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Bee Intelligencer Informing the towns of Middlebury, Southbury, Woodbury, Naugatuck, Oxford and Watertown A FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Volume VIII, No. 19

Friday, May 11, 2012

Area selectmen address chamber members By MARJORIE NEEDHAM First Selectmen Ed Edelson of Southbury, George Temple of Oxford, Gerald Stomski of Woodbury and Ed St. John of Middlebury spoke Wednesday at the Greater Tribury Chamber of Commerce annual selectmen’s breakfast. This year’s topic was “The State of Our Town’s Economic and Business Climate.” First, State Sen. Rob Kane (R32) spoke briefly about the business climate at the state level. He said he is a small business owner like most of the chamber members and, like them, he often lies awake at night worrying about his business. Kane encouraged them to hang in there and said, “We will turn this thing around.” Edelson said businesses and the government need to work together and collaborate. He said he didn’t think people were looking for handouts. “What we all need is a level paying field,” he said He said collaborations among the towns are important, and Oxford and Middlebury are collaborating with Southbury to address traffic congestion at exit 16 off I-84. He said teachers trying to get to their jobs at Pomperaug High School sometimes are held First selectmen, left to right, Ed Edelson of Southbury, George Temple of Oxford, Gerald Stomski of Woodbury, and Ed St. John of up for 30 minutes at that interMiddlebury listen as MC Tom Hill of WATR introduces them at the Greater Tribury Chamber of Commerce breakfast Wednesday. The section. selectmen spoke to the chamber about the state of their towns’ economic and business climate.  (Marjorie Needham photo) Stomski said communication

Selectmen set May 14 special town meeting, turn down dispatcher By JONATHAN “CHIP” LONGO matter, and he hopes it can happen next month. He also said he The Board of Selectmen (BoS) would like to have it on the ballot met Monday night in the Town in November to coincide with Hall conference room with two the presidential election. “We get members present, First Select- great turnout for a general elecman Edward B. St. John and Se- tion,” he said. lectman Ralph Barra. Selectman The board voted on an easeElaine Strobel was unable to at- ment modification for Connectitend due to a prior commitment. cut Light and Power (CL&P). St. Items on the agenda were the John said CL&P will be replacing town charter revision draft, an transmission lines and needs easement for CL&P, a special access by the Woodside Heights town meeting to move the Tor- senior housing project. He said rington Health District contract the work is scheduled to start and the proposed Property soon and continue through 2013. Maintenance Ordinance to refThe next topic for discussion erendum, and a legal opinion on was a call for a special town holding a special town meeting meeting Monday, May 14, at 5 to discuss the police communi- p.m. in the Town Hall conference cations department. They added room. The board opted to move one item to the agenda, a com- the decision on whether to have mittee member’s resignation a referendum vote on staying letter. with the Torrington Area Health During public comment, the District and the proposed PropBoard discussed the fate of the erty Maintenance Ordinance to communications department. that date. That department is responsible The last regularly scheduled for dispatching calls for the Mid- item on the agenda was a legal dlebury Police Department. Dis- opinion concerning a petition patcher Jim Roy was in atten- brought by Dispatcher Jim Roy dance. asking the town to have a special The first item on the agenda town meeting to form a tempowas the town charter revision rary committee and establish draft. St. John noted the Charter funding for the Communications Revision Committee completed Department. St. John read a legal its public meetings and has pre- opinion from the Middlebury sented the BoS with the final Law Firm. Its letter stated Roy’s draft. He said the BoS has 45 days petition would not be for a to review it. He said there needs to be a public hearing on the – See BoS on page 5

among the first selectmen is the first and most important issue. “We face the same challenges in our communities,” he said. Noting that Woodbury has no airport (like Oxford) or interstate (like Middlebury and Southbury), he said the town relies on its history and culture. Its recent Earth Day celebration attracted 6,500 people to town, and afterwards five potential new businesses contacted town officials. Stomski said the biggest problems come from the state and federal government, and the challenge is to cut taxes while keeping services. Before the panel discussion, Stomski told the newspaper he learned through prior business experience the state is not business-friendly. When his company had 18 employees, his profits were low, and when the year ended he would have to pay the state more money. When he downsized to three employees, his business volume went down, but his profits went up. “There is something fundamentally wrong with that,” Stomski said. Temple said Oxford is experiencing a lot of activity. “We are the fastest growing town in Connecticut,” Temple said. “But we have the slowest growing infrastructure.” He said it’s important to keep up a town’s infrastructure.

– See Selectmen on page 3

P&Z hears both support and criticism of Whittemore Crossing expansion plans By TERRENCE S. MCAULIFFE The Middlebury Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) at its May 3 meeting continued a public hearing for outdoor dining and alcoholic beverage service at Whittemore Crossing. It also approved a family subdivision on Middlebury Road and ice cream sales at Pies & Pints.  The public hearing on outdoor dining and alcoholic beverage service at the Whittemore Crossing retail and office complex at 1365 West Street was continued until June 7 so commissioners could see a detailed site plan showing interior and exterior space usage, restaurant seating and parking calculations. Attorney Michael McVerry, representing owner  Dr. Dean Yimoyines, reviewed the history of the former woodworking shop from the initial remodeling permits in 2009 to the Connecticut destination spot it has become in 2012, noting the regulatory approvals it received along the way. Architect Richard Merrill described the proposed 420-square-foot addition on the side of the building facing Whittemore Road as a “greenhouse conservatory” design. The addition will house a full-service bar extending over the patio, providing liquor for both patio dining and the café inside the building. McVerry said zoning regulations permitted such use so long as noise or activity did not injure the health and comfort of others or disturb the tranquility of the surrounding neighborhood. He said Junipers was on one side of the property and Pies & Pints on the other, both of them full liquor license restaurants. Commissioners questioned whether requirements for a 30-inch wall surrounding the patio were met by decorative stone walls and wrought iron railings. They also asked for specifics on which areas of the building

would be used for dining and which areas for retail sales. Attorneys from Junipers and from the bordering St. John of the Cross Parish House opposed the permit for expanded use. Middlebury attorney Michael Broderick, representing Junipers, said commissioners needed to review the increased space of the building, particularly parking requirements, mentioning a nine-parkingspace easement obstructed by a stone wall. He said reports also needed to be written by the fire marshal and the Conservation Commission. Hartford attorney Karen J. Casey, representing the Catholic Church, said the 4.4-acre Parish House property was being used as a residence for clergy as well as for offices. She said Whittemore Crossing was lovely, but it had reached a “tipping point” where the increased utilization of the twoacre parcel was no longer in compliance with parking requirements, buffer zones, and other zoning regulations written to protect the community as a whole.  Letters from three residents and comments from 18 people attending the hearing were in favor of the plans, mentioning the quality of the project, the attraction to more economic development, and “putting Middlebury on the map” as a Connecticut destination rivaling West Hartford and New Haven, and bringing business to the town. Norman Drubner, former resident and developer of Middlebury Hamlet and other properties, said he supported the project and asked commissioners to apply the “rule of reason” as to whether the business expansion was detrimental to any neighbor. He said the commission should consider only the zoning application and not stray into variances or legal matters that have nothing to do with the permitted use, a recommendation echoed by McVerry. Theo

Anastasiadis, co-owner of neighboring Pies & Pints, said he could have been opposed but was supportive because of the quality business being attracted. A subdivision of land owned by Toula Kaloidis at 2065 Middlebury Road was unanimously approved subject to recommendations by Town Engineer John Calabrese and a decision by the Board of Selectmen (BoS) on driveway width requirements. The subdivision allows Ioannis Kaloidis to build a house on land owned by his mother. Regulations require an 18-foot-wide driveway, but stone monuments at the current entrance would need to be removed unless the BoS grants a waiver.  An ice cream parlor with takeout window at Pies & Pints was unanimously approved. The parlor was originally proposed as “The Trolley Stop” by William Perrotti in 2008 as an extension of the former Perrotti’s West Street Pizza and Pub, but it never opened. The new owners, Anastasiadis and Christos Gogas, were advised to create a crosswalk to the Greenway for pedestrian safety.  In other matters, town employee Kenneth Long told commissioners of plans by the Water Pollution Control Authority to renovate sewer pump stations at Shadduck Road, Benson Road and Long Meadow Road. Long said underground storage tanks would be removed and replaced with above-ground tanks along with mechanical upgrades to existing facilities but no expansion of capacity. In administrative matters, commissioners approved revisions to the Zoning Enforcement Officer job description.  The next regular P&Z meeting will be Thursday, June 7, at 7:30p.m. at Shepardson Community Center.

Book Review.....................2 Adoptable pets.................8 Classifieds.........................7 Community Calendar.........2 Computer Tip....................8 Fire Log.............................2 Frugal Mummy..................5 In Brief..............................4

Library Happenings............2 Nuggets for Life................4 Obituaries.........................5 Parks & Rec.......................6 Puzzles.............................6 Reg. 15 School Calendar...3 Senior Center News...........3 Varsity Sports Calendar......6

Editorial Office: Email: mbisubmit@gmail.com Phone: 203-577-6800 Mail: P.O. Box 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 Advertising Sales: Email: mbiadvertising@gmail.com

Upcoming Events

Inside this Issue

Saturday

May 12

MMS PTO Fundraiser When: What: Where: Cost:

7 to 11 p.m. In the Spirit of Technology: A Beer and Wine Tasting Event and Silent Auction B’Nai Israel, 444 Main St. North, Southbury $30 per person. Tickets may be purchased online at www.mmsptoct.org

Greater Tribury Chamber of Commerce 9th Annual Golf Classic

monday

May 21

When: What: Where: Cost:

12 to 9 p.m. Golf tournament includes 18 holes, cart, range balls, lunch and dinner The Golf Club at Oxford Greens, 99 Country Club Drive, Oxford $150 members; $175 nonmembers. For info go to www.greatertriburychamber.org or call 203-267-4466.

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The Bee-Intelligencer

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Friday, May 11, 2012

MMS student wins state chemistry challenge Memorial Middle School (MMS) seventh-grader Henry Hu received the first-place trophy and certificate for the state competition of the “You Be the Chemist Challenge” at the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford April 28. Six Region 15 students who were regional competition winners in February also participated in the state contest. Hu now will represent the State of Connecticut in the national challenge June 25 at Philadelphia’s National Constitution Center. There he will compete with state winners from across the country. After an hour of grueling chemistry questions, Jared Cocomazzi, a seventh grader from Rochambeau Middle School (RMS), was the second runner-up. Eric Gao (RMS grade 6), Justin Callanan (RMS grade 6), Daniel Koobatian (RMS grade 7), and Graham Reitman (MMS grade 8) were awarded medals for their efforts.  “The students were extremely focused in their preparation for this challenge,” said MMS science teacher Susan Johnson. She, along with RMS science teacher Diane

Memorial Middle School seventh grader Henry Hu (left) Connecticut’s statewide “You Be the Chemist Challenge” winner is shown with Graham Reitman, who also participated in the challenge. Sirica, helped the students get ready for the competition. “Not only did Henry, for example, start with an already well-developed knowledge of chemistry, he pushed himself to learn the material well enough to really ap-

Mary’s Book Review “Sacré Bleu” by Christopher Moore Reviewed by Mary Conseur This work of historical fiction features dialogues that might have taken place in Paris during the Gay Nineties among well-known impressionist painters Seurat, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Pissarro, Toulouse-Lautrec, Courbet and Gauguin. While historians often dwell on the pathos of the artists’ lives in the demimonde, Moore paints their lives in a more humorous light. He writes, “Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec drank, not because he was depressed or self pitying, but because he really liked being drunk.” (p. 397) When someone cautions the artist about the health dangers of being involved in multiple sexual unions, Toulouse-Lautrec replies, “Nonsense! That is just the Myth of Syphilis!” (p. 230.) Moore pays special attention to the color blue in the impressionists’ work; hence the title of the book (“Sacré bleu!” also is

ply his knowledge to solve challenging chemistry problems.  In order to win the You Be the Chemist Challenge, Henry was able to quickly access his knowledge of chemistry, organize his understanding, and apply it to complex problems in front of an audience.” In 2010, MMS student Bobby Bickley was the State of Connecticut champion. The Region 15 middle schools are sponsored  by Water-

Region 15 students Eric Gao, Justin Callanan, Henry Hu, Jared Cocomazzi, and Daniel Koobatian, are shown with science teacher Diane Sirica and Hubbard-Hall representatives, the Region 15 sponsors. (Submitted photos) bury-based Hubbard-Hall, a family-owned and operated chemical manufacturer and distributor. As the sponsor, they also will pay for Hu’s expenses for the national competition in June. In February, students from Rochambeau and Memorial Middle Schools competed in their school competition, and the 16

top scorers moved on to the regional competition held at City Hill Middle School in Naugatuck. The six regional winners advanced to the state competition in April. The You Be the Chemist Challenge is a fun and innovative academic competition that engages students in grades five to

eight in the science of chemistry. Additionally, the challenge provides teachers with an exciting way to educate their students about science, encourages parents to participate in their child’s education, and provides industry members a tool to help develop a stronger relationship with their community.

Woodbury will vote on open space an expletive in French.). Blue pigment in the painter’s palette was, for centuries, made from the gemstone lapis lazuli, found only in the mountains of Afghanistan. Lapis was, at times, more valuable than gold; it was a sign of wealth for patrons to commission works of art using this ultra-marine blue color. In the art world, blue was the color of the Virgin Mary’s cloak, the color of bonnets and gowns in Renoir’s portraits, the dominant color of van Gogh’s “Starry Night,” the color of Monet’s water lily landscapes, and the color of Goya’s and Manet’s blue nudes. “Sacré Bleu” would make a delightful film in the style of Woody Allen’s recent “Midnight in Paris,” but describing the Parisian art world of the Gay Nineties generation.

Woodbury First Selectman Gerald Stomski has put informational posters, photographs, and maps of Woodbury’s proposed open space acquisition on display at the Woodbury Public Library for residents to see prior to the annual budget town meeting Monday, May 21, at 8 p.m. at the Senior/Community Center in Woodbury. At that meeting, the town will seek approval to acquire open space property on Minortown Road. The property provides a linkage to the existing town greenway. It protects land that is eligible to be classified as a Class 1 or Class 2 watershed. Officials say it will provide a valuable resource for recreation, fishing, conservation of wildlife habitat, and natural resources. It protects prime, naturally occurring features such as the aquifer, the flood plain, and the Nonnewaug River, which flows through the property. Per state mandate, it must be maintained Monday, May 14 as an agricultural property, thus Police Commission preserving the town’s local agri6 p.m...................................................Town Hall Conference Room cultural heritage. The State of Connecticut DeTuesday, May 15 partment of Energy and Environmental Protection has designated Commission on Aging 9:30 a.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 26 the property as one of ConnectiElderly Tax Relief Committee 5:30 p.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 26 Water Pollution Control Authority 7:30 p.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 26

Middlebury Community Calendar

An exhibit detailing property on Minortown Road the town of Woodbury proposes to acquire as open space is at the Woodbury Public Library. Woodbury First Selectman Gerald Stomski placed it there so residents could learn about the property before they vote on the acquisition May 21. (Submitted photo) cut’s Greenways. It is being pur- Environmental Protection. A available at the display, which can chased in part with a grant from handout on the cost analysis of be seen during regular library the Department of Energy and the Open Space acquisition is hours until the vote May 21.

Library Happenings Middlebury

Wednesday, May 16 Beautification Committee 6:30 p.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 26

Thursday, May 17 Safety & Health Committee 12:30 p.m............................................Town Hall Conference Room Calendar dates/times are subject to change If your organization would like your event included in the community calendar, please e-mail the information to beeintelligencer@gmail.com

Middlebury Volunteer Fire Department Call Log Date Time Address/Incident 4/29/12 12:05 115 Tucker Hill Road. Fire alarm activation. Residents left home while cooking. Water evaporated and caused food to burn and produce a large amount of smoke. Fire department evacuated smoke from residence. 4/30/12 04:28 171 White Ave. Transformer exploded, causing fluids to leak on ground and causing a smoke condition. 5/02/12 10:48 Rte. 64 at Chase Parkway in Waterbury. Motor vehicle accident with entrapment. Patient rescued by MVFD using rescue tools on Engine 3. 5/04/12 17:38 259 Lakeshore Drive. Carbon monoxide detector activation. Zero readings recorded.

veteran sportswriter and Pulitzer Author Dr. Jerry Prize nominee takes a look at this Labriola to speak historic baseball season, how it Girls’ Craft Thursday, May 31, at 7 p.m., Dr. was shaped and affected by the The Tuesday night girls’ craft war and what, ultimately, it Jerry Labriola will discuss his latest book, “Object of Betrayal,” as well May 15 at 6:30 p.m. will be mak- meant to America. as other high-profile criminal ing healthy fruit desserts. The cases in the Southbury Public Liprogram is for girls in grades Hearing Loss brary’s Kingsley Room. After the three and up. Presentation discussion, Labriola will be avail Local audiologist Dr. Zelda able for a book signing. RegistraBuild a Fairy House Build a fairy house during an Shleifer of the Hearing, Balance tion is required; call 203-262-0626, adult workshop with Flanders and Speech Center will give a pre- ext. 130. Labriola is the author of eight Nature Center Tuesday, May 15, sentation on hearing loss Thursat 6 p.m. at the library. Create a day, May 17, at 2 p.m. in the Nel- mystery novels, four of which he surprise, and enchant your chil- lie Beatty Room. Shleifer’s pre- co-authored with internationally dren and grandchildren by tuck- sentation, “Don’t Let Hearing renowned forensic scientist Dr. ing a beautiful, all-natural fairy Loss Slow You Down,” will address Henry Lee. He writes full time, is house into the bottom of a tree. many popular concerns and top- a past president of the Connecticut The $20 fee includes all materials, ics associated with hearing loss. Authors Association, and is a Seating is limited, so call 203- member of the Mystery Writers of but bring special barks or articles 287-9915 by Friday, May 11, to America and the International Asfrom nature if you wish. Space is reserve a seat. For more informa- sociation of Crime Writers.  strictly limited. Sign up at the tion about Shleifer, visit www.  As an author and crime analyst, library or by calling 203-758hearingbalance.com. he lectures extensively on mystery, 2634.  The Howard Whittemore Me- forensic science and true crime The Middlebury Library is at 30 Crest Road in Middlebury. For morial Library is at 243 Church issues. For the past six years, he information, call 203-758-2634. St. in Naugatuck. For informa- has been a regular worldwide lection, call 203-729-4591. turer aboard the Queen Mary 2, the Queen Victoria, the Queen Elizabeth, the Emerald Princess, and the Norwegian Cruise Line Whittemore Book Club ships. Wednesday Film The Whittemore Book The Wednesday afternoon “Spring Flowers” Club will meet Tuesday, May 15, movie May 16 at 1:30 p.m. in the at 7 p.m. in the Main Reading Photographs Exhibit Room to discuss “The Devil in Kingsley Meeting Room stars Georgia Sheron color and blackthe White City” by Erik Larson. Meryl Streep in her Oscar-winning performance as Margaret and-white photographs of tulips, Thatcher, the first and only fe- daffodils and roses will be on disAuthor male prime minister of the play at the Gloria Cachion Art GalJack Cavanaugh United Kingdom, in a surprising lery through Wednesday, June 13.  Meet author Jack Cavanaugh and intimate portrait as she looks The still life compositions were at a book talk and signing back over her life while fighting photographed using available Wednesday, May 16, at 6:30 p.m. the demons of old age. Jim Broad- light. Some are on canvas; others in the Nellie Beatty Room. Cava- bent plays her husband. were hand printed on watercolor naugh’s book is “Season of ’42: The room’s surround sound paper. Sheron, a former Southbury Joe D, Teddy Ballgame, and Base- theater has an infrared listening resident, took the photographs of ball’s Fight to Survive a Turbulent system available. For more infor- farmer John Ludorf that are in the First Year of War.” In the book, the mation, call 203-262-0626. library’s permanent collection.

Naugatuck

Southbury

Check www.southburylibrary. org for more information. The library is at 100 Poverty Road in Southbury (203-262-0626).

Woodbury Children’s Gardening Program The Pomperaug Valley Garden Club will host a gardening program for children at the library Friday, May 11, at 4 p.m. Children of all ages are invited to create a special floral gift for Mother’s Day. All supplies will be provided. This program is free and open to area residents, but registration is required.  For information or to register for this program call the Children’s Department at 203-2633502  or visit  www.woodburylibraryct.org .    

Six Pack Art Collective Exhibit The Six Pack Art Collective, composed of six artist friends, will present “Natural Forms,” in the library gallery through Wednesday, May 30. Artists in the group are Dorie and Peter Petrochko of Oxford, Martha and Ted Schwerdtle of Roxbury, and Joan and Bill Anthony of Woodbury. Works on exhibit will include paintings done in a variety of media, pastels, wood crafts (wood vessels and wood sculpture), stone and wood sculptures, colored pencil drawings, and fish created from palm tree seed pods decorated with metal fins and tails. For information, call 203-2633502  or visit  www.woodburylibraryct.org. The library is at 269 Main St. South in Woodbury.


The Bee-Intelligencer

Friday, May 11, 2012

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Senior Center News AARP President Needed AARP Chapter 4960’s current president is retiring. If you are an AARP member and would like to serve as president, contact Vincent Cavalea at 203-758-2655.

Basic Digital Photo Class This one-session class will meet Monday, May 14, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Learn to download, edit, organize and create online photo albums you can share with family and friends. Bring your cameras and laptops. The fee is $10.

who want to learn the basics of using a computer. It includes descriptions of parts of a computer, practice using a mouse and keyboard, basic word processing, basic “Paint” fundamentals, and an introduction to the Internet and email. It is a good introductory class for those who want to take the “Course in Computer Fundamentals” for more in-depth instruction. The cost for five classes is $25. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 203-5774166.

Council on Aging

Computer Security Class

(Kathleen Brown-Carrano cartoon)

Pruning tips

Q:

I haven’t pruned many of my hedges and trees in several years, and some of them have grown wild and ragged-looking. If they’re past the blooming stage, is it safe to trim them? Also, any tips to make this task easier? – Carol in Oklahoma

A:

Trying to tackle all of the shrubbery and trees in your yard can be daunting, even when it hasn’t been several years since their last pruning. The best thing to do is take an initial tour of your yard with notebook in hand. Mentally split the yard into several sections, and then note what needs to be done in each: Trimming, pruning or even removal of foliage. Next, tackle each section one at a time. Depending on your schedule, you may need to do one section each day. A particularly foliage-heavy section may take an entire weekend. You

Selectmen Continued from page 1

“If you fix the roads, the town looks better. Then people want to move there,” Temple said. Asked about economic incentives towns offered businesses, St. John said for many years Middlebury attracted businesses by selling people on the town itself. “In my absence,” St. John said, “economic development incentives were developed.” St. John served as first selectman for 24 years and then retired for four years before returning to office last December. Stomski said incentives come in a lot of forms, and not all are financial. He said a friendly land use office is a big incentive, as is a good town website. “We revamped the town website,” Stomski said. “Businesses can post their web sites on the town website, and we help them advertise their businesses.” He also said town officials work with new businesses to help them get business.

By Samantha Mazzotta might need help from friends or relatives to take care of large or excessively high hedges, meaning you’ll need to plan a time for them to come over. And if a tree needs complex trimming – for example, its branches are encroaching on the roof or on power lines – you’ll need to arrange for a professional tree trimmer to inspect it, provide an estimate and do the work. Pruning on your own takes a little practice, but don’t worry too much about mistakes, as they eventually will grow out. Plants that have already bloomed can be pruned without a problem, and plants or trees that are still blooming are, by this time of Temple said Oxford offers tax incentives to new businesses, and the first selectman and members of boards and commissions meet with business people interested in coming to Oxford. Town officials also will travel to look over facilities run by a business that hopes to open in Oxford. “We’re not desperate,” Temple said. “We want to see if it fits.” Edelson said the three towns affected by the proposed enterprise zone around Oxford Airport need to work together. “It doesn’t matter where the airport is located,” he said, noting Oxford, Middlebury and Southbury all will benefit from an enterprise zone. He disagreed, however, with the idea that first selectmen should be out encouraging businesses to move to town. He said that should be left to commercial realtors. “Our main job is to create attractive communities where people want to live, raise families and retire,” Edelson said. Instead of looking for a group of shops, towns should look at

year, safe to trim. As you’ll likely be piling up a lot of branches and limbs, check with your local government about proper disposal of yard waste. Most have programs in place, such as scheduled pickup dates during the growing season, and guidelines for containers or bags the trimmed branches should be placed in. If you hire a tree trimmer, be sure to ask how branches will be disposed of and if that cost is included in the estimate. Send your questions or tips to ask@thisisahammer.com, or write This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

Keep hedge and tre e-tr imming equipment sharp, clean and lightly oiled so they cut branches cleanly and efficiently. their facilities, he said. He said Pomperaug High School just ranked 14th in the state, but we are losing internationally because we are not educating a technologically savvy work force. “The most important investment we can make is education,” he said. “We are small towns, but we shouldn’t be small minded.” Asked about vacancy rates in his town, Stomski said Woodbury probably doesn’t need more retail space. What it needs is recreational facilities for residents. He said Wallingford has a four-story building with a rock-climbing wall on one floor and other recreational activities on the other floors. “You need to bring people into town for something good, and then business will follow,” Stomski said. Temple said it’s important for towns to bring in businesses that aren’t economically driven. An example is a medical office. “If you get sick, you have no choice. You have to go to the doctor,” he said.

MMS fundraiser Saturday The Memorial Middle School (MMS) PTO’s “In the Spirit of Technology: A Beer and Wine Tasting Event and Silent Auction” will be Saturday, May 12, from 7 to 11 p.m. at B’Nai Israel at 444 Main St. North in Southbury. An updated list of silent auction items includes reserved parking and front-row seating for Eighth Grade Commencement; a full set of braces from an orthodontist; a Lake Quassapaug Outing Club summer membership; UCONN, Jets and Red Sox tickets; and many more items. The two-hour beer and wine tasting and the silent auction start at 7 p.m. Middlebury Fine Wine & Spirits is providing the beer and wine. Owner Robert Heusted said, “I have been part of the community for over 20 years, and my kids have had the benefit of attending Memorial Middle School. I feel honored to be part of this fundraising effort to make that experience even better for current and future students.” At 9 p.m., guests will be encouraged to dance to the music of local rockers, “Fight the Fear,” and enjoy the provided appetiz-

ers and dessert. Guests may bring their own beverages during the entertainment portion of the evening. The event hopes to raise funds

for technology for MMS classrooms, cultural arts programs, and teacher grants. Tickets are $30 per person. To purchase tickets, go to www.mmsptoct.org.

Region 15 School Calendar Saturday, May 12 MMS PTO Beer & Wine Tasting with Silent Auction ..... 7 to 11 p.m.

Monday, May 14 Personnel Policies/Curriculum Committee....... PHS Media Center 6 p.m. Board of Education.......................... PHS AP Room No. 103, 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, May 15 MES Grade 5 Band and Orchestra Spring Concert..................7 p.m.

Wednesday, May 16 PHS PTO.........................................................................................7 p.m.

Thursday, May 17 PES Grade 5 Band and Orchestra Spring Concert...................7 p.m. MMS PTO...................................................................................9:30 a.m.

Friday, May 18 MMS Student Government Social and Dance Social - Grade 6 only................................................... 2:45 to 4:15 p.m. Dance - Grades 7/8 only............................................. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Region 15 website: www.region15.org

Name that TV Show Panda Homecare and the senior center are sponsoring “Name that TV Show” Thursday, May 17, at 12:30 p.m. MC/DJ Sir James from WRTC 89.3 will host the game, which is similar to the old “Name that Tune” show. The game consists of 40 verbal clues immediately followed by the musical theme of shows like Mr. Ed, Howdy Doody, Alfred Hitchcock and many more. The event will include refreshments and giveaways. Reservations are required. Call 203-577-4166.

The next Council on Aging meeting will be Tuesday, May 15, Learn how to safeguard your at 9:30 a.m. at the senior center. computer and the information on it Tuesday, May 15, from 10 Skype Class a.m. to noon. Learn to detect and This one-session class will avoid nasty computer viruses. meet Thursday, May 17, from 10 Credit card and online banking a.m. to 12 p.m. to learn how to are safe if you follow these simple set up a free Skype account. rules. The class fee is $10. Skype allows you to chat online with anyone else who has Skype Beginners’ Computer installed on their computer. Chat Fundamentals Class face to face with your old school The “Beginners Computer chums in Texas, California, even Fundamentals” class will start Italy, or any place in the world, Monday, May 14, from 1 to 3 p.m. all for free! Bring your laptop to The class is for fairly new users class. The fee is $10.

Trip Thimble Island Cruise The bus will leave the senior center Thursday, June 21, at 10 a.m. for a 12:15 p.m. cruise around the Thimble Islands aboard the Sea Mist. The islands off the coast of Branford, Conn., were used for everything from farming to quarrying its famous pink granite and bootlegging to hiding Captain Kidd’s treasure. He sailed there in 1665. Relax and enjoy yourself as the Sea Mist cruises around 25 inhabited islands. Call 203-5774166 to reserve a seat. Admission and transportation will cost $17.

Don’t just sit there Numerous studies have shown us two things: It’s never too late to start being active, and a small amount of activity is better than none when it comes to better health. Now there’s an additional benefit: Being active helps keep depression and other psychological issues at bay. Not only that, but a recent study shows those with “psychological distress are four times more likely to be functionally limited.” The study, done on 91,000 adults age 65 and older, indicates one-third of us don’t get regular exercise, and the number goes up even more for those 75 and older. Another study on the same topic came to a serious conclusion: Those who have depression had better results from exercising three times a week than those who took drugs for their symptoms. All it took was getting 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise. Other researchers have approached senior health from a different angle: A Psychological Bulletin news release from the Harvard School of Public Health reported on a study that compared psychological well-being to heart health. It found psychological well-being reduces the chance of heart attack and stroke. Specifically, being optimistic, happy and satisfied with life can reduce the risk of a cardiovascular event. Somehow those emotions not only protect us, but can slow down existing disease.

How then do we use this information? A simplistic look might be this: If we elevate our mood with exercise and gain a sense of emotional well-being, we’re also helping our heart. And looking on the bright side of life gives an ad-

ditional benefit: Those of us who are optimistic cut our risk of heart attack in half. Matilda Charles regrets she cannot personally answer reader questions, but she will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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June 25 –August 10 Weekly themes and field trips. Memorable traditions and friendships. Option to combine with other Summer At Chase programs. June 18 –August 17 A safe, beautiful campus including two playgrounds. Summertime enrichment. Chase teachers guide the adventure.

Details and registration at: www.chasecollegiate.org /summer

Call 203-236-9532 or e-mail: summer@chasemail.org 47 acre campus at 565 Chase Parkway, Waterbury, CT 06708 Rt 84, exit 18


The Bee-Intelligencer

4

Friday, May 11, 2012

Bee Intelligencer in•tel•li•gencer: n. One who conveys news or information The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed.

Issued every week by: The Middlebury Bee-Intelligencer Society LLC Bee-Intelligencer Staff: Editor-In-Chief/Publisher: Marjorie Needham Contributing Writers: Mary Conseur, Stephen Davis, Jonathan “Chip” Longo, Terrence S. McAuliffe Art & Production: Mario J. Recupido Advertising Sales: mbiadvertising@gmail.com - Submit press releases in person, by mail or email The Bee-Intelligencer welcomes news, press releases and advertising from all surrounding communities Editorial Office: 2030 Straits Turnpike, Suite 1, Middlebury, CT 06762 Direct mail to P.O. Box 10. Telephone: 203-577-6800 • Email: beeintelligencer@gmail.com Advertising Information: Telephone: 203-577-6800 • Email: mbiadvertising@gmail.com Deadlines: Display Advertising: 5 p.m. Friday preceding publication Classified Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday preceding publication Editorial/Press Releases: Noon Monday preceding publication Copyright © 2012 by The Middlebury Bee-Intelligencer Society, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

In Brief Mother’s Day at Quassy Amusement Park Sunday, May 13, Quassy Amusement Park will host a Mother’s Day event: Mom can ride for free and receive a complimentary dinner. If a child purchases an all-day ride wristband for $18, his or her mom will receive a free wristband and dinner voucher. Only mothers may redeem the free ride wristband and dinner voucher. Enjoy more than a dozen great rides at Quassy including the new “Crazy Cups” and award-winning “Wooden Warrior” roller coaster. The park is open Mother’s Day from 12 to 6 p.m. Parking is $6. Individual ride tickets also are available at $3.50 each. The park is at 2132 Middlebury Road, Rte. 64, in Middlebury.

Church Car Wash Saturday, May  12, members of the United Church of Christ Senior Pilgrim Fellowship (SPF) in Southbury  will conduct a car wash in the church parking lot

from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. There is no charge for a car washing, but SPF members will accept free-will donations to earn money towards their mission trip to Frankfort, Maine, where they will do community volunteer work this summer. The church is at 283 Main Street North in Southbury. For more information about the car wash or  SPF, call the church office at 203-264-8807.

Middlebury Special Town Meeting Monday A Middlebury special town meeting will be Monday, May 14, at 5 p.m. in the Town Hall Conference Room at 1212 Whittemore Road to move the following questions to a referendum vote: Shall the Town of Middlebury join the Torrington Area Health District, as approved by the Board of Selectmen on April 16, 2012? Shall the Town of Middlebury adopt the Property Maintenance Ordinance as approved by the Board of Selectmen on April 16, 2012?

Unplug to plug in this Mother’s Day Mother’s Day is a perfect day to unplug from life’s electronic ways and spend quality time with mom. Isn’t it amazing we choose to electronically plug in, tune in, turn on and tap into our lives these days for almost everything? We do it to hear the news of the day, text our way into and out of conversations, sweep our fingers across screens to read books, and scan our way through grocery stores. We meet through virtual offices and date online. The dependency we have on all things electronic is mind boggling. It’s great and necessary in our society on the one hand; disconcerting and disengaging on the other hand. This week’s nugget for life is to unplug from your electronic love affair on Mother’s Day. Ditch the alarm clock and wake up to the rising of the sun to begin the day quietly. Invite a warm spring zephyr into your home by opening windows. Go to a farmer’s market with mom for a holistic and natural

Nuggets for Life By CYNTHIA DE PECOL bonding experience. Take a walk, or enjoy a board game or quiet reading time together. Think of what really matters in her heart, and speak to that part of her. Appreciate having a long chat with her and be curious about her life. And if the only way to spend time with her from afar is on Skype or the phone, go on a journey of discovery with her around her life and learn what her newest dreams are. Look into her eyes and really hear her by actively listening. Have a conversation with no interruption. Silence really does speak. Can you unplug for a day to discover a new way? Cynthia De Pecol is a Yoga Instructor, Reiki Master and Life Coach who lives in Wash

Middlebury Road (Opposite the Shell Station) Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily Anthony Calabrese 203-758-2765

Pansies - Bowls, Baskets, Flats Petunias • Azaleas • Roses • Shrubs Vegetable Plants • Perennials

Strawberry Plants • Onion Sets • Seed Potatoes Mulch available by the bag or by the yard Bird Seed Headquarters Deer Corn • Livestock and Poultry Feed Local eggs. Fresh daily. $3 per dozen

Glebe House fundraiser May 19 A late spring evening, elegantly orchestrated dinner parties, and great company is promised for those attending Woodbury’s Glebe House Museum and Gertrude Jekyll Garden’s annual fundraiser, “An Evening of Festive Dinners with Friends,” Saturday, May 19. This year’s event celebrates the Marshall Children Education programs. The evening will begin with cocktails at 5:30 p.m. in the Gertrude Jekyll Garden at the Glebe House Museum, where a live auction also will take place. Following the cocktail party, guests will attend one of 10 elegant dinners. Most dinners will include eight guests who will be treated to an array of delicate specialties in distinctive settings such as a 300-year-old mill surrounded by wonderful antiques, a charming 1750 saltbox with lovely gardens, an historic 1828 mansion house, a classic stately Georgian manor house overlooking a horse farm and a Tuscany-style villa overlooking the Litchfield Hills. No matter where you go, you can count on a delightful evening, with plenty of wine and good company. The cost per person of $150 will support innovative educational programs, maintain and preserve the Glebe House Museum and its collections and

Planning “An Evening of Festive Dinners with Friends” are, left to right, Sun Williams, Chris Giftos, Chairman Anne Slattery, Museum President Carter Booth, and Jane Gaillard. The benefit for the Glebe House Museum and The Gertrude Jekyll Garden will be Saturday, May 19, in 10 local homes (Submitted photo) support the renovation and maintenance of the Gertrude Jekyll Garden, the only extant work in the United States by England’s most important garden designer, commissioned in 1926. This is an opportunity to have a relaxed good time and support

a worthy cause. Invitations are being mailed to museum members and others on request. Anyone who would like to make reservations for the event may contact the museum director, Judith Kelz at 203-263-2855 or ghmgjg@snet.net.

The Glebe House Museum & Gertrude Jekyll Garden has been welcoming visitors since 1925. The Gertrude Jekyll Garden was installed to enhance the fine 18th century architecture of the house and to celebrate its Revolutionary War heritage.

invite all of you to attend our many activities, including our 100th Girl Scout Jubilee at the Durham Fairgrounds Saturday, May 19, and our Girl Scout International Camporee at Camp Laurel Aug. 5 to 11. Thank you again for your generous support of Girl Scouts of Connecticut. You are helping our mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Warmly, Jennifer Smith Turner Girl Scouts of Connecticut, CEO

of elimination unless Congress continues funding this lifesaving program. The CDC funds these lifesaving programs in 34 states, including Connecticut, so people with asthma and their families can learn to better manage their disease. This means people can learn to prevent life-threatening asthma attacks, reducing healthcare costs and saving lives.  There is no better time than now – National Asthma Awareness Month – to contact your members of Congress and ask them to help save the National Asthma Control Program.  As asthma rates increase, more must be done to combat this disease. To learn more about the American Lung Association’s programs and resources for managing asthma, visit www.lung.org/ asthma. Sincerely, Jeff Seyler, President & CEO American Lung Association in the Northeast

Tax Collectors Association, Inc. attorney, Adam Cohen of Pullman and Comley, LLC, regarding our handling of this. His response follows: “The deposit funds *were* proceeds of a tax sale, so applying them against the tax delinquency is easily defensible. For the town to simply pocket the money for other uses would be much harder to justify since there’s no law or logic that lets a town earn a profit from tax sale proceeds.” Certainly Mr. Clark is entitled to his opinion, but our office follows state statute. Jean Dawes Middlebury Tax Collector

Letters to the Editor Girl Scouts appreciate support To the Editor: I would like to express my sincere thanks and appreciation on behalf of my 46,500 sister Girl Scouts to those of you who supported our 2012 Cookie Program. We sold more than 2.9 million boxes of cookies! In addition, our girls collected more than 125,000 boxes of cookies for our Gift of Caring program, Cookies for Heroes, which we will send to our service women and men throughout the world. Our cookie program is a fun, hands-on way for girls to gain five important skills they can apply in their everyday life. Selling a box of cookies helps girls learn about goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills and business ethics. I also want to thank our many volunteers for helping make the cookie program a success. It also is important to recognize our 19,000 volunteers for their yearround hard work and efforts. I want to personally thank each and every one of you who make Girl Scouts the premier leadership experience for girls. As our 100th anniversary year continues, we are celebrating with many exciting events. We

Save National Asthma Control Program To the Editor: Spring is in the air – and so are asthma triggers. Did you know asthma is the third leading cause of hospitalization among children under 15, or that it is a leading cause of school absences?  More than 25 million Americans – including more than 252,000 adults and more than 91,000 children in Connecticut – have asthma. Yet the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) National Asthma Control Program – which has helped reduce deaths and hospitalizations due to asthma since its inception in 1999 – is in danger

Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor may be mailed to the Bee-Intelligencer, P.O. Box 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 or emailed to beeintelligencer @gmail.com. Letters will be run as space permits. Please limit letters to 500 words, avoid personal attacks, and understand letters will be edited. To the Editor: This is in response to both of For verification purposes, please Mr. Lewis S. Clark’s letters re- include your name, street address garding the Gargoni tax sale and and daytime telephone number. his dissatisfaction with our handling of the situation. We contacted the Connecticut

Tax sale funds properly credited


The Bee-Intelligencer

Friday, May 11, 2012

Middleburian to be on NBC show Friday Middlebury’s municipal historian Dr. Robert Rafford will be on the Friday, May 11, edition of NBC’s “Who do you think you are?” It will air on NBC at 8 p.m. Rafford, who is a genealogist, said the program features a subject who meets with various historians, archivists, genealogists, and other experts and uncovers his or her genealogy with the help of a variety of documents that point the way, all with a human interest focus. He said he did the Connecticut research for his subject, whose name he couldn’t reveal due to a confidentiality agreement, and his part of the episode was filmed in

Bridgeport in March. Although Rafford couldn’t reveal the name of his subject, the show’s website says it is Jason Sudeikis of NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” (SNL). The preview for this Friday’s show gives a microsecond glimpse of Rafford meeting with Sudeikis. Sudeikis’ impersonations on SNL include Vice President Joe Biden, “American Idol” winner Taylor Hicks, and the hip-hop dancer recurring character in the “What Up with That” sketch. Rafford said the segment will show him welcoming his subject to the Bridgeport Town Hall Annex and taking him inside to see

vital records pertinent to his genealogy. Rafford did more than 50 hours of research and found many documents related to his ancestry, but the producers had to narrow the story and so will include only a few of the records he found. He said it took a whole day to film his part of the segment, but he expects to be seen on screen for a very short time Friday night. Regardless, he said, “It was a fascinating way to spend a day and earn 15 seconds of fame!” Rafford said he also researched the ancestry of actor Matthew Broderick for the show a few years ago, but he was not

filmed for that episode. He is currently researching 17th-century documents for another subject’s ancestry. He doesn’t know the identity of that person, but the show usually features motion picture, sports, television or other entertainment stars. Rafford said he wasn’t sure how NBC chose him to be on the show, but he has a number of genealogy clients, so one of them may have referred him to the producers. He said he thinks the whole show is quite charming and interesting. The web site for the show is www.nbc.com/who-doyou-think-you-are/.

How diabetes is diagnosed DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have a friend whose glucose tests taken in the morning range from 140 (7.8) to 200 (11) and are never in the normal range. He is constantly thirsty and has other diabetes symptoms. His doctor ordered a hemoglobin A1C test, which came back as 5.2. The doctor told him they no longer do the fasting blood sugar test, only the HbA1C, and he is not diabetic since his test is normal. Has testing for diabetes changed? Should my friend consult another doctor? – L.P. ANSWER: Up until 2010, doctors diagnosed diabetes on the basis of blood sugar (actually plasma glucose). A relatively new test, hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C or just A1C, was added to the criteria for both diagnosing diabetes and monitoring diabetes control in the past year or so. Hemoglobin is a large molecule inside all red blood cells that grabs oxygen from the lungs and releases it to all parts of the body as blood circulates. Blood sugar coats hemoglobin. Since red blood cells last

120 days, the percentage of hemoglobin coated with sugar indicates how well-controlled diabetes is. An acceptable control level is one that is 7 percent or less. Fasting blood sugar, the specimen taken after at least eight hours of not eating, is still used for diagnosing diabetes. A level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher lands one in diabetes territory. A second way to diagnose diabetes is to give a person 75 grams of glucose (sugar) to eat and test the blood two hours later. A value of 200 (11.1) qualifies as diabetes.

Now a third way of making the diagnosis is employing HbA1C. One selling point for using it is there’s no requirement for fasting. HbA1C of 6.5 or greater makes the diagnosis. Your friend is a diabetic. His fasting blood sugar qualifies him as being one. Furthermore, he has a diabetes symptom – perpetual thirst. He probably has to urinate frequently, another diabetes symptom. The fact his HbA1C is normal doesn’t cancel these facts. That test is only one of three. He should see another doctor. The diabetes booklet guides people through this prevalent and difficult illness. Readers can obtain a copy by writing: Dr. Donohue – No. 402W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: A friend of ours is in a nursing home with pneumonia. We’re afraid to visit

her. Is pneumonia catchy? – A.M. ANSWER: A huge number of different germs cause the many different kinds of pneumonia. A blanket statement on transmission, therefore, is impossible. The pneumococcus (NEW-moeKOK-us) bacterium is a prominent cause of pneumonia, especially in adults and the elderly. This germ can be spread in droplets coming from a cough or sneeze. However, 24 hours of treatment renders the patient no longer a transmitter. You can bank on it that a hospital or a nursing home will not let you visit any patient who might be at risk of spreading any infectious disease. Dr. Donohue regrets he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

5

Obituaries Richard Argenta

Uncle of Frank Argenta Richard Argenta, 87, of Waterbury, passed away Friday, May 4, at his home in the presence of his loving wife. He was the husband of Yolanda (Marcella) Argenta. Richard was born in New Rochelle, N.Y., Feb. 6, 1925, a son of the late Frank and Anna (Molteni) Argenta. He was a graduate of Leavenworth High School and was a veteran of the U. S. Navy, having served during World War II. He was an electrician who worked for Electric Boat in New London and later for Anaconda American Brass until his retirement. Richard was an avid golfer who enjoyed playing golf at the local golf courses. Besides his wife of 47 years, he leaves three sisters-in-law: Mary Argenta, Ann Genevese, and Josephine Cicchitto, all of Waterbury, and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his two brothers, Frank and Anthony Argenta; two brothers-inlaw, Albert Marcella and Angelo Marcello; and two sisters-in-law, Mary D’Averso and Antoinette Rubbo. A Mass of Christian Burial Monday was followed by burial in Calvary Cemetery with full military honors. For more info or to send e-condolences, visit www.chaseparkwaymemorial.com

Sam F. Perrotti Husband of Marie A. Perrotti

Sam Francis Perrotti, 87, of Naugatuck, passed away Monday, May 7, at the Middlebury Convalescent Home. He was the husband of Marie A. (Pesanelli) Perrotti. Sam was born in Waterbury Oct. 25, 1924, a son of the late Pasquale and Carolina (Billotta) Perrotti and was educated in the local school system. He moved to Naugatuck 53 years ago. He was a World War II U.S. Marine Corps veteran serving as a corporal in the Aircraft Maintenance division. He was the recipient (c) 2012 North America Synd., Inc., All of the Good Conduct Medal, The World War II Victory Medal, the AsiRights Reserved atic-Pacific Campaign Medal, and a certificate of satisfactory service. Sam was the retired co-owner of Bendix Brake of Waterbury, working there for more than 30 years. He was a communicant of St. Francis of Assisi Church and served as a former usher. Sam had a passion for opera and enjoyed vacations with extended Mother’s Day is Sunday, May mom is to not only get the gift, If you’ve got an ALDI near you, make. Find the details here: family on Cape Cod, having made 13, this year and you’ve still got but to have someone offer to then you’re in luck. As well as http://bit.ly/JQkCkc many friends at favorite local restau-

Frugal Mummy

Marvelous Mother’s Day gifts

time to wow her with a great gift. If you’ve just had that “ah ha” moment, then panic not! Not only am I a mum myself, but I’m a frugal girl, too, and know things moms like that won’t destroy your budget. Firstly, don’t get all crazy thinking she’ll like only an expensive gift. Moms like two things: Not having to do anything and relaxation. If you can give her either of those things, then you’ve hit the nail on the head! Gift certificates for a local salon always will be greeted warmly, but make sure you think it through. The best treat for a

BoS -

Continued from page 1 “proper purpose” as defined by the town charter. The letter, sent to Roy by mail, basically tells him he has nowhere to go with his request. In the letter, town attorney Robert Smith concluded Roy’s petition would violate three parts of the charter. The first, section 304E, says only the BoS has the right to establish a temporary committee. Second, Smith said according to section 702, the pe-

watch the kids while she goes and also get to choose the appointment time. If you’re buying it for your spouse, check her calendar, make an appointment and then give her the gift. Moms often are so busy thinking of others that having someone take charge is always a treat. The local beauty salon training center shouldn’t be overlooked. I love the fact that, for just $9, I can get a basic facial done, which is way less than I’d pay at a regular salon, and the people training there are usually just a few months away from getting their license.

tition would interfere with the charter’s budget procedures. Lastly, Smith wrote a town meeting approving an “additional appropriation not recommended by the Board of Finance” (BoF) would violate section 703 B of the Charter. St. John told Roy only the BoF can increase the budget, not the BoS. St. John suggested Roy appeal directly to BoF Chairman Mike McCormack. He also noted that, during public discussions about the budget, no one raised any concerns about the communications portion, which the BoF

being a cheap place to get groceries, they have great deals on flowers. Don’t worry about them being old: One time my flowers lasted two weeks! Gift baskets are beautiful, but often cost upwards of $50 for a nice one. Instead, make a themed one for mom with items she’ll really like. Purchase an inexpensive basket from a local home store and fill it with fun items tailored just to her. For a unique gift the kids can give to mom, I put together a candy bar poem using only six candy bars that can be purchased inexpensively, and it’s easy to

cut by $100,000. When asked what will happen to the dispatchers if there is no funding available to pay them, St. John said it was a decision of the BoF, but it would ultimately fall on the BoS. When St. John asked about minimum staffing requirements, Police Chief Richard Guisti, who was in attendance, said he did not know the minimum staffing requirements. Roy said they would not be able to adequately staff the position without the money the BoF cut. St. John said the budget he sent to the BoF had the full

Finally, Oreo Flower Pops will really wow any mom. For pops made from Oreos and melted chocolate with jellybeans for decoration, see: http://wp.me/ p1Iorw-5kb. And for what not to get? I don’t care what any woman tells you: Nobody, but nobody, really wants any kitchen or cleaning-related item for our special day! Join Clair Boone and thousands of other savvy shoppers at www.facebook.com/mummydeals.org or read her other tips at www.mummydeals.org

amount for communications, but the BoF cut the funds. “Yours truly has to live with those numbers,” St. John said. In other business, the BoS added to the agenda a letter from Robert Rafford saying he resigned from the Elderly Tax Relief Committee. Prior to adjournment, the BoS went into executive session with Smith to discuss “legal matters.” The next regularly scheduled BoS meeting is Monday, May 21, at 6 p.m. in the Town Hall conference room.

Independent foreclosure review If you experienced a foreclosure on your primary residence between Jan. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2010, you could be eligible for a free Independent Foreclosure Review and compensation. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has required 14 of the biggest mortgage-servicing institutions to create independent review programs to discover whether “financial injury” occurred due to errors or mistakes in the foreclosure process. For example, if the balance at foreclosure was more than you owed, you were part of a modification agreement, you were under bankruptcy protection or if inaccurate fees were tacked on to your mortgage, you might qualify for help. The errors could have occurred at any step of the foreclosure pro-

cess: The house was sold under a foreclosure, foreclosure was halted when payments were brought current, foreclosure was initiated but the house was sold quickly, or foreclosure was started but isn’t yet finalized. The foreclosure review includes whether: – ownership of the promissory note or deed of trust had been determined – state laws were followed – a loan modification request was being considered at the time – the loan had been in default for the required period of time

– fees were charged that were not allowable or were excessive – borrowers had the opportunity to apply for help programs such as the Home Affordable Modification Program. The banks involved are: America’s Servicing Co., Aurora Loan Services, BAC Home Loans Servicing, Bank of America, Beneficial, Chase, Citibank, CitiFinancial, CitiMortgage, Countrywide, EMC, EverBank/EverHome Mortgage Company, Financial Freedom, GMAC Mortgage, HFC, HSBC, IndyMac Mortgage Services, MetLife Bank, National City Mortgage, PNC Mortgage, Sovereign Bank, SunTrust Mortgage, U.S. Bank, Wachovia Mortgage, Washington Mutual (WaMu), Wells Fargo Bank N.A. and Wilshire Credit Corp. Letters were to have gone out

last year to all who lost properties under foreclosure, but if you didn’t get one, it’s not too late to join the review process. But you have only until July 31, 2012, to complete the request and get it in the mail. If your foreclosure process started in 2010 but didn’t end until 2011, you’re still eligible. To request a form or for help filling out a form, call the comptroller at 1-888-952-9105. To learn more, go online to www.occ.gov and click on Independent Foreclosure Review. David Uffington regrets he cannot personally answer reader questions, but he will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Write to him in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@gmail.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

rants. He loved working with his tools, which he did until his last days. Sam will be greatly missed. Besides his loving wife of 53 years, he leaves his devoted daughter, Caroline Perrotti of Washington, D.C.; one brother, Anthony Perrotti of Waterbury; and many nieces and nephews. His funeral is Saturday, May 12, at 12:15 p.m. from the Alderson Funeral Home of Naugatuck at 201 Meadow St. and will proceed to St. Francis of Assisi Church at 318 Church St. for a Mass of Christian Burial at 1 p.m. Burial will follow in St. James Cemetery on Cross St. in Naugatuck. Friends may call at the funeral home Friday, May 11, from 5 to 8 p.m. For further information, to light a candle, or to send an online condolence, go to www.aldersonfuneralhomes.com.

Ronald Pruchnicki Sr. Father of Ronald Pruchnicki Jr.

Ronald W. Pruchnicki Sr., 70, passed away unexpectedly at his home Friday, May 4. He was born in Waterbury, Oct. 3, 1941, son of the late Theophile and Dorothy M. (Kraus) Pruchnicki. He resided in Naugatuck most of his life and graduated from Naugatuck High School. Ron moved to Middlebury five years ago. He retired from the Naugatuck Police Department as the only permanent detective in town at that time. He was the owner of Corey’s Market in Naugatuck for many years. He also owned and operated Anthony’s Pizza in Waterbury, which moved to Oakville, where it still remains and continues to be operated by his family. He leaves his son, Ronald W. Pruchnicki Jr. of Naugatuck; his daughter, Carrie Lombardo of Waterbury; a sister, Shirleyan McHale and her husband, Thomas, of Old Lyme; three grandchildren: Nicolette Lombardo and Joseph and Michael Pruchnicki; one niece, Maribeth McHale, and one nephew, John McHale. His funeral Wednesday was followed by burial in St. James Cemetery in Naugatuck. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice. To send an online condolence, visit www.naugatuckvalleymemorial.com

Obituary Policy Please ask your funeral director to send obituaries and photos to us at beeintelligencer@gmail. For more information, call 203-577-6800. The Bee-Intelligencer runs obituaries and their accompanying photos free of charge. We do this as a community service to honor the deceased and the family and friends who love them.

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The Bee-Intelligencer

6

Friday, May 11, 2012

Panthers keep rolling along

Gymnastics Competition By STEPHEN DAVIS

In preparations for the 2012 Connecticut High School baseball season, one question remained: Who would be the team to beat in the South West Conference? Many experts predicted it was Newtown’s time to shine after many years of successful winning seasons. However, twotime defending champion Pomperaug, receiving just 10 percent of the experts’ votes in the offseason, has made a statement of its own as the regular season winds down. Ever since the Panthers’ season-opening loss in New Fairfield to the New Fairfield Rebels, the Panthers have had some astonishing highlights. Pomperaug currently owns an undefeated record at home, including three no-hitters by seniors Andrew Reel and David Cherry, who already has thrown two this season. Speaking of Cherry and Reel, the two senior aces pitched in the Panthers’ most recent

home games against arch-rival Masuk and New Milford Friday and Monday, respectively. In a rematch of the South West Conference championship game from a year ago, Pomperaug hosted rival Masuk from Monroe. The Panther bats were on fire as the team exploded for four runs in the first inning of Masuk starter Adam Madison, and they tacked on one more to take a 5-0 lead after two innings. However, Masuk came alive in the fourth inning as Pat Tripodi and Matt Fedora earned back-toback walks, and with the bases loaded, Jake Duckworth drove in Tripodi and Fedora. Cherry settled down and got the final two outs, and Pomperaug held on to a 5-2 advantage. After connecting for six hits over the first two innings, the Panthers could muster only three hits throughout the rest of the game. Cherry finished the game with three walks, four hits allowed, and three strikeouts, earning the win.

After Zach Snapkowski walked Malik Cummings in the fifth inning, pitching coach Andy Cloutier removed him in favor of sophomore Eric Beatty. Beatty accomplished the task he was given, and that was to shut down Masuk’s offense until the seventh and final inning. Anthony Amoroso and Kyle Horton started the inning off with singles, Cummings struck out, and Thomas Milone worked out a walk to load the bases, with the go-ahead run coming to the plate. After Beatty got Matt Duignan to fly out to Reel, it came down to Tripodi. Tripodi hit a ground ball to Garrett DeLotto near third base, and he fired the ball across to first base to just beat out the sprinting Tripodi as Pomperaug players celebrated a 5-2 victory. After two days off, the Panthers had another home game as they took on the New Milford Green Wave. In a similar fashion to Friday’s Masuk game, the Panther bats warmed up through the

first three innings, as the Panthers led 6-0 while recording eight hits to support starting pitcher Andrew Reel. However, once again, the New Milford bullpen found a way to silence Pomperaug’s bats by allowing only one hit in the final four innings. The Green Wave would not go home quietly, as New Milford scored two runs in the sixth inning off of Reel, and they scored one more run off of Steve Consiglio in the seventh inning. In the end, Reel ended up having 10 strikeouts while walking three Green Waves and allowing three hits in six innings of work. On Wednesday, the Panthers were to continue their hot streak as the team traveled to play the Stratford Red Devils. The Red Devils enter the fray with a record of 9-5, fresh off a 9-2 win over the New Fairfield Rebels. The next home game for Pomperaug will be Friday, May 11, when they play host to the Brookfield Bobcats.

20, from 12 to 3 p.m. at Shepardson Field. Dog lovers are invited to enjoy a fun afternoon with their furry friends. The event consists of an all-breed dog show, competitions in a variety of categories, demonstrations, vendors and raffle prizes. There is an entry fee for competition. For more information, email kswiley@sbcglobal.net

who want to learn the ins and outs of being in a stage production will be instructed by theater veterans Deb McKenna, Rich McKenna and T.J. Thompson, who will teach stage directions, voice instruction and acting techniques at rehearsals as everyone works together towards the final performance. Children may audition for specific roles; however, everyone is guaranteed a part. CCK is a way to boost a child’s self-esteem and help them with memorization, public speaking and time management. The fee is $150 for residents; $160 for nonresidents. Families also will be responsible for the cost of costumes. Scholarships are available. For more information about  CCK and scholarships, email  CurtainCallKidsCT@ gmail.com or visit its Facebook page by going to www.facebook. com  and searching for “Curtain Call Kids CT.”

Middlebury Parks & Recreation Gymnasts, back, left to right, Micaela Gagas and Chrissie Tzepos of Convertibles Needed Middlebury and Lucy Bernetsky of Oxford and front, Veronica GaMiddlebury Parks and Recregas of Middlebury strike a pose during a pause in a competition at ation is seeking individuals with USA Gymnastics in Watertown last Saturday. Tzepos has been taking convertible cars to drive our Vetclasses in gymnastics since she was 3 years old. (Marjorie Needham photo) erans of Foreign Wars in the town’s Memorial Day Parade Sunday, May 27, at 5 p.m. to honor them for their service. If you can help, please call 203758-2520.

Pomperaug High School Varsity Games May 11 to May 18, 2012

Baseball

Challenger Sports

One-Day Safe Boating & PWC Certification Course

Fishing Derby

This single session, eight-hour course taught by Professional Marine Education will be offered to those 12 and older Saturday, May 19, and Saturday, June 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Room 26 at Shepardson Community Center. It provides a certificate of completion as partial fulfillment of the requirements to obtain the Certificate of Personal Watercraft Operation, which allows the operation of motorized recreational vessels up to 65 feet and sailboats 19.5 feet or longer. Students should bring a pen/pencil to class. The fee is $62 for residents; $72 for nonresidents.

Friday, May 11............... Brookfield (H)......................................... 4:15 p.m. British Soccer Camp Monday, May 14............ Notre Dame-Fairfield (H)......................... 4:15 p.m. Sign up by May 11 for the June Wednesday, May 16...... Bethel (A).................................................... 7 p.m. 25 to 29 week of British soccer for ages 3 to 12 and receive this Boys Golf Monday, May 14............ Masuk (H).................................................... 3 p.m. year’s free jersey. Camp includes Tuesday, May 15............ Joel Barlow (H)............................................. 3 p.m. fun games, skill-building drills Wednesday, May 16...... Newtown (H)................................................ 3 p.m. and World Cup scrimmages every day! Register online at ChalBoys Lacrosse Monday, May 14............ New Milford (A)............................................ 4 p.m. lengersports.com OR send mailThursday, May 17.......... Joel Barlow (H)............................................. 7 p.m. in registrations and checks payable to Challenger Sports to Girls Lacrosse Brittany Emin, Challenger Saturday, May 12.......... Norwalk (A)................................................ 11 a.m. Sports, 94A Jefferson Blvd., WarMonday, May 14............ Masuk (A).................................................... 4 p.m. wick, RI 02888. For more inforTuesday, May 15............ Bethel (H).................................................... 7 p.m. mation, call 401-213-0461 or email bemin@challengersports. Boys Outdoor Track Saturday, May 12.......... Bethel, Unique Invitational (A)...................... 9 a.m. com.

Girls Outdoor Track

Monday, May 7.............. Masuk, Immaculate, Lauralton Hall (A)......... 4 p.m.

Softball

Friday, May 4................. Masuk (A)............................................... 4:15 p.m. Monday, May 7.............. New Milford (H)....................................... 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, May 9........ Stratford (A)............................................ 4:15 p.m. Thursday, May 10.......... Brookfield (H)......................................... 4:15 p.m.

Boys Tennis

Monday, May 7.............. Joel Barlow (A)........................................ 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, May 9........ Bethel (H)............................................... 3:45 p.m.

Girls Tennis

Monday, May 7.............. Joel Barlow (H)........................................ 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, May 9........ Bethel (A)............................................... 3:45 p.m. (H) Home (A) Away

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derby only. Any fish caught after 10 a.m. or the following days will not be honored. Rules are available at the parks and recreation office. The Middlebury Police Social Club and Parks and Recreation Department sponsor this event.

The annual fishing derby for Middlebury children ages 5 to 12 will be Saturday, May 19, from 7 to 10 a.m. at the Meadowview Park Pond, rain or shine. Prizes will be given out the day of the

Curtain Call Kids

Auditions for the Curtain Call Kids (CCK) fifth summer production, “The Wizard of Oz,”  will be Monday, May 21, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Shepardson Community Center at 1172 Whittemore Road in Middlebury. Kids ages 8 to 18 from all area towns are invited to participate by registering before May 21 through the Middlebury Parks and Recreations Department. The CCK program designed for young actors will meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Shepardson Center starting May 21 (except May 25) and ending with performances Aug. 17 and 18 at a venue to be announced. Past perforSecond Annual mances have been at the Nancy Dog Show Marine Studio Theater in TorThe Middlebury Community rington and the Thomaston OpWomen’s Club’s Second Annual era House. Dog Show will be Sunday, May Youth with a flair for drama 1. In the 2009 and 2010 major-league seasons, only two players compiled at least a .300 batting average, 20 stolen bases and 20 home runs. Name them. 2. How many different seasons has Alfonso Soriano compiled at least 35 home runs and 30 steals? 3. In 2001, the Rams’ Kurt Warner became the third quarterback to lead the NFL in completion percentage, touchdowns passes and passing rating in the same season for a second time. Name the two to do it before him. 4. The 1981-82 North Carolina men’s basketball team, which won a national title, had three players who ended up among the top five slots in the NBA Draft. Name two of them. 5. Name three of the five New York Rangers to win the All-Star Game MVP Award. 6. The first Czech athlete to win a Winter Olympic gold medal did so in what event? 7. Who was the youngest winner of a multi-round LPGA event before 16-year-old Lexi Thompson won in 2011?

Answers:

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1. Hanley Ramirez (Marlins) and Shin-Soo Choo (Indians). 2. Four (2002, ‘03, ‘05 and ‘06). 3. Sammy Baugh (1940, ‘47) and Steve Young (1992, ‘94). 4. James Worthy (No. 1, 1982), Michael Jordan (No. 3, 1984) and Sam Perkins (No. 4, 1984). 5. Don Maloney (1984), Mike Gartner (‘93), Mike Richter (‘94), Wayne Gretzky (‘99) and Marian Gaborik (2011). 6. Jiri Raska won a gold medal in ski jumping in 1968. 7. Paula Creamer was 18 years, 9 months old when she won an event in 2005.

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Friday, May 11, 2012

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Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF CERTIFICATION OF PARTY MIDDLEBURY ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS -ENDORSED CANDIDATES FOR MUNICIPAL OFFICES (Prescribed by the Secretary of the State and required to be The Middlebury Zoning Board of Appeals hereby gives notice published by Municipal Clerk under Conn. Gen. Stat. § 9-395) that at the Regular Meeting held on May 2, 2012 at 7:30 P.M. in LEGAL NOTICE the Shepardson Hall, 1172 Whittemore Road, Room #26, MiddleA certified list of Democratic party-endorsed candidates for the bury, CT, the following decisions were made: Town of Middlebury for election as Justice of the Peace will be on file in my office at 1212 Whittemore Road, Middlebury, Con- Appeal #3147 – 81 Fenn Road Seeking a 15-foot side line necticut, and copies thereof will be available for public distribu- variance from Section 11 of the Zoning Regulations to take down tion not later than the fourteenth day following the close of the two homes and existing garage to allow for a new home. Accept town committee meeting, caucus or convention which made the the application for and schedule a public hearing on Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. endorsement. A Primary will be held August 14, 2012 if the required primary Dated this 3rd day of May 2012 petition(s) for opposition candidate(s) is filed, pursuant to SecLinda Burton, Clerk tions 9-382 to 9-450 of the Connecticut General Statutes, not Middlebury Zoning Board of Appeals later than 4:00 p.m. on June 12, 2012. Petition forms, instructions and information concerning the procedure for filing of opposing candidacies, including schedules, may be obtained from: LEGAL NOTICE Thomas McCormack, Democratic Registrar of Voters, 1212 MIDDLEBURY PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION Whittemore Road, Middlebury, Connecticut. REGULAR MEETING Dated at Middlebury, Connecticut this 11th day of May, 2012. The Middlebury Planning & Zoning Commission hereby gives Edith Salisbury notice that at the regular meeting held on Thursday, May 3, 2012 Municipal Clerk of Middlebury at 7:30 p.m., at the Shepardson Community Center, 1172 Whittemore Road, Middlebury, CT the following decisions were made:

LEGAL NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF CERTIFICATION OF PARTY Kaloidis Family Subdivision/2065 Middlebury Rd. – Appli-ENDORSED CANDIDATES FOR MUNICIPAL OFFICES (Prescribed by the Secretary of the State and required to be cations for Subdivision and Excavation & Grading Permit – Pubpublished by Municipal Clerk under Conn. Gen. Stat. § 9-395) lic Hearing was closed and the applications were approved per conditions. LEGAL NOTICE A certified list of Republican party-endorsed candidates for the Town of Middlebury for election as Justice of the Peace will be on file in my office at 1212 Whittemore Road, Middlebury, Connecticut, and copies thereof will be available for public distribution not later than the fourteenth day following the close of the town committee meeting, caucus or convention which made the endorsement. A Primary will be held August 14, 2012 if the required primary petition(s) for opposition candidate(s) is filed, pursuant to Sections 9-382 to 9-450 of the Connecticut General Statutes, not later than 4:00 p.m. on June 12, 2012. Petition forms, instructions and information concerning the procedure for filing of opposing candidacies, including schedules, may be obtained from: Nancy S. Robison, Republican Registrar of Voters, 1212 Whittemore Road, Middlebury, Connecticut.

1365 LLC – Special Exception Use for “outdoor dining” pursuant to Section 31.4.2 of the Middlebury Zoning Regulations and Special Exception Use for alcoholic beverages pursuant to Section 66 of the Middlebury Zoning Regulations - Public Hearing was continued to 6-7-12 Tribuary Restaurant Group LLC aka Pies and Pints/1 Store Rd. – Application for use pursuant to Section 31.1.3 – Application was approved. WPCA Resolution pursuant to Section 8-24 of the CT State Statutes for Pump Stations 1, 2, & 3 was approved. Dated this 7th day of May, 2012 Curtis Bosco, Chairman

Dated at Middlebury, Connecticut this 11th day of May, 2012 Edith Salisbury Municipal Clerk of Middlebury

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TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY ANNUAL BUDGET MEETING Thursday, May 24, 2012 - 5:00 P.M.

The following Budget will be presented by the Board of Finance at the Annual Budget Meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 5 p.m. at Middlebury Town Hall 1212 Whittemore Road This notice is published pursuant to the Charter Section 702D. Submitted by the Board of Finance Michael McCormack Vincent Cipriano Stephen Ruccio David Cappelletti Michael Kenausis Edward Asselin Thomas Proulx, Alternate Richard Spierto, Alternate

TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY MEANS OF FINANCING - FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 REVENUES

As of March 31 Actual Revenues Approved Budget Actual Revenues Estimated Revenues Proposed Budget FY 2010-11 w/ Amend FY 11-12 9 Months FY 11-12 for FY 11-12 FY 2012-13

Property Taxes............................................$24,697,934 ..........$25,431,466 ..........$25,253,608 ............ $25,350,000 ........ $25,453,753 Supplemental Auto........................................... 145,097 .................120,000 .................163,137 ................... 163,137 ............... 140,000 Prior Years Taxes.............................................. 363,924 .................270,000 .................402,456 ................... 402,456 ............... 270,000 Interest/Penalties.............................................. 168,888 .................120,000 .................183,679 ................... 183,679 ............... 120,000 Tax Collector Copies.....................................................-............................. -.........................229 .......................... 294 ...................... 250 Total Property Taxes..................... $25,375,843 ......... $25,941,466 ......... $26,003,109 ........... $26,099,566 ....... $25,984,003 State Grants..................................................... 364,692 .................285,410 .................167,145 ................... 285,410 ............... 288,706 Investment Income............................................. 55,131 ...................50,000 ...................24,552 ..................... 30,000 ................. 35,000 Assessor Copier Fees............................................. 658 ........................450 ........................558 .......................... 600 ...................... 450 Assessor Personal Property Audits...............................-..................120,000 .................105,260 ................... 120,000 ............... 120,000 Town Clerk........................................................ 123,342 .................125,725 .................107,912 ................... 125,725 ............... 148,400 Building Department......................................... 197,513 ................ 168,150 .................. 92,461 ................... 140,000 .............. 120,550 Donations / Tower Rental Revenues................ 241,542 ................ 182,335 ................ 149,367 ................... 182,335 .............. 197,937 Health Department............................................... 9,983 .................. 11,540 .............................-................................-........................... Water Commission............................................... 3,603 .................... 5,000 .................... 3,003 ....................... 4,000 .................. 4,000 Fire Department............................................................-............................. -........................ 947 ...................... 1,007 .......................... Police Department.............................................. 15,765 .....................8,400 .....................9,166 ....................... 9,500 ................. 10,100 Public Works Department/Sale Of Old Assets...............-......................6,100 .............................-........................ 5,982 .......................... Transfer Station Fees......................................... 53,054 ...................52,000 ...................30,133 ..................... 35,000 ................. 45,500 Park & Rec Self Sustaining Account................ 157,083 .................172,000 .................150,198 ................... 172,000 ............... 172,000 Park & Recreation.............................................. 52,249 ...................65,250 ...................13,396 ..................... 65,250 ................. 66,550 Elderly Program Revenue.................................. 16,900 ...................18,475 ...................10,888 ..................... 18,475 ................. 20,475 Public Library........................................................ 5,712 .................... 5,200 .................... 3,374 ....................... 5,200 .................. 5,200 Education Cost Sharing - State........................ 586,577 .................684,186 .................342,094 ................... 684,186 ............... 719,899 Reimbursement From Region #15................................-....................10,000 .............................-................................-........................... Special Duty Fund.........................................................-....................59,973 ...................44,980 ..................... 59,973 ............... 104,400 Capital Non Recurring Fund..........................................-....................17,200 .....................5,400 ..................... 17,200 ................... 7,200 Infrastructure Trust Fund...............................................-..................121,166 ...................38,628 ................... 121,166 ................113,552 Park & Rec Rev Fund....................................................-....................10,000 .............................-................................-.................. 10,000 Library Improvement Fund............................................-....................46,734 ...................32,524 ..................... 46,734 ................. 42,985 Total Revenues.................................... 27,259,647 ........... 28,166,760 ........... 27,335,093 ............. 28,229,309 ......... 28,216,907 Transfers From Sewer Fee & Assessment......... 75,659 ...................80,000 ...................37,830 ..................... 80,000 ............... 283,270 Total Means Of Financing................ 27,335,306 ........... 28,246,760 ........... 27,372,922 ............. 28,309,309 ......... 28,500,177 Expenditures

Town of Middlebury Appropriations Summary 2012-2013

As of March 31 Actual Expenses Adopted Budget Actual Expenses Estimated Expenses Proposed Budget For Fy 11-12 Fy 2012-13 Fy 2010-11 W/Revisions Fy 11-12 9 Months Fy 11-12

Board Of Selectman........................................$133,680 ...............$136,971..................$96,368.................. $136,971.............. $136,071 Finance Department......................................... 251,057 .................262,466..................181,255.................... 262,466................ 243,060 Town Treasurer..................................................... 4,402 .....................4,491......................3,367........................ 4,491.................... 4,491 Assessor........................................................... 147,704 .................205,459..................153,840.................... 205,459................ 180,909 Tax Collector....................................................... 86,016 ...................93,683....................73,438...................... 93,683.................. 87,945 Town Clerk........................................................ 110,228 .................112,749....................83,513.................... 112,749.................112,749 Registrar Of Voters............................................. 37,442 ...................53,549....................21,266...................... 53,549.................. 58,029 Board Of Finance............................................... 31,543 ...................32,729....................31,300...................... 32,729.................. 32,529 Board Of Assessment Appeals............................. 1,051 .....................5,099.........................639........................ 5,099.................... 1,000 Legal................................................................. 129,971 .................125,000..................105,074.................... 125,000................ 125,000 Probate Court..................................................... 16,020 ...................17,000......................7,769...................... 17,000.................. 15,000 Town Hall............................................................ 75,467 ...................67,861....................56,808...................... 67,861.................. 73,530 Building Department......................................... 107,810 .................110,740....................80,082.................... 110,740.................116,574 Payments To Other Jurisdictions.......................... 9,459 .....................9,494......................9,474........................ 9,494.................. 45,671 Planning And Zoning.......................................... 32,815 ...................27,209....................19,917...................... 27,209.................. 21,999 Zoning Board Of Appeals..................................... 4,574 .....................5,229......................4,700........................ 5,229.................... 6,305 Conservation Commission................................. 14,672 ...................14,469......................8,556...................... 14,469...................11,769 Economic Development Committee........................ 708 ........................475.........................475........................... 475....................... 750 Beautification Committee..................................... 1,629 .....................1,475.............................0........................ 1,475.................... 1,475 Insurance.......................................................... 307,701 .................329,771..................300,712.................... 329,771................ 340,484 Historical Society.................................................. 3,718 .....................3,410......................2,427........................ 3,410.................... 3,900 Health Department............................................. 60,243 ...................62,647....................44,931...................... 62,647........................... 0 Water Commission............................................. 79,707 ...................81,597....................57,018...................... 81,597.................. 86,456 Fire Department............................................... 230,827 .................222,789..................141,582.................... 222,789................ 223,284 Civil Preparedness............................................... 1,212 .....................1,500......................1,482........................ 1,500.................... 1,500 Fire Marshal....................................................... 10,421 ...................11,420......................7,796...................... 11,420...................11,530 Police Department......................................... 1,161,275 ..............1,195,665..................903,024................. 1,195,665............. 1,243,318 Communications Center................................... 306,436 .................307,925..................228,391.................... 307,925................ 212,401 Engineering........................................................ 22,428 ...................30,000......................4,038...................... 30,000.................. 20,000 Buildings And Grounds..................................... 247,415 .................246,142..................184,340.................... 246,142................ 247,819 Shepardson Community Center......................... 41,355 ...................43,525....................33,433...................... 43,525.................. 43,525 Public Works.................................................. 1,425,782 ..............1,406,445..................955,068................. 1,406,445............. 1,417,043 Waste Removal................................................ 315,659 .................316,061..................225,610.................... 316,061................ 315,517 Park & Rec Self Sustaining Account................ 176,334 .................177,300..................131,925.................... 177,300................ 161,000 Park & Recreation............................................ 257,067 .................240,593..................162,338.................... 240,593................ 233,106 Youth & Family Services..................................... 48,475 ...................45,000....................45,000...................... 45,000.................. 45,000 Social Services................................................... 41,956 ...................43,268....................33,005...................... 43,268.................. 43,315 Elderly Services.................................................. 67,612 ...................73,443....................53,799...................... 73,443.................. 72,543 Public Library.................................................... 416,811 .................395,271..................301,965.................... 395,271................ 395,271 Employee Benefits........................................ 1,846,157 ..............2,000,994...............1,692,792................. 2,000,994............. 2,039,754 Contingency Fund........................................................0....................37,789.............................0...................... 37,789.................. 50,000 Information Technology...................................... 52,926 ...................27,477....................24,000...................... 27,477.................. 60,000 Debt Service..................................................... 547,207 .................442,000..................405,569.................... 442,000................ 250,000 Refund Of Taxes................................................. 10,119 ...................25,000......................8,989...................... 25,000.................. 15,000 Capital Budget-Town / Facilities....................... 205,988 .................287,053..................177,083.................... 287,053................ 285,003 Capital Budget-Town / Public Safety............................0....................45,300......................4,800...................... 45,300................ 125,180 Extraordinary Items.............................................42,283......................4,025......................3,094........................ 4,025.................. 38,625 Capital Non-Recurring Fund................................14,263................... 14,200 .................. 11,259 ..................... 14,200.................. 14,200 Municipal Infrastructure Fund..............................81,171................. 127,154 ................ 127,154 ................... 127,154................ 127,154 Library Improvement Fund..................................39,763................... 46,734 .................. 27,982 ..................... 46,734........................... 0 Park & Rec Revenue Fund....................................9,983................... 10,000 ............................0...................... 10,000.................. 10,000 Total Town Appropriations...............9,268,542...............9,587,646...............7,238,448................. 9,587,646............. 9,406,782 Department Of Education.................17,927,638.............18,677,886.............15,756,665............... 18,677,886........... 19,093,395 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS.......................$27,196,180...........$28,265,532...........$22,995,113............. $28,265,532......... $28,500,177

End-of-season cleaning special! Book by May 31 and save $25* *Regular $225

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203-264-0559

owner/operator

agostino tile, llc Over 20 years experience I will use your tile or mine.

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Butkus Plumbing

Adrian Cela Co-owner

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Legal Notice

EML Services

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• Stone Walls • Walkways • Patios • Chimneys • Fireplaces • Roofing • Tile Floors Commercial and Residential • Stone & Brick Siding & Insured • Brick and Block Works Licensed CT LIC/REG • Old & New Construction #0607918

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Custom Ironwork Design & Fabrication BOB KLUGE

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The Bee-Intelligencer

8

Friday, May 11, 2012

Adopt a Rescue Pet

Send in your pet photos

CARTER Carter is new to the shelter and is not happy here. This sweet Terrier mix loves people and is missing his warm home and family. Sadly, they had to move and give this boy up. After spending four years with them, Carter is anxious to find a new home. He wants a place where he can remain the rest of his life. Carter is trained in commands such as sit, lie down, and roll over. If you want a dog who is already trained, then please consider Carter. You can visit him at the Animals For Life shelter.

LEAH Leah is an older Poodle mix who was dumped on someone’s doorstep prior to being brought to Animals For Life. She manages to navigate around very well despite having advanced cataracts in both eyes. Leah would love a home where she can be cuddled and held. She is cat-friendly and also is fine around other small to medium size dogs who are laid back like her. If you would like to meet this sweet soul, please call Animals For Life ahead of time as Leah is in foster care.

For more information on these pets, call 203-758-2933 or visit Animals For Life at the Middlebury Transfer Station on Rte. 63 at the corner of Woodside Ave. Adoption hours are Mondays and Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 12 to 3 p.m. For more about the adoption process, visit www.animalsforlifect.org.

Your pet could be featured as “Pet of the Week” in this picture frame. Send us your pet’s photo by email to mbisubmit@gmail or by regular mail to P.O. Box 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 along with your pet’s name, your last name and your town.

PET OF THE WEEK Beverly lives with the Anderson family in Middlebury

Chapin’s Computer Tip

SaveTube SaveTube.com provides a great way to copy a video clip to your desktop for later viewing or to create a DVD for a presentation. All you need to do is copy and paste the URL to the site’s interface and select the file format, and the video clip is copied to a destination of your choosing. For example, a business owner wanted to copy their website’s landing page video onto a DVD that could be used during

CANNON Cannon is a very handsome young man between the ages of 1.5 to 2 years old. He is cautious of men, but will warm up in time. His skin is very sensitive, and he seems to have a food allergy. We have him on Taste of The Wild Salmon flavor and his skin looks great. He is doing wonderfully on it. He will lay in your lap all day if he is allowed, loves children and LOVES playing fetch. He gets very stressed out when he sees other animals, so he NEEDS to be the only animal in the house.

Maribelle is such a heartwarming little girl!! She was abandoned here at our shelter and is now looking for her new forever home. Maribelle is one year of age and such a sweetheart. She adores snuggling and would make a great companion for most any home!

Ladybug Cake & Candy Supply Gift Certificates

134 Main St. South

72G Bennett Sq., Southbury, CT (behind Leo’s Restaurant)

LadybugCakeandCandy.com

ARE YOUR POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS ALL OVER NEW ENGLAND? The Community Papers of New England can display this size ad to over 1 million homes.

To place your advertisement, call 877-423-6399 203-577-6800

A Progressive and Informed Approach to Tree Care and Removal

We sell • Service • Install Mulch • Topsoil • Stone Bluestone • Brick Pavers • Belgium Block

Free Landscaping Ideas

Trees, Shrubs, Flowers

unusual for owners to include their pets in important life events like weddings, but it can be difficult finding a venue that accepts pets. You should hit the Internet to search for venues that welcome dogs. Dogfriendly.com is a comprehensive guide to hotels and other facilities where dogs are allowed. Another site, vowwowwow.wordpress.com, is specifically for owners looking to include their pets in their wedding ceremony. Other sources are business review sites like yelp. com or word of mouth from friends and neighbors.

Even before you settle on a venue, start planning how Suzee will be incorporated into not just the ceremony, but the entire day. You and your fiancée will be incredibly busy and distracted. Heidi Ganahl, CEO of Camp Bow Wow, advises couples to choose a trusted friend or hire a professional pet sitter to be Suzee’s caretaker throughout the event. Her attendant won’t just walk Suzee down the aisle to you, but also will make sure she is fed, exercised, monitored and has enough “quiet time” so she doesn’t get stressed out. Best wishes on this important day! Send your questions or pet care tips to ask@pawscorner.com, or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. For more pet care-related advice and information, visit www.pawscorner.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. P UZZLE SOLUTIONS:

Ferrari’s Appliance We Sell & Service All Brands 160 Rubber Ave. Naugatuck, CT

Delivery available

Tel. 203-723-9705 Fax 203-723-9718 Open 7 Days • 1483 New Haven Road, Naugatuck

Daniel Weise 203-410-7544

EXERCISE!!

FUN!!

video’s URL to. Pick a file format that works best for you and let it ride! When complete, disengage the Internet and double-click the video you just downloaded to make sure it works as desired. Copy and paste it to a flash drive or start your DVD software and burn copies. It is really that simple. For more tips, visit chapinbusiness.com. For answers to your technology questions, call us at 203-262-1869.

Dog isn’t welcome at wedding venues

MARIBELLE

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: My fiancé and I are getting married at the end of June, and we want “Suzee,” our bichon frisé, to be an important part of the ceremony. We agreed she would be present as we exchange our vows For more information on these animals, as well as others at Meriden Humane Society (MHS), email and will be in our wedding picmeridensociety@sbcglobal.net. MHS is open Wednesday through Sunday from noon to 6 p.m., and volun- tures. The trouble is we cannot find teers can be available to meet with you through an appointment. MHS is at 311 Murdock Ave. in Meriden. a venue that allows dogs inside other than service dogs. We even had to drop one pastor who said Find the he would not allow Suzee to be Bee-Intelligencer on present when he led the ceremony! Can you help? – Kurt W. Supplies for all your cake and candy needs! in Upstate New York DEAR KURT: First of all, conClasses for kids and adults (Call for details.) gratulations! Second, it’s not Birthday Parties • Hard-to-find Specialty Items

203-264-BAKE (2253) 

a presentation. SaveTube allowed them to copy the video file (in MP4 format) to their desktop and then to a DVD or flash drive. Now they have a video clip to use for presentations, to keep as a backup copy or for a template for a commercial elsewhere. Go to SaveTube.com and download the file that makes it work. The installation takes only seconds, and you will be presented with an area to copy the

Arborist Lic. # S-5338 Pesticide Reg. # B-2383

info@weisechoice.com www.weisechoice.com

(203) 723-7230

Licensed and Insured • Located in Middlebury

Traveling Seas Pet Supplies Tropical Fish & Pet Supplies

A great opportunity for kids to burn off a little energy,

run, jump, swing and play!

Instructional Classes • Birthday Parties • Cheerleading • Great foundation for other activities • Meet new friends • Free time for mom (this is huge) • Ages 2 to Adult • Try a Class... Then Decide

Save your furniture ... jump on ours See our class schedule at usagymnastics.net 811 Straits Turnpike • Watertown, CT 06795

Usa gymnastics

860-945-6970

25 OFF

FREE

Registration Fee

With Coupon. Cannot be combined. Expires 5/1/12

MBI

Birthday Party

When enrolling for classes With Coupon. Cannot be combined. Expires 5/1/12

Offering beer, wine & distilled spirits Beer tastings Thursdays 5 - 7 pm Wine tastings Fridays, 5 - 7 pm & Saturday afternoons

10% case discounts on wine* *Not to exceed State of Connecticut minimum pricing

MBI

$

1255 Middlebury Road (the Hamlet)

203-527-6651 Hours: Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Fresh and Salt water Tropical Fish Set up and maintain freshwater or salt water aquariums (home or office)

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w it h th is ad

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M ay 30, 2012

Supplies for:

Dogs • Cats • Birds Reptiles • Small Animals

Dog Foods: Taste of the Wild, Nature's Variety, Natural Balance, Iams, Eukanuba

20 Main St. (Rear of old Pin Shop) Oakville, Ct Hours: Mon - Sat 11 am - 7 pm Sun 11 am - 6 pm 860-417-2972

www.travelingseaspet.com

MBI051112  
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