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Implications


School

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y / SCHOOL OF GR APHIC DE SIGN

Class

SENIOR PORTFOLIO

Instructor

MARY SCOT T

Student

MARION RIGGS

W W W.MARIONRIGGS.COM

@ MARION.RIGGS

GMAIL .COM

B o o k b i n d e r y

BLURB

W W W.BLURB .COM

Photography

MARION RIGGS

Title of Book

I M P L I C AT I O N S

F o n t s

BERTHOLD AK ZIDENZ GROTE SK

WALBAUM

S o f t w a r e

A D O B E C R E AT I V E S U I T E 5 . 5

© All rights reserved. No par t of this publication can be reproduced without expressive permisson from Marion Riggs .


Implic ations

MAR ION R IGGS

G raduate Por t folio Academy of Ar t 2011


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00 Implications

CONTE X T D E S IG N PRO C E S S C IR CUL AR

My path to design is via sociology, which shaped my approach to problem-solving. In sociology we don’t typically look at the individual, but at broader categories like class or gender, and try to analyze how the members of these groups are impacted by social structures. Similarly with design, we typically also try to gain insight into the audience for which we are designing. If you want to connect with your target audience, you need to understand the implications of what you are designing. Or rather: you need to know what it is that you are implicitly saying to them with your design. Design doesn’t just influence the target audience, it also influences the next generation of design: design feeds into new design. Each ring in the circles I created is influenced by the previous ring and gains a new meaning when connected with the others. The rings are symbols for the process of design, which is fluid, always evolving, never ending, often circling back on itself.


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INTRODUCTION

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Table of Contents

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A Plea for Simplicity

p. 12

02

Spring is Coming

p. 34

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Aspects of Change

p. 58

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Care for Children

p. 94

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Going for a Ride

p. 122

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Coffee Blossoms

p. 146

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Car Politics

p. 166

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Food Future

p. 188

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Dinner Dilemma

p. 206

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Identity Marks

p. 218


I M P L I C AT I O N S

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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TO N Y C A M P O LO Soc iologist


Your past is important but it is not nearly as important to your present as the way you see your future.


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01 A Plea for Simplicity

DESIGN ETHIC MID - CENTURY ONE COLOR

Objective

Instructor

ESTHER CLARK

Course

PRINT 2

Title

CHOOSE

Format

BOOK / POSTERS / CARDS

Fonts

FUTURA BT

In this open-ended project we were asked to design a brochure/catalog for a product of our choice. In addition we should provide posters and other collateral. We were required in particular to emphasize the concept behind the design in order to evoke an emotional connection to the product.

Approach

Being a big fan of George Nelson’s bubble lamps, I decided to design for their nationwide promotion in the Design Within Reach (DWR) stores. Although the lamps were designed in the late 1940s, their beauty is timeless, and they fit as well in the current century as in the last one. In my opinion, their essence is their elegant simplicity, their reduction to lines, and their distinctive organic shapes. In the course of reading about the mid-century design period I found a number of essays written by George Nelson concerning the function of good design and the role of the designer, which I incorporated into the brochure through quotes.


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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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dogma


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“I see the designer as an artist, he is someone who gives form to the essence of any thing. He is a purveyor, not of comforts, but of truths. And truth is a most important quality in design of any dimension. Because people tend to recognize it when they see it.

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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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dogma


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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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dogma


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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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“You can always tell when the communication comes through because in the shock of understanding the message there is also the feeling that you’d known it all your life.

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your personality. The bubble lamps (designed by George Nelson, 1904–1986) are sold exclusively at DWR. Visit us in one of our sixty-seven studios or online @ www.dwr.com, or call us at 1.800.944.2233. DWR_the best in modern design.

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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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dogma


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PLEA FOR SIMPLICITY

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02 Spring is Coming

E VE NT PR E S TIG E COLOR FUL

Objective

Instructor

JERE MY STOUT

Course

IDENTITY 3

Title

S P R I N G S H O W 2 0 11

Format

BR AND BOOK

Fonts

KNOCKOUT / FR ANKLIN GOTHIC

The biggest event at the Academy of Art is the annual spring show at the end of May. For the graduates, it is the highlight of their academic career, and an opportunity to show their work to peers as well as potential employers who come to look for new talent. We were asked to brand the event to heighten its perception.

Approach

The unique challenge of this project was that in a way, we were designing for ourselves, as we would eventually become one of those graduates who show their work. Since the public appearance of the Academy of Art does not match its prestige, and has in the past been perceived as darkly hued and overly commercial, I decided to take the name of the event literally and bring light, color and the power of spring to San Francisco. The majority of the advertisement happens on the streets, on buses and lampposts where bright colors and lightness will stand out, contrasting with the grayness of the city as well as the gray weather typical for that time of the year.


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SPRING IS COMING

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MAY 2011 Grey, grey, go away C ome again another day...

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SPRING IS COMING

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SPRING IS COMING

LOGO

P R I M A RY LOGO

P R I M A RY LOGO rever sed

S EC O N DA RY LOGO

T YPE FAC E S

A B

C

01 K nockout / Junior M iddleweight ( H TF 30 )

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUV WX YZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv wx yz 1 2 34 5 6 7 8 9 0 ! ? @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) - + { } 0 2 K n o c k o u t / J u n i o r We l t e r w e i g h t ( H T F 5 0 )

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1 2 34 5 6 7 8 9 0 ! ? @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) - + { } 03 ITC Franklin Gothic / Book

A B C D E F G H I J K L M NO P Q R S T U V W X Y Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv wxyz 1234567890!?@#$%^&*() - +{}

COLORS

YELLOW P M S 116 c LIGHT ORANGE P M S 14 3 c DARK OR ANGE P M S 15 0 5 c PINK PMS 205c RED P M S 18 6 c PURPLE PMS 259c LIGHT BLUE PMS 2985c DARK BLUE PMS 3025c BL ACK PMS Black

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[ SCHOOLS

[ HOME

[ C ON TAC T

[ EVENTS

[ VISIT

WE BPAG E Springshow 2011

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

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SPRING IS COMING

[ SCHOOLS

[ HOME [ EVENTS

MAY 25

[ C ON TAC T

[ C ON TAC T

OPENING NIGHT 7–9PM 7 9 & 1 8 0[ NVeI wS I M T ontgomery St

[ VT I SINUING IT C ON M AY 2 8– JUNE [ VISIT

1 0 A M T O 6 P M [e x c e p t S u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

ADVERTISING ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFEC TS ARCHITECTURE

[ SCHOOLS

ART EDUCATION FASHION

[ HOME

FINE ART

[ EVENTS

[ C ON TAC T

GAME DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN ILLUS TR ATION

[ VISIT

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION MULT IMEDI A C OMMUNIC AT IONS MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

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ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105

2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105

We are proud to announce our 2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

5

MAY 25

:30–8:30 PM

OPENING NIGHT 6:30–8:30 PM

t (a t V a n N e s s S t)

1 8 4 9 W a s h i n g t o n S t r e e t ( a t V a n N e s s S t)

C ON T INUING M AY 2 6–AUGU S T 15

2 6 –AUGU S T 15

u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

1 0 A M T O 6 P M [e x c e p t S u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

ademyar t.edu

1.800.5 4 4 . 2 7 8 7 / w w w. ac ademyar t.edu

tured m

Spring Show Award Winners will be featured a t 7 9 G a l l e r y J u n e 1 4 – J u l y 31 1 0 a m – 6 p m

olidays]

7 9 Ne w Mon t gomer y S t [excep t Sunday s & Holiday s]

RT EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

ADVERTISING / ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS / ARCHITECTURE / ART EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

CTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

DESIGN / ILLUSTRATION / INDUSTRIAL DESIGN / INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

B DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

COMMUNICATIONS / MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA / PHOTOGRAPHY / WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105

2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105

We are proud to announce our 2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

5

MAY 25

:30–8:30 PM

OPENING NIGHT 6:30–8:30 PM

t (a t V a n N e s s S t)

1 8 4 9 W a s h i n g t o n S t r e e t ( a t V a n N e s s S t)

u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

1 0 A M T O 6 P M [e x c e p t S u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

ademyar t.edu

1.800.5 4 4 . 2 7 8 7 / w w w. ac ademyar t.edu

tured m

Spring Show Award Winners will be featured a t 7 9 G a l l e r y J u n e 1 4 – J u l y 31 1 0 a m – 6 p m

olidays]

7 9 Ne w Mon t gomer y S t [excep t Sunday s & Holiday s]

RT EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

ADVERTISING / ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS / ARCHITECTURE / ART EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

CTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

DESIGN / ILLUSTRATION / INDUSTRIAL DESIGN / INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

B DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

COMMUNICATIONS / MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA / PHOTOGRAPHY / WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105 ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSIT Y 79 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FR ANCISCO / CA 94105

We are proud to announce our 2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

5

MAY 25

:30–8:30 PM

OPENING NIGHT 6:30–8:30 PM

t (a t V a n N e s s S t)

1 8 4 9 W a s h i n g t o n S t r e e t ( a t V a n N e s s S t)

2 6 –AUGU S T 15

C ON T INUING M AY 2 6–AUGU S T 15

u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

1 0 A M T O 6 P M [e x c e p t S u n d a y s & H o l i d a y s]

ademyar t.edu

1.800.5 4 4 . 2 7 8 7 / w w w. ac ademyar t.edu

tured m

olidays]

RT EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

C ON T INUING M AY 2 6–AUGU S T 15

2 6 –AUGU S T 15

2 0 11 A N N U A L A R T S H O W

ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

Spring Show Award Winners will be featured a t 7 9 G a l l e r y J u n e 1 4 – J u l y 31 1 0 a m – 6 p m 7 9 Ne w Mon t gomer y S t [excep t Sunday s & Holiday s]

ADVERTISING / ANIMATION & VISUAL EFFECTS / ARCHITECTURE / ART EDUCATION / FASHION / FINE ART / GAME DESIGN / GRAPHIC

CTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

DESIGN / ILLUSTRATION / INDUSTRIAL DESIGN / INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION / MULTIMEDIA

B DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

COMMUNICATIONS / MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA / PHOTOGRAPHY / WEB DESIGN & NEW MEDIA

ACCREDITED MEMBER WASC, N ASAD, Council for Interior Design Accreditation ( B F A - I A D), N A A B ( M - A R C H )

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MAY 25 OPENING NIGHT

7 9 & 18 0 N e w M o n t g o m e r y

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SPRING IS COMING

PHOTOGRAPHY FASHION

ARCHITECTURE GRAPHIC DESIGN

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C LY D E K LU C K H O LN Anthrop ologist


My basic postulate is that no cultural forms survive unless they constitute responses which are adjustive or adaptive.


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03 Aspects of Change

PAPE R PRO M OTION BOOK LE TS FLIP BOOK

Objective

Instructor

ARIEL GREY

Course

TYPOGRAPHY 4

Title

EVERCHANGING

Format

B O O K L E T S / S W AT C H C A R D S

Fonts

H E LV E T I C A N E U E

To create a promotion system that showcases the paper lines for a paper company of our choice. The design should include one or more booklets with a variety of paper finishes, as well as swatch cards in a new and distinctive format.

Approach

To showcase Mohawk’s VIA paper line I chose the concept of “change”. In three different booklets I show how change affects us throughout our lives. In the first book I show through the use of charts and statistics how change happens on a macroscopic scale. The second book contains personal stories of change: how several individuals actively changed their lives, or how events forced change upon them. The third book is a purely typographic, experimental book which discusses stagnation, the fear of change and how we can overcome them. For the swatch cards, I created a flip book that morphs a phrase while changing from white to pink.


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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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and being judged and humiliated. The possibility of failure threatens to dislodge their already low sense of worth and therefore does not merit the risk. On the other hand when self/worth is strong, fear may still exist, but it no longer has the power to destabilize forward move-

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ment. “Failure” is perceived as a temporary setback or as a potential learning experience. Strong self/esteem enables individuals to focus on taking

Here are some tried and tested tips on how to fight your fears. Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway_The best method to fight any fear is to take positive action against whatever it is that you are afraid of. Is fear of failure stopping you from learning that new skill? Go ahead and learn it! This is what courage is all about: to act despite the fear. Educate Yourself_Learn more and more about the object that you are afraid of. You want to chuck your job and plunge into your own business, but are afraid of the risks involved? Then the best way to reduce the fears is to consciously learn about the business in as much depth as you can. Preparation increases confidence and calms those butterflies in the stomach. Just be aware of “Analysis-paralysis”. Use self-affirmations_that give a positive spin to whatever it is that you fear. Write these self-affirmations on a stick-it note where it is easily visible. Say you are afraid of criticism from others, then one possible self/affirmation could be “I am outstanding. I must be outstanding for all the people I will help.” Positive visualization is projecting an image of yourself overcoming your fears, and is a powerful technique to fight your fears. If you are afraid of your boss, visualize that your boss is smiling at you, appreciating you, and complimenting you of a job well done. Keep this image in your mind firmly. What’s the Worst Case Scenario_Often when this question is asked, you realize how silly the fear is. Example, if you are afraid to ask someone out on a date, what’s the worst that could happen? The other person saying “No”? It’s not that bad, right? One of my most enlightening realizations is recognizing that “I have nothing to lose”.

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IN mY ExPErIENcE, WE cAN ALWAYS fIGHT Our fEArS, WIN, ANd GET AHEAd IN LIfE. WHAT dO YOu THINK?

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BOOK 3

BOOK 2

BOOK 1

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

CHANGE HAPPENS ALL THE TIME, IN FACT ALL THE TIME EVERYWHERE ON THE WORLD. AND AS THE WORLD TURNS WITH A SPEED OF 1000 MPH EVEN THINGS THAT DON’T SEEM TO CHANGE AT FIRST SITE HAVE TRAVELLED ALREADY 1000 MILES AND HAVE INDEED CHANGED.

I M P L I C AT I O N S

25,000 miles 24h Earth turns with a speed of

1000miles/hour

Stories of change_At different times in their lives, different people feel the need to change something. Circumstances like an illness or the loss of someone close or something essential force them to do so. We have all been at crossroads in our lives, but haven’t always taken the chance to change, probably out of fear. Here we show stories of eight people who took that extra step, who changed their lives. We hope

Nathan_54 James_76 Carl_38 Jessie_27 Daniel_19 Charlene_20 Rami_32

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2150

1950

1999

2050

1900

1750

1850

IN MARCH 2008, THE WORLD’S POPUL ATION [ THE TOTAL NUMbER OF HUMANS ON EARTH AT A GIVEN TIME] IS bELIEVED TO HAVE REACHED OVER 6.6 bILLION. IN LINE WITH POPUL ATION PROjECTIONS, THIS FIGURE CONTINUES TO GROW AT RATES THAT WERE UNPRECEDENTED bEFORE THE 20TH CENTURY, ALTHOUGH THE RATE OF INCREASE HAS ALMOST HALVED SINCE ITS PEAk, WHICH WAS REACHED IN 1963, OF 2.2 PERCENT PER YEAR. THE WORLD’S POPUL ATION, ON ITS CURRENT GROW TH TRAjECTORY, IS E xPECTED TO REACH NEARLY 9 bILLION bY THE YEAR 2050.

EVERY THING IN LIFE IS CONNECTED SOMEHOW. YOU MAY HAVE TO DIG DEEP TO FIND IT BUT ITS THERE. EVERY THING IS THE SAME EVEN THOUGH ITS DIFFERENT. SOMEHOW EVERY THING CONNECTS BACK WITH YOUR LIFE. THE FACES IN CERTAIN PL ACES MAY BE DIFFERENT, BUT THE SITUATION IS THE SAME. IRONY IS A HIDDEN FACTOR THAT CREEPS AROUND US IN LIFE, LET TING ITS PRESENCE FELT ONLY AF TER IT HAS LEF T. PICTURE BACK TO A YEAR AGO AND THE SITUATION YOU WERE IN. LOOK AT HOW THINGS ARE DIFFERENT YET SOMEHOW EVERY THING IT STILL IN SOMEWAY COGNATE. EVERY THING CONNECTS TOGETHER TO FORM THE BAL ANCE OF LIFE, TO MAINTAIN STRUCTURE. CHANGE IS AND ALWAYS WILL BE INEVITABLE, BUT EVERY THING IS REL ATIVE, AND ALL THE MOMENTS AND TIMES IN YOUR LIFE WILL COME BACK AROUND AGAIN, YOU JUST MIGHT FIND YOURSELF ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN. THINGS ARE ALWAYS CHANGING, AS FAST AS EVERY THING STAYS THE SAME.

1800

Jessie, 27 years Dental Hygienist Seattle, WA

Population in 1750 Population in 2150

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ASIA

EUROPE

AFRICA

NORTHERN AMERICA

L ATIN AMERICA

[ 01] World Population, 1750 –2150 (estimated), total numbers.

[ 02] World Population, in 1750 and 2150 (estimated), percentual distribution.

HUMANIT y

INCRE ASE IN MIGR ATION MORTALIT y INCRE ASE SPRE AD OF DISE ASE

+0.2

LESS ECOLOGICAL PRODUCTIVIT y MORE DE VELOPMENT

ECOSySTEMS

MORE FOREST FIRES IF YOU HAVE A DREAM, FOLLOW THAT DREAM. PERHAPS YOU WILL FAIL. PERHAPS I WILL FAIL TOO. DOES THAT MAT TER SO MUCH IF YOU ENJOY YOURSELF, IF YOU MEET NEW FRIENDS AND FIND NEW PATHS? TOO MANY OF US LIVE OUR LIVES IN THE ABSENCE OF RISK, L ACKING CURIOUSIT Y, STUCK IN ROUTINES, MATERIALLY WEALTHY BUT EMOTIONALLY DRAINED. YET I WOULD ARGUE THAT IS ONLY THROUGH RISK THAT MANKIND ADVANCES.

MOUNTAIN EROSION

+0.4

FORESTS E x TINCTION DESERTIFICATION ANIMAL E x TINCITION WATER SCARCIT y

YOU'VE CHANGED SO MUCH. I GUESS THAT'S WHAT HAPPENS. I WISH YOU KNEW HOW MUCH YOU CHANGED ME. I WONDER IF I CHANGED YOU, IF YOUR LIFE ISDIFFERENT BECAUSE OF ME. BECAUSE MINE'S DIFFERENT. MY GOD, YOU TAUGHT ME SO MUCH, AND NOW WE DON'T EVEN TALK TO EACH OTHER. I GUESS THAT'S WHAT HAPPENS.

Rami_32 Music Producer Los Angeles, CA

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E x TREME WE ATHER

+0.6 GL ACIER RE TRE AT AND DISAPPE AR ANCE

+0.8

DESTAbILIz ATION OF LOCAL CLIMATES INCRE ASED E VAPOR ATION

OCE ANS

SHUTDOWN OF THERMOHALINE CIRCUL ATION SE A LE VEL RISE TEMPER ATURE RISE RE TRE AT OF SE A ICE

OTHER EFFECTS

NORTHWEST PASSAGE

FEEDbACk EFFECTS

was still weak and told that I would likely remain that way permanently. The multinational environment, which I knew so well, seemed an unlikely future. I also knew that I did not really want to work for anyone else again. Too much time is wasted at work on politics, bureaucracy, indecision and fear. Through the summer I thought a lot about the future, without really having a clear idea what that future might be. I had already decided to again spend the winter in Thailand so I began turning my thoughts to ways in which I could monetise my time there. I had few illusions that it would be easy but I also seemed to have an inner calm that was telling me to take some risks and go for it. But go for what? I have no artistic talent. As a child at school I blushed with embarrassment at my complete lack of skills. Yet, though I lack the skills of an artist I am, even so, a creative person. I also happen to be a big fan of contemporary art. Initially to do little more than amuse myself, I began to use Google to research the contemporary art market in Thailand. What I found was interesting. Why so? Ironically, because I found nothing. There was and is almost no information about Thai contemporary art on the internet. This led me to my first conclusion, namely that I had perhaps spotted a gap in the market, a niche that I might be able to exploit. To break into the art market in Europe would take years. Maybe, just maybe I could break into the Thai market instead. The challenge now was to see if there might be a demand for Thai art and to see if I could find any Thai art. I moved from Google to eBay.

ECONOMIC FLOOD DEFENSE TR ANSPORT INSUR ANCE SECURIT y

ME THANE RELE ASE FROM HyDR ATES CARbON CyCLE FEEDbACkS E THANE RELE ASE FROM MELTING PERMAFROST PE AT bOGS

[ 08 ] Effects of global warming. Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007.

Global warming is the increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s near-surface air and oceans since the mid-twentieth century and its projected continuation. The average global air temperature near the Earth’s surface increased 0.74 ± 0.18 °C (1.33 ± 0.32 °F) during the hundred years ending in 2005. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes “most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-twentieth century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations via the greenhouse effect. Natural phenomena such as solar variation combined with volcanoes probably had a small warming effect from pre-industrial times to 1950 and a small cooling effect from 1950 onward. These basic conclusions have been endorsed by at least thirty scientific societies and academies of science, including all of the national academies of science of the major industrialized countries. While individual scientists have voiced disagreement with some findings of the IPCC, the overwhelming majority of scientists working on climate change agree with the IPCC’s main conclusions. Climate model projections summarized by the IPCC indicate that average global surface temperature will likely rise a further 1.1 to 6.4 °C (2.0 to 11.5 °F) during the twenty-first century. The range of values results from the use of differing scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions as well as models with differing climate sensitivity. Although most studies focus on the period up to 2100, warming and sea level rise are expected to continue for more than a thousand years even if greenhouse gas levels are sta-

THE TERM "GLObAL WARMING" IS A SPECIFIC E xAMPLE OF GLObAL CLIMATE CHANGE. THE TERM CLIMATE CHANGE CAN ALSO REFER TO OTHER PERIODS OF OVERALL TEMPERATURE CHANGE SUCH AS GLObAL COOLING. IN COMMON USAGE, THE TERM GLObAL WARMING REFERS TO THE WARMING IN RECENT DECADES AND ITS PROjECTED CONTINUATION, AND IMPLIES A HUMAN INFLUENCE.

31

bilized. The delay in reaching equilibrium is a result of the large heat capacity of the oceans. Increasing global temperature will cause sea level to rise, and is expected to increase the intensity of extreme weather events and to change the amount and pattern of precipitation. Other effects of global warming include changes in agricultural yields, trade routes, glacier retreat, species extinctions and increases in the ranges of disease vectors. Some scientific uncertainties remain, including the amount of warming expected in the future, and how warming and related changes will vary from region to region around the globe. Most national governments have signed and ratified the kyoto Protocol aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but there is ongoing political and public debate worldwide regarding what, if any, action should be taken to reduce or reverse future warming or to adapt to its expected consequences.] Effects The predicted effects of global warming on the environment and for human life are numerous and varied. It is generally difficult to attribute specific natural phenomena to long-term causes, but some effects of recent climate change may already be occurring. Rising sea levels, glacier retreat, Arctic shrinkage, and altered patterns of agriculture are cited as direct consequences, but predictions for secondary and regional effects include extreme weather events, an expansion of tropical diseases, changes in the timing of seasonal patterns in ecosystems, and drastic economic impact.] outcome Projected climate changes due to global warming have the potential to lead to future large-scale and possibly

irreversible effects at continental and global scales. The likelihood, magnitude, and timing is uncertain and controversial, but some examples of projected climate changes include significant slowing of the ocean circulation that transports warm water to the North Atlantic, large reductions in the Greenland and West Antarctic Ice Sheets, accelerated global warming due to carbon cycle feedbacks in the terrestrial biosphere, and releases of terrestrial carbon from permafrost regions and methane. The probability of one or more of these changes occurring is likely to increase with the rate, magnitude, and duration of climate change. Additionally, the United States National Academy of Sciences has warned, “greenhouse warming and other human alterations of the earth system may increase the possibility of large, abrupt, and unwelcome regional or global climatic events. Future abrupt changes cannot be predicted with confidence, and climate surprises are to be expected. The IPCC finds that the effects of global warming will be mixed across regions. For smaller values of warming (1 to 3 °C), changes are expected to produce net benefits in some regions and for some activities, and net costs for others. Greater warming is very likely to produce net costs (or to reduce the benefits from smaller warming) in all regions. Developing countries are expected to be especially vulnerable to reduced economic growth as a result of warming. Most of the consequences of global warming would result from one of three physical changes: sea level rise, higher local temperatures, and changes in rainfall patterns. Sea level is generally expected to rise 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23.2 inches) by the end of

the century.] Causes The Earth’s climate changes in response to external forcing, including variations in its orbit around the Sun (orbital forcing), volcanic eruptions, and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The detailed causes of the recent warming remain an active field of research, but the scientific consensus is that the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases due to human activity caused most of the warming observed since the start of the industrial era. This attribution is clearest for the most recent 50 years, for which the most detailed data are available. One such hypothesis proposes that warming may be the result of variations in solar activity. None of the effects of forcing are instantaneous.] Regional The IPCC finds that the effects of global warming will be mixed across regions. For smaller values of warming (1 to 3 °C), changes are expected to produce net benefits in some regions and for some activities, and net costs for others. Greater warming is very likely to produce net costs (or to reduce the benefits from smaller warming) in all regions. Developing countries, unfortunatly, are expected to be especially vulnerable to reduced economic growth as a result of warming.] Conclusion Most of the consequences of global warming would result from one of three physical changes: sea level rise, ice cap melting, higher local temperatures, and changes in rainfall patterns. Sea level is generally expected to rise 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23.2 inches) by the end of the century. The probability in the future of one or more of these changes occurring is likely to increase with the rate, magnitude, and duration of climate change.]

23

CLIMATE MODEL PROjECTIONS INDICATE THAT AVERAGE GLObAL SURFACE TEMPERATURE WILL LIkELY RISE A FURTHER 1.1 TO 6.4°C DURING THE T WENT Y-FIRST CENTURY. THE RANGE OF VALUES RESULTS FROM THE USE OF DIFFERING SCENARIOS OF FUTURE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AS WELL AS MODELS WITH DIFFERING CLIMATE SENSITIVIT Y. THE DEL AY IN REACHING EqUILIbRIUM IS A RESULT OF THE L ARGE HEAT CAPACIT Y OF THE OCEANS.]

>> WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU KNEW YOU COULD NOT FAIL?

+++ +++ +++

BOOK 1

global changes

BOOK 2

personal change


portfolio

MARION RIGGS

BOOK 1

global changes

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10


I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

ASPECTS OF CHANGE

66 | 67

nuances


MARION RIGGS

25,000 miles 24h Earth turns with a speed of

1000miles/hour

03

02

ANtiPodES THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD. THERE IS AN INFORMAL AND ANECDOTAL bELIEF AMONG AMERICANS THAT IF YOU DIG A HOLE DEEP ENOUGH, EVENTUALLY YOU WOULD COME OUT IN THE HEART OF CHINA, FAR EAST. THIS IS THEORETICALLY POSSIbLE IF THE HOLE IS ANGLED IN THE RIGHT WAY, bUT IF YOU DIG STRAIGHT DOWN AND THROUGH THE E x ACT CENTER OF THE EARTH FROM ANY WHERE IN THE 48 CONTIGUOUS UNITED STATES, YOU’D COME OUT IN THE INDIAN OCEAN. ONLY IN PARTS OF ARGENTINA OR CHILE WOULD A STRAIGHT HOLE EMERGE IN CHINA.

01

CHANGE HAPPENS ALL THE TIME, IN FACT ALL THE TIME EVERYWHERE ON THE WORLD. AND AS THE WORLD TURNS WITH A SPEED OF 1000 MPH EVEN THINGS THAT DON’T SEEM TO CHANGE AT FIRST SITE HAVE TRAVELLED ALREADY 1000 MILES AND HAVE INDEED CHANGED.

portfolio

5

01.

11

10

1950

1999

2050

1900

1750

IN MARCH 2008, THE WORLD’S POPUL ATION [ THE TOTAL NUMbER OF HUMANS ON EARTH AT A GIVEN TIME] IS bELIEVED TO HAVE REACHED OVER 6.6 bILLION. IN LINE WITH POPUL ATION PROjECTIONS, THIS FIGURE CONTINUES TO GROW AT RATES THAT WERE UNPRECEDENTED bEFORE THE 20TH CENTURY, ALTHOUGH THE RATE OF INCREASE HAS ALMOST HALVED SINCE ITS PEAk, WHICH WAS REACHED IN 1963, OF 2.2 PERCENT PER YEAR. THE WORLD’S POPUL ATION, ON ITS CURRENT GROW TH TRAjECTORY, IS E xPECTED TO REACH NEARLY 9 bILLION bY THE YEAR 2050.

1850

[ 03 ] Lifestages. Distinct developments and aging processes.

1800

THE PROBLEM OF PERSONAL IDENTITY RELATES TO CHANGE AS APPLIED TO PEOPLE. THE MOLECuLES THAT MAKE uP EACH INDIVIDuAL CHANGE ALMOST COMPLETELY OVER A PERIOD OF YEARS. uSuALLY, THERE IS NO TROuBLE IN SAYING THAT A LITTLE GIRL IN 1920, FOR EXAMPLE, IS THE SAME AS AN OLD WOMAN IN 1998, EVEN THOuGH THEY SHARE A RELATIVELY SMALL NuMBER OF MOLECuLES IN COMMON. THE SAME PERSON IS JuST DESCRIBED IN TWO DIFFERENT WAYS, FIRST AS A LITTLE GIRL, AND SECOND, AS AN OLD WOMAN. IN FACT, WE ARE CONFIDENT ENOuGH OF OuR

Rites of passage refers to the processes by which a creature moves from one state, level, or role to another. This process is usually psychologically, physically and spiritually intense. Many rites of passage, such as human birth, adulthood status, and death have become ritualistically celebrated and are experienced in various ways depending on the culture. Rites of passage have, so van gennep, three phases: separation, liminality, and incorporation. In the first phase, people withdraw from the group and begin moving from one place or status to another. In the third phase, they reenter society, having completed the rite. The liminal phase is the period between states, during which people have left one place or state but haven’t yet entered or joined the next.

ABILITY TO REIDENTIFY PEOPLE OVER TIME THAT WE ARE GIVEN SOCIAL SECuRITY NuMBERS THAT ARE SuPPOSED TO LAST uS FROM WHEN WE GET THEM uNTIL WE DIE MANY YEARS LATER. THE QuESTION IS EXACTLY WHY WE CALL THE OLD WOMAN IN 1998 THE SAME PERSON AS THAT LITTLE GIRL IN 1920.

[

Rites of Passage. //01. Separation from the familiar//02. Transition from old state to new state //03. Reintegration into original

Is It possIble for people to change theIr personalItY? MaYabe not If It Is upt to theIr free wIll. but there are ManY waYs people change over tIMe. If theY want It or not. or MostlY theY”re not aware of It. one Interst Ing questIon reMaIns: who are we, what Is our true IdentItY If we are changIng?

11.25pm

03.25am

07.25pm

11.25am

infancy_From birth to age 2, humans develop muscle strength and nervous system control. Infants start with the ability to focus their eyes, then develop verbal communication skills and usually take their first steps around age 1. During this time, their digestive system begins to process solid and complex foods. by age 2, their vocabulary may include as many as 200 words.] Childhood_As toddlers, humans develop a sense of humor along with their emerging sense of identity and self-expression. During the preschool years, children further develop their motor skills to include running, jumping and balancing on one leg. After age 5, children have more developed social lives, they learn to read and write and have a vocabulary of more than 2,000 words. Physically, they have better balance and smoother muscle coordination. At the onset of puberty, usually between the ages of 8 and 13, they move into adolescence with the development of genital organs and characteristics.] Adolescence_The transition from childhood to adulthood, begins around age 13. Adolescents have an improved ability of selfexpression but may have difficulty refining a selfidentity and controlling their emotions and impulses. They can work for longer amounts of time on more difficult tasks than when they were children. They experience rapid growth and weight gain due to puberty, as well as hormonal changes that can lead to acne and a change in voice, as well as mixed emotions.

03.

[ 04] Rites of Passage. Model after VanGennep.

03.25pm

Infancy AGE 0-2. chIldhood AGE 2-13. adolescence AGE 13-18. young adulthood AGE 18-40. mIddle adulthood AGE 40-65. senIor adulthood AGE 65+

12

02.

13

Young adulthood_A person reaches physical maturity and stops growing around age 18. As early as age 20, people may notice the beginning signs of aging: fine wrinkles, thinning skin, loss of firmness in hands and neck, graying hair, hair loss and thinning nails. At age 30, the human body’s major organs begin to decline. According to the american federation for aging research, cognitive abilities seem to be at their peak starting between ages 30 and 40.] Middle adulthood_After age 40, metabolism slows down and skin and hair may show more signs of aging. Starting at 40, people should begin annual tests such as screening for colon and breast cancer. Muscle strength decreases between the ages of 40 and 65, vision and hearing diminish and bones become weaker. Women especially begin to lose bone density in the years before menopause, which usually occurs in the 50s. People in their late 50s and early 60s will experience a small degree of declining cognitive abilities.] Senior adulthood_Advanced signs of aging, including less skin elasticity, are apparent in adults over age 65. Arthritis and osteoporosis affect the joints and bones of many senior citizens, and other chronic conditions such as heart disease and cancer exact a heavy toll on the quality of life and cost of health care. Some people live to be well over 100 years old, but life expectancy, according to the CDC, is around 77.6 years in the United States, varying for women and men.

2150

[

UNTIL RECENT TIMES, THE RITE OF PASSAGE, kNOWN AS INITIATION OR COMING OF AGE, WAS THE CENTRAL CULTURAL FORM FOR THE EDUCATION AND NURTURANCE OF HUMANS FROM CHILDHOOD INTO ADULT LIFE USING A PROCESS THAT CL ARIFIED AND AFFIRMED NEW ROLES AND STATUS IN THE ADULT COMMUNIT Y. CURRENT MODELS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ARE INDIVIDUALLY FOCUSED AND OVERLOOk MUCH OF THE COLLECTIVE UNDERSTANDING EVIDENT IN CULTURES THAT EMPLOYED RITES OF PASSAGE EFFECTIVELY AND SUCCESSFULLY OVER CENTURIES.

07.25am

4

Population in 1750 Population in 2150

CHANGE IN PEOPLE AND THE POPuLATION

9

8

ASIA

EUROPE

AFRICA

NORTHERN AMERICA

L ATIN AMERICA

[ 01] World Population, 1750 –2150 (estimated), total numbers.

[ 02] World Population, in 1750 and 2150 (estimated), percentual distribution.

04

05

06

07

08

09

10


Generativity/stagnation

wisdom

Ego integrity/despair

THE PREDICTED EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND FOR HuMAN LIFE ARE NuMEROuS AND VARIED. IT IS GENERALLY DIFFICuLT TO ATTRIBuTE SPECIFIC NATuRAL PHENOMENA TO LONG-TERM CAuSES, BuT SOME EFFECTS OF RECENT CLIMATE CHANGE MAY ALREADY BE OCCuRRING. RAISING SEA LEVELS, GLACIER RETREAT, ARCTIC SHRINKAGE, AND ALTERED PATTERNS OF AGRICuLTuRE ARE CITED AS DIRECT CONSEQuENCES, BuT PREDICTIONS FOR SECONDARY AND REGIONAL EFFECTS INCLuDE EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS, AN EXPANSION OF TROPICAL DISEASES, CHANGES

[ 05] The Erikson life-stage virtues, accquired in different developmental stages of life.

According to Erik Erikson (1902-1994) we develop in psychosocial stages. Psychosocial development as articulated by Erik Erikson describes eight developmental stages through which a healthily developing human should pass from infancy to late adulthood. In each stage the person confronts, and hopefully masters, new challenges. Each stage builds on the successful completion of earlier stages. The challenges of stages not successfully completed may be expected to reappear as problems in the future. He emphasized developmental change throughout the human life span. In Erikson’s theory, eight stages of development unfold as we go through the life span. Each stage consists of a crisis that must be faced. According to Erikson, this crisis is not a catastrophe but a turning point of increased vulnerability and enhanced potential. The more an individual resolves the crises successfully, the healthier development will be. Favourable outcomes of each stage are sometimes known as “virtues”, a term used, in the context of Eriksonian work, as it is applied to medicines, meaning “potencies.” Erikson’s research suggests that each individual must learn how to hold both extremes of each specific life-stage challenge in tension with one another, not rejecting one end of the tension or the other. Only when both extremes in a life-stage challenge are understood and accepted as both required and useful, can the optimal virtue for that stage surface.

IN MANY WAYS, THE CONFLUENCE OF THESE THREADS HAS MADE A PERSON’S CHRONOLOGICAL AGE LESS RELEVANT. AND THOSE NEW AT TITUDES AbOUT AGE ARE SPAWNING L AWS AND POLICIES THAT REFLECT SUCH CHANGES.

Intimacy/isolation

caring

“actIng Your age” used to MaKe sense. goIng to college, leavIng hoMe, gettIng MarrIed, havIng chIldren and retIrIng tooK place at predIctable stages. that was then. now, It’s not so easY. not when MarKet surveYs of “aMerIcan Youth” routInelY Include ages 16-35. or last Month, when a 60-Year-old woMan becaMe the natIon’s oldest Mother of twIns and a 68-Year-old Man becaMe the usa’s oldest new catholIc prIest. so when the proMo for a new tv datIng show asKs, “does age Matter?” we aren’t reallY sure anYMore. “age has becoMe Much less sIgnIfIcant In our socIetY and In the MInds of people,” saYs rIchard settersten Jr., a professor at the center for healthY agIng research at oregon state unIversItY. age used to be an IMportant waY to organIze lIfe, but now, the pIcture Is changIng: people are lIvIng longer and often staYIng healthY Into theIr 70s and 80s; ManY go bacK to school and start second careers.

OLD AGE

Identity/role confusion

love

17 1900

47.3 68.2 69.7 70.8 73.7 75.4 75.8 76.1 76.5 76.7 76.7 77 77.2 77.3 77.5 77.8

With the increase in longevity, it's no accident that ages for life events such as marriage or having a child are inching upward. Centuries ago, when 40 was considered old age, people married as teens to make sure they lived long enough to raise children. Living twice that long alters our perceptions. It opens up a series of opportunities for living that didn’t exist before. It’s revolutionized how we think about these various life stages. The definition of ‘old’ is getting higher and higher. Age used to be an important way to organize life, but now, the picture is changing.] People are living longer and often staying healthy into their 70s and 80s; many go back to school and start second careers. Meanwhile, more young college graduates are delaying entry into a tight job market. Some opt for grad school or public service; many put off marriage and family. And children seem to grow up faster, trading toys for cellphones and buddy lists while still in elementary school. At the same time, today’s children seem to grow up faster. Experts such as Cleveland child psychologist Sylvia Rimm say kids are not only acting older but also maturing earlier. The signs of adolescence are appearing at earlier ages, from physical puberty to earlier dating. Age has seemed to change, life seems less linear now and people are more going back and forth in their life stages. In many ways, the confluence of these threads has made a person’s chronological age less relevant. And those new attitudes about age are spawning laws and policies that reflect such changes.

+++ +++ +++

2004

[ 06 ] Life expectancy in USA, by birth. National Center of Health Statistics.

INCRE ASE IN MIGR ATION MORTALIT y INCRE ASE

HUMANIT y

14

Industry/inferiority

fidelity

SPRE AD OF DISE ASE LESS ECOLOGICAL PRODUCTIVIT y

+0.2

MORE DE VELOPMENT

MORE FOREST FIRES ECOSySTEMS

MIDLIFE CRISIS

Initiative/guilt

competence

MOUNTAIN EROSION FORESTS E x TINCTION

+0.4

DESERTIFICATION ANIMAL E x TINCITION WATER SCARCIT y

+0.6 CHANGE ON EARTH/ GLOBAL WARMING

E x TREME WE ATHER

YOUNG ADULT

Shame/doubt

purpose

GL ACIER RE TRE AT AND DISAPPE AR ANCE DESTAbILIz ATION OF LOCAL CLIMATES

+0.8

INCRE ASED E VAPOR ATION

SHUTDOWN OF THERMOHALINE CIRCUL ATION SE A LE VEL RISE

OCE ANS

TEENAGER

Basic trust/mistrust

will

TEMPER ATURE RISE RE TRE AT OF SE A ICE NORTHWEST PASSAGE

ECONOMIC

OTHER EFFECTS

AROUND AGE SIX

hope

SCIENTISTS DO AGREE THAT 01. GLObAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IS AbOUT 0.6°CELSIUS HIGHER THAN IT WAS A CENTURY AGO// 02. ATMOSPHERIC LEVELS OF CARbON DIOxIDE (CO2) HAVE RISEN bY AbOUT 30 PERCENT OVER THE PAST 200 YEARS// AND 03. CARbON DIOxIDE, LIkE WATER VAPOR, IS A GREENHOUSE GAS WHOSE INCREASE IS LIkELY TO WARM THE EARTH’S ATMOSPHERE.]

FLOOD DEFENSE TR ANSPORT INSUR ANCE SECURIT y

ME THANE RELE ASE FROM HyDR ATES

FEEDbACk EFFECTS

KINDERG ARTEN

IN THE TIMING OF SEASONAL PATTERNS IN ECOSYSTEMS, AND DRASTIC ECONOMIC IMPACT. THE PROBABILITY OF ONE OR MORE OF THESE CHANGES OCCuRRING IS LIKELY TO INCREASE WITH THE RATE, MAGNITuDE, AND DuRATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

INFANT STAGE

TODDLER STAGE

68 | 69

ASPECTS OF CHANGE

todaY we're seeIng that clIMate change Is about More than a few unseasonablY MIld wInters or hot suMMers. It's about the chaIn of natural catastrophes and devastatIng weather patterns that global warMIng Is begInnIng to set off around the world. the frequencY and IntensItY of whIch are breaKIng records thousands of Years old.

title

“actIng Your age” used to MaKe sense. goIng to college, leavIng hoMe, gettIng MarrIed, havIng chIldren and retIrIng tooK place at predIctable stages. that was then. now, It’s not so easY. not when MarKet surveYs of “aMerIcan Youth” routInelY Include ages 16-35. or last Month, when a 60-Year-old woMan becaMe the natIon’s oldest Mother of twIns and a 68-Year-old Man becaMe the usa’s oldest new catholIc prIest. so when the proMo for a new tv datIng show asKs, “does age Matter?” we aren’t reallY sure anYMore

I M P L I C AT I O N S

CARbON CyCLE FEEDbACkS E THANE RELE ASE FROM MELTING PERMAFROST PE AT bOGS

[ 08 ] Effects of global warming. Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007.

Global warming is the increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s near-surface air and oceans since the mid-twentieth century and its projected continuation. The average global air temperature near the Earth’s surface increased 0.74 ± 0.18 °C (1.33 ± 0.32 °F) during the hundred years ending in 2005. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes “most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-twentieth century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations via the greenhouse effect. Natural phenomena such as solar variation combined with volcanoes probably had a small warming effect from pre-industrial times to 1950 and a small cooling effect from 1950 onward. These basic conclusions have been endorsed by at least thirty scientific societies and academies of science, including all of the national academies of science of the major industrialized countries. While individual scientists have voiced disagreement with some findings of the IPCC, the overwhelming majority of scientists working on climate change agree with the IPCC’s main conclusions. Climate model projections summarized by the IPCC indicate that average global surface temperature will likely rise a further 1.1 to 6.4 °C (2.0 to 11.5 °F) during the twenty-first century. The range of values results from the use of differing scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions as well as models with differing climate sensitivity. Although most studies focus on the period up to 2100, warming and sea level rise are expected to continue for more than a thousand years even if greenhouse gas levels are sta-

+0.6

THE TERM "GLObAL WARMING" IS A SPECIFIC E xAMPLE OF GLObAL CLIMATE CHANGE. THE TERM CLIMATE CHANGE CAN ALSO REFER TO OTHER PERIODS OF OVERALL TEMPERATURE CHANGE SUCH AS GLObAL COOLING. IN COMMON USAGE, THE TERM GLObAL WARMING REFERS TO THE WARMING IN RECENT DECADES AND ITS PROjECTED CONTINUATION, AND IMPLIES A HUMAN INFLUENCE.

+0.4

+0.2

bilized. The delay in reaching equilibrium is a result of the large heat capacity of the oceans. Increasing global temperature will cause sea level to rise, and is expected to increase the intensity of extreme weather events and to change the amount and pattern of precipitation. Other effects of global warming include changes in agricultural yields, trade routes, glacier retreat, species extinctions and increases in the ranges of disease vectors. Some scientific uncertainties remain, including the amount of warming expected in the future, and how warming and related changes will vary from region to region around the globe. Most national governments have signed and ratified the kyoto Protocol aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but there is ongoing political and public debate worldwide regarding what, if any, action should be taken to reduce or reverse future warming or to adapt to its expected consequences.] Effects The predicted effects of global warming on the environment and for human life are numerous and varied. It is generally difficult to attribute specific natural phenomena to long-term causes, but some effects of recent climate change may already be occurring. Rising sea levels, glacier retreat, Arctic shrinkage, and altered patterns of agriculture are cited as direct consequences, but predictions for secondary and regional effects include extreme weather events, an expansion of tropical diseases, changes in the timing of seasonal patterns in ecosystems, and drastic economic impact.] outcome Projected climate changes due to global warming have the potential to lead to future large-scale and possibly

irreversible effects at continental and global scales. The likelihood, magnitude, and timing is uncertain and controversial, but some examples of projected climate changes include significant slowing of the ocean circulation that transports warm water to the North Atlantic, large reductions in the Greenland and West Antarctic Ice Sheets, accelerated global warming due to carbon cycle feedbacks in the terrestrial biosphere, and releases of terrestrial carbon from permafrost regions and methane. The probability of one or more of these changes occurring is likely to increase with the rate, magnitude, and duration of climate change. Additionally, the United States National Academy of Sciences has warned, “greenhouse warming and other human alterations of the earth system may increase the possibility of large, abrupt, and unwelcome regional or global climatic events. Future abrupt changes cannot be predicted with confidence, and climate surprises are to be expected. The IPCC finds that the effects of global warming will be mixed across regions. For smaller values of warming (1 to 3 °C), changes are expected to produce net benefits in some regions and for some activities, and net costs for others. Greater warming is very likely to produce net costs (or to reduce the benefits from smaller warming) in all regions. Developing countries are expected to be especially vulnerable to reduced economic growth as a result of warming. Most of the consequences of global warming would result from one of three physical changes: sea level rise, higher local temperatures, and changes in rainfall patterns. Sea level is generally expected to rise 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23.2 inches) by the end of

the century.] Causes The Earth’s climate changes in response to external forcing, including variations in its orbit around the Sun (orbital forcing), volcanic eruptions, and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The detailed causes of the recent warming remain an active field of research, but the scientific consensus is that the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases due to human activity caused most of the warming observed since the start of the industrial era. This attribution is clearest for the most recent 50 years, for which the most detailed data are available. One such hypothesis proposes that warming may be the result of variations in solar activity. None of the effects of forcing are instantaneous.] Regional The IPCC finds that the effects of global warming will be mixed across regions. For smaller values of warming (1 to 3 °C), changes are expected to produce net benefits in some regions and for some activities, and net costs for others. Greater warming is very likely to produce net costs (or to reduce the benefits from smaller warming) in all regions. Developing countries, unfortunatly, are expected to be especially vulnerable to reduced economic growth as a result of warming.] Conclusion Most of the consequences of global warming would result from one of three physical changes: sea level rise, ice cap melting, higher local temperatures, and changes in rainfall patterns. Sea level is generally expected to rise 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23.2 inches) by the end of the century. The probability in the future of one or more of these changes occurring is likely to increase with the rate, magnitude, and duration of climate change.]

23

annual avERaGE 5 yEaR avERaGE

0

-0.2

25

-0.4

-0.6

1869

2000

[ 09 ] Global Warming, in Celsius, 1860 –2000. Compiled by the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia and Center of the Uk.

CLIMATE MODEL PROjECTIONS INDICATE THAT AVERAGE GLObAL SURFACE TEMPERATURE WILL LIkELY RISE A FURTHER 1.1 TO 6.4°C DURING THE T WENT Y-FIRST CENTURY. THE RANGE OF VALUES RESULTS FROM THE USE OF DIFFERING SCENARIOS OF FUTURE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AS WELL AS MODELS WITH DIFFERING CLIMATE SENSITIVIT Y. THE DEL AY IN REACHING EqUILIbRIUM IS A RESULT OF THE L ARGE HEAT CAPACIT Y OF THE OCEANS.]

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11.25pm

03.25am

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

07.25pm

03.25pm

title

11.25am

07.25am

I M P L I C AT I O N S

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title ASPECTS OF CHANGE

In a sense we’re always changing and always staying the same. When I compare my self of today with my self from a few years ago, I observe that I’m the same but more. I’m the same in how I think and process information but experience has changed the way I interpret everything. Every day adds a new layer of character. We should anticipate aging with optimism rather than dread. And as Emerson said, as we grow old the beauty steals inward.

I M P L I C AT I O N S

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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BOOK 2

personal change

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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BOOK 3

fear of change

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ASPECTS OF CHANGE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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My love for you is everchanging.

My love for you is everchanging.

My love for you is ever hanging.

My love for you is ever hanging.

My love for you is ever handing.

My love for you is ever handing.

My love for you is ever handing.

My love for you is ever hanging.

My love for you is ever hending.

My love for you is ever ending.

My love for you is ever ending.

My love for you is neverending.

My love for you is neverending.

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04 Care for Children

CON FE R E N C E AI D CON C E RT NON - PROFIT

Instructor

K E L LY C O N L E Y

Course

GRAPHIC DESIGN 3

Title

CARE FOR CHILDREN

Format

BROCHURE / POSTERS / BOT TLE S / CD / TICKETS / BANNERS

Fonts

Objective

G O T H I C 13

Is it possible to make the world a better place through design? What are the elements of socially-conscious design that lead the viewer to take action? We were asked to pick a topic with a social cause, and design the collateral for a conference, that has an emphasis on effecting change.

Approach

Childhood poverty is a pressing and scandalous topic, particularly because it occurs in one of the richest countries in the world. To give the topic more public impact I decided to build the conference around a concert, modelled after the world aid concerts for Africa in the 1980s, with prominent rock stars who are also politically active. It was furthermore important to me to give voice to the people most affected by childhood poverty: the children themselves. I decided to include children’s drawings to articulate their dreams of a better world, as well as large pictures of them to evoke compassion for the subject. One key challenge of this project for me was to ďŹ nd a way to communicate a potentially depressing topic in an engaging and lively way.


title

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

AARE RE EMPL RE EMPLO EA RO ST ST OME OM OD ORR YEAR WER YEAR WER

I M P L I C AT I O N S

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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Y R

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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Britney {7} Monroe, LA

I M P L I C AT I O N S

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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MARION RIGGS

Childhood pover ty in the US

Nearly 15 million children in the United States, 21% of all children, live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level. Research shows that, on average, families need an income of about twice that level to cover basic expenses. Poverty can impede children’s ability to learn and contribute to social, emotional, and behavioral problems. Poverty also can contribute to poor health and mental health.

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CARE FOR CHILDREN

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give


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05 Going for a Ride

B R AN D ING TR ANS P ORT FAM ILY

Objective

Instructor

T O M M C N U LT Y

Course

IDENTITY 2

Title

GO CAB LONDON

Format

BRAND GUIDE

Fonts

D I N / H E LV E T I C A N E U E

To create a brand system for transport with multiple applications. What would a taxi of the 21st century look like? What features would it have? The project was to cover the design of the physical vehicle, and the naming of and branding for the campaign.

Approach

In many metropoles, there is an unserved market of families and travelers that would appreciate a taxi that is comfortable, family-friendly and environmentally conscious. The taxi will be first introduced in London for the 2012 Olympic Games, and subsequently rolled out in other metropoles around the world. The actual vehicle is based on the existing “black cab� in London, but built to be more environmentally friendly and in a white/silver finish. It is accompanied with a car seat for children and has ample space for strollers or wheelchairs. The new cab is introduced through an extensive advertising campaign targeting billboards, public transport and merchandise.


I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

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GOING FOR A RIDE

Fig.

07 12

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Moodboard GoCab

YOUNG LON D ON FAM ILY GREEN

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

GOING FOR A RIDE

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City Slick


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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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GOING FOR A RIDE

LOGO

TAG LIN E

T YPE FAC E DIN regular

A B C D E G H J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z COLORS

//////////// G o C a b Ye l l o w / P M S 3 9 6 5 c

//////////// G o C a b Te a l / P M S 5 4 9 3 c

//////////// G o C a b G r e y / P M S 4 3 1c

//////////// GoCab Brown / PMS 402c

//////////// G o C a b O r a n g e / P M S 7 18 c

//////////// GoCab Black / PMS Black

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///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

I M P L I C AT I O N S

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GOING FOR A RIDE

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Go Cab ! Go London

City Slick


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GOING FOR A RIDE

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7562

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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GOING FOR A RIDE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

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GOING FOR A RIDE

E XE CUTIVE C AR D

Melanie Hunter Public Relations

p 020.8874.2948 /// e mhunter@gocab.com 84 Eccleston Square /// London SW1V 1PX

BAC KS I D E OP TIONS

Back // optional

Note Card

Melanie Hunter

p 020.8874.2948 /// e mhunter@gocab.com

Public Relations

84 Eccleston Square /// London SW1V 1PX

Melanie Hunter

p 020.8874.2948 /// e mhunter@gocab.com

Public Relations

84 Eccleston Square /// London SW1V 1PX

Melanie Hunter

p 020.8874.2948 /// e mhunter@gocab.com

Back // optional

Back // optional

Public Relations

84 Eccleston Square /// London SW1V 1PX

D R IVE R ’ S C AR D

//4.6 Optional Corporate Business Cards / Back Side // 70% WE CONNECT LONDON

These are optional back sides of the business card.

their business card of one of these three options (fo

Slightly different, they are still part of the same family.

including the business card on the previous pages.)

It is possible for the employees to pick the back side of

thinkable to produce a set of all four cards if desired

020.8874.2948

Timothy Robson trobson @ gocab.com Driver since ‘95//No 37458702


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GOING FOR A RIDE

7562

LONDON CITY DISTRICT COUNCIL

7562

5

trobson @ gocab.com

City Slick

020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948 020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948 020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948 020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948

020.8874.2948 020.8874.2948

H124

020.8874.2948

DENISE L. JOHANSON

Timothy Robson

020.8874.2948

Driver since ‘95//No 37458702

01/11

020.8874.2948

VALID THRU

020.8874.2948

01/09

M1 BOC 1 s t D E C 11

M A X . PA S SENGER S

call 020.8 874.294 8

4426 9580 5873 8569 VALID FROM

VEHICLE REG. NO E X P IR Y DAT E

Timothy Robson

020.8874.2948

title

020.8874.2948

I M P L I C AT I O N S


B R U C E LE E Ac tor


Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successfull personality and duplicate it.


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06 Coffee Blossoms

RE-BRANDING ORGANIC FEMALE

Objective

Instructor

NICOLE FLORE S

Course

PRINT 3

Title

YUBAN

Format

BRAND GUIDE

Fonts

D I N / J A M E S FA J A R D O

Recently the coffee market has seen new brands emerge with a lot of attention to detail. The Yuban brand has been around for many years and needed a fresh, modern look to attract younger, and in particular female customers. At the same time, the design needed to preserve the core elements of the Yuban brand.

Approach

In my research I discovered that Yuban started out over 100 years ago with a special roast for Christmas (hence the name). The coffee cans stood out on the supermarket shelves in their dark colors and boldness. I wanted to keep and even enhance these aspects of the design. To attract a younger and more feminine clientele, as well as to emphasize the organic quality of the coffee, I used a hand drawn flower as the main graphic. The bright colors serve as a contrast against the dark background, and the color variety allows for differentiating the assorted flavors. Since the change from the old design is quite drastic, multiple poster campaigns were created to introduce and make people familiar with the new design.


I M P L I C AT I O N S

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COFFEE BLOSSOMS

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Moodboard Yuban

YOUNG UR BAN FE M IN IN E O RG AN I C

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COFFEE BLOSSOMS

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YUBAN COFFEE

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YUBAN

YUBAN

YUBAN

YUBAN

COFFEE

COFFEE

yuba yu ban ba n

COFFEE

COFF FFE EE

yuba yu ban ba

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COFFEE BLOSSOMS

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COFFEE BLOSSOMS

Organic Coffee

Organic Coffee

Organic Coffee

DIN regular

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 1 Organic 2 3 4 5Coffee 6 7 8 9 0 ! ? @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) - + { } J a m e s Fa j a r d o

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R Organic S T U Coffee V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 ! ? @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) - + { }

Organic Coffee

Organic

Organic Coffee

Yuban-Black PMS Black 5c CMYK 0/40/22/87 RGB 71/112/43

Yuban-Red PMS 485c CMYK 0/95/100/0 RGB 238/50/36

Yuban-Brown PMS 536c CMYK 33/80/89/33 RGB 129/61/39

Yuban-Orange PMS 021c CMYK 0/53/100/0 RGB 247/143/30

Yuban-Pink PMS 467c CMYK 9/95/100/0 Coffee RGB 238/50/36

Yuban-Tan PMS 467c CMYK 9/15/34/0 RGB 231/210/173

Yuban-Yellow PMS 121c CMYK 0/11/69/0 RGB 255/222/108

Organic Coffee

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Decaffeinated YUBAN Decaffeinated YUBAN

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YUBAN

YUBAN

Decaffeinated YUBAN

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COFFEE BLOSSOMS

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07 CAR POLITICS

IN FO G R APH I C S S TATIS TI C S BU M PE R S TI C K E RS

Objective

Instructor

M A R K R O U D E B U S H / G E O R G E S L AV I K

Course

I N F O R M AT I O N D E S I G N

Title

L E T M E T E L L YO U

Format

BOOK

Fonts

BASKERVILLE / CLARENDON / FRUTIGER

To tell a story based on numbers, charts and statistics. The challenge was to collect data over the course of several months and generate enough statistical material to create a narrative based around a series of charts. The charts needed to be interesting to look at but also encapsulate multiple layers of information.

Approach

Being from Europe, I am still amazed at how differently cars are perceived in the U.S., and especially how bumper stickers are used to express one’s opinion on politics, radio stations or other assorted topics. For this project I conducted a street survey in Berkeley, counting and categorizing bumper stickers in three different geographical areas. Since I previously worked as a sociologist, I am familiar with techniques for interpreting statistics and I extracted as much information out of the topic and the data as possible. For example, one topic I explored is whether there is a correlation between certain areas and the predominance (or absence) of bumper stickers, as well as the categories they belong to like humor or politics.


I M P L I C AT I O N S

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CAR POLITICS

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AV E R AG E

T O TA L

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title

CAR POLITICS

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E xcerpt of stickers

ACTON STREET I want to be just like barbie. That bitch has everything. RUSSELL STREET Grandmother against war. UNIVERSITY LOT Thank you for not breeding. Support animal rescue and adoption. Stop animal cruelty.

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title

CAR POLITICS

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CAR POLITICS

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CAR POLITICS

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MARIN BERKELEY

OAKLAND SAN FRANCISCO

N

CENTRAL BERKELEY LO W E R M I D D L E C L A S S YO U N G FA M I L I E S CAMPUS DISTRICT S T U D E N T S A N D FAC U LT Y

ELMWOOD DISTRICT UPPER MIDDLE CL ASS

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title

CAR POLITICS

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CAR POLITICS

POLITICAL 34% P E AC E

07%

IDENTIT Y

25%

H O B BY

12 %

HUMO R

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OTHER

09%

T O TA L

POLITICAL 30% P E AC E

22%

IDENTIT Y

22%

H O B BY

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HUMO R

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OTHER

09%

RUSSELL ST

POLITIC AL 35% P E AC E

10 %

IDENTIT Y

16 %

H O B BY

19 %

HUMO R

09%

O T H E R

10 %

AC TON ST

POLITICAL 28% P E AC E

08%

IDENTIT Y

38%

H O B BY

04%

HUMO R

17 %

O T H E R

04%

UNDERHILL LOT

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title

CAR POLITICS

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B E R N A R D JA F F E I love Huc kabees


When you get the blanket thing you can relax because everything you could ever want or be you already have and are.


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08 Food Future

FOO D C H E M IS TRY G E N E TI C S

Objective

Instructor

ARIEL GREY

Course

TYPOGRAPHY 3

Title

THE REAL THING

Format

BOOK

Fonts

C E N TA U R / O C R B E / E M P E R O R E I G H T

To make a book that uses typography to explore a concept or social topic. The book should be at least thirty pages in length and include a mixture of text, photography and charts.

Approach

This book takes a close look at what we eat and how our food is more and more being altered and “enhanced”. There is such a variety in food nowadays that many people would not even recognize what their parents and grandparents ate. We can observe many food trends today, some even contradicting each other. On the one hand, there is a subculture which worships food as with gourmet and haute cuisine trends, or sees food as art rather than an end in itself. And on the other hand, food is becoming less and less natural through genetic modification, with the addition of artificial substances and through other “enhancements.” Our food seems to become more and more science-driven, with unknown effects on us, the consumers. If you believe the saying “you are what you eat,” we might no longer know exactly who we are.


I M P L I C AT I O N S

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FOOD FUTURE

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FOOD FUTURE

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FOOD FUTURE

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

FOOD FUTURE

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it quietly slipped into our markets and supermarkets without proper labels, and without having passed adequate safety tests

[ fig. 04 ııı toxicity scale: Food Flavoring Agents

� � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � �

� � � � � � ���� � � � � � � �� � � � � � � ���

������������ ������������ ���

class i Flavoring agents that have simple chemical structures and efficient modes of metabolism which would suggest a low order of toxicity by the oral route.

class iI Flavoring agents that have structural features that are less innocuous than those of substances in Class I but are not suggestive of toxicity. Substances in this class may contain reactive functional

class iII groups. Flavoring agents that have structural features that permit no strong initial presumption of safety, or may even suggest

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I M P L I C AT I O N S

title

19 6 | 19 7

FOOD FUTURE

Something we entrust our lives to—our food supply—is being redesigned faster than any of us realize, and scientists have hardly begun to test the long-term safety of these new foods. The genetic engineering of our food is the most radical transformation in our diet since the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago. During these thousands of years, people have used the naturally occurring processes of genetics to gradually shape wild plants into tastier, more nutritious, and more attractive food for all of humanity. Until very recently, these

soybean maize cotton canola/rape seed potatoes squash papaya

cultivation

differentiation

pluripotent

unipotent

evolved food plants were part of the common heritage of humankind. Food plants have been available to all in conveniently small and storable packets, seeds,for distribution, trade, and warehousing. In fact, selective plant breeding has brought food security, greater nutrition, and increased biodiversity, while at the same time protecting food systems against hard times, such as natural or economic disasters. In the new kind of agriculture, a handful of giant corporations have placed patents on food plants, giving them exclusive control over that food. These transnational corporations have altered the minute life-processes of food plants by removing or adding genetic material in ways quite impossible in nature. And like our nightmare vision of the untested airplane, genetically altered food is being quietly slipped into our markets and supermarkets without proper labels, and without having passed adequate safety tests. Furthermore, genetically engineered

fig 01 ııı Major GM-Food Crops worldwide ]

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FOOD FUTURE

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IM P L I C AT I O N S

ACACIA, GUM (ACACIA SENEGAL (L.) WILLD.) ACESULFAME POTASSIUM ACETAL ACETALDEHYDE ACETALDEHYDE, BUTYL PHENETHYL ACETAL ACETALDEHYDE ETHYL CIS-3HEXENYL ACETAL ACETALDEHYDE PHENETHYL PROPYL ACETAL ACETANISOLE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETOIN ACETOLEIN ACETONE ACETONE PEROXIDES ACETOPHENONE ACETOSTEARIN 6-ACETOXYDIHYDROTHEASPIRANE 4-ACETOXY-2,5-DIMETHYL3(2H)-FURANONE 4-(P-ACETOXYPHENYL)-2BUTANONE 4-ACETYL-6-TERT-BUTYL-1,1DIMETHYLINDANE 3-ACETYL-2,5-DIMETHYLFURAN 2-ACETYL-3,(5 OR 6)-DIMETHYLPYRAZINE, MIXTURE OF 3-ACETYL-2,5-DIMETHYLTHIOPHENE 2-ACETYL-3-ETHYLPYRAZINE 3-ACETYLMERCAPTOHEXYL ACETATE N-ACETYL-L-METHIONINE ACETYL METHYL CARBINYL ACETATE 2-ACETYL-5-METHYLFURAN 2-ACETYL-3-METHYLPYRAZINE 4-ACETYL-2-METHYLPYRIMIDINE ACETYLPYRAZINE 2-ACETYLPYRIDINE 3-ACETYLPYRIDINE 2-ACETYLTHIAZOLE 2-ACETYL-2-THIAZOLINE 3-(ACETYLTHIO)-2-METHYLFURAN ACONITIC ACID ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE-ACRYLIC ACID RESIN ACRYLAMIDE-SODIUM ACRYLATE RESIN ACRYLIC ACID-2-ACRYLAMIDO2-METHYL PROPANE SULFONIC ACID COPOLYMER ACTIVATED CARBON ADIPIC ACID ADIPIC ANHYDRIDE AGAR (GELIDIUM SPP.) BETA-ALANINE L-ALANINE DL-ALANINE ALBUMIN ALCOHOL, DENATURED FORMULA 23A ALCOHOL SDA-3A ALFALFA, EXTRACT (MEDICAGO SATIVA L.) ALFALFA, HERB AND SEED (MEDICAGO SATIVA L.)

0220 2| 0| 32 0 3

FO FU TU t i t il tel e F O OO D DF U TU RR EE

ALGINIC ACID ALKANET ROOT, EXTRACT (ALKANNA TINCTORIA TAUSCH) ALKANOLAMIDE OF COCONUT OIL FATTY ACIDS AND DIETHANOLAMINE ALKYLENE OXIDE ADDUCTS OF ALKYL ALCOHOLS/PHOSPHATE ESTERS OF SAME, N-ALKYL(C8-C18 FROM COCONUT OIL) AMINE ACETATE ALPHA-ALKYL-OMEGA-HYDROXYPOLY(OXYETHYLENE) ALLSPICE, OIL (PIMENTA OFFICINALIS LINDL.) ALLSPICE, OLEORESIN (PIMENTA OFFICINALIS LINDL.) ALLSPICE (PIMENTA OFFICINALIS LINDL.) ALLYL ALPHA-IONONE ALLYL ANTHRANILATE ALLYL BUTYRATE ALLYL CINNAMATE ALLYL CROTONATE ALLYL CYCLOHEXANEACETATE ALLYL CYCLOHEXANEBUTYRATE ALLYL CYCLOHEXANEHEXANOATE ALLYL CYCLOHEXANEPROPIONATE ALLYL CYCLOHEXANEVALERATE 4-ALLYL-2,6-DIMETHOXYPHENOL ALLYL DISULFIDE ALLYL 2-ETHYLBUTYRATE ALLYL 2-FUROATE ALLYL HEPTANOATE ALLYL HEXANOATE ALLYL HEXENOATE ALLYL ISOTHIOCYANATE ALLYL ISOVALERATE ALLYL MERCAPTAN ALLYL METHYL DISULFIDE ALLYL METHYL TRISULFIDE ALLYL NONANOATE ALLYL OCTANOATE ALLYL PHENOXYACETATE ALLYL PHENYLACETATE ALLYL PROPIONATE ALLYL SORBATE ALLYL SULFIDE ALLYL THIOPROPIONATE ALLYL TIGLATE ALLYL 10-UNDECENOATE ALMOND, BITTER, OIL (FFPA) (PRUNUS SPP.) ALOE, EXTRACT (ALOE SPP.) ALPHA-ACETOLACTATE DECARBOXYLASE ENZYME PREPARATION FROM BACILLUS ALTHEA FLOWERS (ALTHEA OFFICINALIS L.) ALTHEA ROOT (ALTHEA OFFICINALIS L.) ALUM (DOUBLE SULFATE OF AL AND NH4, K, OR NA) ALUMINUM AMMONIUM SULFATE ALUMINUM CALCIUM SILICATE ALUMINUM CAPRATE ALUMINUM CAPRYLATE ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE ALUMINUM LAURATE ALUMINUM MYRISTATE ALUMINUM NICOTINATE ALUMINUM OLEATE ALUMINUM PALMITATE

ABELMOSCHUS L.) 2’-AMINOACETOPHENONE P-AMINOBENZOIC ACID DL-(3-AMINO-3-CARBOXYP ROPYL)DIMETHYLSULFONIUM CHLORIDE AMINOGLYCOSIDE 3’-PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE II AMINO TRI(METHYLENE PHOSPHONIC ACID), SODIUM SALT AMINOPEPTIDASE FROM LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS 1-AMINO-2-PROPANOL AMMONIUM ACETATE AMMONIUM BICARBONATE AMMONIUM CARBONATE AMMONIUM CASEINATE AMMONIUM CHLORIDE AMMONIUM CITRATE, DIBASIC AMMONIUM GLUCONATE AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE AMMONIUM ISOVALERATE AMMONIUM PECTINATE AMMONIUM PERSULFATE AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE, DIBASIC AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC AMMONIUM SULFATE AMMONIUM SULFIDE AMMONIUM SULFITE AMYL ALCOHOL ALPHA-AMYLASE ENZYME PREPARATION FROM BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS AMYLASE FROM ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS AMYLASE FROM ASPERGILLUS NIGER AMYLASE FROM ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE AMYLASE FROM BACILLUS SUBTILIS AMYL BUTYRATE ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMALDEHYDE ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMALDEHYDE DIMETHYL ACETAL ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMYL ACETATE ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMYL ALCOHOL ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMYL FORMATE ALPHA-AMYLCINNAMYL ISOVALERATE AMYL DECANOATE AMYL FORMATE AMYL 2-FUROATE AMYL HEPTANOATE AMYL HEXANOATE 2-AMYL-5 OR 6-KETO-1,4DIOXANE AMYL OCTANOATE AMYLOGLUCOSIDASE FROM RHIZOPUS NIVEUS AMYL SALICYLATE AMYRIS (AMYRIS BALSAMIFERA L.) AMYRIS, OIL (AMYRIS BALSAMIFERA L.) TRANS-ANETHOLE ANGELICA (ANGELICA SPP.) ANGELICA ROOT (ANGELICA SPP.) ANGELICA ROOT, EXTRACT (ANGELICA ARCHANGELICA L.) ANGELICA ROOT, OIL (ANGELICA ARCHANGELICA L.)

ANISE, OIL (PIMPINELLA ANISUM L.) ANISE (PIMPINELLA ANISUM L.) ANISE, STAR (ILLICIUM VERUM HOOK, F.) ANISE, STAR, OIL (ILLICIUM VERUM HOOK, F.) ANISIC ACID ANISOLE ANISYL ACETATE ANISYL ALCOHOL ANISYL BUTYRATE ANISYL FORMATE ANISYL PHENYLACETATE ANISYL PROPIONATE ANNATTO, EXTRACT (BIXA ORELLANA L.) ANNATTO, SEED (BIXA ORELLANA L.) ANOXOMER ANTHRACITE COAL, SULFONATED BETA-APO-8’-CAROTENAL APPLE ESSENCE, NATURAL APRICOT KERNEL, OIL (PRUNUS ARMENIACA L.) ARABINOGALACTAN L-ARABINOSE L-ARGININE ARNICA FLOWERS (ARNICA SPP.) ARROWROOT STARCH ARTEMISIA (ARTEMISIA SPP.) ARTEMISIA EXTRACT ARTEMISIA OIL ARTICHOKE LEAVES (CYNARA SCOLYMUS L.) ASAFETIDA, FLUID EXTRACT (FERULA ASSAFOETIDA L.) ASAFETIDA, GUM (FERULA ASSAFOETIDA L.) ASAFETIDA, OIL (FERULA ASSAFOETIDA L.) ASCORBIC ACID ASCORBYL PALMITATE ASCORBYL STEARATE L-ASPARAGINE ASPARAGUS, SEED AND ROOT, EXTRACT ASPARTAME L-ASPARTIC ACID ASPERGILLUS NIGER FOR FERMENTATION PRODUCTION OF CITRIC ACID ASTAXANTHIN AZODICARBONAMIDE BACTERIAL CATALASE FROM MICROCOCCUS LYSODEIKTICUS BAKERS YEAST EXTRACT BAKER’S YEAST PROTEIN BAKER’S YEAST GLYCAN BALM LEAVES, EXTRACT (MELISSA OFFICINALIS L.) BALM LEAVES (MELISSA OFFICINALIS L.) BALM (MELISSA OFFICINALIS L.) BALM, OIL (MELISSA OFFICINALIS L.) BALSAM FIR, OIL (ABIES BALSAMEA (L.) MILL.) BALSAM FIR, OLEORESIN (ABIES BALSAMEA (L.) MILL.) BALSAM, PERU (MYROXYLON PEREIRAE KLOTZSCH) BALSAM, PERU, OIL (MYROXYLON

BAY LEAVES, SWEET, OIL (LAURUS NOBILIS L.) BAY LEAVES, WEST INDIAN, EXTRACT (PIMENTA ACRIS KOSTEL) BAY LEAVES, WEST INDIAN, OIL (PIMENTA RACEMOSA (MILL.) J.W. BAY LEAVES, WEST INDIAN, OLEORESIN (PIMENTA ACRIS KOSTEL) BEECHWOOD, CREOSOTE (FAGUS SPP.) BEESWAX BEESWAX, BLEACHED BENTONITE BENZALDEHYDE BENZALDEHYDE DIMETHYL ACETAL BENZALDEHYDE GLYCERYL ACETAL BENZALDEHYDE PROPYLENE GLYCOL ACETAL BENZENE BENZENETHIOL 2-BENZOFURANCARBOXALDEHYDE BENZOIC ACID BENZOIN BENZOIN, RESIN (STYRAX SPP.) BENZOPHENONE BENZOTHIAZOLE BENZOYL PEROXIDE BENZYL ACETATE BENZYL ACETOACETATE BENZYL ALCOHOL BENZYL BENZOATE BENZYL BUTYL ETHER BENZYL BUTYRATE BENZYL CINNAMATE BENZYL 2,3-DIMETHYLCROTONATE BENZYL DISULFIDE BENZYL ETHYL ETHER BENZYL FORMATE 3-BENZYL-4-HEPTANONE BENZYL ISOBUTYRATE BENZYL ISOVALERATE BENZYL MERCAPTAN BENZYL METHOXYETHYL ACETAL BENZYL TRANS-2-METHYL-2BUTENOATE BENZYL METHYL SULFIDE BENZYL PHENYLACETATE BENZYL PROPIONATE BENZYL SALICYLATE BERGAMOT, OIL (CITRUS AURANTIUM L. SUBSP. BERGAMIA WRIGHT ET ARN.) BIOTIN BIPHENYL BIRCH, SWEET, OIL (BETULA LENTA L.) BIRCH TAR, OIL (BETULA PENDULA ROTH AND RELATED BETULA SPP.) BISABOLENE BIS(2,5-DIMETHYL-3-FURYL) DISULFIDE BIS(2-METHYL-3-FURYL) DISULFIDE BIS(2-METHYL-3-FURYL) TETRASULFIDE d i s p l a y BIS-(METHYLTHIO)METHANE BLACKBERRY BARK, EXTRACT (RUBUS, SPP. OF SECTION EUBATUS)


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09 Dinner Dilemma

LE T TE R PR E S S R E C IPE S C AR DS

Objective

Instructor

MACY CHADWICK

Course

LETTERPRESS

Title

T H E D A I LY D I N N E R D I L E M M A

Format

BOOK / CARDS

Fonts

G O T H A M / AV E N I R

To design and print a multi-page book on letterpress. We were required to use multiple colors, which translates into multiple printing plates, as well as to print an edition of five books. The topic was free for us to choose.

Approach

This project reflects in particular my personal situation at that time. Every day I needed to have a plan for dinner: what to cook and whether or not we had the ingredients at home. At that particular time I was tired of all the small decisions I needed to make and thought about simplifying the cooking process by creating a cookbook which provides some basic and proven recipes, divided into three categories: meat, fish and vegetarian. The recipes are printed on pocket-sized cards, which are easy to take to the store to have the list of ingredients. The book contains additional cards which can be used for adding other recipes, making shopping lists, and taking notes to help answer the daily question of: What shall I cook tonight?


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DINNER DILEMMA

Fig.

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DINNER DILEMMA

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DINNER DILEMMA

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DINNER DILEMMA

OLD-TIME BEEF STEW

FLEISCHPFLANZERL Fleischpflanzerl are the German equivalent to Hamburger patties. They are

INGREDIENTS

usually shaped smaller and thicker and are eaten warm with potato salad or cold on a sandwich. Preparation time: 30 min.

2 lbs stew beef 2 Tbsp vegetable oil 2 cups water 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 or 2 bay leaves 1 medium onion, sliced 1 Tsp salt 1 Tsp sugar 1/2 Tsp pepper 1/2 Tsp paprika Dash ground allspice or ground cloves 3 large carrots, sliced 3 ribs celery, chopped 2 Tbsp cornstarch

INGREDIENTS 1 lb lean mincemeat 1/2 cup white bread 3 oz milk handful diced onions handful of parsley 1 lemon 1 egg Salt, Pepper and Paprika to season METHOD 1 Cut the bread into small cubes and soften them in the milk. Dice the onions and chop the parsley. 2 Sweat the onions in a hot pan till glassy. Add the parsley, toss briefly, and put the onions and parsley in a bowl. Press some of the milk out of the bread cubes and add them to the onions and parsley.

INGREDIENTS 1 Brown meat in hot oil. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, and allspice. Cover and simmer 1 1/2 hours. 2 Remove bay leaves and garlic clove. Add carrots and celery. Cover and cook 30 to 40 minutes longer. 3 To thicken gravy, remove 2 cups hot liquid. Using a separate bowl,

Add the minced meat, a little lemon peel and the egg to solidify the mass, season with salt, pepper and paprika. Knead the ingredients together well. 3 Take a good Teaspoon of the meat-mixture. With slightly moistened hands, knead them again and press them slightly flat. Sautée the formed “Fleischpflanzerl” in a hot pan for 2 minutes on each side. 3 Place them on a baking sheet and bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes until ready.

combine 1/4 cup water and cornstarch until smooth. Mix with a little hot liquid and return mixture to pot. Stir and cook until bubbly.

Serve with potato or green salad on a plate.

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10 Identity Marks

S I M PLE E XPR E S S IVE BL AC K + W H ITE

Instructor

VAR IOUS

Course

VAR IOUS

This section is a collection of logos which I created over the course of my academic term, as well as my work as a freelancer. Each identity mark was developed through client interviews and focused research. Identity marks are the essence of a product, and therefore must represent what the client is trying to communicate about the product in the simplest and most effective way .


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IDENTITY MARKS

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IDENTITY MARKS

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B R A S S E R I E

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IDENTITY MARKS

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modern search

Organic Coffee

Organic Coffee

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IDENTITY MARKS

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essence


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Danke Thank you

SINCERE G R AT E F U L PROUD

Te a c h e r s

Macy Chadwick, Esther Clark, Kelly Conley, Renee D’Arcy, Nicole Flores, Ariel Grey, Tom McNulty, Carson Pritchard, Scott Rankin, Mark Roudebush, Christopher Simmons, George Slavik, Jeremy Stout and Mary Scott.

Friends and Family

Thanks a lot for everything. I couldn’t have done it without your support, camera loans, over-the-ocean encouragement, take-out dinners, little kisses, patience, grammar checks and love: Brian, Lucie, Jamie, Nicky, Supriya and my parents.


Implications  

Graduate portfolio

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