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MARANA DOWNTOWN ACTIVITY CENTER A Development Plan for Marana’s Downtown Study Area

Prepared by Arizona State University’s Masters in Urban & Environmental Planning Program Spring 2013


Marana Downtown Activity Center Development Plan Final Report Prepared for the Town of Marana by students and faculty at Arizona State University’s Masters in Urban & Environmental Planning Program:

Students: Evan Balmer Anton Fischer Jilai Hou Julia Kerran Daksha Masurkar Marissa McKinney Jennifer Mikelson Mailen Pankiewicz Amanda Straight Maggie Soffel Adam Stranieri Wei Wei Faculty: Dr. Joochul Kim


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ASU MUEP students would like to thank:

Marana Town Council Mayor Ed Honea Vice Mayor Patti Comerford Dave Bowen Herb Kai Carol McGorray Jon Post Roxanne Ziegler Marana Planning Commission Norman Fogel, Chair Marcia Jakab,Vice Chair Terry Fehrmann, Commissioner Don Duncan. Commissioner Steve Miklosi, Commissioner Richard Miller, Commissioner Thomas Schnee, Commissioner Planning Staff Kevin Kish, AICP, Planning Director Cynthia Ross, AICP, Planner II Dr. Joochul Kim, Associate Professor, ASU School of Geographical Sciences & Urban Planning


TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1: Introduction

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Section 2: Marana Profile

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Section 3: Study Area

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Section 4: Gateway

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Section 5: Downtown Core

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Section 6: Lake District

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Section 7: Adventure District

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Section 8: Community Services District

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Section 9: Conclusion

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Appendix

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SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION The Town of Marana’s rapid growth over the last few decades has spurred the need for continued development to accommodate the rise in population. Creating a unified, cohesive plan with a vision for how this development should look is vital to creating a well-designed community in the future. In its 2010 Economic Roadmap, the Town of Marana defined nine activity centers around which to focus new development. The Marana Downtown Activity Center is one of the activity centers identified to be the heart of Marana and the core economic base of the town (Town of Marana, 2010c). The Marana Downtown Activity Center Conceptual Plan provides a vision for how this area might grow and develop over the next thirty years to become a thriving downtown core full of economic, commercial, entertainment, and community activities. Marana’s growing population and aging demographics allow for opportunities to create unique places and foster different housing types. Generating new employment opportunities is vital to bringing in a young population and a large part of this strategy involves making downtown Marana a vibrant, active town center, where people will want to live and visit. In order to grow the Marana Downtown Activity Center, the area needs to be easily accessible from I-10. The gateway design will improve the interstate’s connection to the downtown by allowing for wayfinding signs and creating a sense of place. It facilitates the connection between the many different districts and sections of downtown and provides the first focal point after entering the area. The Downtown Core District will allow for continued development of the current civic and health center as well as the integration of mixed-use, pedestrianfocused environments typical of downtown urban areas. Open civic space and walkable paseos will allow the Downtown Core to be a unique space for residents and an important attraction for visitors.

Employment opportunities and other ways of building the economic base of the downtown are extremely vital. The Lake District will support many research parks, an industrial park, and a higher education campus. These uses also complement and support a hotel and convention center complex suited for corporate guests. The District also provides a unique public green space containing a lake and amphitheater that can serve both residents and visitors which will serve as a major center of the community. The Adventure District offers different forms of entertainment, with a small amusement park and a variety of family-focused attractions. Additionally, the District has a transportation center, serving as the central hub of both a potential bus circulator system and a proposed bike-share system. Bike-share stations will be placed throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center, creating a network to facilitate multi-modal transportation options. The Community Services District provides additional recreational outlets geared towards outdoor sports and athletics, including a rock wall facility, Motocross BMX racing, and a skatepark. A botanical garden in this District provides a community space for relaxation and educational programs. This District will also support opportunities for important community centers, such as a YMCA or Boys and Girls Club. The proposed districts of the Marana Downtown Activity Center all provide important amenities that will help transform the area into a true center of economic activity. While these districts are unique, they are all connected and provide the downtown with a cohesive plan that can attract visitors and offer amenities to residents. With opportunities for employment, higher density housing opportunities, and interesting commercial, entertainment, and civic activities, the Marana Downtown Activity Center can be a vibrant place well-suited for the needs of future development in the Town of Marana.

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SECTION 2 MARANA PROFILE The demographic and economic profile of the Town of Marana showcases a need to accommodate a rapidly growing population. The age, income and occupation breakdown provide evidence of a need for more diversity in housing and employment opportunities in Marana.

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MARANA PROFILE Population Growth and Breakdown The Town of Marana has shown a large growth in population over the last few decades, nearly tripling in population from approximately13,556 in 2000 to 34,961 in 2010 (Figures 2.2 and 2.3). According to unofficial numbers from the Pima County Association of Governments, this growth is likely to continue with an estimated population of 99,238 by 2030 as shown in Figure 2.1 (Town of Marana, 2010b). This trend indicates a need to continue to increase development and to create plans for this future of Marana as a much more urban, populated place. Figure 2.1

Figure 2.2

Figure 2.3

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MARANA DOWNTOWN ACTIVITY CENTER

As the town has grown over the last decade, the demographics of the residents have changed as well. Population pyramids for 2000 and 2010 are shown in Figure 2.2 and 2.3 and show the age and sex breakdown of Marana residents by percent of total population. These graphs show a significant change in the age structure of the population. There has been a drastic increase in the percent of Marana residents that are retirement age and older. While all categories have increased in total population, the percent of the population for all age categories below 40 has decreased. The most significant decreases were in children under four and adults 30-39. These changes show the shifting demographics of the town. The aging population demonstrates a need for a variety of housing types in Marana. As Marana residents continue to age, there will be an increased need for smaller and more diverse housing opportunities with the potential for aging-in-place. Marana will also face a need to attract new, younger residents in order to support the town and its continued growth. In order to do this, the town needs to include not only a diverse array of housing options, but also increased employment opportunities and unique entertainment activities.


MARANA PROFILE Racial Distribution While the age structure of Marana has changed, the racial distribution of its residents over the past decade has primarily remained the same. Figure 2.5 shows that Marana is currently a majority white community at 82%. However, the percentage of residents who are American Indian and Alaska Native has slightly decreased since 2000 while the Asian population has increased, becoming the second largest ethnic category behind white.

Figure 2.4

Figure 2.5

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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MARANA PROFILE Household Type Despite the change in age distribution in Marana, the percent of households that are family as opposed to nonfamily has increased from 77% in 2000 to 83% in 2010 (3-year ACS estimate) as shown in Figures 2.6 and 2.7. There has been a change in the structure of these families over the last decade as seen by the Family Households by Type graphs from 2000 and 2010.

Figure 2.6

Figure 2.7

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MARANA PROFILE

Figures 2.8 and 2.9 show the breakdown of family households by type. The percentage of family households without children under 18 has been increasing, providing more evidence for the need for smaller housing options. There has also been a decrease in the percentage of these family households that are married couples and an increasing number of households headed by either a male or female with no significant other present. These single parents will also require smaller housing options, further emphasizing the need for greater housing diversity in Marana.

Figure 2.8

Figure 2.9

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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MARANA PROFILE Housing Tenure Over the last decade, housing in Marana has become less owner-occupied as shown in Figures 2.10 and 2.11. The percent of renter-occupied housing increased from 17.3% in 2000 to 24.3% in 2010 (3-year ACS estimate). This is likely a result of the recent economic and housing crises, with foreclosures forcing residents into rental housing. Anticipating changes to these factors may require a heavy reliance on unforeseeable market trends, however, continuing to increase the diversity of housing types in Marana will likely be essential to maintaining a healthy, diverse economy and inviting a variety of future residents.

Figure 2.10

Figure 2.11

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MARANA PROFILE Geographic Mobility Marana’s increasing population of older residents can be explained by Figure 2.12, which shows that Marana is an attractive city for retirement. Nearly 50% of people between the ages of 65 to 74 years old moved to Marana from a different state, and nearly 20% of the same age group moved from a different county in Arizona. Also, 40% of people 75 years or older moved from a different state to settle in Marana. As the influx of an aging population continues to accelerate, the town must provide new amenities and create more opportunities in order to attract a younger population, while still providing the necessities needed for its older residents.

Figure 2.12

Existing Land Use Much of the Town of Marana is undeveloped land. Figure 2.13 shows a breakdown of all the land uses according to the Marana 2010 General Plan. The availability of this undeveloped land allows for the potential for new development that will serve new residents as Marana continues to grow. The Marana Downtown Activity Center currently has a large of amount of undeveloped land despite being connected to important civic activities. Focusing on this area will be critically important moving forward for the Town of Marana. Only 53 acres (~0% of all land area) of Marana’s land use is dedicated to multi-family residential housing, indicating an opportunity for development of this sector in the downtown area. There is also only 1% of land devoted to commercial uses and 2% devoted to industrial uses, suggesting room for considerable growth in shopping and employment activities to serve both existing and new residents in Marana.

Figure 2.13

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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MARANA PROFILE Employment Figure 2.14 represents the distribution of workers commuting both inside and outside the Town of Marana. According to the 2010 US Census, 10,073 workers commute from neighboring cities to work in Marana. Table 2.1 shows that the City of Tucson provides Marana with the majority of their workforce, followed by Casas Adobes, and Marana itself. In total, 9,380 Marana residents commute to neighboring cities for work, mostly to Tucson, Casas Adobes, and Phoenix (as shown in Table 2.2). Only 1,288 residents of Marana work within the town.

Figure 2.14

Table 2.1

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Table 2.2


MARANA PROFILE Top Employment Marana’s top twenty employers are shown in Table 2.3. Three of the top 20 employers within the 2010 General Plan study area are government-related jobs including: Marana Unified School District, the Town of Marana, and the Army Reserve/National Guard. The Marana Unified School District is the top employer, providing 1,800 jobs. Major private employers have approximately 1,945 employees, while major public and nonprofit employers have approximately 2,610 employees. There are approximately 2,300 people employed by major retail and service employers in Marana (Town of Marana, 2010a). Unemployment Figure 2.14 shows that the unemployment rate has declined since peaking during the economic crisis in 2010. Marana has been recovering well from the recent recession, with a current unemployment rate of 6.2%, below the state average of 7.9% (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013). As the economy continues to recover, providing a more diverse range of employment opportunities in Marana will be essential to foster the growth of the town and maintain and support a healthy economy.

Table 2.3

Figure 2.15

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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MARANA PROFILE Occupation Type Figures 2.16 and 2.17 show the occupational outlook by sector in Marana in 2000 and 2010 (3-year estimates). There has been very little fluctuation in the occupations of residents over the last decade. Major sectors like business and related occupations, changed by only one percent. Service occupation data reflects the same trend. Analysis of occupation by sectors reveals a stable workforce and a growing population. It is increasingly important to diversify the employment opportunities to accommodate for different education levels. (Note: The construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations category and the farming, fishing, and forestry occupations category from 2000 were combined in the 2010 in the natural resource, construction, and maintenance occupations category.)

Figure 2.16

Figure 2.17

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MARANA PROFILE Income An analysis of household incomes over the last decade reveals a strong differentiation between economic classes as shown in Figures 2.18 and 2.19. Despite an increase in the overall population, the percentage of households earning less than $10,000 a year has declined. In contrast there has been an explosion of households with incomes between $65,000 and $125,000. The construction of housing developments in Marana offering larger homes may be associated with the influx of population with incomes above the median average capable of affording these more expensive houses.

Figure 2.18

Figure 2.19

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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MARANA PROFILE Education The level of educational attainment of Marana residents has moderately increased from 2000 to 2010 as shown in Figures 2.20 and 2.21. There is a growing number of people with at least a bachelor’s degree, and there has also been an increase in the number of residents with some college, but no degree. The number of people not completing high school has dropped. Overall, the demographics of Marana point towards continued development that will require additional need for diversity in housing and land uses. The aging population will require increasing the variety of housing options. In addition, providing unique entertainment and employment opportunities will help bring a younger demographic to the town. This is vital for creating a self-sufficient Marana that can accommodate the rapid changes taking place within the town limits over the next several decades.

Figure 2.20

Figure 2.21

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REFERENCES Figures Figure 2.1 Town of Marana. (2010). Marana 2010 General Plan. Retrieved April 1, 2013 from: http://www.marana.com/index.aspx?NID=927 Figure 2.2 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Age Groups and Sex Summary File 1: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.3 U. S. Census Bureau. (2010). Sex by Age Summary File 1: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.4 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Demographic Profile Data: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.5 U.S. Census Bureau (2010). Demographic Profile Data: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.6 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.7 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.8 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.9 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.10 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.11 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.12 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.13 Town of Marana. (2010). Marana 2010 General Plan. Retrieved April 1, 2013 from: http://www.marana.com/index.aspx?NID=927

Figure 2.14 US Census Bureau. (2010). Inflow/Outflow: Marana town, AZ. Retrieved from http://onthemap.ces.census.gov/ Figure 2.15 AZStats.gov. (2013). Local Area Unemployment Statistics. Retrieved March 1, 2013 from http://azstats.gov/laus-data-query-tool/ Figure 2.16 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.17 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.18 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.19 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.20 U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Educational Attainment by Sex: Marana town, Arizona. Figure 2.21 U.S. Census Bureau (2009-2011). American Community Survey: Marana town, Arizona. Tables Table 2.1 U.S. Census Bureau (2010). Home Destination Analysis: Marana town, Arizona. Retrieved from http://onthemap.ces.census.gov/ Table 2.2 U.S. Census Bureau (2010). Work Destination Analysis: Marana town, Arizona. Retrieved from http://onthemap.ces.census.gov/ Table 2.3 Town of Marana. (2010a). Demographics. Retrieved April 1, 2013 from http://www. marana.com/index.aspx?NID=951

SECTION 2 | MARANA PROFILE

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SECTION 3 STUDY AREA

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STUDY AREA Existing Conditions The Downtown Marana Activity Center consists of approximately 1,129 acres of largely undeveloped land as exemplified in Figures 3.1 and 3.3. Vacant land and farmland define the northwestern half of the study area, comprising 697 acres, while the southern half is scattered with sparse development and large parcels of vacant land. Existing development includes small-scale commercial, single-family homes, apartments, Ora Mae Harn District Park, Marana school district and school bus depot, health services, and various civic buildings.

Figure 3.1 W. Grier Road looking north

Figure 3.2 Marana Road looking south

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STUDY AREA

Image 3.3 Ora Mae Harn District Park Image 3.6 Marana Apartment

Image 3.4 Family Dollar, existing commercial Image 3.7 Marana Municipal Complex

Image 3.5 Single-family homes

Image 3.8 Marana Health Center

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STUDY AREA

Proposed Districts The Marana Downtown Activity Center District Map shows four districts that will define the Downtown Activity Center:

Map 3.1 Marana Downtown Activity Center Districts Map

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The Downtown Core District is the central district within the study area and contains the majority of existing development. This area is composed of 282 acres and is designed to function as the primary neighborhood center with mixed-use development, civic space, and a variety of housing options.

The Lake District consists of 580 acres in the northwestern section of the study area. This district is defined by large research and development parks, mixed-use development, and a large, central park containing a lake.

The Adventure District is the only swath of land in the study area that is located east of the I-10. This area is composed of 117 acres and is primarily defined by a theme park and transit center.

Finally, Marana’s Community Services District is located in the southeastern corner of the study area. This area is composed of 150 acres of community services and outdoor activity centers.

The School District and Ora Mae Harn District Park were not included in this plan because they are established uses and will not change as the surrounding area develops.


PROPOSED LAND USES

Map 3.2 Marana Downtown Activity Center Overall Land Use Map

Map 3.2 shows all future land uses in the Marana Downtown Activity Center. Note that the hatched areas in the Downtown Core will not change.

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STUDY AREA

Map 3.3 Marana 2010 General Plan, Bicycle Mobility Plan

Connectivity Connectivity throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center is achieved with safe, accessible, and diverse mobility options for pedestrians and cyclists. Marana’s 2010 General Plan includes a Bicycle Mobility Plan (Map 3.3) which features buffered bike lanes along all main streets and arterials, providing safe access for cyclists traveling within and between the four districts (Town of Marana, 2010). 22

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STUDY AREA

Map 3.4 Marana Downtown Activity Center Bike Share & Open Space Map

This Bike Share & Open Space Map illustrates how the bike share program is integrated throughout all districts and open spaces. Bike share programs serve as an additional transit option for citizens, with pick-up and drop-off locations positioned at strategic centers.

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STUDY AREA Greenways with multi-use paths snake through all four districts, providing safe pedestrian mobility between destinations. This greenway network connects pockets of open space between mixed-use, commercial, and residential areas to the proposed linear park along Barnett Road as well as Ora Mae Harn District Park.

Image 3.9 Example of Bike Share Station, West Palm Beach, Florida

Image 3.10 Example of a Multi-Use Path, Prescott, AZ

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Image 3.11 Barnett Road Existing Conditions, Slated for Linear Park - Marana, AZ


REFERENCES Images Image 3.1 Google Maps. (n.d.). Image of Marana Road looking south [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 3.2 Google Maps. (n.d.). W Grier Road looking north [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 3.3 Metroshot. (n.d). Ora Mae Harn District Park [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://localphototours.metroshot.com/usa/arizona/marana/ Image 3.4 Google Maps. (n.d.). Family Dollar, Existing Commercial [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 3.5 Google Maps. (n.d.). Single Family Homes [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 3.6 Decca Builders Incorporated (n.d.). Marana Apartments [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.deccabuilders.com/jobs/maranaapartments.htm

Image 3.11 Julia Kerran (Photographer). (2013). Barnett Road Existing Conditions, Slated for Linear Park, Marana, AZ [Photograph]. Maps Map 3.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Marana Downtown Activity Center Districts Map. Map 3.2 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Marana Downtown Activity Center Overall Land Use Map. Map 3.3 Town of Marana (2010). Marana 2010 General Plan, Bicycle Mobility Plan [Map], Retrieved 04/06/2013, from: http://www.marana.com/DocumentCenter/Home/ View/4036 Map 3.4 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Marana Downtown Activity Center Bike Share & Open Space Map.

Image 3.7 Kelly Wright & Associates, PC (n.d). Marana Municipal Complex [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.kwmech.com/projects/government/ Image 3.8 Vickie Marana (n.d.). Marana Health Center [Photograph], Retrieved 04/06/2013, from: http://vickiemarana.blogspot.com/2011/06/and-common-ground-awardgoes-to.html Image 3.9 Better Cities and Towns (n.d.). Example of Bike Share Station, West Palm Beach, Florida [Photograph], Retrieved 04/22/2013, from: http://bettercities.net/images/18292/bicycle-sharing-station-cityplace-west-palm-beach-florida Image 3.10 Chollaball.net (2010). Example of a Multi-Use Path, Prescott, Arizona [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://chollaball.net/blog/2010/07

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SECTION 4 GATEWAY

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GATEWAY

Map 4.1 Gateway Area Map

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

As travelers enter Marana from the I-10 freeway at Sandario Road, there are currently no significant features to announce their entrance to the town. Map 4.1 highlights the intersection of W. Marana Road and N. Sandario Road, which will serve as the central entry point to the Marana Downtown Activity Center. This important transit node requires a prominent designation. Currently, gas stations anchor two of the major corners at this intersection, suggesting transiency and a lack of established community.

Image 4.1 Sandario Road looking North, Marana, AZ

Image 4.3 Southwest Corner of Intersection at Sandario Road and Marana Road, Marana, AZ

Image 4.2 Sandario Road and Frontage Road Intersection looking North, Marana, AZ

SECTION 4 | GATEWAY

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OBJECTIVE Vision

Rationale

As drivers exit the I-10, attractive native landscaping and a large monument sign welcome them to Marana (Image 4.4). As Image 4.5 shows, the monument features a corten steel plate set in a gabion wall, boasting the town symbol and welcome statement. Perched atop the gabion are three large agave plants, and surrounding the monument are a variety of native desert fauna.

Creating a unique brand that sets Marana apart from other towns must begin at the central entry point to the community and continue throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center. This gateway serves to welcome visitors and introduce them to Marana’s four distinct districts.

Four complementary monument signs surround this town entry point (Image 4.6), guiding visitors to the Marana Downtown Activity Center’s four districts: the Downtown Core District, the Lake District, the Adventure District, and the Community Services District. Additional monuments brand the various bike share locations throughout all of the districts (Image 4.7). These prominent identifying features serve as landmarks for the town and provide an essential wayfinding tool for downtown exploration. Finally, additional maps and informational packets are provided at a nearby welcome center that describe the Marana Downtown Activity Center and what attractions each of its four districts have to offer. A discussion of the welcome center can be found in the Downtown Core District section.

Image 4.4 Marana Welcome Sign Concept

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A gateway is an essential ingredient in the function and design of a place. Whether it is an arch, a monument, landscaping, or a simple sign, a gateway designates arrival to an established location, giving it a sense of place, community identity, and permanency. Placemaking describes the intention of creating more livable communities that possess unique character by drawing from aspects of a community’s culture and history. A strong sense of place implies that a community’s identity is apparent in all aspects, from streetscapes and signage to transportation and land use. This can be accomplished through design and branding.


EXHIBITS

Corten steel plate centered in gabion base (8’6”T x 2’6”W x 6”D)

Corten steel plate set in gabion wall 3’6” from right corner and 2’6“ from left corner (5’W x 12’L x 6”D) Acrylic Marana logo attached to face of steel

Steel plate powdercoated to match teal in Marana logo (5’6”W x 2’T x 4” D) 8” brushed aluminum lettering, lit from behind

12” brushed aluminum lettering, lit from behind

Agave Americana at base for continuity

8” brushed aluminum lettering, lit from behind

Gabion base filled with native Arizona Rip Rap (3’ square)

Agave Americana in planter at surface of gabion base

Image 4.6 District Monuents

(5’T x 10’L x 6’D)

Image 4.5Gateway MaranaMonument Gateway Monument Marana

District Monuments

Image 4.7 Bike Share Station Monument Concept

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REFERENCES Images Image 4.1 Maggie Soffel (Photographer). (2013). Sandario Road looking North, Marana, AZ. [Photograph]. Image 4.2 Maggie Soffel (Photographer). (2013). Sandario Road and Frontage Road Intersection looking North, Marana, AZ [Photograph]. Image 4.3 Julia Kerran (Photographer). (2013). Southwest Corner of Intersection at Sandario Road and Marana Road, Marana, AZ [Photograph]. Image 4.4 Google Maps. (n.d.) Southeast Corner of Intersection at Sandario Road and I-10 South On-ramp, Marana, AZ. [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https:// maps.google.com ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Marana Welcome Sign Concept. Image 4.5 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Marana Gateway Monument. Image 4.6 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). District Monuments. Image 4.7 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Bike Share Station Monument Concept. Maps Map 4.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Gateway Area Map.

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SECTION 5

Image 5.1 Downtown Core District Monument Sign

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DOWNTOWN CORE DISTRICT BOUNDARY MAP

Map 5.1 Downtown Core District Boundary Map

Map 5.1 shows the 282 acre Downtown Core District, which is bound by N. Lon Adams Road and N. McDuff Road to the east, W. Barnett Road to the south, N. Sandario Road to the west, and the I-10 Frontage Road to the north. 34

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INTRODUCTION Existing Conditions The existing conditions of the Downtown Core District include scattered development interspersed by large swaths of vacant land. The Marana Municipal Complex and Ora Mae Harn District Park occupy the southern edge of the District. W Barnett Road, to the south, is slated to become a linear park which will serve to connect the park to a larger network of green space.

Image 5.2 Existing Marana Municipal Complex

Image 5.3 Existing Ora Mae Harn District Park

SECTION 5 | DOWNTOWN CORE

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INTRODUCTION Existing Conditions North of the Marana Municipal Complex is the Marana Health Center, the Marana Fire Department, and Marana Apartments to the east and west of Marana Main Street. Existing single-family homes border the Downtown Core District along the western edge, as well as across the intersection of Marana Main Street and Grier Road.

Image 5.4 Existing Marana Health Center

Image 5.5 Existing Marana Fire Department

Image 5.6 Existing Marana Apartments

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Image 5.7 Existing single-family homes


OBJECTIVE Vision Marana’s Downtown Core District will serve as a vital and unique hub for commerce, living, working, and recreation. The District is defined by its economic vitality, diversity of housing options, accessibility for healthy, active lifestyles, and safe, connected mobility, as conveyed in the Land Use Map 5.2 and Detailed Land Use Map 5.3. Mixed-use development supports a vibrant downtown community by providing housing in close proximity to local shops and neighborhood services. Options for living downtown include live/work units and apartments in mixed-use buildings, townhomes, assisted living units, and single-family homes. A variety of opportunities for housing throughout the Downtown Core helps foster a diverse community and provide the critical mass for local businesses to thrive. A balanced mix of boutique retail, neighborhood services, entertainment, and office space serves local residents as well as visitors to Marana. A hotel and welcome center draw revenue from travelers along the I-10 and encourage their continuation along Marana Main Street to discover all Marana has to offer.

Rationale The Downtown Core District will support key components of Marana’s Economic Roadmap, such as economic development and tourism attraction, by providing unique amenities. The pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use vision for the Downtown Core District is viable for Marana because currently no such environment exists. Marana’s southern development is characterized by automobile-dependent lifestyles, replete with strip malls, chain retail, and big-box stores. The current and future community of Marana requires an environment that recognizes and protects the importance of the pedestrian realm and fosters the success of local businesses. The vision for the Downtown Core District satisfies the needs of a diverse population of local residents, business owners, and visitors.

The unique identifier of the Downtown Core is its dedication to the pedestrian environment. Outdoor gathering spaces, multi-use pathways, wide sidewalks, shade trees, and buffered bike lanes highlight the human-scale design and safe, connected mobility of the district. This network of pedestrian mobility encourages active lifestyles and creates a vibrant street presence. The vision for the Downtown Core District is a diverse, livable, thriving downtown which serves as the focal point of the town and as a unique destination for the region.

SECTION 5 | DOWNTOWN CORE

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LAND USE MAP

Map 5.2 Marana Downtown Core Land Use Map

Marana’s Downtown Core District is defined by a variety of proposed and existing land uses as exemplified in the Land Use Map 5.2. The land uses within the Downtown Core are based on the assumption that Marana Main Street will extend north to connect this district with the Lake District. Existing land uses are hatched on the land use map and massing plan, and will not be discussed in the following sections. 38

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DETAILED LAND USE MAP

Map 5.3 Marana Downtown Core Detailed Land Use Map

Map 5.3 suggests future building massing within the Downtown Core. The smaller-scaled mixed use buildings form an interesting network of pedestrian walkways, or paseos, which open up onto the existing Marana Municipal Complex and event space. SECTION 5 | DOWNTOWN CORE

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COMMERCIAL Welcome Center & Hotel The northernmost section of the Downtown Core District is designed to attract traffic from the I-10 and includes a welcome center with a gas station, food and dining options, a unique open area that travelers can enjoy, and a hotel. Food and dining options are separated from the gas station and parking area by a pleasantly landscaped, open plaza where visitors can stretch their legs, have a bite to eat, allow their children to play, and enjoy the outdoors. This unique arrangement of uses and green open spaces distinguishes Marana’s welcome center from standard rest stops and encourages healthy, active lifestyles. Informational kiosks assist with wayfinding and surround the plaza to direct visitors to Marana’s four districts.

Image 5.8 Berkshire Visitor Center, Pittsfield, MA

Image 5.9 Wyndam Hotel, Green Valley, AZ

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The hotel in this area is designed for those passing through to stop and rest, and use as a home base from which to explore the entire Marana Downtown Activity Center. Positioned along the I-10 Frontage Road, the hotel buffers its interior courtyard from the freeway. The Wyndham Hotel in Green Valley, Arizona serves as an example of the three-to four-story height, desert character, and ample use of open space Marana’s hotel might utilize along the I-10.


COMMERCIAL Entertainment Uses The welcome center and hotel area are complemented by larger entertainment uses to the South, including a movie theater, bowling alley, and larger restaurants. These entertainment options are designed to attract both local residents and visitors. Green open space provides a connection from the Lake District’s civic center complex to the restaurants and entertainment provided across the street in the Downtown Core. Tempe Marketplace in Arizona serves as an example of how Marana’s entertainment area might function, where four to five story buildings connected by open spaces create a safe and accessible pedestrian zone. It is important to note, however, that this land use is not intended to reflect a regional lifestyle center like Tempe Marketplace; rather it is designed to capture the entertainment appeal at a smaller scale.

Image 5.10 Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ

Image 5.12 Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ Image 5.11 Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ

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MIXED USE Main Street Shops Marana’s Downtown Core District follows Marana Main Street south from the entertainment uses and into a vibrant neighborhood center. This Main Street corridor is characterized by three-story, dense, mixed-use development which provides retail space at the street level and residential units and office space above. Boutiques, art galleries, restaurants, cafes, and bakeries inhabit the ground floor of the buildings along this stretch of Marana Main Street, and live/work units are found scattered throughout. Restaurants and cafes with outdoor patio seating serve to activate the street and enliven the downtown. The mixed-use, main street character of downtown Sausalito, California serves as an example of how Marana’s Main Street might function. With reduced setbacks, vegetation, and welcoming storefronts, this commercial neighborhood center is conducive to pedestrian activity and vibrant street life. Image 5.13 Van Dyke Café, Miami, FL

Image 5.14 Downtown Sausalito, CA

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Mixed-use buildings carry the energy from central Marana Main Street down toward the Marana Municipal Complex. The southernmost portion of designated mixeduse areas along Marana Main Street includes neighborhood services on the ground floors, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, and hardware stores, with professional offices and residential units occupying the second floors. This section of the Downtown Core is taller, with building heights from three- to six-stories to accommodate housing density, supportive commercial, and workspaces. On-street parking, buffered bike lanes, wide sidewalks, shade trees, and wayfinding signs promote safe pedestrian mobility and easy access to everyday services. Scattered green open spaces provide pockets of outdoor relaxation between the various uses.

Image 5.15 Trader Joe’s, Boston, MA


MIXED USE Paseos What sets Marana’s Downtown Core apart from other traditional neighborhood centers are its paseos: a network of pedestrian-only pathways linking a collection of unique restaurants and cafes with outdoor seating, small-scale entertainment venues and shops. These paseos provide a pleasant experience for shopping, and are a unique attraction for the Town of Marana. Much like the paseos in the town of Gilroy, California, Marana’s paseos will offer shaded, human-scale refuge from the bustling Main Street. Intertwined among the paseos are small gathering spaces. These areas offer shaded seating for pedestrians to rest, sip coffee, and chat with friends between the networks of shops. Like The Domain in Austin, Texas, these public gathering spaces incorporate outdoor furniture and shaded comfort. Image 5.16 Paseo, City of Gilroy, CA

Image 5.17 The Domain, Austin, TX

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PASEO MODELS

Image 5.18 Paseo Conceptual Model

Image 5.19 Paseo Conceptual Model

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Image 5.20 Biltmore Fashion Park, Phoenix, AZ

Image 5.21 Paseo, Santa Barbara, CA


PASEOS Stone archways on either side of Marana Main Street designate the entrance to the network of paseos that meander through the commercial core. Inspired by the archway at Mission Inn in Riverside, California, these architectural features will serve as anchors to Marana’s downtown paseos and landmarks for visitors.

Image 5.22 Mission Inn, Riverside, CA

Image 5.23 Mission Inn, Riverside, CA

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MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING Apartments Located between existing single-family homes and Marana’s Fire Department are multi-family apartments. At two- to three-stories, this housing option provides a transition between the pre-existing single-family homes and the increased density of the three- to six-story mixed-use buildings along Marana Main Street. A green pathway serves as a buffer between the single-family lots and the multi-family apartments and spills out onto an open green space for outdoor recreation and relaxation. Townhomes The southwestern corner of Marana’s Downtown Core District features an assisted living facility for senior citizens. This housing complex includes an interior courtyard with green space and gardens for residents and their visitors to enjoy. This assisted living facility is nestled between the Marana Health Center and surrounding medical offices, and has direct, walkable access to Marana’s civic spaces and neighborhood shops and services.

Image 5.25 Multi-Family Apartments, Santa Clara, CA

Image 5.26 Multi-Family Apartments, Chandler, AZ

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Image 5.27 Assisted Living Townhomes, Houston, TX


INSTITUTIONAL Health Center Marana’s expanded health center offers more options for community and regional healthcare needs. Expanded office space, emergency care, diagnostic, and rehabilitation services will attract more healthcare professionals to Marana and support the town’s growing population. Increasing the availability of unique specialists offering quality services to the region will highlight Marana as a healthcare destination. The architectural design features of the existing Marana Health Center are retained throughout the expanded development and native vegetation is utilized to create inner courtyards with healing gardens for patients and their loved ones. Image 5.27 Existing Marana Health Center

Image 5.29 Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ

Image 5.28 Existing Marana Health Center

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OPEN SPACE Event Space Conceptual Models East of the Marana Health Center is a community event space that overlooks the Marana Municipal Complex. This space is characterized by informal seating, shade structures, and temporary coffee carts that populate the area throughout the day. This is a space that allows for both informal community gathering and more formal programming. The lot adjacent to the Marana Municipal Complex is a natural community gathering place and is programmed throughout the year for community events such as scavenger hunts, concerts, and outdoor movie nights. Due to its location between neighborhood retail uses and the town’s civic buildings, this gathering space serves as an anchor for the community and unifies the diverse land uses in the Downtown Core District. Images 5.30 and 5.31 are conceptual 3D renderings of this proposed event space.

Image 5.30 Event Space Conceptual Model

Image 5.31 Event Space Conceptual Model

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Image 5.32 Event Space, Santa Fe, NM


ROUNDABOUTS To distinguish the Downtown Core from other districts, small traffic roundabouts serve to slow traffic speeds along Marana Main Street while also providing opportunities for art installations, attractive landscaping, and overall design continuity. Examples from France and Carmel, Indiana illustrate the attractive simplicity of utilizing traffic calming measures to beautify and brand a place.

Image 5.33 Landscaped Roundabout, UK

Image 5.34 Oxley Central Roundabout, UK

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DOWNTOWN CORE 3D CONCEPTUAL MODEL

Image 5.35 Downtown District Conceptual 3D Model Looking Southeast

This conceptual model displays a view of the proposed plan from the northwest corner of the district. The model highlights building distribution, scale, and height. More intense uses are concentrated along the I-10, with the paseo network of mixed use buildings following to the south. The medical facilities towards the south are in close proximity to existing residential areas. 50

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REFERENCES Images Image 5.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Downtown Core District Monument Sign. Image 5.2 SW Desert Homes. (n.d.). Exiting Marana Municipal Complex [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://movingtoswdesert.com/post/2258870/marana-tucson-az-s-northern-neighbor Image 5.3 Metro Shot. (n.d.). Existing Ora Mae Harn District Park [Photograph], Retrieved 04/19/2013, from: http://localphototours.metroshot.com/usa/arizona/ marana/marana-2.html Image 5.4 Vickie’s Marana Internship Blog. (2011). Existing Marana Health Center [Photograph], Retrieved 04/06/2013, from: http://vickiemarana.blogspot.com/2011/06/ and-common-ground-award-goes-to.html Image 5.5 Google Maps. (n.d.). Existing Marana Fire Department [Photograph], Retrieved 04/19/2013, from: https://maps.google.com Image 5.6 Decca Builders, Incorporated (n.d.). Existing Marana Apartments [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.deccabuilders.com/jobs/maranaapartments.htm Image 5.7 Google Maps. (n.d.). Existing Single-Family Homes [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: https://maps.google.com Image 5.8 Berkshire On Stage. (2010). Berkshire Visitor Center. [Photograph], Retrieved 05/24/13, from http://berkshireonstage.com/2010/05/16/half-price-ticket-outlets-expanding-to-meet-local-demand/ Image 5.9 Wyndham Hotel and Resorts (n.d.). Wyndham Hotel, Green Valley, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/17/2013, from: http://www.wyndham.com/hotels/arizona/ green-valley/wyndham-green-valley-canoa-ranch-resort/hotel-overview Image 5.10

AZcentral.com (n.d.). Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.azcentral.com/thingstodo/venues/Harkins_Tempe_Marketplace_16_815447301896 Image 5.11 AZcentral.com (n.d.). Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.azcentral.com/commphotos/azcentral/2788/1/10#1 Image 5.12 EastValleyTribune.com (n.d.). Tempe Marketplace, Tempe, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/get_out/article_ a0e40aea-c6f4-11e1-bbe5-0019bb2963f4.html Image 5.13 Lincoln Road Mall Directory (n.d.). Van Dyke Café, Miami, FL [Photograph], Retrieved 03/18/2013, from: http://www.lincolnroadmalldirectory. com/#VanDykeCafe Image 5.14 Panoramio (n.d.). Downtown Sausalito, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/03/2013, from http://www.panoramio.com/photo/1590671 Image 5.15 Eat and Be Happy (2008). Trader Joe’s, Boston, MA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/09/2013, from http://eatandbehappy.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/trader-joes. jpg Image 5.16 City of Gilroy (2008). Paseo, City of Gilroy, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from http://www.cityofgilroy.org/cityofgilroy_files/city_hall/community_development/planning/paseo_design/PaseoDesign_Acknowledgements_Intro.pdf Image 5.17 National Real Estate Investor (2008). The Domain, Austin, TX [Photograph], Retrieved 04/03/2013, from http://nreionline.com/sadi/domain Image 5.18 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Paseo Conceptual Model. Image 5.19 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Paseo Conceptual Model.

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REFERENCES

Image 5.20 Biltmore Fashion Park. (2013). Paseo at Biltmore Fashion Park. [Photograph], Retrieved 05/24/13, from http://www.nelsenpartners.com/portfolio-biltmorefashion-park Image 5.21 Flickr. (2013). Paseo [Photograph], Retrieved 05/24/13 from http://www.flickr. com/photos/datasitesolutions/534130363/ Image 5.22 Google Maps (n.d.). Riverside, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/03/2013, from https://maps.google.com Image 5.23 Google Maps (n.d.). Riverside, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/03/2013, from https://maps.google.com Image 5.24 The Villas & Shops at San Marcos Commons (n.d.). Multi-Family Apartments, Chandler, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/03/2013, from www.sanmarcoscommons.com/villas.php Image 5.25 HMH (n.d.). Multi-Family Apartments, Santa Clara, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/30/2013, from http://hmhca.com/projects/urban-infill.php

Image 5.29 Land 8 (2010). Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from http://land8.com/photo/banner-good-samaritan-medical-5 Image 5.30 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Event Space Conceptual Model. Image 5.31 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Event Space Conceptual Model. Image 5.32 A/N Blog (2012). Event Space, Santa Fe, NM. [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/aiany12_santefe_05.jpg Image 5.33 RobTM (2011). Landscaped Roundabout [Photograph], Retrieved 05/17/2013, from http://www.robtm.co.uk/YOP1/files/archive-may-2011.html Image 5.34 Yummy Taters. (2013). Oxley Central Roundabout [Photograph], Retrieved 05/17/2013, from http://yummytaters.blogspot.com/2011/04/all-about-roundabout.html

Image 5.26 Apartment Wiz (n.d.). Assisted Living Townhomes, Houston, TX [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from http://www.apartmentwiz.com/houston_apartments_search/houston_apartments_search.aspx?id=135&apartment_ area=Houston%20Senior%20Living%20Apartments

Image 5.35 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Downtown District Conceptual 3D Model Looking South.

Image 5.27 Julia Kerran (Photographer) (2013). Existing Marana Health Center, Marana, AZ [Photograph].

Map 5.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Downtown Core District Boundary Map.

Image 5.28 MHC Healthcare (n.d.). Existing Marana Health Center, Marana, AZ [Photo-

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graph], Retrieved 04/06/2013, from http://maranahealthcenter.org/our-services/ copper-cafe/

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Maps

Map 5.2 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Downtown Core District Land Use Map. Map 5.3 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Downtown Core District Detailed Land Use Map.


SECTION 6

Image 6.1 Lake District Monument Sign

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LAKE DISTRICT BOUNDARY MAP

Map 6.1 Lake District Boundary Map

The Marana Lake District (Map 6.1) occupies 580 acres west of the Downtown Core District bounded by W. Sagebrush Road and W. Grier Road to the north and south and N. Sandario Road/I-10 and N. Sanders Road to the east and west. 54

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INTRODUCTION Existing Conditions The Lake District is composed almost entirely of vacant land as seen in Images 6.2 and 6.3. There are cultivated agricultural plots south of W. Sagebrush Road, south of W. Marana Road, and east of N. Sanders Road. Existing development in the District is limited to a small cluster of commercial buildings at the southwest corner of W. Marana Road and N. Sandario Road and another at the southwest corner of W. Grier Road and N. Sandario Road. There are no existing roads or other infrastructure in the Lake District other than those lining the District’s edges and W. Marana Road which runs through the center of the District. Running parallel to the I-10 is a two lane frontage road.

Image 6.2 Looking southwest at the intersection of Marana & Sandario Roads

Image 6.3 Looking north from Grier Road

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OBJECTIVE Vision Statement

Rationale

The Lake District’s central feature is the elongated lake situated halfway between Marana Road and Grier Road. Surrounded by public green space, the lake area will serve varied functions as a public amenity, gathering space, and recreational area. The lake’s amphitheater will provide varied opportunities for entertainment, performance, and civic uses. Further activating the lake and its surrounding green space is mixed-use development to the northwest and commercial development to the southeast. High density town home developments are planned northeast and southwest of the lake with prime access to both the lake and adjacent businesses.

The Lake District provides a variety of features to support Marana’s Economic Roadmap goals of attracting varied industries such as tourism, environmental technology, bio-medical sciences and analytical instruments (Town of Marana, 2010c). The Lake District will improve Marana’s economic competitiveness and make the Marana Downtown Activity Center an attractive destination for local and regional firms, residents, and visitors. Development proposals in the District each address a critical function lacking in Marana’s existing downtown area. There are currently limited employment opportunities in the Marana’s downtown. The District’s focus on research and development firms will help position Marana as a progressive economic center by promoting creative and innovative firms and activity. The convention center, amphitheater, and lake provide much needed civic, public, and open space for entertainment and recreational uses. Townhome and multi-family residential development in the Lake District will diversify housing opportunities in Marana.

In addition to these functions, the Lake District serves as an employment and research and development center for Downtown Marana, housing several largescale research parks and a higher education campus. It also provides an extension of the commercial development in the northwest corner of the Downtown Core District, with a hotel and convention center located at the southwest corner of W. Marana Road and N. Sandario Road. The Lake District also provides high-density housing options with townhomes and multi-family apartments located in the southern portion of the district, which provide a strong residential component that will create 24/7 activity that will help local businesses succeed. Townhomes are sited to take advantage of the unique amenities afforded by the lake while multi-family apartments are sited with convenient access to adjacent commercial development. All housing in the district offers convenient, walkable opportunities for employees in the research, education, and commercial sectors of the District. Finally, the Lake District places a strong emphasis on connectivity for pedestrians, cyclists, and recreational users through its interwoven system of greenways, open green space, and pedestrian and bike pathways. This network will connect the northern research centers to the residential uses and recreational spaces in the District’s southern half. This network is intended to foster a sense of community throughout the Lake District, promote the use of alternative transit modes, equitably distribute access to district amenities, and encourage active recreational uses. The character of green infrastructure throughout the district will respect the unique character of Marana’s natural foliage while providing inviting public park amenities and an integrated, paved cyclist and pedestrian pathway system. Maps 6.2 and 6.3 convey these land use functions and suggested building massing plans.

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Further, land uses in the Lake District directly complement each other while providing Marana new opportunities for economic growth and activity. The light industrial district offers opportunities for firms to work with research and development, commercial, and educational partners. The higher education campus space serves a critical function through developing a strong, talented, and local labor pool for Lake District firms. Mixed-use development is targeted to provide support for civic, public, and open spaces as well as innovative housing options for students and young people. Through this comprehensive approach, the Lake District constitutes a key component in establishing downtown Marana as a prime destination and economic engine for the region.


LAND USE MAP

Map 6.2 Lake District Land Use Map

The Lake District is comprised of diverse land uses situated around a lake feature at its center, as exemplified in the Land Use Map 6.2. SECTION 6 | LAKE DISTRICT

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DETAILED LAND USE MAP

Map 6.3 Lake District Detailed Land Use Map

Map 6.3 suggests future building massing within the Lake District. The central lake amenity and generous open spaces balance the wide range of buildings scales and uses. 58

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INSTITUTIONAL Universities The north side of Marana Road will feature a higher education institution. In addition to buildings for classrooms and administrative functions, the site will also host residence halls and sports facilities. A higher education campus constitutes a key regional attraction for Marana in drawing not only students, but small business owners and local and national firms. Further, the higher education campus is an important component of the Lake District’s economic development strategy as it provides a local source of talented, professional labor for recruitment to District firms.

Image 6.4 Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, Arizona

Image 6.5 Arizona State University Polytechnic Campus, Mesa, AZ

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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Research Facilities The Lake District has five sites designated as research and development parks. The size of the individual sites varies, allowing the opportunity for a variety of firms to locate within the Lake District. The research and development parks provide long-term employment opportunities for Marana residents and generate economic activity in the area. It is intended for the research and development parks to maintain landscaped open spaces for employee recreational use, including landscaped pathways, parks, and athletic fields/courts. Circulation within each park is to be determined by the user, with main points of entry situated away from residential areas. The parks are connected via multi-use bike paths and green paths which circulate throughout the Lake District, connecting employees to their workplaces.

Image 6.6 Solyndra Fab 2, Research Offices, Fremont, CA

Image 6.7 Vancouver Island Technology Park,Victoria, B.C, Canada

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COMMERCIAL Within the Lake District there will be several different types of commercial development, each of which will serve a different function. Convention Center At the southwest corner of Marana Road and Sandario Road, a convention center complex will serve as a regional attraction for the Town of Marana. The complex provides critical convention space, civic space, and public use opportunities for local and regional firms, the higher education campus, and civic and public organizations. Its location, adjacent to the Downtown Core District, allows easy, walkable access to Downtown Core attractions and the nearby research and development park and higher education campus. Further, its position just south of the I-10 exit at Sandario Road provides easy access for visitors. In addition to the convention center, the complex will also feature several small and medium sized commercial uses that will serve both convention center visitors and the multi-family developments located just south of the convention center.

Image 6.8 Tinley Park Convention Center, Tinley Park, IL

The convention center complex will also include an open green space component. This green space will provide an outdoor area for convention center functions while also serving as a buffer between the convention center and the multi-family development to the south.

Image 6.10 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Tucson – Reid Park, Tucson, AZ

Image 6.9 Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, IN

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COMMERCIAL Medium- to Large-Scale Commercial At the northwest corner of the intersection of W. Marana Road and N. Sandario Road there is a medium to large-scale commercial use area intended to serve the convention center located to the south. A larger commercial site is located south of the convention center complex along N. Sandario Road and extending to the south edge of the district at Grier Road. Commercial development in this area is intended to complement and extend the commercial uses in the Downtown Core District and provide amenities for the adjacent existing single-family residential in the Downtown Core to the east and the Lake District’s proposed multi-family development to the west. These two areas are intended for commercial uses with intensities above that of the boutique and entertainment uses in the downtown core and may serve as ideal sites for an anchor retail business.

Image 6.11 San Tan Village, Gilbert, Arizona

Image 6.12 DC Ranch Commercial Building, Scottsdale, AZ

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An additional medium to large-scale commercial site is located along the southeast edge of the lake and park area. This location is intended to primarily serve the recreational users of the park and will include restaurants and some mediumscale shopping. A similar commercial development is situated along W. Kirby Hughes Road between a research and development park and the higher education campus space. This location is intended to serve employees of the research and development park, the light industrial use area, and students with similar retail and service options.


COMMERCIAL Neighborhood Commercial Neighborhood commercial development is positioned at key corners within research and development parks. These small-scale commercial uses will provide convenient, walkable access to shopping, services, and dining for park employees and nearby residents. Preferred uses include small-scale retail outlets, neighborhood services, personal service businesses (e.g., salons), convenience stores, and small markets.

Image 6.13 Knickerbocker Place, Madison, WI

Image 6.15 Luci’s Healthy Marketplace, Phoenix, AZ

Image 6.14 Postino Wine CafĂŠ, Gilbert, AZ

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RESIDENTIAL Townhomes The majority of the residential development in the Lake District consists of townhomes. Townhomes are located along the northeast, southwest, and west edges of the lake and south of W. Marana Road on the west edge of the district. Their location allows residents easy, walkable access to both the recreational amenities of the lake, public open space, amphitheater, and the commercial uses provided in nearby mixed-use and commercial sites. Townhomes in this area meet the needs of a diverse range of residents including working professionals, retirees, and families. Units have varying stories and square footage in order to accommodate different demographics. Each block of townhomes is scaled to complement adjacent uses and provides pedestrian access to nearby attractions. Residents of these developments are well situated to access the multiuse pathways that connect the Lake District with the other districts. The high density of townhomes in the Lake District is designed to complement and support the activity throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center and assist in developing an active, vibrant community. Image 6.16 Portland Place Condominiums, Phoenix, AZ

Image 6.17 Townhomes – Stapleton, CO

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RESIDENTIAL Multi-Family Multi-family housing is located south of the convention center complex and west of the commercial district that fronts Sandario Road. This development will be consistent with the higher densities prevalent throughout the Lake District and offer an additional housing opportunity for residents of the Downtown Activity Center. The developments themselves will feature different design elements, elevations, and massing characteristics. These variations will allow each development to be unique and provide options for prospective residents in terms of affordability and amenities.

Image 6.18 Blue Star Corner, Emeryville, CA

Image 6.19 Brookwood Terrace Family Apartments, San Jose, CA

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LIGHT INDUSTRIAL Industrial Buildings & Warehousing A light industrial use area situated near the Marana Gateway provides a small area of concentrated office space, warehousing, transportation logistics, and professional services opportunities. This unique location allows the light industrial use area to take full advantage of the large traffic volume from the I-10 exit and activity near the Gateway. Comprising one of the most intensive land uses in the Lake District, this area is buffered by a greenbelt and multiuse pathway. Further, like the research and development parks, the light industrial use area generates unique employment opportunities and serves as a key contributor to the economic growth potential of the Lake District.

Image 6.20 Sears Distribution Center at ProLogis Park Duck Creek, Stockton, CA

Image 6.21 Palm Valley 303, Goodyear, AZ

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MIXED USE Mixed-use development is located in three strategic positions ringing the lake to provide innovative housing options as well as small-scale retail spaces serving adjacent residential and recreational users. With the ability to provide groundfloor retail or offices with small-scale second-floor residential units, the mixeduse developments offer both unique amenities and higher densities. Mixed-use developments are also highly adaptable to market conditions; if there is a greater need for additional office space or residential units, mixed-use districts can easily transform to meet these needs. Mixed-use areas that include residential projects must integrate these options with commercial spaces. Live/work spaces, second story apartments, and loft spaces comprise preferred housing typologies. Commercial uses may include restaurants, cafes, specialty retailers, galleries, or neighborhood grocers or markets. However, the residential component of the mixed use zones also make commercial spaces ideal for artisans, entrepreneurs, small business owners, and other innovative uses such as technology or business incubator spaces. Image 6.22 Verrado Mixed-Use Building, Buckeye, AZ

Image 6.23 Verrado Mixed-Use Building, Buckeye, AZ

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PUBLIC OPEN SPACE Green Space Beginning with the park surrounding the lake itself, the Lake District will feature a robust network of green and open spaces. The park that surrounds the lake will be the focal point of this network, however, there will be a large variety of green spaces interspersed throughout the District. Research and development sites will feature large parks that provide recreational areas for both employees and residents of the area. In addition to these uses, there will also be an extensive green path network. These paths will provide connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists to the other districts in the Marana Downtown Activity Center and beyond.

Image 6.24 Town Lake Park, McKinney, TX

Image 6.25 Multi-use path, Scottsdale, AZ

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PUBLIC OPEN SPACE The Lake The lake is Marana’s public recreational centerpiece. It is an inclusive and accessible public amenity that also provides opportunities for commercial and real estate development. Restaurants, parks, townhomes, and shopping are accessible at the lake’s perimeter. Along the waterfront, outdoor splash pads, public fountains, boat rentals, and fishing provide a range of family friendly recreational uses. This diversity of functions helps facilitate year-round use of the lakefront. In addition to its recreational offerings, the lake serves as a highly identifiable landmark for Marana Downtown Activity Center. A modest two-way bridge will allow pedestrian and vehicular traffic to cross the lake and will further distinguish the site as one of Marana’s most unique amenities.

Image 6.26 Loews Lake, Las Vegas, NV

Image 6.28 Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Tampa, FL

Image 6.27 Tempe Town Lake, Tempe, AZ

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PUBLIC OPEN SPACE Public Facilities Public facilities along the lake constitute complementary waterfront amenities and will serve as social hubs within the Lake District. Features include sports equipment rental buildings, an outdoor amphitheater, recreational green space, and a multi-use path that loops around the lake. The amphitheater located within the lake’s park is a key component of this strategy as it offers a flexible performance and civic space lacking in the area for festivals, concerts, and other events. The mix of free activities and gathering places around the lake encourages longer trips and social interactions. This easily accessible and pedestrian oriented area is welcoming to both visitors and Marana residents.

Image 6.29 Lyonia Preserve & Environmental Center Amphitheater, Deltona, FL

Image 6.30 Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Tampa, FL

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LAKE DISTRICT 3D CONCEPTUAL MODEL The following series of 3D conceptual views shows the proposed massing of buildings, green space areas, building heights, and densities within the Lake District. The massing, location, and density of buildings in these views directly correlates to these same features within the detailed land use map.

Image 6.31 Conceptual View of Proposed Townhome Development

Image 6.31 shows how entrance areas in townhome developments integrate open space, provide attractive landscaping, and individual walkways leading to each cluster of residential units.

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LAKE DISTRICT 3D CONCEPTUAL MODEL

Image 6.32 Conceptual View of Proposed Research and Development Park Edge Area

Research and development park facilities are buffered from the street edge with a variety of pedestrian amenities. Immediately adjacent to research facilities are paved, lighted walkways. Adjacent to these walkways is a green space buffer which incorporates signage, seating, and landscaping to provide a public space for both employees and pedestrians. Finally, wide sidewalks with street trees at their outer edges provide a safe environment for both pedestrians and bicyclists. 72

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LAKE DISTRICT 3D CONCEPTUAL MODEL

Image 6.33 Conceptual View of the Lake District Looking from South to North

This aerial image of the Lake District highlights the distribution of land uses, the proposed street and circulation system, proposed parking areas, and the network of public green spaces.

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REFERENCES Images Image 6.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Lake District Monument Sign. Image 6.2 Google Maps. (2011). Google Streetview of Existing Conditions, Retrieved 5/29/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 6.3 Google Maps. (2011). Google Streetview of Existing Conditions, Retrieved 5/29/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Image 6.4 Berridge Manufacturing Company (n.d). Grand Canyon University [Photograph], Retrieved 04/07/2013, from: http://www.berridge.com/images/Winter-Spring%20 06%20Byline-Total%20Metals&DurrantArcht/Grand-Canyon-Univ-Student-U.jpg Image 6.5 Arizona State University (n.d). Arizona State University Polytechnic Campus [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://www.asu.edu/tour/polytechnic/ academic.html Image 6.6 Architect Magazine (2010). Solyndra Fab 2, Research Offices, Fremont, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.architectmagazine.com/ industrial-projects/green-industrial.aspx Image 6.7 Rowe Architecture (n.d.). Vancouver Island Technology Park,Victoria, B.C., Canada [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.rowearchitecture.com/projects/vancouver-island-technology-park/ Image 6.8 Tinley Park, IL (n.d.). Tinley Park Convention Center, Tinley Park, IL [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://il-tinleypark.civicplus.com/index.aspx?nid=583 Image 6.9 Arch Daily (n.d.). Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, IN [Photograph], Retrieved 04/07/2013, from: http://ad009cdnb.archdaily.net/wp-content/ uploads/2011/09/1316105537-icc-e02-small-1000x666.jpg Image 6.10 Rincon Research Corporation (n.d.). DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel – Reid Park, Tucson, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/08/2013, from: http://www.rincon.com/ visiting.htm 74

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Image 6.11 About.com (n.d.). San Tan Village, Gilbert, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/07/2013, from: http://0.tqn.com/d/phoenix/1/0/f/k/2/mallsantan03.jpg Image 6.12 Market Street LLC (n.d.). DC Ranch Commercial Building, Scottsdale, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://www.beonmarketstreet.com/ Image 6.13 Fiore Companies (n.d.). Knickerbocker Place, Madison, WI [Photograph], Retrieved 04/07/2013, from: http://fiorecompanies.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/ Knickerbocker-Place-Ext-1.jpg Image 6.14 Town of Gilbert (n.d.). Postino Wine Café, Gilbert, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gilbertaz/5468544034/ Image 6.15 AZ Business Magazine (2011). Luci’s Healthy Marketplace, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://aznow.biz/small-biz/local-non-profitphoenix-public-market-offers-food-connections Image 6.16 Downtown Phoenix Journal (n.d.). Portland Place Condominiums, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.downtownphoenixjournal. com/real-estate/livehere/portland-place-condominiums/ Image 6.17 Capital District Regional Planning Commission (n.d.). Townhomes, Stapleton, CO [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.cdrpc.org/New_Centersweb.pdf Image 6.18 David Baker & Partners (n.d.). Blue Star Corner, Emeryville, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://www.dbarchitect.com/project_detail/53/Blue%20 Star%20Corner.html Image 6.19 1888 Press Release (2011). Brookwood Terrace Family Apartments, San Jose, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/08/2013, from: http://www.1888pressrelease.com/ktgydesigned-green-affordable-family-apartments-opens-in-sa-pr-354662.html Image 6.20 Architect Magazine (2010). Sears Distribution Center at ProLogis Park Duck


REFERENCES Creek, Stockton, CA [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://www.architectmagazine.com/industrial-projects/green-industrial.aspx Image 6.21 ArizonaNotebook.com (n.d.). Palm Valley 303, Goodyear, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 03/28/2013, from: http://arizonanotebook.com/light-rail-job-nodes-are-key-to-valleysfuture-says-suncors-steve-betts

Thomas Balsley Associates (2013). Curtix Hixson Waterfront Park, Tampa, FL [Photograph]. Retrieved March 28, 2013 from: http://www.tbany.com/ projects_page.php?projectid=275 Image 6.31 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Conceptual View of Proposed Townhome Development.

Image 6.22 Verrado (n.d.). Verrado Mixed-Use Building, Buckeye, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://verrado.com/community-life/shopping/

Image 6.32 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Conceptual View of Proposed Research and Development Park Edge Area.

Image 6.23 Verrado (n.d.). Verrado Mixed-Use Building, Buckeye, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://verrado.com/community-life/shopping/

Image 6.33 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Conceptual View of the Lake District Looking from South to North.

Image 6.24 Panoramio (n.d.). Town Lake Park, McKinney, TX [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/37213520

Maps

Image 6.25 Velo-city (n.d.). Multi-use pathway, Scottsdale, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://velo-city.org/cycle-friendly-parks/index.html Image 6.26 Peter Greenberg Worldwide (2013). Loews Lake, Las Vegas, NV [Photograph]. Retrieved March 28, 2013 from: http://www.petergreenberg.com/2009/03/05/staying-offthe-strip-in-las-vegas/

Map 6.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Lake District Boundary Map. Map 6.2 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Lake District Land Use Map. Map 6.3 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Lake District Detailed Land Use Map.

Image 6.27 JFlick at Inkstain (2011). Tempe Town Lake, Tempe, AZ [Photograph]. Retrieved March 28, 2013 from: http://www.inkstain.net/fleck/2011/02/water-in-the-desert-tempe-townlake-2/ Image 6.28 Thomas Balsley Associates (2013). Curtix Hixson Waterfront Park, Tampa, FL [Photograph]. Retrieved March 28, 2013 from: http://www.tbany.com/projects_page. php?projectid=275 Image 6.29 West Volusia Florida (2013). Lyonia Preserve & Environmental Center Amphitheater, Deltona, FL [Photograph]. Retrieved March 28, 2013 from: http://visitwestvolusia.com/ whattodo.cfm/mode/details/id/11252/lyonia-preserve-and-environmental-center Image 6.30 SECTION 6 | LAKE DISTRICT

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SECTION 7

Image 7.1 Adventure District Monument Sign

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DISTRICT BOUNDARY MAP

Map 7.1 Adventure District Boundary Map

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INTRODUCTION Existing Conditions The 117 acre Adventure District lies east of the US I-10 freeway and is bounded by the United Pacific Rail Lines to the west, and N. Adonis Road to the east., as shown in Map 7.1 This area is currently undeveloped.

Map 7.2 Aerial view of the Adventure District Area

Image 7.3 Northern view of vacant land from North Adonis Road

Image 7.4 Southern view of vacant land in the Adventure District

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OBJECTIVE Vision

Rationale

The Adventure District contributes to the Marana Downtown Activity Center by providing unique family entertainment attractions and a transportation center. Additionally, the Adventure District provides much needed commercial activity to this area of Marana. The northern portion of the district consists of an amusement park that provides a variety of recreational and entertainment uses designed to draw people to the District. This amusement park consists of large outdoor activity areas as well as an indoor facility. The attractions of the park can be easily seen from the freeway, encouraging travelers to visit the Marana Downtown Activity Center.

The Adventure District offers family entertainment options that are currently lacking in Marana. The location of the amusement park buffers existing residential development from the freeway and lends the entire Marana Downtown Activity Center more prominence to people traveling on I-10. The transportation center is well situated to allow connectivity to all of the districts while preventing bus storage and traffic congestion concerns in the more dense districts south of I-10. Existing residents in the communities north of the Adventure District will benefit from having access to transit options connecting them to districts in the Marana Downtown Activity Center along with the convenience of having shopping and family activities near their residences.

Southeast of the amusement park is a transportation center that will serve as the base of operations for Marana’s bike share program and provide space for both offices and bus storage for Marana’s potential circulator bus system. The transportation center will be a building reminiscent of the Tempe Transportation Center, at a scale appropriate to support operations and maintenance of the bike share program and circulator system. Supporting commercial centers in the Adventure District deliver much needed shopping and dining options for nearby residents and amusement park visitors. These commercial centers are inwardly focused, allowing for parking on the perimeter and a family friendly, pedestrian environment on the interior. The pedestrian focus will generate a safe, accessible shopping environment, foster interactions between shoppers, and activate the public realm. Physical design of these spaces is similar to the paseo concept employed in the Downtown Core District and creates continuity throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center. The vision for the Adventure District is a unique and action-packed area that will provide activities for residents in adjacent existing residential communities as well as drawing visitors from other areas of Marana and beyond, creating a zone ripe for economic growth in the Marana Downtown Activity Center. Refer to Maps 7.2 and 7.3 for a depiction of land uses.

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LAND USE MAP

Map 7.2 Adventure District Land Use Map

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DETAILED LAND USE MAP

Map 7.3 Adventure District Detailed Land Use Map

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COMMERCIAL RECREATION The northwest section of the Adventure District is comprised of a small amusement park that is easily seen from the freeway. The park has a large outdoor entertainment area which includes mini-golf courses, a driving range, batting cages, small rides, and go-kart tracks. The indoor facility contains a video arcade, a laser tag arena, and a children’s play area as well as restaurants and other smaller food and beverage options.

Image 7.5 Castles-N-Coasters, Phoenix, AZ

Image 7.7 Freedom Station Family Fun Center, Miniature Golf Course, Prescott Valley, AZ

Image 7.6 CrackerJax Family Fun & Sports Park, DrivinRange, Scottsdale, AZ

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COMMERCIAL The utilization of inwardly focused commercial areas will be unique in Marana. This orientation makes pedestrian access and use easy and efficient as well as safe for families and children. The interior areas are reminiscent of New England town squares which allow for a multiplicity of interactions between shoppers and a safer environment due to the lack of interactions between vehicles and pedestrians. The interior courtyards allow for passive activities such as outdoor dining, resting in public spaces, and socializing in small gathering areas as well as the active use of walking, unencumbered by vehicles, between every shop in the area.

Image 7.8 Tempe Marketplace Pedestrian Walkway, Tempe, AZ

Image 7.9 Tempe Marketplace Courtyard, Tempe, AZ

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Image 7.10 Kierland Comons Fountain, Phoenix, AZ


INSTITUTIONAL The transportation center will serve as the central hub of both the intra-city circulator system and the bike share program, which will serve to connect the different districts in the Downtown Activity Center. The building itself will house offices that oversee the intra city circulator and the bike share programs. It will also provide an area for bus and bicycle maintenance. The area adjacent to the building will be for storing the circulator buses so they are not in view of adjacent residential development.

Image 7.11 Tempe Transportation Center, Tempe, AZ

Image 7.12 Millennium Park Bike Share Station in Chicago, IL

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REFERENCES Images Image 7.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Adventure District Monument Sign. Image 7.2 Julia Kerran (2013). Northern View of Vacant Land from North Adonis Road [Photograph]. Image 7.3 Julia Kerran (2013). Southern View of Vacant Land in the Adventure District [Photograph]. Image 7.4 Castles-N-Coasters (n.d.). Castles-N-Coasters, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.castlesncoasters.com/attractions Image 7.5 CrackerJax Family Fun & Sports Park (n.d.). CrackerJax Family Fun & Sports Park, Driving Range, Scottsdale, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http:// sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/31586_10152282896575258_192776650 6_n.jpg Image 7.6 Freedom Station Family Fun Center (n.d.). Freedom Station Family Fun Center, Miniature Golf Course, Prescott Valley, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/10/2013, from: http://www.acitytransformed.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Mini-Golf-4. jpg Image 7.7 Fiesta Inn Resort (2010). Tempe Marketplace Pedestrian Walkway, Tempe, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/18/2013, from: http://fiestainnresort.files.wordpress. com/2010/06/a_0408_highdesign1_lg.jpg Image 7.8 Trip Advisor (n.d.). Tempe Marketplace Courtyard, Tempe, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/18/2013, from: http://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotos-g31377Tempe_Arizona.html#26926579 Image 7.9 Shackelton.wordpress.com (n.d.). Kierland Commons Fountain, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/18/2013, from: http://shackelton.files.wordpress. com/2010/05/kierland-fountain-3.jpg 86

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Image 7.10 Arizona State University (2009). Tempe Transportation Center [Photograph], Retrieved 04/20/2013, from: https://asunews.asu.edu/files/images/12_tempe_transit_center_6459w.jpg Image 7.11 Julia Kerran (Photographer). (2013). Millenium Park Bike Share Station in Chicago, IL [Photograph]. Maps Map 7.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Adventure District Boundary Map. Map 7.2 Google Maps (2013). Aerial View of the Adventure District Area [Map], Retrieved 04/29/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Map 7.3 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Adventure District Land Use Map. Map 7.4 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Adventure District Detailed Land Use Map.


SECTION 8

Image 8.1 Community Services District Monument Sign

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DISTRICT BOUNDARY MAP

Map 8.1 Community Services District Map

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INTRODUCTION Existing Conditions Map 8.1 shows that the Community Services District is a 150 acre parcel that is bounded by Ora Mae Harn District Park to the west, Barnett Road to the south, and I-10 to the east. Currently, there are rodeo grounds that occupy the northern 30 acres of the site, however, these facilities are scheduled for relocation and will not be included in the plan for the District. The remainder of the area consists of a mix of vacant and underutilized agricultural land. Postvale Road, which bisects the parcel from north to south, is the only existing road in the study area.

Map 8.2 Aerial View of the Community Services District

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OBJECTIVE Vision Statement

Rationale

The Community Services District is an important and unique component of the larger Downtown Marana Activity Center. Unlike the other districts in the study area, the Community Services District is focused almost exclusively on recreation. This district incorporates the surrounding schools and Ora Mae Harn District Community Park to create a recreational area that can be enjoyed by all members of the community.

The Community Services District offers recreational amenities that are unique not only for the Town of Marana, but also for the region. These recreational activities will contribute to Marana’s economic growth in a number of different ways. Hosting regional competitions in the extreme sports park will draw visitors to the area and generate new sales tax revenues for the Town of Marana. Connectivity throughout the Marana Downtown Activity Center is of primary importance, and the Community Services District is connected to the other districts through a network of bike paths and greenways. This connectivity makes it possible to walk from the Community Services District to the Downtown Core District in a matter of minutes. Because the Community Services District will serve as a regional attraction, the connectivity to the other districts will provide additional consumers for the area, which will create additional sales tax and lodging revenue for the Town of Marana.

The Community Services District will provide facilities for community and youth organizations. Being located in close proximity to schools and parks allows community-building organizations such as the Boys and Girls Club of America and the YMCA to offer a wide range of activities. The extreme sports park proposed for this district is a unique feature that, in addition to being an amenity for residents of Marana, will also be a strong regional attraction for the Marana Downtown Activity Center. The extreme sports park will feature tracks for Motocross and BMX racing. The tracks will be large enough to host regional competitions, which will have a positive economic impact for the Town of Marana. In addition to the tracks, there will be separate freestyle parks for both skateboards and BMX bikes, these parks will be built to professional regulation standards and able to host regional competitions. The extreme sports park will also feature both indoor and outdoor rock-climbing facilities. The rock-climbing facilities will cater to a wide range of abilities while the indoor facility will provide an ideal summer recreational opportunity. The commercial component of the Community Services District will be limited. Commercial development will be small-scale and primarily cater to users of the recreational features within the Marana Downtown Activity District. Commercial development within the Community Services District is intended to serve users of the District’s recreational facilities and amenities by providing services and goods related to these activities. The botanical garden will offer a different type of recreational opportunity and broaden the appeal of the Community Services District. The botanical garden will feature plant species native to the region and be a place for residents to relax and enjoy Marana’s natural beauty. The botanical garden also offers a unique educational opportunity for nearby schools and community organizations. By offering classes on botany and planting techniques, the botanical garden will prove to be a great resource for the community. Maps 8.3 and 8.4 provide a depiction of proposed land uses and a massing plan. 90

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LAND USE MAP

Map 8.3 Community Services District Land Use Map

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DETAILED LAND USE MAP

Map 8.4 Community Services District Detailed Land Use Map

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INSTITUTIONAL The north side of the Community Services District will feature a campus for a variety of community and youth organizations such as The Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America, and the YMCA and YWCA. Instead of these different facilities being housed in a single large structure, the institutional component of the Community Services District is envisioned as a series of smaller buildings that are similar in scale to the surrounding uses. These organizations will serve to activate not only the Community Services District, but also the surrounding area, including the adjacent Ora Mae Harn Community Park.

Image 8.2 Proposed YMCA in McIntire Park, Charlottesville,VA

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EXTREME SPORTS PARK The area north of Barnett Road and west of Postvale Road will feature an extreme sports park. This park will include tracks for both Motocross and BMX racing, as well as separate freestyle parks for skateboards and BMX bikes. Other unique features of the extreme sports park are the rock climbing facilities. The park features both indoor and outdoor rock-climbing facilities that will cater to a range of abilities. An extreme sports park will be a unique asset for Marana and serve as a regional attraction for the Downtown Marana Activity Center.

Image 8.3 Redstone Skate Park, Highlands Ranch, CO

Image 8.4 Rock wall at University of Houston, Houston TX

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COMMERCIAL Adjacent to the extreme sports park will be a limited number of commercial establishments. These commercial uses will be small-scale and complementary to the recreational amenities of Marana. These establishments are intended to cater to the adjacent extreme sports park in the form of equipment rentals, sales and repair, or they could focus on retailers offering services and products for active outdoor lifestyles.

Image 8.5 The Bike Shop, Seattle, WA

Image 8.6 REI Store at Settler’s Ridge Pittsburgh, PA

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BOTANICAL GARDEN The east side of the Community Services District, north of Barnett Road and east of Postvale Road, will feature a botanical garden. The botanical garden will complement the extreme sports park by providing a more passive activity center for families and residents of the area. By offering tours and botany and gardening classes, this facility will also serve as an educational resource for the community. The botanical garden will feature species that are native to the region and will be constructed in a manner to take advantage of the migratory patterns of birds in the area.

Image 8.7 Desert Botanical Gardens, Phoenix, AZ

Image 8.8 Desert Botanical Gardens, Phoenix, AZ

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REFERENCES Images Image 8.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Community Services District Monument Sign. Image 8.2 The Hook. (2011). Proposed YMCA in McIntire Park, Charlottesville,VA [Rendering], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://www.readthehook.com/files/imagecache/max_viewable/images/field_images/ymca-front.jpg Image 8.3 Highlands Ranch Metro District. (n.d.). Redstone Skate Park, Highlands Ranch, CO [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://highlandsranch.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/RedstoneSkatePark_sm.jpg

Maps Map 8.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Community Services District Map. Map 8.2 Google Maps (n.d.) Community Services District Exiting Conditions [Map], Retrieved 4/21/2013, from: https://maps.google.com/ Map 8.3 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Community Services District Land Use Map. Map 8.4 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013). Community Services District Detailed Land Use Map.

Image 8.4 Bayou City Outdoors. (n.d). Rock wall at University of Houston, Houston TX [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://www.bayoucityoutdoors.com/ clubportal/EventDetailPublic.cfm?clubID=3&EventID=123967&mo=7 Image 8.5 Ray’s Life Cycle. (2010). The Bike Shop, Seattle, WA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://rayslifecycle.blogspot.com/2010/04/walmart-bicycle-vsbike-shop-bicycle.html Image 8.6 Gear Junkie. (2009). REI Store at Settler’s Ridge, Pittsburgh, PA [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://gearjunkie.com/black-friday-at-rei Image 8.7 Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau (n.d.). Desert Botanical Gardens, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://www.experiencescottsdale.com/listings/desert-botanical-garden/ Image 8.8 Life Under the Big Top (2011). Desert Botanical Gardens, Phoenix, AZ [Photograph], Retrieved 04/21/2013, from: http://lifeunderthebigtoptoo.blogspot. com/2011/05/arizona-botanical-gardens.html

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CONCLUSION The Marana Downtown Activity Center Conceptual Plan is a comprehensive vision of development for the next 30 to 50 years. The future of the Town of Marana is ripe with opportunity. The four proposed districts take advantage of Marana’s existing assets to fulfill the visions described within the Marana 2010 General Plan, the Town of Marana Strategic Plan II, and the Town of Marana Economic Roadmap (Town of Marana, 2010b, 2010c, 2012). By capitalizing on Marana’s location along a major interstate and railroad, between the two major cities of Tucson and Phoenix, and the town’s abundance of vacant land within a gorgeous Sonoran Desert setting, this conceptual plan positions Marana to flourish as a vibrant community with regional attractions and a highly skilled workforce. The Town of Marana’s gateway design and emphasis on district wayfinding helps create a sense of community identity while supporting both residents and visitors mobility throughout the downtown districts. This strong sense of place provides distinction, character, and a unique signature for the Marana Downtown Activity Center.

District offers a commercial shopping experience unique in Marana and serves to attract tourists to the Marana Downtown Activity Center. In addition to the regional and tourist attractions, the Conceptual Plan aims to foster and support a diverse, vibrant, resident community in downtown Marana. Support for local businesses and community events enhances Marana’s sense of place and fosters close neighborhood connections. Housing options to suit any need, access to green open spaces, and safe pedestrian mobility make Marana an ideal place to call home. The Marana Downtown Activity Center Conceptual Plan illustrates the town’s vast potential for growth and development. With relatively few existing development constraints and promising population growth projections, Marana faces many exciting opportunities. The Downtown Core District, the Lake District, the Adventure District, and the Community Services District serve together as a prototype for the future development potential of Marana’s downtown.

A campus for higher education supports Marana’s goal of enhancing the local workforce by providing access to the knowledge, skills, and training demanded by employers (Town of Marana, 2012). Technical and vocational programs, business incubators, and two- to four-year degree programs contribute to local economic development and assist in attracting major firms. Research and development parks and light industrial uses facilitate attraction, retention, and expansion of employment opportunities (Town of Marana, 2010c). These land uses provide opportunities for the Town of Marana to expand existing industries targeted in the Strategic Plan for economic development, including transportation and logistics, and capitalize on emerging industries such as environmental technology, and bio- and medical science (Town of Marana, 2010c). Expanded medical facilities and services will attract further professional and highly skilled workers in this sector and position Marana to take advantage of regional needs. Another critical industry targeted by Marana’s Strategic Plan is the tourism and visitor experience industry (Town of Marana, 2010c). A well-designed welcome center, convention center, hotels, and entertainment options provide visitors with a vast array of amenities. The paseo concept utilized in the Downtown Core

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CONCEPTUAL 3D MODEL

Image 9.1 Conceptual View of the Marana Downtown Activity Center

This 3D model of the entore proposed Downtown Activity Center conveys the scale of development and the land area included in the plan. Several key intersections are visible, specifically the Downtown Core roundabouts and the Gateway area in the upper right corner. From this view, it is clear that the Gateway area and a pedestrian-oriented I-10 underpass provide a critical connection to the Adventure District. 100

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REFERENCE Images Image 9.1 ASU MUEP Capstone Studio. (2013).Conceptual View of the Marana Downtown Activity Center

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Documents cited in this report: Town of Marana. (2010a). Major Employers. Retrieved 04/02/2013, from: http:// www.marana.com/index.aspx?nid=950 Town of Marana. (2010b). Marana 2010 General Plan. Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://www.marana.com/index.aspx?NID=927 Town of Marana. (2010c). Town of Marana Economic Roadmap. Retrieved 04/05/2013, from: http://www.marana.com/DocumentCenter/Home/View/3503 Town of Marana. (2012). Town of Marana Strategic Plan II. Retrieved 04/01/2013, from: http://az-marana2.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/Home/View/5420 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2013). Current Unemployment Rates for States and Historical Highs/Lows. Retrieved 04/20/2013, from http://www.bls.gov/web/ laus/lauhsthl.htm

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APPENDIX •

Marana Town Council Agenda & Staff Report - May 7, 2013

Marana Planning Commission Agenda & Staff Report - April 24, 2013

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Marana Downtown Activity Center  

Worked with the town of Marana, AZ to create a design proposal comprising of existing and future condition analysis, planning and architectu...