated 1,400 tons of steel used in the dredger is being imported from South Africa.

 TNPA and IHC at the keel laying ceremony

for the new 5,500 cubic metre trailing suction dredger being built in Rotterdam

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

27


FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

Steel manufacturer attains global recognition

T

he Scaw Metals Group has recently received DNV accreditation at its Cape Town branch, to certify its wire rope slings and attachments in accordance with DNV specification 2.7-1. under direct authority from DNV-GL. DNV-GL is acknowledged as one of the world’s leading certification bodies offering the latest in management systems certification services. This ground-breaking achievement, together with the existing DNV type approval of Scaw’s Chain Division (MckinnonŽ), re-enforces Scaw’s position as a leading quality supplier of products to the maritime and lifting industries worldwide. The accreditation holds significance as the increasing offshore and marine industry along the West, South and East coasts of Africa requires lifting slings to be certified by an accredited body prior to delivery. Further to this it benefits Scaw by allowing their clients to now purchase lifting equipment in the full knowledge that it complies with the stringent requirements of the DNV specification, as well as receive a DNV certificate issued by Scaw. The Type Approval of Scaw Chain division and their primary supplier, Crosby Europe, for components used in the manufacturing process further compliments this achievement. “The accomplishment is the perfect platform for us to show our high-quality products to our industry counterparts. And gives the organisation a competitive standing alongside global players,� said Markus Hannemann, CEO of the Scaw Metals Group. Management applauds the Cape Town branch for their commitment of taking a major step in driving the organisation to become more efficient. The Scaw Cape Town branch set itself a target to achieve this recognition in view of the benefits it could derive in the oil industry. The branch management team under the guidance and dedication of its Rigging Superintendent embarked on the journey to achieve this target. It required every component of the lifting set to be analysed and tested in accordance with the DNV requirements.

Keeping river waterways navigable in Nigeria

D

amen has sold two more vessels to a long term Nigerian customer. A tug, type STU2208, and a cutter suction dredger, type CSD500, arrived at their upriver operating point at the beginning of the year where they will assist in keeping the river navigable.

its hydraulic deck crane. Furthermore the PASAM is a standby Fire Fighting vessel as it has been fitted out with a complete FiFi installation. The PASAM has unrestricted navigation class approval, and sailed from the Netherlands to Nigeria on its own keel in three weeks.

The Nigerian customer has well chosen the vessels names: PASAM for the tug meaning Daddy Sam, and DASERAH for the CSD500 meaning Mummy Serah. Both vessels will be working alongside a CSD500 delivered by Damen previously. Their main aim is ensuring the accessibility of an inland port, used by a fuel depot.

The CSD500 DASERAH is a standard Damen cutter suction dredger fitted out for a max dredging depth of 14m. It has been enhanced by a number of option packages, including anchor booms and a spud carriage pontoon for boosting its efficiency. Adding the NAGUARD survey software package has perfected the dredging accuracy. In addition discharge piping afloat and on land was included in the package delivery.

The cutter suction dredger will perform continuous maintenance dredging on the river, where sand banks keep impacting on the navigability. The tug will tow fuel barges and assist during the mooring process of these barges. Moreover the tug will assist the dredger for relocations, for refuelling, and jobs as anchor handling using

Both the tug and the dredger have been commissioned on location by Damen Field Service engineers and have started their respective jobs.

 The PASAM assisting at the assembly of the DASERAH at Port Harcourt at sunset

 The DASERAH seen from the cutter unit

George Katergarakis, Executive Head of Sales and Marketing says, “We are truly impressed with what the branch has achieved.�

 The PASAM assisting the assembly of the DASERAH at Port Harcourt along the transport vessel 28

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015


Abnormal lift catches the tide for patrol vessel launch

T

ime and tide wait for no man, it is said, so specialist heavy lift and abnormal load transport solutions company Vanguard ensured precision timing for the jacking and lifting of a 310 tonne patrol vessel from the Damen shipyard to the synchrolift at the Victoria and Albert Waterfront precinct of Cape Town harbour late last year.

RESPONSIVE POWER FOR PROPULSION AND AUXILIARY DUTIES

“Missing the optimal launch time of 04.30 am on a Friday morning could have meant a 28-day delay before the next opportunity, so there was no lee-way for any hold-ups or errors,� said project engineer Roland Cumings, who worked with the team from Vanguard’s Cape Town branch on the contract. At over 50 metres long, the vessel was jacked from its cradle at the shipyard and transported by Vanguard’s 22-axle self-propelled modular trailer configuration over a distance of about five kilometres to the port. These self-propelled modular trailer configurations have the capacity to carry over 1,000 tonnes, are well suited for load-in and load-out barging operations and are steered remotely by an experienced operator. “As the waterfront area has grown and developed, it has become busier and more built up, creating certain challenges for the movement of abnormal loads,� said Cumings. Having planned meticulously for this project, we were able to guide the remotely-operated trailer without a hitch to the destination.� After loading the vessel at the shipyard during the Wednesday, it was moved to a holding area that night to accommodate traffic and cause as little disruption as possible. The transporting began mid-morning on the Thursday, and by the afternoon was installed on the bogeys at the synchrolift, ready for the tide in the early hours of the Friday morning. The synchrolift, situated at the Albert Basin, lowered the vessel into the water on a platform with nine pairs of synchronous, steel wire rope winches along the support jetties. “The five days that our Cape Town branch spent to engineer the solution required by Damen ensured that all specialised equipment was mobilised on time and every detail of the operation was planned,� he said. “It allowed us to confidently meet the strict two-day deadline for this important contract.� Vanguard’s expertise and familiarity with the environment also contributed to the success of the operation; the company has previously moved vessels in the Cape Town port, the heaviest weighing over 600 tonnes.

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FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

Marine cluster responds to changing market The DCD Marine Cluster, which incorporates DCD Marine Cape Town, Elgin Brown & Hamer South Africa (EBH SA) as well as Elgin Brown & Hamer Namibia (EBH Namibia), is focusing on ongoing capacity building and skills training in order to respond to anticipated changes in the market.

F

or Gerry Klos, Managing Director of the DCD Marine Cluster, it is incumbent on players in the industry to be flexible and responsive to changing market challenges and demands. “The offshore repair market is all about the power of prediction,” says Klos. “You need to anticipate the changes in markets and future trends which may affect the shipping industry. “The shipping market is, of its nature, very cyclical – characterised by periods of intense activity around projects; and then times which are quieter. It is therefore vitally important to study international trends very carefully before investing in infrastructure or adding capacity,” he says. “While oil and gas exploration has become a major driver of infrastructure development, it is not always easy to quantify. There are many variables - markets change and the process of analysis is

therefore ongoing.” “The acquisition of EBH and the subsequent formation of the DCD Marine Cluster resulted in the leveraging of EBH’s strong brand and DCD’S established marine track record to boost our mutual global competitiveness,” says Klos. “The DCD Marine Cluster, through its combined resources and synergies, is now able to offer the market an enhanced level of service and expertise. Moreover, we are able to offer clients several docking possibilities at various ports spanning the east and west African coastline; as well as a greater footprint in terms of workshop and dry dock or floating dock facilities.”

Optimal service through skills development Ongoing development of infrastructure, such as Namdock 3 and A-Berth, has important implications for the future of

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the DCD Marine Cluster as a whole, notes Klos. “As you invest in additional capacity, so you have to upgrade skills, administration and ancillary services. During a company’s growth phase it is especially important to develop skills in order to continue to deliver optimum levels of service,” he says. “In terms of skills, the DCD Marine Cluster has resulted in enormous opportunities for synergy,” he adds. “As explained, the nature of the industry is that there are peaks and troughs in demand and workload. In peak times it can sometimes be difficult to supply adequate skills and services to the industry. Within the Cluster, we can now ‘pool our resources’, which provides our clients with a better service, ultimately.” Klos feels strongly that it is not only the responsibility of individual companies, but of the entire marine industry of South Africa to proactively grow the country’s skills base: “In a highly competitive and labour-intensive sector such as this, one cannot overstate the importance of sustainable job creation and ongoing skills development.”


Ship repair and boat building

FEATURE

Load test facility meets industry needs

F

ollowing the announcement of an extensive investment to upgrade their load test facilities made last year, Cape Armature Winders (CAW), confirms that it is continuing to meet the needs of the oil and gas as well as rail sectors.

“The shipping market is, of its nature, very cyclical – characterised by periods of intense activity around projects; and then times which are quieter. It is therefore vitally important to study international trends very carefully before investing in infrastructure or adding capacity,� he says. He notes the fact that the shipbuilding and ship repair industries, internationally, employ millions of people, and thus have the capability of adding substantially to the national economy. This is because of the backwards and forwards linkages associated with job creation, also known as the ‘multiplier effect’.

The successful completion of specific contracts for Tronox, De Beers, Petro SA, the South African Navy and Chevron refinery has seen significant return on investment for the company. The fully PLC controlled system is able to accommodate a point of measurement and that motors can be tested at 60 Hertz thereby simulating marine applications and providing certainty on the performance of refurbished or repaired motors. “In addition the verification of performance and the ability to ensure system capability between motors and drives is recommended prior to storing critical spare motors. Precision torque measurements and power input measurements assess your electric motor’s performance,� says George Epenetos, explaining that all load testing is conducted by highly skilled engineers and experienced

load testing staff experts on site in Killarney Gardens. He confirms that the ability to undertake load testing on this scale has been welcomed by the industry who were previously sending motors to Johannesburg. The Cape Town option has provided local industry with a cheaper and quicker alternative. The test bay features include:

1600 amp 220 – 720 volts 50 and 60 Hertz 3300 to 6600 volts AC and DC supply Water-cooled eddy current dynometer

Computerised touch screen controls with printouts

Lock rotor for full load tests up to 450 kw in both directions

Temperature monitoring

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FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

Developing skills and jobs for continued growth W ith a focus on growth, familyowned South East Marine Services has already achieved significant traction over the last year and reports plans to further expand its staff complement during the course of 2015.

“We increased the staff by some 30 percent during 2014 and intend to expand this by another 60 percent this year,” says Chief Commercial Officer, Marc Petring who adds that job creation and skills development are important cornerstones of his mandate to promote growth at the

company.

It’s a tough ambition in times when many of the larger shipyards and marine services firms are downsizing in response to harsh market conditions, but Petring is optimistic about being able to attract new customers to their order book. “We actively canvassed the market last year and successfully managed to bring new clients onto the books,” he explains adding that this has helped them weather the storm and resulted in the increase of staff that allows them to complete con-

Reviewing the environmental impact of ship repair

E

lgin Brown & Hamer (EBH) Namibia has embarked on a number of initiatives in order to analyse and review its potential impact on the natural environment; and also to address concerns which may arise regarding its operations and potential environmental risks. The company is equally resolute in its compliance to local and global legislation. “As a responsible, internationally ISO-accredited business, EBH Namibia’s environmental ethos has always been focused on pollution prevention and we adhere very strictly to all governing port regulations,” says Hannes Uys, Chief Executive Officer. “Health, safety, security and care of the environment take precedence in all areas of EBH Namibia’s work and operations; and we have consistently maintained an operational environment which complies with international standards and all relevant Namibian legislation.” The company has recently embarked on a review of its current environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental management plan (EMP), with the assistance of external stakeholders, and has committed itself to ongoing environmental awareness campaigns within the organisation. In addition, EBH Namibia has recently engaged an internationally-accredited, independent expert to conduct analysis of water samples from Walvis Bay, which were compared with international standards. The subsequent report, which is still under review, has indicated that EBH Namibia is operating well within the international limits set for the protection of benthic and seashore fauna, coastal birds and sea birds. EBH Namibia’s strong safety ethos in-

32

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

cludes a commitment to providing a safe place of work for its employees, as well as being proactive in the prevention of emissions which may be harmful to the environment and the community, according to Uys. “We pride ourselves in not only looking after our own people, but also the wider community in which we operate. This involves ensuring a clean and healthy coastal region in which the people of Walvis Bay can work and play.” Uys says that this overriding aim has become particularly important in the light of the company’s recent growth in operational capacity following the inclusion of its third Panamax-sized floating dock in October 2013. “We have endeavoured to maintain sustainable business practices over the years, and this has contributed to our significant growth over a relatively short period of time. We hope to engage all stakeholders to make further strides towards environmental advocacy,” he says. “We are very aware of the proximity of our operations to one of Namibia’s richest and most important wetlands and its abundant fish and bird life. We will continue to be proactive by continually investing in measures to prevent the risk of water pollution and to ensure that our employees and the general public are not negatively affected by EBH’s operations in any way. EBH Namibia takes seriously the responsibility we have in not only safeguarding, but having a positive influence on, this beautiful environment in which we operate,” Uys concludes.

tracts without the need for additional crew from labour brokers. Petring adds that a focus on creating teams within the workforce has paid dividends as it has allowed for certain promotions from within and improved turnaround on projects. “We looked at our current workforce and focused on trying to move people up the ranks to create a cohesive team structure where we can rotate teams and move them around the business,” he says explaining how this ability to shift the workforce has created a multi-skilled team that is able to respond to their clients’ needs. With the added benefit of complete staff retention, Petring says that the anticipated growth for the coming year is in line with creating a stable business in unpredictable times. It’s a vision that he and his sister, who acts as the Chief Operational Officer, share with their father; and one that drives decisions to upskill staff as well as look at operational efficiencies for the future.

Available facilities still a challenge Situated directly adjacent to the Sturrock drydock in the port of Cape Town, Petring says that they obviously want to make optimum use of these ship repair facilities, but that a lack of maintenance continues to hamper this for the sector as a whole. “There is no shortage of people wanting to use the facilities, but our hands are tied,” he says referring to the lack of availability of working cranage at many of the ship repair facilities in Cape Town. “We need an action plan and we need to see an actual budget that addresses these issues.” Petring adds that a lack of priority in identifying critical maintenance issues seems to exist. He points to a recent decision to remove graffiti from the drydock walls rather than to allocate funds for fixing cranes and other critical infrastructure. “The non-functional cranes are now in the way and we have to pass on the cost of hiring additional cranes to the customer when it would be preferable to have access to proper working infrastructure,” he says. Indications, however, that Transnet National Port Authority (TNPA) are starting to re-open talks with industry does provide some light at the end of the tunnel for the sector.


Ship repair and boat building

FEATURE

Nigeria eyes investment in new drydock facilities Following the conclusion of a feasibility study into the establishment of a new dockyard within Nigeria, Nigeria LNG (NLNG) has called on investors to consider the building of a drydock to accommodate the company’s vessels whoch are currently being maintained outside of the country.

T

he dockyard, for location in Badagry, follows the conclusion of feasibility studies by Royal HaskoningDHV, an independent, international engineering and project management consultancy headquartered in the Netherlands. The studies come as one of the benefits of NLNG’s US$1.6 billion contract with shipbuilders, Samsung Heavy Industries and Hyundai Heavy Industries, for the building of six new vessels. “This dry-dock, when completed, holds huge potential for investors and for Nigeria. Our LNG vessels and very large crude carriers (VLCC) of other companies in the oil and gas, and marine industries, which are currently maintained overseas, resulting in millions of dollars in capital flight, will soon be maintained in-country with significant value-added for the Nigerian economy,” said Babs Omotowa, NLNG’s managing director and chief executive officer at an investors forum held in Lagos.

NLNG, leveraging on the agreement with the ship manufacturers, secured a number of lucrative opportunities beneficial to the Nigerian economy, including the training of about 600 young Nigerians in various aspects of shipbuilding, export of goods from Nigerian manufacturing companies, and the feasibility studies for building a dockyard. Feasibility studies for citing the drydock were carried out on seven locations — Badagry, Lekki FTZ, Ladol Island, Ogogoro Island, Olokola FTZ, Onne, Bonny — before consultants identified Badagry as the most suitable location for the dockyard. Observers of Nigeria’s maritime sector have long lamented the absence of an operational dockyard to cater for very large crude carriers (VLCCs) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers. Existing dockyards can only handle smaller vessels.

that owners of large vessels in Nigeria and the West African sub region, have had to pay large sums of money to access docking facilities located mainly in Asia, Europe and the Americas, that can accommodate such large vessels. The drydock is also planned to be operated and managed according to best international standards, and when completed, will generate revenue and add jobs to the economy. “I can confidently tell you that if we have a dockyard here, Nigeria LNG with its current 13 vessels in our fleet will be one of your patrons. When our company receives its six additional vessels from Samsung Heavy Industries and Hyundai Heavy Industries, those vessels will also be maintained here. I have no doubt the other players in Nigeria’s oil and gas industry will also be looking to service and maintain their vessels at this ship yard once it becomes operational,” said Capt Temi Okesanjo, Nigeria LNG’s General Manager, Shipping Division speaking to investors at the forum to discuss the potential of the proposed dockyard.

The absence of such a facility has meant

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

33


FEATURE

Ship repair and boat building

“Dormac has formally applied to operate a floating dock in Saldanha supported by our clients interests. Our exit of the Saldanha facility was because this approval was not granted. We have engaged at all levels on this.� the industry held a two-day workshop under the mediation of Peter Thomas to address concerns. A SWOT analysis was developed and a ship repair cluster established. However by June 2005 the then newly formed and now defunct Cape Shiprepair Initiative’s chairman stated once again that more effort needed to be put into getting existing equipment and infrastructure to operate adequately. Of course some years later there was the call from TNPA for proposals to priva-

tise the ship repair facilities in all of the ports. By April 2011, the industry was still waiting for a response to their bids and soon thereafter TNPA abandoned the plan altogether. And so in 2015 with Operation Phakisa’s Initiative 5 on the table, the same old issues are once again receiving attention. This time the potential impact of unstalling the marine manufacturing sector has reached the presidency; this time set timelines are being presented; this time TNPA is being compelled to meet deadlines and this time we can only OPERATION PHAKISA - Initiative 5 hope that action will follow talk. DURBAN DATES Operation Phakisa, however, aims to not only address existing Replacement of drydock south side crane rail 2015 to 2018 facilities, but to also address the Repair drydock inner and outer caissons 2014 to 2017 need for additional infrastrucWelding equipment for workshop 24 2015 to 2016 ture development. Upgrade floating dock - feasibility study

2016 to 2018

Drydock Jib Cranes

2016 to 2019

Drydock forklift

2015 to 2016

Drydock compressors

2017 to 2018

Upgrade drydock infrastructure Feasibility and condition report Dockyard lighting E & M (pumps, valves, capstans) Repair concrete works

2016 to 2019 2018 to 2021 2015 to 2016

Ship repair facilities study

2014 to 2015

Electrical upgrade to overhead cranes at workshop 24

2015 to 2016

PORT OF EAST LONDON

DATES

Refurbishment of graving dock

2014 to 2019

Refurbishment of slipway area

2017 to 2019

PORT ELIZABETH

DATES

40 ton slipway refurbishment (including 90 ton boat hoist)

2014 to 2016

Replacement of lead-in jetties

2014 to 2017

Modifications to cradle to fit Voith Schneider tugs

2016 to 2017

PORT OF MOSSEL BAY

DATES

Refurbish cradle and side slipway

2016 to 2017

Reconstruct slipway lead-in jetty

2018 to 2019

Slipway upgrade

2017 to 2019

PORT OF CAPE TOWN

DATES

Sturrock Dock: refurbish floating caisson

2014 to 2015

Sturrock Dock: replace water circulating pumps

2014 to 2016

Widening and lengthening of repair quay

2015 to 2019

Replacement of ten cranes

2015 to 2018

Sturrock Dock: refurbish

2015 to 2019

Robinson Dock: refurbish

2015 to 2019

Syncrolift: refurbish

2014 to 2019

34

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Saldanha Bay development The potential for Saldanha Bay to accommodate rig repair and new building projects was identified early on the history of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance and the bay has seen a number of successful projects. Despite the Mossgas quay and laydown area being the only formalised areas, TNPA made other areas of the port available to the industry and it has been largely acknowledged that the port would be developed to formally welcome rig repair business. The Cape Town shipyards rose to the challenge and invested in projects, training and future planning that revolved around access to Berth 204 and the announcement that an additional berth would be built in the very near future. News that Berth 204 was to be used for manganese scuppered the industry’s ability to effectively use the port in the interim and effectively closed the door to new generation rigs to be hosted anywhere in South Africa except Ngqura. Operation Phakisa, however, offers an ambitious plan for the

port post 2018. These were outlined at a press conference in Saldanha Bay at the beginning of February. Listed as Initiative 2 on Phakisa’s menu, Saldanha Bay will be developed to include:  An offshore Supply Base  A Rig repair facility (extension of the quay beyond Quay 204 to create Quay 205)  A jetty at the Mossgas quay The timelines are nothing less than aggressive and port manager, Willem Roux acknowledged that these would put the Authority under tremendous pressure. “We have to commit to Operation Phakisa. Our timelines have been overtaken by Phakisa,� he told the media, highlighting that a Transaction Advisor would be appointed during February to oversee the process of calling for bids as well as awarding the tender by September this year. TNPA believes that the appetite for the project will come from international bidders, but some hope to see the investment include a local flavour. Interestingly the executive summary emanating from the Ocean Lab process sees the bulk of funding for the Saldanha Bay initiatives coming from TNPA, whereas the media conference seemed to confirm that TNPA is likely to seek a Build Own Operate Transfer (BOOT) partner to foot the larger portion of the bill and invest in both wet and dry infrastructure of Quay 205 as well as the jetty. President Zuma, in his State of the Nation Address, also seemed to imply that the government had committed to the funding for the project. The plan, nevertheless, is to have the two new facilities operational on 1 January 1 2018 – a very ambitious timeline and one that has some industry sources shaking their heads in the light of the processes that will have to be followed as well as realistic time-frames for the actual construction required.

Options for floating docks South Africa currently only has floating docks in Durban where the privately owned facilities are operational, but the TNPA facility is not. There has long been a drive from industry to secure approval to own and operate more of this type of facility in other South African ports, but with little success. In 2004, Cape Town seemed poised to welcome its own floating dock with Willem Kruk of Elgin Brown and Hamer announced that the company had already identified a suitable 180 m x 35 m dock


Ship repair and boat building that would add to the ship repair asset base for the shipyard. The dock never materialised. Saldanha Bay too has been eyed as a potential host to such a facility and the Ocean Lab process suggested the inclusion of this within the initiatives identified for Saldanha Bay. According to initial presentations from the lab, it would be feasible to commission a floating dock off the Mossgas quay by December 2016. Strangely, however, this idea seems to have been dropped from the line-up of new potential developments for the port and Tau Morwe announced at the February media briefing; “there is no appetite locally to bring in a floating dock to Saldanha Bay”. This is simply not true as Chris Sparg of Dormac confirms: “Dormac has formally applied to operate a floating dock in Saldanha supported by our clients interests. Our exit of the Saldanha facility was because this approval was not granted. We have engaged at all levels on this.” Sparg adds that they are proceeding with plans to procure such a facility for Durban and have also been awarded the approval to operate a floating dock in Walvis Bay, Namibia. In Initiative 7 of Operation Phakisa, the plans for Richards Bay, which include the addition of a floating dock to the port, are outlined. Richards Bay continues to attract attention as a potential ship and rig repair destination. Talk of establishing a graving dock in the port continued for a number of years and the idea seemed to have achieved a lift off some two years back when news of a deal with a Chinese shipyard surfaced, but subsequently never materialised. Now Operation Phakisa aims to “quantify and unlock opportunities in oil and gas, ship or rig repair and maritime vessel building in line with market requirements in Richards Bay”.

East London on the radar Phakisa’s plans for East London are de-

FEATURE

Working the ship repair market

A

cknowledging trends in the marine manufacturing sector, Sean Jansen of Marine Solutions says that he is surprised at the lack of penetration into Africa by some of the bigger names in the South African ship repair scene. “International companies are investing in Africa and some of the smaller sub-contractors that we represent have experienced success in these markets,” he says adding that a willingness to diversify to meet market needs has helped them in this regard. He adds that the current focus on price competitiveness – especially being demanded by the oil sector in the light of the price of crude – means that there is scope for traditional subcontractors to work directly with the client and offer competitive prices without mark-ups. “Today you have so many more of the smaller guys getting in to quote. The bottom line is; can you do the job safely and what is the price?” he says adding that this is an opportune market for him and the companies that he markets in the sector. He is, however, concerned at the lack of large projects being attracted to the ports. “It does not matter who you are – if we don’t have anything coming into the harbour – eventually the whole industry will just die. Projects are being cancelled and rigs are passing by without stopping,” he says adding that the industry is unpredictable and can change at any time. His ability to tap into the diverse nature of services and products through the companies that he represents has seen him able to adapt to projects. Looking ahead to prospects for 2015, Jansen says he is hoping to see one or two big projects being attracted into the port of Cape Town.

scribed in Initiative 8 and aim to provide incentives for the boat or shipbuilding industry as well as give this sector preferential access to the Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) land. An estimated R515 million (R215 m from TNPA and R300 m from the private sector) is required for development programmes that include the refurbishment of the slipway in the port with a completion date of August 2015. Not traditionally seen as the boat-building hub of South Africa, East London’s development in this regard has raised some eyebrows and the meeting between TNPA and industry at the beginning of February highlighted the need to review these plans. Industry stakeholders close to this sector believe that there is a more pressing need to further capacitate existing manufacturers in the traditional boat-building ports of Cape Town, Durban and Port

Elizabeth.

Playing catch-up In the interim Namibia’s investment in Walvis Bay has lead to the arrival of a number of floating docks and the beginnings of a ship repair yard with significant private investment involvement. Projects are being lured there and further afield to Las Palmas and even South America. South Africa does not have the luxury of time and the deadlines associated with Operation Phakisa - however ambitious they may seem - are vitally important to an industry sector that could potentially create employment and economic growth. The current situation is far from healthy as retrenchments and lost opportunities to attract work to the ports will see the industry continuously playing a catch-up game until facilities are improved.

Marine Solutions Marine-Solutions is focused on marketing within the ship repair industry in Cape Town. We also believe that we can help you secure a competitive costing and deliver an excellent service to all your ship repair needs. Marine-Solutions deliver through partnerships and only use companies that have the same high standards that are needed in the ship repair market.

www.marine-solutions.co Cell: +27 (0)73 212 2882 Email: sean@marine-solutions.co MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

35


MARITIME NEWS

Industry updates

UNSAFE PORTS AND BERTHS There have been several reported incidents in Durban where vessels have either grounded alongside a berth or just near a berth. These incidents immediately raised concern amongst port operators and users as to whether Durban could be declared an unsafe port in terms of contracts between Owners and Charterers. The MV Ocean Victory casualty at Kashima, Japan, in 2006 resulted in a claim against a charterer and reminded charterers of the legal obligations that they may take on when warranting in the charter party that the vessel will be trading between safe ports, berths and anchorages.

A

n investigation into each grounding will obviously need to take place in order to determine the facts in question. One such investigation revealed that the master had declared the wrong draught, which resulted in the vessel grounding. In light of the groundings in Durban, the port prudently looked at the draughts in the port and immediately reduced the under keel clearance (UKC) in the port by 30cm. This decision had an immediate impact on the industry for at the time, there were a number of vessels on the water sailing to Durban that were within the draught restrictions for Durban and there were a number of consortium agreements in place in order to bring larger vessels to Durban. These contracts were agreed based on the draught restrictions

in place at the time. All ports have some element of danger. This will, however, not render a port unsafe if these dangers can be overcome by the ordinary skill of the master. Dangers that are avoidable by ordinary good navigation and seamanship do not render a port unsafe. There is often a risk that a vessel can be damaged when entering, at berth or leaving a port. This may result in hull repair costs, but also result in delays in addition to liabilities for third party property damage. Shipowners will often try to recover these losses from charterers on the basis of an alleged failure by the charterer to order the vessel to a safe port, berth or anchorage depending on the contractual terms contained in the charter party.

Increase in stevedore damage claims in Mozambique

A

ccording to a brief issued by the legal team at Bowman Gilfillan, there has been an increase in the number of reports of stevedore damage to ships in the Port of Beira, which is managed and operated by the Port Authority, Cornelder de Mozambique (CdM) with stevedores under their employ. The firm warns that the common law liability of the vessel owner for stevedore damage can shift to the vessel’s charterers, depending on the clauses contained in charterparties and, in particular, stevedore damage clauses. CdM’s Operational and Commercial Regulations for the Container and General Cargo Terminals establish the terms and conditions to which users of the port are subject and in relation to any services provided by the Port Authority. The relevant sections pertaining to Responsibility of a Ship are provided for in Article 48, which states that: “The respective captain who supervises and commands cargohandling operations shall be exclusively responsible for everything which occurs inside or from the inside of the ship, whether the operation is executed by a member of the crew, or by a person extraneous to it, contracted, or not, by the ship or its agent. “The owners of a ship, or the person representing them, shall be liable on the terms on which principals are liable for the acts of their agents, for all damage or losses caused to the ship itself, or to cargo, by stevedores, operators of equipment, gate clerks or any other persons who execute the operation in which damage or loss arises, provided that such damage or losses occur within or from inside the ship. “The liability of the ship, or of its representative, shall cease when the damage or loss, or when the operation from which the damage or loss arose, is ascertained to have taken place outside of, or from outside of the ship. Bowman Gilfillan emphasise that CdM can rely on its regulations to avoid claims for any stevedore damage that may occur in its port. “This will prove difficult for parties to recover any claims from stevedores and the damage may have to lie where it falls contractually. Owners and charterers should be aware of this and are advised to bring this matter to the attention of their P&I Clubs and Hull Underwriters,” they say.

36

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Contractual liabilities In contract law, some contractual terms can be expressed or implied. It is expected that the vessel will trade between safe ports and safe berths. Often charterers give an express warranty for the safety of the port and berth. For example, clause 5 of the New York Produce Exchange (NYPE) charter 93 provides that the vessel shall be employed between “safe ports and safe places”. So, when charterers consider their liability under the charter party in respect of a grounding incident, they should keep in mind that they have probably given an express warranty for the safety of the port or berth. If this is not expressly mentioned in the charter party terms, then in most cases, the courts will not imply such a warranty. However, if the charter party terms simply provide for a geographical range of unnamed ports, then the matter may be different and the warranty may be implied. If there is a safety warranty (whether expressed or implied) then one must ask when does the obligation arise? The general view is that it arises when the charterers order the vessel to proceed to a port or berth. This means that a berth that was safe can now be unsafe as a result of an incident or the berth could be unsafe and made safe prior to the vessels arrival. Changing circumstances Circumstances change very quickly in shipping and an initially safe berth can be rendered unsafe simply, for example, by change in weather conditions. It is therefore imperative that a charterer makes prudent enquiries regarding circumstances in a port prior to a vessel’s arrival just in case the circumstances have changed and the vessel needs to proceed to another port in order to deliver the cargo. In this regard, port agents and P&I correspondents are best placed to provide up-to-date information on a port or berth or any problems associated with a particular port. This information is also freely publicised by port managers. The general view is that at the time the port needs to be safe for the ship to reach, use and leave it. Charterers who repeatedly insist on ordering a vessel to an unsafe port could be in serious breach of the charter party. Defining a safe port So what does the word “safe” actually mean? The accepted view is that a port will not be safe unless at the relevant time the ship can reach it and use it, without in the absence of abnormal occurrence,


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MARITIME NEWS

Industry updates

being exposed to danger that cannot be avoided by good navigation and seamanship. The above relates to physical safety, but a charterer can also warrant that a port is also politically or legally safe. This issue can arise where the local political and legal system does not provide effective legal remedies to resolve disputes. If a vessel is damaged and/or delayed as a result of an incident then the owner of the vessel could hold the charterer responsible for the damage and/or losses under the charter party. Owners will seek to claim that the loss was caused by an allegedly unsafe port or berth to which charterers ordered the vessel to proceed. In such a case it is important to be aware of what evidence should be collected in relation to any incident. In a case where, for example, an abnormal occurrence causes damage to a vessel (such as an exceptional storm), the port will not be considered unsafe. A port will only be unsafe if the danger derives from its own attributes.

Innovation in East London

T

ransnet Port Terminals (TPT) is introducing an additional method of handling vehicles ready for export at its Multi-Purpose Terminal (MPT) in East London. In an innovative move, cars will now be loaded into containers prior to shipment, rather than directly driven onto the vessel, which will in turn ensure faster turnaround times for the terminal, as well as economic spin-offs for region. This new car containerisation project, already in operation since December 2014, is set to increase automotive volumes by 22,000 per annum and increase container twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) by 14,600 TEUs per annum. TPT has invested in the region of R200,000 to ensure that the East London MPT has the adequate infrastructure needed for the project. “TPT is excited to implement this new method of transporting cars in the region, which will provide our clients with access to new export markets and innovative supply chain solutions. In addition, this project will boost the much needed volumes for the auto sector, building foreign direct investment confidence for East London,� says operations manager at the East London Car Terminal, Prince Mangayi. “In support of economic growth in the region, Transnet Port Terminals continues to find ways of diversifying its services to meet customer demand,� says TPT’s General Manager for Eastern Cape operations, Siyabulela Mhlaluka. Mangayi adds, �Since the new project’s inception, the East London MPT loaded an impressive 1674 units, which is a 3 percent increase from before.� “It is expected that the project will promote job creation and skills development, thereby positively contributing towards the TPT business and the East London economy,� says Nelisiwe Mbenekazi, Terminal Manager at the East London MPT.

Investigating incidents The on board investigation into any grounding or damage to a vessel should determine the chain of events that resulted in the incident. A charterer would not be held liable if there is an element of negligence in the master’s or pilot’s actions. This may also be the case where the master sees the danger, but fails to take action to avoid the danger. For example, the master sees that a fender is missing on the berth yet continues to berth the vessel. Shipping accidents can be extremely expensive and costly for all those involved. Some expensive claims have arisen simply from a vessel breaking her mooring lines. Two such cases arose in Durban recently when a strong storm caused the vessels to snap their mooring lines and as a result, one ship then struck another. The question that arose was whether the vessels were aware of the impending storm and whether before the storm struck they took preventative action by checking mooring lines or doubling up on mooring lines. The general view is that should a port not be properly dredged or should it fail to give adequate warnings to vessels about dredging works then this could result in an unsafe port claim under a charter party safety warranty clause. Durban is Africa’s busiest port and it would be a serious issue should it be physically unsafe or system failure in the port. By Michael Heads, P&I Associates Durban.

38

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

 The new car containerisation project, already in operation since December 2014, is set to increase automotive volumes by 22,000 per annum

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Nigerian investment in port equipment A

PM Terminals placed an order for 16 new advanced Rubber-Tire Gantry cranes (RTGs) as part of an ongoing programme of upgrading and expanding container handling capabilities and capacities throughout the APM Terminals Global Terminal Network. Four of the high-performance RTGs are scheduled for delivery to APM Terminals Apapa, Nigeria, with delivery in one year. The new 16-wheeled RTGs, to be manufactured by Konecranes, will offer a lifting capacity of 41 tons, and the ability to maneuver containers into stacks five containers high. The four RTGs ordered for APM Terminals Apapa, the busiest container terminal in West Africa, will bring the total fleet to 14 RTGs. A USD $135 million investment and expansion programme was announced for APM Terminals Apapa in 2011. APM Terminals has invested USD $220 million in Apapa since assuming the concession in 2006 and has significantly improved terminal productivity. APM Terminals Apapa is the largest container facility by capacity of the three ports serving Lagos, Nigeria’s largest city and business center. APM Terminals Apapa has doubled container volume in the past eight years and has dramatically improved productivity for Nigeria’s inbound containers.

Competition court paves way for fishing rights acquisition

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ceana announced the decision by the Competition Appeal Court to uphold its appeal and in so doing confirm its entitlement to include the pelagic fishing rights in its proposed acquisition of Foodcorp.

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Oceana Group’s CEO, Francois Kuttel, said that in the absence of securing the pelagic fishing rights, the company could have not gone ahead with the deal. The pelagic fishing rights were a commercial imperative for the acquisition to proceed. The R400m deal will involve Oceana acquiring Foodcorp’s fishing business, which consists of the business of catching, processing and selling deep-sea trawl hake, south coast lobster and pelagic fish. Excluded from the acquisition is Foodcorp’s west coast lobster and hake long-line fishing rights. “Over half of our canned pilchards are currently imported from 12 canneries we have established internationally. We now want to look at replacing some of these imports by using Foodcorp’s pelagic fishing rights.” “We argued from the start that we were best placed to secure Foodcorp’s long term future and this has been a very long and arduous process. What is critical is the sense of security and certainty this now brings to the approximately 1,000 employees of Foodcorp. They have been in a state of limbo since the process first started, which must have been very unsettling for them.”

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MARITIME NEWS

Industry updates

R9 million in a new laydown area T

he Coega Development Corporation (CDC) will invest R9-million in the establishment of a new laydown area, serving as a temporary storage site for abnormal cargo. The lay down area, located on the boundary between the Port of Ngqura and the Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ), will stretch across 12 hectares of land in Zone 1. To date, the Port of Ngqura has been the port of entry for major abnormalsized equipment, particularly wind turbine components and items such as the cold box units for the Afrox and Air Products air separation units, among others. The deep-water Port of Ngqura is a transhipment hub and an ideal entry point to South Africa for abnormal cargo due to the draft depth, dedicated berth for general cargo and uncongestiveness of port operations. The ease of movement and good road condition from the port through Coega IDZ onto the national road (N2) is an additional benefit to shipping to and from the Port of Ngqura.

“The laydown area thus provides an essential component to the logistics value chain; enabling cargo short-to-medium term storage,” says Linda Sityoshwana, CDC’s trade solutions project manager. The development of the laydown area entails two phases over the next year, and ambitious plans are also on the horizon to develop the area into a hub of maritime economic activity. “In Phase One of the project, the CDC will establish a multi-user facility for abnormal and out of gauge cargo storage, such as components of renewable energy manufacturing enterprises in the IDZ,” says Sityoshwana. “It is further possible that maintenance work for marine drilling or production rigs can also take place in this designated area, so closely situated to the Port of Ngqura. In fact IDZ’s are designed in part to offer such back-of-port services.” It is foreseen that during Phase Two, which will be undertaken within the

2015/2016 financial year, Zone 1 will be declared a customs controlled area (CCA). This means that users of the laydown area will be able to benefit from the duty and VAT incentives available within a customs controlled area. Zone 2 of the Coega IDZ has already been designated a CCA in May 2014. Future investors and tenants likely to make use of the laydown also include Project Mthombo, the ferrous metals plants, and the biofuels facilities. The laydown area will allow tenants of the area to move cargo between the port and IDZ, within an allocated space through a dedicated entrance, reducing heavy traffic on the main entrance route to the port. According to Dr Ayanda Vilakazi, CDC head of marketing and communications, the lay down area will further enhance Nelson Mandela Bay as world-class investment destination by leveraging the Coega IDZ and the Port of Ngqura as a transhipment hub and geostrategic point for the export and import of manufactured goods.

DAFF meets with fishing industry

T

he Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Senzeni Zokwana and his Deputy Minister, General Bheki Cele, met with the captains of the fishing industry at the beginning of February.

Large Pelagics

10 yrs

01 Mar 05 28 Feb 15 29 Feb 16

West Coast Rock Lobster

10 yrs

15 Nov 05 31 Jul 15 29 Feb 16

West Coast Rock Lobster

10 yrs

15 Nov 05 31 Jul 15 29 Feb 16

Patagonian Tooth Fish

10 yrs

12 Jan 06 30 Oct 15 29 Feb 16

Hake In-shore Trawl

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

The extension is effective from 28 February 2015 to 29 February 2016. This extension will allow the department to prepare for the upcoming Fishing Rights Allocation Process (FRAP) 2015/16. Futhermore, the extension will help to establish a well-managed and transparent process that will foster efficiency and accountability for the FRAP 15/16 course of action.

Horse Mackerel

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

Seaweed

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

KwaZulu-Natal Beach Seine 10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

The Minister concluded by mentioning that “This year, we will see the implementation of the Small-scale Fisheries Policy. This means over and above the long-term rights, allocation to Smallscale Fisheries will also during this same period be realised.”

Net Fish

10 yrs

01 Jan 06 31 Dec 15 29 Feb 16

Minister Zokwana emphasised that the department’s commitment to ensuring that the highest standard of governance is maintained to protect and manage marine resources. He also announced that, in terms of section 81 Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act No. 18 of 1998) he will exempt all right holders whose rights are due to expire in 2015 from section 18(1) of the Act. This exemption will grant an extension for a period of one year. “After careful consideration, I have decided it will be sensible to grant an exemption to the current fishing rights holders,” said the Minister.

(Tuna and Swordfish Longline) (Offshore)

(Nearshore)

Fish processing establishment 15 yrs 01 Jan 02 31 Dec 16 31 Dec 16 *Read more about this on p. 8

HOAX SINKING

NAMIBIAN REINFORCEMENT

INCREASED FOCUS

DECADE MILESTONE

A hoax email was circulated in January purporting to show pictures of a ship sinking in the Durban harbour. Transnet National Ports Authority was quick to respond and assure port users that no such incident occurred.

ENSafrica’s shipping and logistics offering has been further reinforced after joining forces with a prominent Namibian law firm, Lorentz Angula (LA) as of November last year. This expanded capability aims to enhance the company’s breadth and depth of expertise.

With the aim to create a wider focus and increase its membership base, the South African Shippers Council recently took the decision to seek a name change to “The South African Shippers Transport and Logistics Council (SASTaLC)”. This, along with a three-year strategy programme, is to be presented for adoption at the next Annual General Meeting.

Smit Amandla Marine celebrates ten years of operation as a black empowered marine solutions provider following its establishment in South Africa in 2005. Employees, who own 12 percent of the company, aim to drive the consistent growth, a progressive safety culture and peak productivity across the board.

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015


Marine mining and offshore exploration

What happens when we revalue oil?

OFFSHORE NEWS

Ghana’s oil hub gains momentum

G

hana’s oil and gas services hub is gaining momentum as part of the Takoradi Port expansion programme and reports are that many major players in the Ghanaian oil and gas sector have already signed lease agreements. Companies involved in the establishment of the hub include Schulmberger, Viking/Halliburton, Tullow, Conship, Bollore, Supermaritime and Subsea 7.

Despite assurances that the current low oil price represents the normal cyclical nature of the industry as well as the fact that the major players will adopt a long term perspective that will see investment and development continue – the nose dive of a per barrel price to under $60 cannot be said to have had little effect or be insignificant for those companies that have grown to meet the needs of servicing the offshore exploration sector. Many of these companies have a business plan that was reading well while oil prices climbed, but will require some editing within the current oil story line.

F

rom 2010 to the middle of last year, many executives that were lapping up high salaries from the bowl of cream or charging rates based on an entirely different oil value will have to reconsider how their companies remain in business. So what happens when we revalue the price of oil? According to most in the industry, the decision to point oil prices towards $50 per barrel is a direct result of the Saudi’s resolution to claim market share and remove higher-priced new exploration from the menu. There is some debate as to which markets can operate at what price levels, but the consensus is that the Saudi’s can supply for a sustained period at the lowest prices.

Impact on employment tenure While there has been obvious job attrition within the service sector and some companies have been cutting staff num-

bers in a similarly calculating manner to the way that Eskom sheds its load, there has been a serious attempt made to retain skills. Some of the smaller companies have been more successful in this regard – having opted to remain lean with multiskilled workers, they are not resorting to the massive layoffs being undertaken by the larger companies. Media articles are awash with news of layoffs at not only the oil majors, but also massive suppliers such as ConocoPhillips, Schlumberger, Halliburton and Baker Hughes. South African and African firms are not immune. Marine manufacturing and engineering companies are well into the retrenchment processes – with some citing not just the dropping oil price, but also the lack of available facilities and infrastructure to attract what work is available to their yards.

The former cocoa and sawn timber sheds have been demolished to make way for the construction of the Oil hub to service the oil fields of Ghana and the West African sub-region. Both these commodities are now being accommodated elsewhere and transported by truck to the port. Subsea 7 has already broken ground with the completion of their offices, workshops and warehouses. They have also completed the construction of their fabrication facility and have already commenced the $600 million contract for Tullow with respect to the TEN project. The contract includes the fabrication of six suction pipes each weighing 110 tons and 18 sleepers each weighing 14 tons. In addition, 50 welding machines and two crawler cranes with 400 ton and 225 tons capacity have been positioned at the yard to assist in the handling of heavy lifts to and from the yard. In addition to the above, Subsea 7 is reclaiming 5,000 m2 area at the former log pond as an additional operational area. The 4,800 m2 former shed 4 area at the main wharf has been allocated to Baj Freight Company Limited, a key logistics company in the Oil and Gas industry, and is being re-enforced with pavement blocks to support the industry.

Continued over the page 

CONSTITUTIONALLY FLAWED

TIME CHARTER

BLOCK ACQUISITION

EPANDED OPORTUNITY

South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma has sent back the Mining and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill to the National Assembly because it does not pass “constitutional muster”. The Bill was sent back in terms of section 79(1) of the Constitution on the basis that the definition of “This Act” is likely unconstitutional.

In a decision to retire three of its smaller less efficient LNG carriers, Nigeria LNG Ltd (NLNG) has entered into an agreement with Golar LNG to time charter two more modern and technically advanced ships. Employment of the Golar Frost and Golar Crystal under these contracts commenced in January 2015 and will continue for approximately 12 months for each vessel.

Sterling Energy Mauritania Limited (Sterling), a subsidiary of Sterling Energy Plc, has signed a sale and purchase agreement with Tullow Mauritania Limited (Tullow) to acquire a 40.5 percent interest in the Production Sharing Contract for Block C-3, located offshore in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. Sterling will pay Tullow approximately US$2.5m in consideration and repayment of past costs.

Chevron Corporation (NYSE:CVX) has announced that its wholly-owned subsidiary Chevron Mauritania Exploration Limited has reached an agreement to acquire a 30 percent nonoperated working interest in Blocks C8, C12 and C13 offshore Mauritania from Kosmos Energy. The transaction is subject to the approval of Mauritania’s government.

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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OFFSHORE NEWS

Marine mining and offshore exploration

In a presentation to members of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance during January, Chris Bredenhann - PwC Africa Advisory Oil & Gas industry leader, warned against being too quick to retrench staff and skill-sets that would be difficult to recoup should the market turn. He said it was important to retain core competencies. Interestingly some smaller marine service companies report that they are expanding staff numbers and benefiting from the availability of scarce skill sets in the market place.

Economic agility Consultants are advising service com-

panies to develop economic nimbleness and agility as they respond to the call to sharpen pencils and even extend payment milestones. They say that there is an opportunity in the current culled oil price landscape to develop efficiencies and value adds to their services. Speaking as part of a panel discussion at the Break Bulk Africa congress in Johannesburg, Howie Frylinck, Trade Lane Manager Angola for GAC Laser International Logistics, commented on how the current environment is providing these opportunities to create positive outcomes in terms of how they respond to customers’ needs. “We are seeking ways of adding value at no additional cost,” he says.

Deepwater assets to sustain Angola

A

s the second largest oil producer in Africa, Angola is heavily dependent on the oil sector, making it vulnerable to oil price fluctuations. In addition, drilling costs offshore Angola are very high, and Douglas Westwood (DW) forecasts a resultant drop in deepwater completions in Angola in 2016. Despite this set-back, Angola’s deep and ultra-deep projects are key to driving offshore production during a period of reduced spending and retrenchment. DW does not expect to see projects that are past FID being cancelled and many projects have been under construction for a number of years and will start up in the coming three years. DW expects Angola to meet its 2015 target production of two million barrels of oil per day. As cuts to expenditure are announced, operators like BP and Total are looking to core assets in Angola as a focal point for spending over the next three years. Importantly, Total launched the development of the Kaombo ultra-deep project in April 2014, bringing online a potential 230,000 barrels of oil per day. Chevron, ExxonMobil and Eni also have major deepwater oil projects in Angola, collectively adding a peak capacity of nearly 1 million barrels per day. These are all due to start production before 2018. DW forecasts a dip of 2.3% in offshore oil production in 2016, before recovering to 2.2 million barrels of oil per day in 2021.

Opportunities It’s also an opportunity, ironically, for new smaller players to enter into the field into certain service sectors where they can offer attractive rates and are not burdened by massive overheads. Discussion around this opportunity at Break Bulk Africa focused on the fact that in less pricesensitive environments access to the majors was restricted by entrenched procurement structures. These are reportedly being eroded by the need to seek more cost-effective options. Independent African oil and gas consultant, Dave Wright, warns therefore that companies need to bolster themselves against giving the market away. “The opportunity now exists to innovate and do things differently and smarter,” he says. A need to tighten belts may also have an impact on promoting local content drivers. Ex-pat salaries are legendary in the oil game and increasing local content may help slim down the salary bill. An impetus to realise this dividend may well lead to relevant training and could result in long-term gains for the African workforce. The panel also highlighted how the oil price, which will have an impact on quelling the appetite for exploration and drilling, may have an unforeseen benefit that will make the “greenies” smile. Frylinck suggests that a moratorium on drilling and exploration projects may, in fact, give the earth time to “breathe”.

The downturn offers exploration opportunities for larger oil companies, with potential for expansion in Angola as smaller companies apply for farm-in partners and Sonangol aims to sustain investment. Eni have staked their claim, securing a three year extension for exploration work near their Angolan assets. Repsol has also displaced an exploratory vessel from the Canary Islands for a venture offshore Angola. A focus on core assets, and even the expansion of assets in Angola has been the message from several major oil companies at the start of 2015.

Offshore flare-out milestone for Nigerian offshore field

T

otal has completed the flare out of the Ofon field on Oil Mining Lease (OML) 102 offshore Nigeria. The associated gas of the Ofon field is now being compressed, evacuated to shore and monetised via Nigeria LNG. “The flare-out of the Ofon field illustrates our commitment to developing oil and gas resources around our existing hubs in Nigeria. This important milestone of the Phase Two of the Ofon project was achieved in a context of high levels of local content,” commented Guy Maurice, Senior Vice President Africa at Total Exploration & Production.

December 2014

The Ofon field is located 65 kilometres from Nigerian shores in water depths of 40 metres. The field initially commenced production in 1997 and is currently producing about 25,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day (boe/d). This flare-out milestone will allow for the gradual increase of production towards the 90,000 boe/d production target through monetization of around 100 million cubic feet of gas per day, followed later in 2015 by the drilling of additional wells. The execution of the project also involved significant local content, including the first living quarters platform to be fabricated in Nigeria. 

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

33 January 2014

45 47

January 2015

Offshore rig count for Africa Source: Baker Hughes


News impacting the global maritime industry sectors

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

PEMA highlights results of port equipment survey for 2013 The Port Equipment Manufacturers Association (PEMA) recently released its latest market surveys on global container port equipment deliveries. Prepared annually, the reports are key elements in the Association’s work of providing independent intelligence on handling equipment and technology trends in the ports and terminals sector.

T

he surveys are divided into three main equipment areas: ship-to-shore container cranes, yard container cranes and mobile port handling equipment, covering reach stackers, FLTs and terminal tractors. The latest editions include detailed global and regional delivery volumes for 2013, as well as delivery trend data for the period 2005-2013. After a sharp rebound in 2012, ship-toshore (STS) crane deliveries declined by 30 percent in 2013. During the year, 167 new

units were delivered, compared with 238 the year before. For the first time in many years, Europe was the largest regional market, taking 42 new STS cranes. China took 34 new units, down from 54 in 2013. Deliveries to the rest of Asia dropped by 75 percent, following completion of some major projects in Korea during 2012. Latin America accounted for 13 percent of the market, equating to 22 new STS cranes A total of 728 new yard cranes were delivered in 2013, up from 690 in 2012.

China

All mobile equipment types showed a decrease compared with 2012. Reach stackers were down 12 percent, with 1324 new units delivered. Laden FLTs declined 17 percent to 146 units. Empty FLTs dropped 5 percent to 671 units. Both 4×2 and 4×4 terminal tractors saw a 2 percent decline, at 1596 and 404 units respectively. However, terminal tractor data excludes North America, which is served by only two main suppliers and therefore does not meet PEMA’s regulatory reporting criteria. “These latest surveys are excellent examples of how PEMA is delivering on its promise to be an independent knowledge resource for the global ports and terminals sector. Our increasingly extensive range of surveys, information papers and recommendations provide the industry with unique insights into key issues facing manufacturers and the industry as a whole,” said PEMA President, Ottonel Popesco.

STS Deliveries

Latin America

Deliveries of new rubber-tyred gantry cranes (RTGs) dropped from 610 units in 2012 to 520 units in 2013. However, the rail-mounted gantry crane (RMG) segment saw dramatic growth of 145 percent, with 198 new RMGs delivered – the highest number ever recorded. Europe was the largest RMG market, taking 111 units, 84 of which were specifically identified as automated stacking cranes (ASCs). Of the RTGs delivered, 11 percent were identified as e-RTGs or variants, powered by electricity rather than diesel to reduce emissions and fossil fuel usage

Europe

A total of 728 new yard cranes were delivered, up from 520 during the previous year.

Separately, PEMA has just published an information paper on laser technology in ports and terminals. This was the 8th publication of its kind conducted by the Association, with other papers covering areas such as container weighing, RFID, environmental technologies, container yard automation and OCR. Last year, PEMA also produced its first major standards initiative, laying out protocols for a neutral software interface between container terminal operating systems (TOS) and container handling equipment (CHE) control systems.

ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

WORLDWIDE AGENCY SECURED

BUNKER FORUM

NEW SEAFARERS APP

Royal Boskalis Westminster NV and Van Oord have been awarded a contract by PT Muara Wisesa Samudra to design and construct an artificial island for the Dredging and Land Development Works for Pluit City off the coast of Jakarta, Indonesia. The contract is valued at EUR 350 million.

GAC has been appointed sole provider of hub agency services for the worldwide LNG fleet of BG Group. The agreement also covers crude oil and LPG shipments to accommodate BG Group’s expanding cargo range. The new five-year contract took effect on 1 January 2015.

The Port of Gibraltar will be showcasing its bunkering and marine services at the International Bunker Industry Association (IBIA) Regional Forum on 24-27 February. Speakers will include representatives from Peninsular Petroleum, World Fuel Services, Intertanko, Vopak, Vemaoil and Aegean.

Seafarers’ Rights International (SRI) have launched a new app which will allow seafarers facing legal problems to obtain immediate information concerning their rights, wherever they are in the world. The app has a unique ‘Find a Lawyer’ tool which gives immediate access to a database of lawyers around the world.

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

News impacting the global maritime industry sectors

Schedule reliability ends 2014 with a decline

A

fter three months of continuing improvements in schedule reliability, 2014 ended with a decline, according to SeaIntel’s latest Global Liner Performance report. On-time performance decreased to 71.7 percent (based on 11,202 vessel arrivals) in December from 75.6 percent in November. Data from INTTRA shows that container delivery declined as well in the same period to 58.2 percent, based on more than three million container movements. The decline in schedule reliability in December followed the seasonal pattern and was driven by a general decline in the majority of the world’s large trade lanes. Notably declines in the Asia-North Europe, Transpacific EB and Transatlantic EB and WB trade lanes drove the global score down. For the 10th consecutive month, Maersk Line was the most reliable carrier in December with a global score of 85.1 percent based on vessel arrivals in more than 270 ports. Hamburg Süd and CSAV took the second and third spot with a score of 81.4 percent and 79.3 percent, respectively. In December all Top 20 carriers recorded a decline in global schedule reliability, with Maersk Line, PIL and MOL recording the smallest decreases. “Shippers should not expect to see any considerable improvement in schedule reliability in January or February with the 2M and Ocean Three carriers launching their new service networks. Even a well-planned implementation of a new network is bound to meet some unexpected challenges, likely resulting in a negative impact on schedule reliability, said Morten Berg Thomsen, shipping analyst at SeaIntel. Thomsen added: “SeaIntel will follow the major four alliances’ ontime performance closely in the main East-West trades going forward as the development in the reliability of individual alliances is of great importance for the shippers’ supply-chains. Shippers should have access to solid data on alliance level, so they can make a well-informed and accurate decision, before they commit volumes to an alliance carrier.”

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Maritime Thesaurus and Ontology tool developed

T

he partly EU funded research project on maritime regulations, e-Compliance, has announced the delivery of its Maritime Thesaurus and Ontology. The e-Compliance thesaurus is a hierarchically structured controlled vocabulary containing a large number of terms and concepts that are frequently used in maritime regulations. It is intended to be used as a reference vocabulary for the drafting of maritime rules and regulations. The thesaurus distinguishes between a “preferred label” and one or more synonymous “alternative labels” for a concept. It thus encourages the use of official, unambiguous terms for given concepts (eg “fishing vessel” instead of “fishing boat”), which will help unify and streamline the language used in regulation texts. In contrast, the e-Compliance ontology is a data structure to model the maritime regulations domain. It is intended to capture the meaning of regulations in a computer-readable fashion. The ontology contains so-called classes, which describe the objects in the domain – ships, ports, regulation documents or even people and their roles. In principle this simple structure is able to capture the meaning of maritime regu-

lations and store it in a computer-readable format. Hence the e-Compliance ontology endows software systems with a certain “understanding” of legal texts that allows them to actively assist users in the task of enforcing and complying with maritime regulations. The e-Compliance project will use the thesaurus and ontology as the basis to develop semantic technologies for searching, drafting and annotating maritime regulations. This technology will rely on the existing content enrichment system “Luxid” (built by e-Compliance partner Temis) which will be configured specifically for the maritime domain. Using this technology, the consortium is developing a “Creation Tool” that is meant to assist legislators with the drafting of maritime regulations. This tool will help its users to choose the correct terms, produce consistently structured regulations and (to some extent) find overlaps and contradictions with already existing regulations. These tools are the first of their kind that are specifically designed for the maritime regulations domain; they are intended to lessen the burden for those that need to create, enforce and comply with maritime rules and regulations.

New guidelines for rescue of migrants at sea

I

n response to the continuing crisis in the Mediterranean that resulted in commercial ships rescuing thousands of migrants and refugees during 2014, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), and ISWAN member, has published new Guidance on Large Scale Rescue Operations at Sea, which can be freely downloaded via the ICS website. ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe explained: “The shipping industry fully accepts its humanitarian obligation to assist anyone at sea whose vessel is in distress. But the scale of the crisis involving thousands of people attempting to get to Europe in craft that are neither fit for purpose nor seaworthy has raised real concerns about the safety and health of ships’ crews that may be involved in rescuing as many as 200 people at a time.” The challenges involved in rescuing large numbers of people and accommodating them on board ship prior to disembarkation are enormous compared to conventional rescue operations. The ICS Guidelines are therefore intended to help shipping companies prepare for this eventuality, whilst taking full account of the

safety and security of the ship should such large scale rescues be necessary. The issues covered by the ICS Guidelines include the provision of additional Personal Protective Equipment for ship’s crew and the safe management and accommodation of large numbers of people on board with an emphasis on sanitation, hygiene and ship security. The Guidelines also refer to the need for companies to take full account of crew welfare in the aftermath of a large-scale rescue. They also contain useful references to relevant advice produced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). “Notwithstanding the shipping industry’s legal and humanitarian obligations to rescue people in distress at sea, it remains incumbent on the governments to find a solution to the current crisis which is placing a very difficult burden on ships’ crews and the companies that have a duty of care for them.” said Hinchliffe, who will be participating at a high-level meeting on the migrants at sea crisis being hosted by the UNHCR in Geneva, in which the IMO Secretary-General will also be taking part.


News impacting the global maritime industry sectors

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Online library to provide a source of best practice for maritime industry The Mass Rescue Operations (MRO) project to create a comprehensive online reference library to be used as a source of best practice by maritime professionals across the world was given a boost in December when they received a grant ÂŁ5,000 grant from the Trinity House Maritime Charity.

T

he material in the library, which has been compiled by experts from all over the globe and is the culmination of five years extensive work including international conferences and workshops, is due to be launched at the World Maritime Rescue Congress (WMRC) in Germany during June. The resource will be launched in various stages with the first phase due to provide access to the content, while enhanced features to improve accessibility will be added during phase two when a “My Library� application will be added that allows users to save content for later review.

It is anticipated that the initial costs to establish and run the resource will extend to about ÂŁ10,000 per year with the majority of this the maintaining the currency of the content, sourcing reviewing and adding new content and providing enhanced features to improve accessibility. Bruce Reid, Chief Executive of the IMRF, says: “The aim is to be able to provide the library as an open source and contributions like the one from Trinity House are helping us achieve that goal. We are still looking for further sponsorship or grants to enable us to provide as full a package of guidance on mass rescue operations as possible and to hit the WMRC launch date.â€?

With a goal to increase awareness and help improve preparedness for events at sea, the library will be run as an “open source� tool with the exception of documents that have been provided by members with stipulations against public distribution. These will have restricted access for members only, but are likely to constitute only about 10 percent of the available material. Five primary categories of information will be available and include:

 Philosophy & focus  Planning  Resources  Command, Control, Coordination, Communication

 Training, exercises / drills, learning from experience

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

45


MARITIME MEMORIES

By Brian Ingpen

DUTCH BRAND LINED WITH MEMORIES By Brian Ingpen

 Built in 1968 at the Verolme Shipyard in

Alblaserdam, the 14116-deadweight Straat Amsterdam was one of eh 20-knot freighters that replaced many of the older, slower vessels in the Royal Interocean Lines’ fleet. Photograph : Lawhill Collection

landing in Australia. The Dutch warship Willem van der Zaan, that had been engaged in minelaying operations off the Javanese coast in a vain attempt to stop the Japanese invasion, escorted the convoy that sailed from Java a fortnight before the Japanese overran the island in March 1942.

In my kortbroek years, one of my local shipping heroes was Mike Still who worked for Holland-Afrika Lijn as the Cape Town agent for Royal Interocean Lines. When he decided to downsize his extensive collection of ships’ postcards, he found a really eager youngster to whom he could pass his duplicates. On a wintry Saturday afternoon my father and I went to his Pinelands home to take delivery of hundreds of postcards, all of which remain in my collection.

D

uring my dockland travels aboard my Raleigh bicycle, I often came across my hero, either waiting to board an incoming RIL ship, or, like good agents still do, waiting for a vessel to leave the harbour. Frequently he would then drive to Green Point to watch the ship pass the lighthouse. Shipping did more than put bread on his table; it was also his passion. For me too, this Dutch company became a fascination, and I boarded many of those fine freighters whose names bore the prefix Straat- or Tji.

Initially known as the Koninklijke Paketvaart Maatschappij (KPM), the company began a service from Batavia (now Jakarta, Indonesia) to South Africa in 1931 using the sister ships Houtman and Tasman and soon joined by Barentsz and Roggeveen. Such was the growth that other ships also came on the run. The largest were the magnificent triple-screw passenger ships Boissevain, Tegelberg and Ruys that were delivered between 1937 and 1938 for an extended service that continued from Cape Town to South America.

I followed its development with considerable interest leading me to do a school assignment on the company, while my classmates were writing boring stuff on farming in Argentina or fishing in Norway. Since the company had provided masses of information for my research, they wanted to see the finished product. Off it went to Hong Kong in one of the ships, and on its return by kind favour of the Master of the passenger liner Tjitjalengka some weeks later, I discovered in the parcel a voucher for a return passage to Durban – upcoast in Ruys and downcoast in Boissevain – quite an adventure for a 15-year-old.

War time duties

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

As war clouds gathered over Europe in May 1939, the newly constructed 146-metre passenger ship Tjitjalengka left her shipyard in Amsterdam on her maiden voyage to the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia). A year after her delivery, German forces invaded Holland and, although she initially continued trading in the Far East, the rapid movement of Japanese forces towards the Dutch East Indies prompted the Dutch Colonial Government to commandeer the vessel, and two other ships. These were used to carry as many passengers as possible and to load the gold stock of the Javasche Bank for

In a harrowingly long voyage, she left Melbourne for Liverpool via Panama and New Orleans, and safely ran the North Atlantic submarine and Dornier gauntlet. Merseyside shipwrights refitted her as a hospital ship in which livery she came to South African ports several times during the course of the war. Although her Dutch officers and Chinese crew were retained, she was officially part of the British hospital ship fleet. Deployed to the Pacific towards the end of the war, her penultimate war-related voyage was to repatriate a large number of wounded Allied prisoners of war from Japan. When she arrived in Tokyo Bay on 30 August 1945, the formalities of the Japanese surrender had to be completed and in the bay lay numerous warships, including the battleship USS Missouri aboard which the formal surrender would he signed. As the officers aboard Tjitjalengka were the only Dutch representatives in Tokyo at the time, they were ordered to witness the signing of the surrender document on behalf of the Dutch government. Soon thereafter, she berthed in Yokohama to embark the prisoners of war for processing in an old cargo shed. In the shed, the former prisoners were separated according to nationality and their physical condition. Those Australians, New Zealanders and Canadians whose condition prevented them from flying or traveling in one of the dozens of troopships in Tokyo Bay were taken aboard Tjitjalengka. She steamed into the bay and passed the anchored ships whose companies were on deck cheering, and the ships’ foghorns blared. On board the American vessels, officers and ratings alike stood to attention and saluted the shipload of


By Brian Ingpen

MARITIME MEMORIES

wounded servicemen now going home. Those in Tjitjalengka who were fit enough to come on deck watched with great excitement – and with an upwelling of raw emotion that reflected the harrowing time that most had endured in those dreadful prison camps. Tjitjalengka headed first for Auckland and then Wellington to disembark the New Zealanders, Canadians and the British servicemen. Finally, the ship set course for Sydney. Australian radio and newspapers had heralded the imminent arrival of the ship and in true fashion, the ship was accorded a glorious welcome as residents turned out, thronging the banks of the harbour in their thousands, to welcome their men home.

 Tjitjalengka as a hospital ship. Photograph : Newall-Dunn Collection

Her final voyage as a hospital ship took her to Hong Kong and Shanghai where she embarked civilians who had been interned, either by the Japanese or Chinese and her passengers included a number of diplomats and Portuguese nuns, now to be repatriated to Singapore or Britain aboard the Dutch liner.

Refurbishment By July 1946, she had been refitted in Amsterdam and returned to her owners with beautifully refurbished accommodation. Wooden paneling, soft colours and fine fabrics adorned the first class public rooms. There were 14 single and 18 double cabins on A and B decks for first class passengers who enjoyed a promenade deck that stretched the length of the central accommodation from the spacious lounge. Second Class “A� passengers had more limited facilities while the 100 Second Class “B� passengers had triple or fiveberth cabins down aft, communal ablution facilities, an inboard dining saloon with hard chairs, and little deck space. Shortly after World War 2, the company underwent a comprehensive restructuring and, while the official name was Koninklijke Java-China-Paketvaart Lijnen registed in the Netherlands, the company’s freight and passenger services were marketed as Royal Interocean Lines.

Rough seas Following the Chinese revolution in 1949 and subsequent tragic events in postrevolution China, as well as the waning of Dutch colonial power ahead of strong nationalist thrust in the former Dutch East Indies, the company reformulated its services. Responding to the booming postwar Japanese economy that generated more trade with South and West Africa and with South America, RIL began an expansion programme, building more ships



Built in 1968 at the Verolme Shipyard in Alblaserdam, the 14116-deadweight Straat Amsterdam was one of eh 20-knot freighters that replaced many of the older, slower vessels in the Royal Interocean Lines’ fleet. Photograph : Lawhill Collection

and widening its services. Tjitjalengka and eight consorts operated from the Far East via South Africa to South America, while other ships went to West Africa. In September 1959 when his ship was heading for Nagoya, Japan, the master of Tjitjalengka listened carefully to the weather forecasts for shipping along the Japanese coast. With growing concern, he heard that Typhoon Vera was sweeping north-westwards, across the Pacific Ocean towards Japan. His anxiety increased when warnings of wind speeds of over 300 kilometres per hour and frightful seas were broadcast, and it became obvious that Japan faced one of its worst natural disasters. Despite the ship being in the usually sheltered Nagoya Bay, the heavy seas, shrieking winds and the tidal surge combined to carry the ship ashore. Devastation ashore was widespread and the storm rendered over 1 million people homeless, killed over 5000 and injured tens of thousands – and with so much chaos in the wake of the typhoon, refloating of the vessel was delayed for nearly four months. Japanese engineers completed the repairs and the ship returned to service in January 1960.

End of an era

into ships’ passenger volumes and fast new freighters that were needed to move the growing cargo volumes displaced older ships such as Tjitjalengka. In comparison with the old liner, RIL’s sleek 20-knot freighters that came on the run in the 1960s had almost double her cargo capacity and were more fuel efficient, despite their advanced speed. The 30-year-old vessel was now past her scrap-by-date, even though her accommodation had been given several refurbishments and her machinery had undergone a number of refits. In May 1968, she was withdrawn from service and acetylene torch-bearers in Hong Kong systematically cut up the beautiful old ship. In response to the almost total containerisation of trade, new consortia seemed to be the most efficient and economical way of operating. As a result, RIL was absorbed into the newly-formed Nedlloyd Group, its ships bore the funnel colours of Holland-Afrika Lijn, and their names were changed to conform to the Nedlloyd nomenclature. Within 20 years, Nedlloyd itself had been absorbed into the P&O Nedlloyd organisation which, in turn, had been taken over and, without any trace remaining, the Anglo-Dutch company was swallowed up by the AP Moller Group.

Air travel that made serious inroads

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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PEOPLE AND EVENTS

Appointments • launches • functions • announcements

SA Navy standby diver statue unveiled A

bronze statue of a SA Navy Standby Diver now stands tall at the end of the pier in Simon’s Town looking with intent out over False Bay. “A gift to the nation, Navy and the community� is how Rear Adm (Ret) Arne Soderland described the donation of the statue, which will be cared for by the Naval Heritage Trust and the Simon’s Town Amenities and Development Company. The statue was unveiled by Lee Woodburne and blessed by Catholic Bishop Cawcutt whilst witnessed by past and present SA Navy Divers, their families, members of the SA Navy and Simon’s Town community. Many had travelled from afar to attend the event, which was coordinated via social media. Music was provided by the Isizunguzungu band under the leadership of Cdr (Ret) Mike Oldham who also played the Last Post and Reveille after the names of those legendary SA Navy divers who had “crossed the bar� were remembered and called out by their “buddies� The idea of a statue to commemorate SA Navy divers was born in October 2013 during social media discussions amongst members of the SA Navy diving fraternity. Marius Huysamer took up the challenge and quickly arrange for ex SA Navy diver Jan Otto du Plessis, a sculptor, to design and mould a bronze statue. A Project Committee was formed and pledges towards the project were quickly instituted. The overwhelming support from past and present SA Navy divers lead to R244 000 being raised towards the project.

The statue, cast in bronze, depicts a SA Navy Standby Diver dressed in a wet suit with twin 7 set of cylinders; twin hose demand valve, weight belt, mask, snorkel, diving knife and fins. At his feet are items associated with the diver’s trade – kelp, crayfish, octopus, perlemoen, shackles, high-pressure hose, limpet mine and a quart of Sedgwick’s Old Brown Sherry. On the plinth is a plaque that reads “This statue stands as a symbol to all past, present and future South African Navy divers. We protect and serve confident in the knowledge that there will always be a fellow diver looking out for us. Ours is a ‘brotherhood’ that transcends race, gender and creed. ‘Semper in excreta’ “ Highly trained and professional SA Navy divers are regarded as Simon’s Towns greatest export as many take up civilian diving positions around the globe after serving time in the Navy. Their professionalism is recognised internationally, which has enhanced the reputation of the SA Navy Diving School.

Bravo Zulu to Marius Huysamer and his Project Committee consisting of Gerard de Vletter, Luke Dicks, Peter Holmes, Clifton Koen, Johan Marais, Bennie Potgieter, Robin Sprong, Erika van Wyk and Michael Vrey. By Lt Cdr Glenn von Zeil PB JCD

After serving in tankers and abroad the polar shipping vessel, SA Agulhas, Siebold-Berry was Second Officer aboard a 126m megayacht for four years during which time he circumnavigated the world and travelled to a variety of interesting places. Three other former Lawhill students are expected to obtain their Master’s certificates in 2015. Other recent achievers are Tsoso Hanong (19), a Lawhill General Botha Old Boys’ Association (GBOBA)/TNPA bursary holder and Ntlahla (Lucky) Tetyana (19), a TNPA bursary holder, who were the dux navigation students at CPUT’s Maritime Studies Department in December last year. They both obtained nine distinctions in their final S2 examinations. Meanwhile Tyron Campbell, who graduated from Lawhill in 2009, has been promoted to Second Officer aboard bulk carriers in the Durban-based Island View Shipping fleet at the age of 24.

Committee with the product of their labours. The committee commissioned fellow ex SA Navy diver Jan Du Plessis, to erect the stature

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His Master’s Certificate of Competency (Unlimited) qualification permits him to command a ship of any size, paving the way for him to achieve his ambition of commanding one of the world’s large Superyachts.

 The SA Navy Standby Diver Statue Project

Management appointment ierre Goosen has been appointed General Manager, Hytec Engineering – a Hytec Group company, which was effective from November 2014. Goosen has 30 years of manufacturing industry experience and holds an MBA degree from Business School Netherlands.

olf Siebold-Berry (29), who matriculated from Simon’s Town School’s Lawhill Maritime Centre at the end of 2003, has become the school’s third former student to obtain his internationally recognised Master’s Certificate of Competency.

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

sculptor, with Marius Huysamer with the SA Navy Standby Diver bronze statue at the end of the Simon’s Town pier. Photo: Capt Peter Smith

Thank you to the Hilti SA and Bolt Fast for assisting with the plinth and the manner in which the statue is secured to it.

Lawhill celebrates achievements of learners

48

 Jan Otto du Plessis , ex SA Navy diver and

New offices bring members together

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elebrating their move to new office space in the Cape Town Convention Centre Tower, the South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA) invited members and guests to engage with them at the conveniently located office space. Speaking at the function CEO, Ebrahim Takolia said “We are starting a new chapter in a very interesting time for the oil and gas industry. We will have to see how the lower oil price affects projects in Africa, but for now we see that even with the rigs we continue to see enquiries coming in to bring rigs into South African waters.� Speaking about the new offices, he said that the facilities available to the Alliance within the space would allow them to engage more fully with the industry. “We are now better located with easier access to parking for visitors. We hope that this makes it easier to connect with us�


Appointments • launches • functions • announcements

Marine sector fuels grand achieve-ments for chess player

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five-year long sponsorship relationship between South African Bunkering & Trading (SABT) and Kenny Solomon has allowed the chess player to reach his ultimate ambitions of claiming the title of Grand Master. Solomon won the gold medal at the 2014 African Individual Chess Championship, held in Windhoek this past December to become South Africa’s very first Grand Master. He is only the second Grand Master from sub-Saharan Africa, joining Zambian, Amon Simutowe in holding the hard-won title for life. This is the highest chess honour bestowed by FIDE, the World Chess Federation, bar the World Champion title. As South Africa’s 1994 Junior Chess Champion and an aspiring Grand Master, Solomon had little support and no privileges. Sponsorship was vital to ensure that he could compete in the international chess circuit, gain the necessary experience and have opportunities to turn his dream into reality. Kenny’s perseverance to find a sponsor paid off when a chess colleague set up a meeting for him at with SABT. SABT, a business that is challenged daily by strategic moves and problem solving as it delivers high quality fuel products to ships in more than 50 ports around the African coastline, could easily recognise the synergies between their corporate brand and the chess player’s passion for his game. The result has been an innovative, lengthy sponsorship that has played a part in enabling Solomon to work towards, and achieve his historic Grand Master title. He admits, however, that becoming a Grand Master was much

 Grand

master Kenny Solomon inspires a love of chess amongst the youth

harder than he imagined it would be, but in 2012 the much-needed experience did start to pay off, and his tally of Olympiad wins included the achievement of 3 Grand Master norms. His title changed from International Master to Grand Master-elect, and there were high hopes in the South African chess community that they would soon have their first Grand Master. “We stayed with Kenny through his long struggle period in which he constantly had to keep pushing himself towards achieving the GM title,� recalls Jon Hughes, “That was a unique aspect of our sponsorship and it reaped the greatest reward - South Africa’s first Grand Master. Perhaps this will impact positively on how South African businesses choose and make decisions about their sponsorships. We’ve learnt that going out on the limb and backing the unlikely guy from the Cape Flats in a marginalised sport can have an historic outcome which can reverberate through the next generations. Research has shown that a country with its first Chess Grand Master can create a blooming chess culture and a boom of Grand Masters. SABT is proud to be part of this process.�

PEOPLE AND EVENTS

Strategic restructuring

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ape Armature Winders (CAW) has announced two promotions in line with the family-run business’ strategy for expansion. “We are positioning ourselves for growth and diversification,� says George Epenetos, who adds that he and his brother, Nick, will still be involved in the daily operations of the business, and will also be fulfilling a macro-management role to ensure that the company achieves its goals and vision. Brett Osborn, who has been with the company since 2009, has been promoted from sales manager to take up the position of commercial manager. Stephen Jacobs, a long-standing staff member of over 25 years who has worked his way up the ranks, will move into the position of operations manager.



Stephen Jacobs has been promoted to operations manager while Brett Osborn takes up the position of commercial manager.

Legal appointment

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yan Reddy has joined ENSafrica in their shipping and logistics team as a senior associate, specialising in maritime, transport and related commercial dispute resolution. He gained experience from two well-established shipping and logistics practices in South Africa, and has also spent time on secondment at the Hong Kong office of Holman Fenwick Willan.

Board appointments

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wo longstanding senior directors of the International Bosch Group have joined the Hytec Group of Companies board as part of the new joint venture into Africa. Roland Keller and Andrew Castle represent a combined 39 years of service to the Bosch Group across numerous management posts throughout the globe, bringing a wealth of experience not only to the Hytec Group, but to the African hydraulics and automation market as well. Keller joins the Hytec Group as Deputy Chief Executive Officer. Originally from Germany, his 22 previous years of service to Bosch Rexroth have included various positions in Germany and the United States, with his most recent as Senior Director, Excavator Centre, Mo-

bile Applications, in China. Castle has been appointed Chief Finance Officer. He has held numerous senior financial positions across 17 years of service with Bosch in the United Kingdom, India, South Africa and the United States. His most recent position was as Vice-President, Finance & Ad-  The new Deputy Chief  Chief Finance Officer, Andrew Castle ministration, Robert Bosch Ltd, Executive, Roland Keller. in the United Kingdom. October 2014, aims to position the The reconstituted board also comcompany for expansion opportunities prises John Wingrove, Chief Executive into sub-Saharan Africa’s hydraulics and Officer, (previously Hytec Group Managautomation markets through greater ing Director) and John Dunmow, Group Finance Controller. installation, service and refurbishment capabilities of turnkey solutions. The joint venture, effective from 1

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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PEOPLE AND EVENTS

Appointments • launches • functions • announcements

Promotions strengthen Port of Durban’s engineering department

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ritical positions that were left vacant following the promotion of key personnel to Transnet National Ports Authority head office have now been filled with the appointment of four senior engineers. The Port Engineer, Sibusiso Nhlabathi said: “We are strengthening the engineering department by filling the gaps in order to gear ourselves up for all the port maintenance as well as capital work that is on the cards.� Amongst the four senior engineers is former Building and Marine’s Maintenance Manager Sindisiwe Shabalala, who becomes senior engineer in charge of all the Port of Durban’s maintenance. She started her career 12 years ago as a technician in the Roads and Tracks division before moving to the Building and Marine division. “Sindisiwe not only boosts the female

CSI project impacts on Hout Bay schools Attending school continues to become a better experience for both learners and teachers at some Hout Bay schools, thanks to the continuing investment by the Oceana Group. An independent impact study by research consultancy, Mthente, has assessed the effect of Oceana’s Corporate Social Investment contribution to the Hout Bay area and to the Sentinel Primary School in particular. Oceana has operations in Hout Bay and has been consistently working through their CSI vehicle, the Oceana Foundation, to improve the environment at Sentinel Primary School both inside and outside of the classroom. Since 2011, the Oceana Foundation has spent R2,3-million on Corporate Social Investment (CSI) projects at Hout Bay schools. “Our two focus areas, Education and Food Security, are adding value to the education the pupils receive and ensuring food security,� said Oceana Group’s CEO, Francois Kuttel. The Oceana Foundation has, in the past arranged and funded the painting of the Sentinel Primary School buildings, provided digital Smart Boards, a branded school minibus and regular donations of Lucky Star products. According to the Mthente report, parents and teachers say that Oceana has changed the quality of teaching and the learning environment at Sentinel Primary School. “Stakeholders cited a change in

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

complement of engineers at the port of Durban, but brings a depth of knowledge and understanding of the functioning of the port and well-honed engineering skills,� said Nhlabathi. Dumisani Mkhize has been promoted from Port Planning to Port of Durban Deputy Port Engineer. He will oversee infrastructure development, planning and maintenance projects that take place in the port. Working alongside the Port Engineer he will also ensure that capital projects that increase port capacity ahead of demand are implemented.

 From Left: Russel Vilbro, Sindisiwe Shabalala and Putumani Mbambe

Russel Vilbro and Putumani Mbambe have also been appointed as Senior Engineers responsible for various capital projects and offer support to each precinct as per Port Strategy. Despite these appoinments there is still room for another Senior Engineer in the near future said Nhlabathi. the look and the feel of the school, which can be attributed in particular to the refurbishment of the school building,� said Awongiwe Mtimkulu, Mthente researcher and consultant. “The new look has contributed to a more positive atmosphere among both teachers and learners, as well as changed perceptions within the community. Stakeholders indicate that community members now recognise Sentinel Primary as an institution of learning to be respected and be proud of.� In 2011, 26 break-ins were recorded, 2012 none and one in 2013 and 2014, symbolising increasing respect for school grounds. The appearance of the newlypainted walls instils pride in the school and was cited by learners as giving increased motivation to perform well in class. “Oceana is pleased that we have been able to assist in creating an environment where eager learners receive quality education from motivated teachers,� said Francois Kuttel.

Appointment of Cape Town Terminals Manager

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ransnet Port Terminals (TPT) Cape Town Terminals (CTT) appointed Pamela Yoyo as the Terminal Manager as of the January 1, 2015. She will provide strategic guidance on operations and overall administration of the terminals. Her appointment follows the promotion of former CTT Terminal Manager, Brenda

 Dumisani Mikhize Magqwaka, to General Manager Containers at TPT KwaZulu-Natal Operations. Yoyo has been employed with TPT for 11 years, having started as a Human Resources Manager at the Richards Bay Dry Bulk Terminal. She has since worked in this position at various TPT terminals including Durban Container Terminal, Cape Town Container Terminal and Multi-Purpose Terminal. She moved into operations management in 2009 as a trainee Operations Manager and climbed the ranks to Chief Operations Manager at the Cape Town Container Terminal. She holds a Bachelors of Technology in Human Resource Management from Technikon South Africa, a Bachelor degree in Maritime Studies and a Master’s degree in Transport and Logistics Management, both from Stellenbosch University.

Restructuring to provide better service

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ape Armature Winders (CAW) has announced the appointments of a new commercial manager as well as an operations manager. Brett Osborn takes up the position of commercial manager while Stephen Jacobs moves into the position of operations manager. According to Osborn, the appointments are part of a company restructure that will see the company actively pursuing new market opportunities. It will also allow CAW to consolidate their current service offering to the industry.


Scientists capture stunning images of the seabed “Diving is always an adventure, the most remote and untouched places always offer something to savour.” Read more about our Green Warrior on page 54

A unique partnership between the fishing industry, a number of marine research institutions and the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), is helping scientists to gain a better understanding of the plants and animals that live on or close to the seabed off the west coast of South Africa.

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team of scientists recently returned to Cape Town with a treasure trove of images showing how well-known deep-sea fishes, like kingklip, hake and jacopever live in their natural environment, and a host of pictures of little known seabed plants and animals. The scientists are participating in a five-year project to better understand the impacts that trawling may have on the seabed. They are studying an area known as Karbonkel, which is located off Port Nolloth. Usually, deep-sea trawlers fish for hake in the Karbonkel area, but these trawl grounds have been closed to allow scientists to methodically survey the seabed in the area. They are using a submersible camera and a benthic grab (a kind of scoop that collects gravels and mud from the seafloor) to determine whether the closure of the trawl grounds is having an impact on the plants and animals that live there. “We are surveying life on the seafloor to see how the trawl lanes that have been closed to trawling are responding to the lack of disturbance,” explained Professor Colin Attwood, chief scientist on the voyage. Continued on page 52 

IN THIS SECTION>> Madagascar aims to triple marine protected areas >> Madagascar’s President Rajaonarimampianina has further committed to reinforce the newly expanded protected area system, as well as to triple the coverage of the country’s MPAs.>> page 53.

Celebrating an independent spirit>> Jon Slayer is an independent spirit who says that his green credentials were paternally nurtured from a very young age as his father included him in various coral reef research trips on the east coast of Africa. >> page 54.

Red tide strikes Elands Bay>> The Minister of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), Senzeni Zokwana, visited the beach at Elands Bay, the site where an estimated 130 tons of West Coast Rock Lobster washed up on the beach. >> page 55.

Ensuring fish have a life worth living >> Understanding that welfare is a fundamental principle of sustainability in the aquaculture arena, means that aquaculturists should be striving to provide a life worth living to the fish they cultivate. >> page 56.


GREEN MARINE

Keeping our oceans alive with opportunity

“We would expect macrofauna to establish themselves in these lanes, but we have no idea how long that will take.� Macrofauna are small marine mammals, including snails, worms, clams and other thumbnail-sized creatures that live and feed in the sediments on the sea floor. Macrofauna were collected and an-

alysed in exactly the same trawl lanes last year, but the difference is that the lanes had been recently trawled. The scientists are eager to see whether there is a difference in the number and type of species photographed and collected now that the lanes have been closed to trawling. Their work represents a unique five-

 A multidisciplinary team of scientists and technicians is involved in the seabed recovery ex-

periment. Pictured here are (back row): Dr Johann Augustyn, secretary of SADSTIA; Professor Colin Attwood of the University of Cape Town; Dr Kerry Sink, head of SANBI’s Marine Programme; Dr Charles von der Meden, a postdoctoral researcher with the South African Environmental Observation Network; Karen Tunley, a PhD student at the University of Cape Town; Hermann Engel an electronics technician with the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries; and Driaan Pretorius, engineering manager of Viking Fishing. In front, holding the benthic grab that will collect samples from the seabed during the voyage are Jean van der Merwe, fleet electronics manager at Sea Harvest, and Dr Lara Atkinson, an offshore marine scientist with SAEON.

 The fishing industry has

been intricately involved with the design and organisation of the seabed recovery experiment. Pictured here are Driaan Pretorius, engineering manager with Viking Fishing and Jean van der Merwe, fleet electronics manager with Sea Harvest. Both are part of the scientific crew on the Ellen Khuzwayo, and are contributing their immense knowledge of electronics and fishing to the experiment.

 Technical experts, Charles

von der Meden, who is experienced in the operation of the Ski-monkey submersible camera, and Hermann Engel, an electronics technician with the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, are pictured with chief scientist, Professor Colin Attwood of the University of Cape Town.

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

“In South Africa, hake trawling occurs almost entirely on soft, muddy, sandy or gravelly sediments and even though the size and weight of trawl gear is strictly regulated, we want to understand the impacts that trawling has on the ecosystem – and the time it takes for the seabed to recover after it has been trawled.� year collaboration between the South African Deep-Sea Trawling Industry Association (SADSTIA), DAFF, the University of Cape Town and the South African Environmental Observation Network (SAEON). The goal of the collaboration is to obtain a scientific understanding of the environmental impact of hake trawling in South Africa. Dr Johann Augustyn, secretary of SADSTIA, explained the rationale behind the experiment: “As an industry, we are concerned about our footprint,� he said, referring to the impact of fishing activities. “In South Africa, hake trawling occurs almost entirely on soft, muddy, sandy or gravelly sediments and even though the size and weight of trawl gear is strictly regulated, we want to understand the impacts that trawling has on the ecosystem – and the time it takes for the seabed to recover after it has been trawled.� SADSTIA’s members have agreed to close an important trawling ground to facilitate the study and the fishing industry arranged for two senior electronics technicians to assist the scientific team. Driaan Pretorius, engineering manager with Viking Fishing, and Jean van der Merwe, fleet electronics manager with Sea Harvest, both worked on the Ellen Khuzwayo during the February research cruise. “We’re quite excited about the experiment,� said Russell Hall, Sea Harvest’s trawling division manager. “Jean has been involved right from the start of the experiment when we started looking at areas where we could test the trawl recovery process, so he has all the background, and we think his expertise


Keeping our oceans alive with opportunity

GREEN MARINE

Waddling to raise awareness

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enguin Promises has once again launched its Waddle for a Week campaign for 2015, which will take place from 11 to 18 April. The event was started in 2011 when AKA (Animals Keepers of Africa) chose to create awareness around the plight of the endangered African penguin which is endemic to southern Africa.



Two ribbon eels and a deep-water spider crab.

The event has tried to move away from the more traditional fund raising campaigns with their slogan: “We don’t want your money honey, we want your love.� The organisers felt that a quick monetary donation had no long term effect on behaviour, whereas an investment of time and actual involvement in an activity had a more lasting effect on the individual, their behaviour and ultimately the environment. The six-day waddle covers a distance of approximately 120km starting in Gansbaai, the home of the Dyer Island African Penguin breeding colony and finishes at Boulder’s Beach in Simon’s Town. Old Mutual finance has once again stepped up as a confirmed sponsor for 2015 – 17. The waddlers are made up of eager animal keepers from various animal facilities, as well as members of the public. They are well supported along the route with refreshment, accommodation and support. They are joined along the route by various groups of eager learners who complete short stretches of the route.

 A rat-tail is captured in the light of the submersible camera.

Enthusiasm for the event is contagious and all monies gathered along the way are donated to the South African Foundation for Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) to assist with the rehabilitation work conducted at their facility. For more information visit www.penguinpromises.com By Natalie Janse

Madagascar aims to triple marine protected areas

H  A kingklip is pictured in its natural envi-

aving already surpassed the island’s 2003 Durban Vision to more than triple the total area of Madagascar’s protected areas and announcing the country’s largest locally managed marine protected area (MPA) in the Barren Isles archipelago, Madagascar’s President Rajaonarimampianina has further committed to reinforce the newly expanded protected area system, as well as to triple the coverage of the country’s MPAs.

in electronics will be very helpful to the project.�

The announcement was made at the IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney where over 6,000 delegates, made up of world leaders, scientists, conservationists and local community members from 170 countries gathered to discuss the role of protected areas in conserving biodiversity.

ronment, at a depth of about 300m. Around it are raspberry starfish, Crossaster penicillatus.

Driaan Pretorius assisted the scientific team in 2014 and contributed his time and expertise again this year. Also on the scientific team was Dr Kerry Sink, the head of the South African National Biodiversity Institute’s (SANBI) Marine Programme, and a long-time advocate for a system of offshore marine protected areas (MPAs). Dr Sink is excited by the fact that the team gathered photographs from Child’s Bank, a seamount located adjacent to the Karbonkel trawl grounds. “Child’s Bank has been identified as a focus area for offshore protection, but on this survey we saw it for the very first time,� she said. The Ski-Monkey submersible camera was modified to allow it to collect images from Child’s Bank without damaging the hard corals and benthic species that occur there. Offshore MPAs are entrenched in the Phakisa programme – government’s initiative to unlock the economic potential of South Africa’s oceans – and SADSTIA has worked with scientists and conservationists since 2006 to identify the most suitable areas for an offshore MPAs.

During his address, President Rajaonarimampianina said, “Madagascar has achieved its [Durban] goal, but we can and will do better. Our natural capital is one of our greatest assets. This is why we are placing biodiversity and natural resources at the heart of our new national development plan. “We have positive models by which to chart our course. We look to successful examples of locally managed marine areas [LMMAs], of which Madagascar is proud to be a pioneer in the Western Indian Ocean region. The Barren Isles archipelago, situated off the western coast of Madagascar, is home to some of the healthiest coral reefs in the western Indian Ocean region, and supports the livelihoods of thousands of small-scale fishers. Award-winning marine conservation organisation, Blue Ventures, is working with local communities and authorities to establish a community-managed marine protected area around the islands. “Oceans cover over two-thirds of the Earth’s surface, but currently less than one percent benefit from full protection against extractive activities such as fishing, mining and energy exploration,� said Dr Alasdair Harris, Executive Director of Blue Ventures, during a keynote address highlighting the role that protected areas can play in rebuilding small-scale fisheries. “It’s hugely encouraging to see such a strong focus on the need to better protect our oceans throughout the Congress.� Gildas Andriamalala, Coordinator of Madagascar’s national LMMA Network Mihari, said, “We’re thrilled about President Rajaonarimampianina’s commitment to expand protection of the marine environment. However, the challenge remains in ensuring that these pledges translate into real gains on the ground, and that protection also serves the interests and needs of those communities who depend on the ocean for their livelihoods.�

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

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GREEN MARINE

Keeping our oceans alive with opportunity

Celebrating an independent spirit green warrior:

Jon Slayer

Jon Slayer is an independent spirit who says that his green credentials were paternally nurtured from a very young age as his father included him in various coral reef research trips on the east coast of Africa. Although he has no formal training, this preparation has led to a solid grounding in marine biology that has served him well in his current pursuit of marine conservation, research and natural history film production.

Education

veloping a love of the natural world.

Slayer was raised in a local conservation area and credits his father with his passion for the ocean and natural environment. Growing up in the forests, on the beaches and in the oceans of the east coast of Africa was fertile ground for de-

Slayer says, “I suppose the adventures in this environment extended into my pursuit of outdoor activities and the military in adulthood, but most recently my activities are really a return to my roots.” Slayer started studying a degree in Mechanical Engineering, but abandoned his studies to become the Chief Instructor at a leadership and adventure school, Spirit of Adventure, Shongweni, in Durban. This in turn led to a position as a Commissioned Officer in the Royal Marine Commandos where he participated in operations in Northern Ireland, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Working life When asked about his current job, Slayer says, “I pursue a number of different strands, but have no formal employment. Most recently I have lead research and filming expeditions; produced natural history films, undertaken underwater and terrestrial camera work projects, founded a marine conservation project in Belize; assisted in island habitat restoration projects; protected maritime shipping as a maritime security operative off Somalia, and appeared in several television and cinema features as a special action supporting artist most notably alongside Kiefer Sutherland and

Benjamin Bratt in the most recent series of ‘24’.” Slayer’s work life is obviously extremely varied, but he is quick to point out that the best days are the ones that he spends in the field. “Diving is always an adventure, the most remote and untouched places always offer something to savour.” Travel obviously plays a significant role in Slayer’s daily working life and he regards the quest to maintain consistency as one of his personal challenges. The remote, untouched locations often make keeping in touch with loved ones and colleagues difficult. Sayer says, “The internet helps with this, but the best places to see are off the grid.”

Future plans With regard to the future, Slayer has a number of projects coming to fruition. He is involved in an upcoming documentary project highlighting the British Indian Ocean Territory Marine Protected Area. He is also involved in research trips to the area and terrestrial rehabilitation efforts for the small tropical islands there. Another exciting project on the horizon is an innovative museum exhibit , using a video capture technique of Slayer’s own design. Slayer says that he is inspired by the unknown and never has any definite plan for the future: “I follow my nose, who knows where the scent of adventure will guide next .....” By Natalie Janse

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MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015


Keeping our oceans alive with opportunity

Annual meeting boosts resource management

T

he South East Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (SEAFO), adopted recommendations to employ harvest control rules for the management of Patagonian toothfish, deepsea red crab, alforsino and pelagic armourhead at its annual meeting held in December. The decision was made based on “the best available scientific information”. Furthermore, the Commission set TAC’s for alforsino, pelagic, armourhead and orange roughy for 2015 and 2016. SEAFO further strengthened its compliance measures by adopting a bycatch regime for the trawl fisheries of alforsino and pelagic armourhead.

Conservation Measures The Commission adopted a Conservation Measure dealing with Bottom Fishing Activities and Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems in the SEAFO Convention Area. The newly agreed measure consolidates existing measures aimed at protecting areas which contain concentrations of coral, sponge and sea-pens. It aims to strengthen SEAFO’s response to UNIGA Res 61/105 and further serves to protect the benthos (??) from significant adverse impacts caused by fishing. The Commission agreed on guidelines for scientific research conducted in the SEAFO Convention Area (CA). These guidelines serve to augment existing legally-binding measures contained in the “SEAFO System”. The “SEAFO System” is a comprehensive management utility used to promote compliance in the Convention Area and came into effect in February 2013. Moreover, the “SEAFO System”, in its applica-

GREEN MARINE

RED TIDE STRIKES ELANDS BAY I

n mid-February the Minister of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), Senzeni Zokwana, visited the beach at Elands Bay, the site where an estimated 130 tons of West Coast Rock Lobster washed up on the beach. This was due to a severe case of red tide which drastically reduced the oxygen levels in the water. RED TIDE is a phenomenon that occurs quite regularly along South African coastlines. The name is derived from the colour of the water along affected areas which turns a reddish colour due to dense concentrations of microscopic sea plants called phytoplankton. In the Cape red tides usually occur during late summer and early autumn. The results of these bouts can be harmful to sea life, as well as humans. The most common result of red tide is a depletion of the oxygen dissolved in water. The result of this is that large numbers of sea creatures, including rock lobsters, are washed up onto the shore. Animals such as mussels, clams, oysters and rock lobsters are particularly vulnerable to red tides. This is due to the fact that because they feed by filtering particles, including phytoplankton, from the water. Toxic phytoplankton accumulate in the digestive system of these filter-feeders and subsequently cause illness or death to consumers such as birds, marine mammals and man. At Elands Bay, the beach was closed by police as authorities and volunteers worked together to try to remove all the rock lobster from the masses washed up on the beach. The live lobster were collected, placed in water tanks and later released into safer waters. The dead animals were also removed from the beach and taken to local dump sites to avoid the possibility of them being washed back into the water. A warning was also sent out to the public by Lionel Adendorf, Director of Communications Services at DAFF that although the live lobster found on the beaches in the area was fit for human consumption, this did not mean that the public was free to reap the rewards. “We will fine or arrest anyone found with such lobsters in their possession, as they do not have a permit,” said Adendorf.

tion, is essential for the conservation of species under the SEAFO Convention and for the international efforts to combat Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported fishing (IUU). For further details, please contact Ben van Zyl,

Follow us on Twitter (@GreenMarineSA)

Executive Secretary of SEAFO, email info@seafo.org

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

55


GREEN MARINE

Keeping our oceans alive with opportunity

Ensuring fish have a life worth living We are constantly bombarded with images of cute puppies and kittens looking for the perfect home and thus, animal welfare is a concept that we are very much familiar with. Fish welfare, on the other hand, is a concept that most of us have never heard of and certainly given very little thought to. Understanding that welfare is a fundamental principle of sustainability in the aquaculture arena, means that aquaculturists should be striving to provide a life worth living to the fish they cultivate.

Public perception also needs to be altered. As fish are not cute and cuddly, there seems to be little concern for their welfare. This is a mindset that needs to be altered and both the public and business need to get behind the science. Another issue to be considered with regard to health, welfare and sustainability in aquaculture is that the concept of welfare is subjective. Different countries with different religions view welfare differently. Ideally fish welfare should be applied in all countries with the same standards across the board. However, due to the access of knowledge, skills and technology, this is just not realistic. Simply put, the tools required to achieve sustainability are not the same across all regions.

Supplying resources

M

ost of us have been brought up on the notion that fish welfare is not a concept requiring much consideration as, as we all know, fish do not experience pain, have little or no memory and are, therefore, in essence incapable of experiencing suffering. In a recent webinar, hosted by The Fish Site, Dr Pete Southgate, technical director of the Fish Vet Group shed some light on this myth and also on the inescapable link between fish welfare and sustainability. Before attempting to understand the link between the two concepts a clear definition of both welfare and sustainability is required. Dr Southgate believes that the concept of sustainability means different things to different people, but ultimately, from an aquaculture perspective, can be defined as healthy, productive and enduring systems producing fish with minimum impact on the global environment from growing and processing right through to shipping. According to Southgate, welfare, therefore, is the fundamental principle of sustainability and in the aquaculture arena should operate within the motto of giving every fish a life worth living. This means that the wellbeing of fish should be considered from both a physical and a mental perspective, just the same as the welfare

of all other animals. Southgate believes that supporting the life of fish in a stress free way that does not impact negatively on the environment is crucial to sustainability under the banner of the three E’s: environmental sustainability, ethical sustainability and economic sustainability.

Fish feel pain and experience stress Recent scientific research points to the fact that fish do in fact suffer. They are able to feel pain. They are able to experience fear and they are able to recall these experiences. In other words they are able to experience suffering in the same way as any other animal. This is a difficult concept to sell to the public. The consumer seems far removed from the concept of fish welfare, but are we really? By looking after the welfare of fish we are in fact looking after consumer safety through the reduction of fish disease and consequently the reduction of the medication and chemicals required to treat these diseases, as well as the impact that this would have on the environment. So, how do we go about ensuring the welfare of fish? The number one cause of poor health in fish is stress; primarily due to poor handling and poor environment. This stress in turn makes fish more vulnerable to disease.

Different countries with different religions view welfare differently. Ideally fish welfare should be applied in all countries with the same standards across the board. However, due to the access of knowledge, skills and technology, this is just not realistic. Simply put, the tools required to achieve sustainability are not the same across all regions. 56

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

The challenge is to supply the resources needed to ensure welfare and consequently sustainability in aquaculture circles worldwide. These resources would be economic resources, technological resources, as well as skills, knowledge and training. Unfortunately cost has often been regarded as an obstacle to the implementation of welfare practices. This is, however, often not actually the case and although some expenditure would be required with regard to equipment and feed, what is gained would ultimately far outweigh cost. Another obstacle is that aquaculture farms are often located in remote locations. Training is, therefore, not always easily accessible. Distance learning would then perhaps provide a possible solution. Knowledge then needs to be shared between management and direct labour. The final question is then how can we achieve fish welfare and, thereby, sustainability globally? Dr Southgate feels that there are three major steps to achieving this:

 Recognising that poor welfare is a

reality for fish and that fish do in fact suffer.

 The legislation of welfare laws for fish the same as those considered for all animals.

To consider the difference between farmed and wild fish. Farmed fish are in a controlled environment and, therefore, welfare is more easily achieved, however, the welfare of fish in our oceans also needs to be considered, as it too links to the ongoing sustainability of fish as a food and economic resource on which we are largely dependent. By Natalie Janse


Products and services

BUYERS’ GUIDE

BUYERS’ GUIDE Products and services DECK & ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT  Anchors and Cables African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Bells ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396

 Block & Tackle African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Cables African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax

086 580 4702

 Chain ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Chain & Connectors African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Chain Couplings African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Deck Equipment African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Gear Couplings ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Hydraulic Drives ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Inflatable Buoys and Fenders African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty)Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Lashing Systems

 Mooring Systems Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services Dbn: Tel 031 274 4700; Fax 031 205 9023 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Net Handling Equipment Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Portholes ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Rock Hoppers African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530

 Rope, Fibre

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 List your company’s details here

African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Launch and Recovery System

 Rope, Wire

Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Lifting Equipment African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 List your company’s details here

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

57


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Products and services

 Rope, Wire Greases African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Rope African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Slings African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Swell Compensators C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Winch Control Systems Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

EMERGENCY AND LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT / REPAIRS  Distress Signals, Flares (pyrotechnics) ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Escape Route Signs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Fire Equipment Signs Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Fire-Fighting Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Food Rations, Life jackets

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Winches, Sales, Repairs

 Lifeboat Builders

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Liferaft Service

 Winch Couplings

58

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Rescue Craft Davits HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396

 Safety Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Timeless Technologies: Tel 086 184 6383; Fax 086 527 5250 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Safety Signs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Security Cameras Timeless Technologies: Tel 086 184 6383; Fax 086 527 5250

ENGINE ROOM AND PROPULSION GEAR / SERVICING  Anodes ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Auxiliary Gensets ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel: 031 000 0050; Cpt Tel 021 959 8200 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Cummins South Africa (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 945 1888; Fax 021 945 2288 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions:

Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Raka Marine: Piet 082 658 1061; Gerhard 082 652 8221 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049

 Bow Thrusters African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Control Cables ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

 Couplings ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Diesel Generator Sets ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel 031 000 0050; Cpt Tel 021 959 8200 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Cummins South Africa (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 945 1888; Fax 021 945 2288 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 MTU SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 529 5760; Fax 021 551 1970 Peninsula Power Products: Tel 021 511 5061; Fax 021 511 5441 Raka Marine: Piet 082 658 1061; Gerhard 082 652 8221 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702


Products and services Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049

 Engines ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power Systems: Tel 031 000 0047; Fax 031 000 0051 Cummins South Africa (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 945 1888; Fax 021 945 2288 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 MTU SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 529 5760; Fax 021 551 1970 Peninsula Power Products: Tel 021 511 5061; Fax 021 511 5441 Raka Marine: Piet 082 658 1061; Gerhard 082 652 8221 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049

 Engine, Gearbox & Oil Coolers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947

 Engine & Gearbox Controls ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel 031 000 050; Cpt Tel 021 959 8200 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 List your company’s details here

 Fresh Water Generators ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Fuel & Lubrication Oil Treatment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Gearbox Sales

 Governors

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power Systems: Tel 031 000 0047; Fax 031 000 0051 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Peninsula Power Products: Tel 021 511 5061; Fax 021 511 5441 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

 Gearbox Spares, Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power Systems: Tel 031 000 0047; Fax 031 000 0051 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 MTU SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 529 5760; Fax 021 551 1970 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 General Engineering Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 MTU SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 529 5760; Fax 021 551 1970 Peninsula Power Products: Tel 021 511 5061; Fax 021 511 5441 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947

 Generators ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel 031 000 0050; Cpt Tel 021 959 8200 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Raka Marine: Piet 082 658 1061; Gerhard 082 652 8221 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 SVITZER Salvage Africa : Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138 List your company’s details here

 Nozzles ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Oil Coolers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947

 Oily Water Generators Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Pitch Propeller Repairs African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Pneumatic Engine Control Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Propeller Repairs,Systems African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Propellers African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

BUYERS’ GUIDE

Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Propulsion Systems African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel 031 000 0050; Cpt Tel 021 959 8200 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Cummins South Africa (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 945 1888; Fax 021 945 2288 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 MTU SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 529 5760; Fax 021 551 1970 Raka Marine: Piet 082 658 1061; Gerhard 082 652 8221 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Spare Parts African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Barloworld Power: Dbn Tel 031 000 0050; Cpt Tel 02 959 8200 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Mares Shipping GmbH: Tel +49 40 37 47840; Fax +49 40 37 478446 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Steerable Thrusters African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 ZF Services South Africa: Tel 011 457 0007; Fax 086 647 1378

 Turbochargers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

59


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Products and services

Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947

021 511 8009

 Trawl Winches, Sales & Repairs HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

FISH PACKAGING

 Valves ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Cartons

 Water Jets

 Blast Freezers

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947 Southern Power Products (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 511 0653; Fax 021 510 3049

FISHING GEAR  Long Line Winches, Sales & Repairs HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Netting, Twines African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Seabed Surveys African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Trawls Scaw SA (Pty) Ltd: Tel Cpt 021 508 1500; Dbn 031 450 7400

 Trawl Bobbins African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Trawl Doors African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Trawl Floats African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Trawl Repairs African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax

60

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523

 Ice Packs / Chill Wrap Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523

FISH PROCESSING EQUIPMENT ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Cannery Equipment HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Chillers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Cutting Machines Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Filletting Machines HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Freezers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Gutting Machines HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Ice Makers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Ozone Eqauipmentg HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Scales Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

NAVIGATION COMMUNICATION AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT / SERVICING  Antenna Instruments C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Automatic Steering ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Autotrawl Systems HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752

 Compasses ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Computer Systems & Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Electronic Charts & Plotters ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 952 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Electronic Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Electronic Surveillance HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Fish Finding Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752

GMDSS Stations ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Gyros ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Maritime Communication Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523


Products and services HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Navigation Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211 List your company’s details here

 Navigation Light Fittings and Spare Globes ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Precise DGPS Positioning C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Radar Sales, Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752

SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Radio Remote Control Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Radio Sales, Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Satellite Phones and Email Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Satelite Phones & Email ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Smoke & Fire Detector Systems ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig Internationaljmhn Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Telecommunications ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Data Solutions: Tel 021 386 8517; Fax 021 386 8519 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Weather & Receivers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752

Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

PROFESSIONAL & SPECIALISED SERVICES  Acoustic Surveys C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Aluminium Technical Information HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Hulamin (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 507 9100; Fax 021 534 2469

 Attorneys Maritime Law Bowman Gilfillan: Tel 021 480 7811; Fax 021 424 1688 Velden Pike Nichols Inc: Tel 031 265 0651; Fax 086 604 6318

 Bulk Terminals Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Classification Societies ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 SMD Telecommunications: Tel 021 511 0556; Fax 021 511 2886

 Consultancy & Training African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 Allweld Solutions: Tel 021 510 1482; Fax 021 510 8082 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Consultants African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Offshore Maritime Services: Tel 021 425 3372; Fax 021 425 3379 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Consulting Engineers ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

Crew Transport Services Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Equipment Selection & Procurement African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206

BUYERS’ GUIDE

African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 511 5504; Fax 021 511 1770: Dbn: Tel 031 274 4700; Fax 031 274 4996 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Ferry Services ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Fisheries Research Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Harbour, Ocean Towage SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138 Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895

 Heavy Lift ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Hydraulic Design, Project & Engineering  Inspection & Testing Services ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Launch Services ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895 Offshore Maritime Services: Tel 021 425 3372; Fax 021 425 3379

 Logistics ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 511 5504; Fax 021 511 1770: Dbn: Tel 031 274 4700; Fax 031 274 4996 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Marine Surveyors ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

Products and services

021 527 7050 Offshore Maritime Services: Tel 021 425 3372 Fax 021 425 3379

 Maritime Training HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Sea Safety Training Centre: Tel 022 742 1297; Fax 022 742 1365 Unicorn Training School: Tel 031 274 4770 Fax 031 5578 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Naval Architects ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Net Monitoring Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752

 Onsite Machining ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 P & I Club Representatives Bowman Gilfillan: Tel 021 480 7811; Fax 021 424 1688

 Personnel Agency DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Project Management ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Salvors Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Seabed Surveys C & C Technologies: Tel 021 705 2741; Fax 021 705 2741 Marine Radio Acoustic Devices: Tel 021 559 4003; Fax 021 559 2752 Smit Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax

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021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Ship Management ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Smit Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Ship Registration ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Spares Procurement African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 511 5504; Fax 021 511 1770: Dbn: Tel 031 274 4700; Fax 031 274 4996 Mares Shipping GmbH: Tel +49 40 37 47840; Fax +49 40 37 478446 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Seascape Marine Services: Tel 021 511 8201; Fax 021 510 0947

 STCW 95Training Unicorn Training School: Tel 031 274 4770 Fax 031 5578

 Superintendent (Marine) ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Surveyors, Hull, Machinery ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302

 Tailshaft Surveys ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900

 Technical Documents ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Towage Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895 Offshore Maritime Services: Tel 021 425 3372; Fax 021 425 3379 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Vessel Purchase/Sales ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Vessel Management, Crew supplies, Maintenance Planning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

086 580 4702 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Pumps

African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Bilge Pumps

 Pump Sales & Service

PUMPS  Ballast Water Systems

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Fish Pumps & Hoses ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Fresh & Sea Water Pumps ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Marine Pump Sales ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 List your company’s details here

 Pumping Services ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Hytec Cape: Tel 021 551 4747; Fax 021 551 2575 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 0836

 Spare Parts ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Mares Shipping GmbH: Tel +49 40 37 47840; Fax +49 40 37 478446 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

SHIP REPAIR & MARINE MAINTENANCE & ENGINEERING SERVICES & EQUIPMENT  Anti fouling systems ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702


Products and services  Battery Charges & Inverters ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Battery Management ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Boat Builders ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Hulamin (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 507 9100; Fax 021 534 2469 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Boiler Cleaning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Boiler Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Cathodic Protection ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770

HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Imtech Marine South Africa: Tel 021 508 4700; Fax 021 508 4888 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Cleaning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Cold Metal Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Corrosion Prevention ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Cutless Bearings African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Diving Services ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax

021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Drydocking ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Electrical & Mechanical Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Electrical Cable Support Systems ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

 Electrical Installations ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Electrical Motor Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 Explosion Proof Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

BUYERS’ GUIDE

Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Gritblasting ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

Gritblasting Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

 HVAC Systems E.R.A.S.E.: Tel 021 949 8955; Fax 021 946 3178

 High (Ultra) Pressure Water Jetting ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Hold Tank Cleaning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

 Hull Blasting & Painting ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

 Hull Cleaning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Hydraulic Systems & Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

 Hydroblasting ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

 Insulation ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

Products and services

021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

 Marine Aitconditioning

Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 E.R.A.S.E.: Tel 021 949 8955; Fax 021 946 3178 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Steel Works

 Marine Coatings

 Stern Bearings

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Marine UPS Inverters ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723

 Pipe Fittings: Pipes ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Refrigeration Service & Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Rudder Repairs/Surveys ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 List your company’s details here

 Ship Conversions ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Ship Equipment Repairs HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Ship Painting ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

 Ship Repairs & Maintenance ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

64

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Steering Gear, Repairs EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411

 Sterngear ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

 Stud Welding ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Tank Cleaning/Sludge Removal & Disposal ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252

EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 511 5504; Fax 021 511 1770: Dbn: Tel 031 274 4700; Fax 031 274 4996 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Underwater Welding Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Underwater Systems ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772 Underwater Surveys: Tel 021 709 6000; Fax 021 788 5302 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Welding Repairs ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 Dormac (Pty) Ltd: Dbn Tel 031 274 1500; Cpt Tel 021 512 2900 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 SA Shipyards: Tel 031 274 1848; Fax 086 580 4702

SHIP SUPPLY

 Tank Blasting & Coating

 Bunkers

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 Maritime Mechanicals Consulting: Tel 021 836 7643; Fax 086 295 2411 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Thruster Repairs African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 EBH South Africa: Tel 031 205 6391; Fax 031 206 0252 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

 Transformers Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009

 Ultrasonic Cleaning ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050

MARITIME REVIEW Africa: February 2015

 Crew Changes Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 Subtech (Pty) Ltd: Tel 031 206 2073; Fax 031 205 7772

 Lubricants ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523

 Launches, Helicopters ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Servest Marine Services: Tel 021 448 3500; Fax 021 447 0895

HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Offshore Rig Supply African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 DCD Dorbyl Marine Cape Town: Tel 021 460 6000; Fax 021 447 6038 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396 Smit Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885

 Oil Pollution Abatement / Cleanup ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Smit Amandla Marine: Tel 021 507 5777; Fax 021 507 5885 SVITZER Salvage Africa: Tel 021 408 6710; Fax 021 408 6138

 Oil Pollution Equipment ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Oil Spill Prevention Kits ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Viking Life-Saving Equipment (SA) (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 514 5160; Fax 086 403 4211

 Ship Chandlers African Maritime Services: Tel 021 510 3532; Fax 021 510 3530 Novamarine a div of Novagroup: Tel 021 506 4300; Fax 021 511 8396

 Spare Parts African Marine Propulsion: Tel 021 801 0898; Fax 086 219 0206 ASI Offshore: Tel 021 527 7040; Fax 021 527 7050 Craig International Supplies (Pty) Ltd: Tel 021 552 9445; Fax 021 552 9523 Grindrod Marine Services: Tel 021 510 0042; Fax 021 511 1770 HSE Supplies: Tel 021 511 8030; Fax 021 511 8009 Mares Shipping GmbH: Tel +49 40 37 4 7840; Fax +49 40 3747 8446 Marine Industrial Electro Solutions: Tel 021 511 8499; Fax 021 986 8723 Unique Hydra: Tel 021 534 4375; Fax 021 534 3610

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EASY CHOICE FOR TOUGH JOBS Tough work on a tight schedule. With reliable, high-performance Cat® marine engines, maximum uptime is given - along with power, fuel economy, and emissions compliance. Barloworld Power supports you with expert service and genuine parts. The choice is clear. For more information call Barloworld Power on 0860 898 000 or visit www.barloworldpower.com

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Upcoming features for 2015 FEBRUARY 1. Ship repair and boat building in southern Africa 2. Hydrography and underwater surveying MARCH / APRIL 1. Maritime security and surveillance 2. Marine law, insurance and finance MAY / JUNE 1. Marine engines and propulsion 2. Health and safety in the maritime sectors JULY / AUGUST 1. Bunker industry review 2. Fish-finding equipment SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 1. Marine civils and port development 2. Towage, salvage and casualty response 3. Lifting and handling equipment NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 1. Marine electronics 2. Maritime organisations, federations and institutes Maritime Review reserves the right to change features without prejudice

Maritime Review February 2015  
Maritime Review February 2015  

News of the maritime sectors in Southern Africa