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name: mari ervik sĂŚtre date of birth: 24.04.1986 education: aho, oslo school of architecture and design(2009-2016), eth zĂźrich (2012-2013) email: marisaetr@gmail.com phone: 92618429


contents 6 selected projects 2015 - 2012

1_in flux, center for the press, diploma thesis, fall 2015, oslo, norway 2_cabin in moldeheia, 10th semester, building in landscape, spring 2014, oslo, norway 3_ smedgata 32, 9th semester, boligfortetting i høyden, høst 2013, oslo, norway 4_ designing the plastic river, 8th semester, eth zürich, spring 2013, zürich, switzerland 5_ culture hall irchel park,7th semester, eth zürich, fall 2012, zürich, switzerland 6_ sørfjorden rock landscape,2nd semester, aho, spring 2010, oslo, norway


1_In

flux, center for the press

oslo, norway, fall 2015, diploma thesis,aho. supervisor: professor erik langdalen and architect andrea pinochet students: mari ervik sætre and ingrid dobloug roede awarded the statsbygg prize for outstanding architecture

News media production has undergone dramatic change during the last decade, and the industry is dominated by decentralization and downsizing. A few large media conglomerates control the major part of the print run in Norway, posing a challenge to media diversity. In order to secure an open democracy, the Fourth Estate needs to be in close proximity to the nation’s institutions of power. Akersgata, the “Fleet Street” of Oslo, is home to both Government and established media houses. A new resource centre for the press

provides facilities for freelancers and independent media producers while co-locating press unions and organizations. The transformation of an existing city block gives spatial diversity, and the 1800s buildings serve as a protective layer, providing the centre with privacy and a number of entrances. Two new buildings hold functions that could service a wide range of competing or collaborating media producers. They provide the flexibility required for a profession in flux


transformed buildings: service/ accomodation

conference building

educational building

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Aftenposten; Akersgata 51/53, 1876-2003; Akersgata 55, 2014-present VG: Akersgata 34, 1902-1923 (sold to Tidens Tegn); Akersgata 55, 1994-present Tidens Tegn: Akersgata 34, 19231941 Deutsche Zeitung in Norwegen: Akersgata 34, 1941-1945 Dagbladet: Akersgata 36 and 47/49, 1912-2008 Vårt Land: Akersgata 47/46, 1970-

te

1981; Grubbegata 6, 2009-present Morgenbladet: Karl Johans gate 25 Nationen: Arbeidergata 4, past. (With Presseklubben Ryktebørsen at the corner in the 1980’s) NTB: Rosenkrantz gate 5, past. Edda Media: Akersgata 28, have also rented locations in Akersgata 47/49 Modern Times Group: Akersgata 73 Schibsted media group: Apotekergata 10 Cappelen Damm: Akersgata 47/49 Amedia: Akersgata 34/36

Finn.no: Grensen 5/7 Radio Metro: Akersgata 45 Fagpressen: Akersgata 43 Teknisk ukeblad: Akersgata 35

media in the akersgata area

transformation (blue) demolition (red) and new structure.

program


EDUCATIONAL BUILDING

Unions and residential organizations of the press are co-located in the Educational building. They are resources for the office workers in the Conference building, and give delocalized media offices an anchor point in the city. Classrooms for educational purposes can be booked in the reception at ground floor level. During the daytime, one can pass through the building, which connects Teatergata with the inner block. The gable walls surrounding the building on two sides define the main construction of the building, and circulation and service rooms are placed along these walls to allow for an organization around the open atrium.

f o y e r e d u c a t i o n al b u i l d i n g

educ a t i o n a l b u i l d i n g f a c i n g t e a t e r g a t a


ground floor, educat i o n a l b u i l d i n g

1 st f l o o r , c o n f e r e n c e b u i l d i n g


CONFERENCE BUIL.DING

A conference hall, a multi-purpose hall and an open archive are located on the publicly accessible ground- and basement floors of the Conference building, and provide locations for big gatherings such as press conferences or public debates. The first, second and third floors are reserved for media workers. Freelancers and small editorial offices can rent desks in the flexible office space on short- or long-term basis, and the shared studio facilities provide a service that might otherwise be too costly or space requiring. Flexibility in structure allows the building to adapt to the constant change characteristic of the media industry.

auditorium, conference building

c o n f e r e n c e b u i l d i n g fa c i n g f o r e c o u r t


ground floor, confer e n c e b u i l d i n g

1 st f l o o r , c o n f e r e n c e b u i l d i n g


akersgat

a

forecourt courtyard

educational building

conference building passage offices for ntb

block plan ground floor


cafe, transformed building

cafe, transformed building

the public forecourt

the passage


honorary residence

shared studios meeting room

educational building

conference building

offices for ntb

b l o c k p l a n 1 st f l o o r


meeting room, transf o r m e d b u i l d i n g

s h a r e d s t u d i o s 1 st f l o o r c o n f e r e n c e b u i l d i n g

honorary residence, transformed building


site plan


conference building


passage

educational building


2_A

building in the moor

oslo, norway, spring 2015, 10th semester, building in landscape, professor beate hテクlmebakk, aho student: mari ervik sテヲtre

This project investigates how temperature can be used as an organizing element in a mountain cabin. The cabin フ《 interior roof expresses how the space relates to temperature differently in various sections. The shape of the building is a result of certain walls requiring to be facing south, (in the two sleeping cabins), combined with a need to shelter outdoor spaces from the strong wind from east and (primarily) from west. Snow is allowed to lie in the sheltered outdoor space and entrances are not located at these zones. Landscape elements are not considered sublime or untouchable, but rather as components

to a structure that the built elements can add on to. The main part of the cabin is placed over the terrain rather than in the terrain, enhancing the impression of landscape as a picture, a view, or a reward (for the work of getting there and being there). With its raised position in the landscape, the cabin can use wind and weather as form-giving elements, and not only protect from them Criterias for the project were: moor (nor. hei),climate zone 3 - 4, 300 meters above sea level, vegetation: unproductive, terrain: hilly, view: wide, max. 1 meter to bedrock and some outcrop


+ 342 c + 347 c + 352

c + 357 c + 362 c + 367

c + 372

Situasjonsplan 1:200 Tegnforklaring morene med myk overflate. dominert av gress. typiske arter: bjønnskjegg med tuer av heisiv, bjønnskjegg, rome, stivstarr,med forekomster av lyng og einebusker stivstarr

bjønnskjegg

heisiv

finnskjegg

røsslyng

krekling

einer

smyle

morene med myk overflate. dominert av lyng. typiske arter: blåbær,røsslyng, krekling, klokkelyng,furumose,skrubbær, furumose

skrubbær

fjell i dagen. amfibolitt med uregelmessige slirer pegmatitt. lyng og lav vokser i sprekker.typiske arter: reinlav, messinglav, kartlav,lyngarter. krekling

blåbær

røsslyng

blåbær

einer

dvergbjørk


fireplace sc h e m e s

f i r e p l a c e s e c t io n

fireplace elevation


n 1:200

a cabin in the moor

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Axometry1:200

1. Insulated wooden roof sloping 1:40 2. Exterior wooden roof sloping 1:40 3. Interior wooden roof sloping 1:40 4. Exterior polycarbonate roof sloping 1:40 5. Interior wooden roof sloping 1:40 6. Primary beams shaped for maximizing sunlight absorbtion 7. Ceiling lowered to prevent air leakage and allow for sleeping places. 8. High exterior beams to let sun light through 9. Gable roof in sauna to achieve intimate atmosphere and pre- vent over-heating 10. Primary beams lowered to allow morning sun in kitchen. 11. Ceiling lowered to prevent air leakage 12. South facing glass Wall to allow sunlight in 13. Dark brick covered floor absorbing sunlight 14. Elevated sleeping space benefits from warm air rising 15. Low opening windows 16. Brick fire place 17. Dark brick covered floor absorbing sunlight 18. Outhouse in brick 19. Trombe wall with vents and controllable flaps to prevent con- vection in the undesired direction.


Langdalen

Arsdalsheia

206 453

Togheia

Moldeheia

475

415

Skihytta

arsdalen

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415

Tjønndalen 287

Langvatnet

Botnane

347

321 275 380

Hyttemyra 262

Tjønndalsheia

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372

Arsdalselva

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368

5 354

Preuthunsetra 322

Skjennarheia

350

Mekdalen

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404

Varden

275

Nonsmyra

Storlihytta

195.5

Vardedlaen

Mekvatnet 181

Bjørsetskaret 315

175

Grua 123

75

75

Kart 1: 10 000 Tegnforklaring skog med høy bonitet

barskog

impediment skog

løvskog

fastmark/ fjell

myr


3_smedgata

32

oslo, norway, fall 2013, 9th semester, boligfortetting i høyden, professor håkon vigsnæs, aho student: mari ervik sætre. awarded prize for exellence in computer graphics

This project began with a modelmaking process to investigate and expand upon the structural and material qualities present in a Tøyen housing block of the 1960’s. The block itself is defined by eight structural walls that also separate the individual apartments. Out of the total, four of these walls are flush with the unit’s central core, which give them a constructive potential. The cantilevering volume is massed along these preexisting axes, creating a framework for construction. This organization in effect rotates the structure

and opens up the surrounding park to more sunlight. The use of wooden beams within the massive concrete building creates a marked contrast that adds to the dynamic spatial qualities of the triangular plans. The added volume between the Enerhaugen Block and the street serves as an ameliorating element between the site’s differing scales and changing context. The existing apartments will be transformed into larger units by combining them vertically, so there will be room for families to live there.


site plan


existing building

model intervention

axonometry


section


plan 1 s t floor

plan 3 floor

p l a n 2 nd f l o o r

p l a n 4 th f lo o r


facade north-east


facade north-west


4_designing

the plastic river

jakarta, indonesia. spring 2013, 8th semester, proffesor christoph girot, eth zĂźrich student: mari ervik sĂŚtre, vera schmidt

In this studio we investigated the future architectural and landscape adaptations in the slum area of Kampung Melayu on the Ciliwung river, in Jakarta, Indonesia. The studio was based on field analysis and included workshops with students from Indonesia and Singapore. The studio was a part of a research project ran by the ETH Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore. Pollution, poor infrastructure and flooding are among the major problems of Kampung Melayu. As of today, the river functions as the slum’s backside and contains functions like bathtub, toilet and garbage disposal.

When the yearly flood occurs, water and waste is spread thorughout the settlement. We proposed strategies for making the settlement more flood resistant, rather than preventing the flood. City blocks will be improved step by step, according to a time priority scheme based on what areas are most flood prone.

We looked for existing housing groups in the slum, and defined blocks according to existing streets. Some streets would be widened, so that a garbage-van would have access to the blocks. There would be a main infrastructure-hub at the peninsula.


SECTION 1 : 200

urban blocks

URBAN BLOCKS

sub blo c k s

HOUSING SUBBLOCKS

DENSITY

density

time priorities

TIME PRIORITIES

STUDENTS: MARI SAETRE, VERA SCHMIDT

SPRING SEMESTER 2013

boat stops

gGARBAGE a r bCOLLECTION age collection

BOAT STOPS

DESIGNING THE CILIWUNG RIVER

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHE GIROT ETH ZURICH

PLAN 1 : 1000

dry period

DRY PERIOD

regular f l o w

REGULAR WATER FLOW

seasonal flood

Seasonal Flood

7 year flood

topography

HEIGHTS, TOPOGRAPHY

EXTREME FLOOD

STUDENTS: MARI SAETRE, VERA SCHMIDT

SPRING SEMESTER 2013

DESIGNING THE CILIWUNG RIVER

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHE GIROT ETH ZURICH


plan first floor

UNIT PLANS UNIT PLANS 1:100 1:100

p la n g r o u n d l e v e l

HOUSING The houses along the river are too weak to deal with the flooding. We propose a new typology, consisting of a concrete structure where people can build theire own houses. A manual

with different materials and constructions would be provided. Each housing block would have rain water collection, and a pipe system that gives water to the units.

SECTION 1:100

SECTION 1:100

section


TION 1:200

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

secton t h r o u g h p a r k o n l e f t s i d e , t e r r a c e d g a r d e n s o n r i g h t s i d e . dotted lines indicate seasonal flood and 7year-flood

PLAN SUB HUB 1:200

SECTIONAL MODEL 1:200

STUDENTS: MARI SAETRE, VERA SCHMIDT

SPRING SEMESTER 2013

SAETRE, 2013 o DESIGNING THE secton garba g e p i c k u p - p o i n t o nSTUDENTS: l e f tMARI si d e ,VERA t eSCHMIDT r r a c eSPRING d g SEMESTER a r d e ns n righ t CILIWUNG s i d eRIVER . dotted lines indicate seasonal flood and 7year-flood

DESIGNING THE CILIWUNG RIVER

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

LANDS

PROFESSOR CHRIST

THE RIVER Terracing the riverbed secures that there is always a navigable part of the river. The terraces will also give room for a green belt with flood filtering vegetation. The most flood prone side will contain parcels with productive gardens.


5_culture

hall irchel park

zürich, switzerland, fall 2012, 7th semester, proffesor miroslav Šik, eth zürich student: mari ervik sætre

The philosophy of this design studio is that through deep analysis of reference projects one can transfer spatial qualities into new contexts and programs. My main reference study was Sverre Fehns Nordic Pavillion in Venice. The program is devided in two buildings. The large building is the culture hall for concerts and conferences while the small building is a cafe. Functional rooms are organized along the northern and western wall, in a 4 meter wide L-shape. The project is situated between the forest and the lake. A new path has been established between the two buildings, replacing the ex-

isting path from north to south. The path extends to a covered forecourt between the cafe and the culture hall. This area is also used as the outdoor area for the cafe in the summer. The path and the forecourt are in white gravel, and in front of the entrances there is asphalt of the same color. The open air stage is facing the southern part of the park. The audience area has a pavement of “gravel grass”, to be able to place chairs and equipment. Five birch trees are planted in the northern part of the site. Two of them are planted to make a boundary of the forplatz together with the concrete columns.


elpark zürich mari ervik sætre IRCHELPARK ZÜRICHstudentin: STUDENTIN: MARI ERVIK SÆTRE

situation 1:500 SITUATION 1:500

site plan

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herbstsemester 2012 professur miroslav ŠikŠIKdozent ruedi seiler günther vogt eth zürich HERBSTSEMESTER 2012 PROFESSUR MIROSLAV DOZENT RUEDI SEILERprofessur PROFESSUR GÜNTHER VOGTd-arch D-ARCH ETH ZÜRICH

MATERIALS AND LANDSCAPE ELEMENTS

1) Concrete are used in all structural elements. 2) Interior cladding and floors are in Oak. 3) Polycarbonat panels are used for the translucent roof. The material allows for continuous daylight in the buildings. The panels have 10 layers, and thick 60mm thick. One panel spans 1 meter, and a light steel construction is holding the panels. 4) The existing white gravel is used to make a new path and a forplatz between the buildings. 5) There is “gravel-gras” in front of the open air stage, 6) Birch trees are planted in the northern part of the building, to create a boundary of the roof and the patio.

plan kulturhalle im irchelpark zürich studentin: mari ervik sætre

proJektdokumentati


section bb

section aa

section cc


Structurally the project is based on the principles of stacked beams of varying sizes. The culture hall consists of 4 layers of beams, and the cafe consists of 3 layers of beams. The third layer is continuous, and connects the two buildings. The top layer of beams of both buildings are lowered to give room for a transparent roof.

The concrete beams span up to 24 meters.The structural roof layer in the cafe spams the opposite way than the culture hall, to reduce the interior roof height (as the third layer is continous). The beams / walls are insulated on the inside. This allows the concrete structure to be exposed to the park.


DACHAUFBAU BUHNE Concrete beams concrete flags Insulation Ribbed concrete slab Total

100cm 10cm 20cm 90 cm 220cm

WANDAUFBAU Sichtbeton 30cm W채rmed채mmung 20cm Eiche verkleidung 7cm Total 57 cm

AUSSENBEREICH Shotterrasen Deckschicht 3cm Vegetationstragschicht 15cm Tragschicht 40cm Erde

BODENAUFBAU Parkett Eiche Screed with underfloor heating Impact sound insulation Concrete slab over basement Plaster to soffit Total

TECHNICAL SECTION

1cm

8cm 4cm

25cm 1cm 39cm


wall with low window meets roof

wall with high window

Polycarbonate panels: 6cm Steel profile follofs angle of the roof Steel construction carries polycarbonate: 5-44cm Gutter

Concrete roof beams sec30cm ond layer:

Concrete roof beams first layer: 120cm Total roof:

concrete Insulation: Oak cladding: Total:

20 cm 20 cm 7 cm 47 cm

WINDOW: The window is supported from exterior glass fin. Solar protection fastened in the (tempered) glass fin.A steel wire is bolted in concrete beam to lead solar protection. Window with double glass: Glass fin, angled: Total:

4cm 30-20cm 24-34cm

150cm - 200cm


KULTURHALLE IM IRCHELPARK ZÜRICH STUDENTIN: MARI ERVIK SÆTRE

PERSPEKTIVE INNEN

PERSPECTIVE CULTURE HALL

HERBSTSEMESTER 2012 PROFESSUR MIROSLAV ŠIK DOZENT RUEDI SEILER PROFES


6_sørfjorden

rock landscape

spring 2010, odda, norway, gk2, introduction to arhcitecture, proffesor beate hølmebakk student:mari ervik sætre

The factory Boliden Odda is among the worlds most cost-efficient producers of zinc and aluminum. Every 14 months, new tunnels are blasted out in the mountains, to store the radioactive bi-products from the production. So far, about 2.5 million m3 of rock has been blasted out, and dumped into the contaminated fjord floor. This contributes to spread the contamination. My project was inspired by treating these masses of rock as a growing resource. The rock still can be dumped in the ocean, but in a more responsible and controlled way. It is possible to cover the fjord ground, to make sure the contamination do not spread.

The masses of rock will be placed closer to the city, to make a recreational park for the citizens of Odda. As the rock is placed in the more shallow water it will reach up above the surface and everyone will be concerned with it one way or the other. Today, the ocean preserves the secret about the masses of rocks. We do not know the consequences and most people do not even know it exists. The project aims to challenge our ignorance of things we can´t see, and to build a physical environment that forces us to get involved with uncomfortable issues.


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SECTION BB 1:1000

SECTION CC 1:1000

SECTION DD 1:1000


Portfolio Mari Ervik Sætre  

6 student projects from AHO and ETH

Portfolio Mari Ervik Sætre  

6 student projects from AHO and ETH

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