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“Spring is sooner recognized by plants than by men.” ~ Chinese Proverb

Prst. Std. U.S. Postage Paid Naugatuck, CT #27

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Bee Intelligencer Informing the towns of Middlebury, Southbury, Woodbury, Naugatuck, Oxford and Watertown A FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Volume IX, No. 14

Friday, April 5, 2013

Middlebury budget hearing Wednesday By MARJORIE NEEDHAM Middlebury’s Board of Finance (BoF) will present the proposed 2013-2014 town budget to the public Wednesday, April 10, at 6:30 p.m. at the firehouse at 65 Tucker Hill Road in Middlebury. The public hearing for the Region 15 School District budget, which also affects Middlebury taxpayers, is the same night, but at 7:30 p.m., in the AP Room at Pomperaug High School. Due to the changes in Middlebury’s charter, Middlebury voters will vote on both the town budget and the Region 15 budget on the same day, Wednesday, May 8, this year rather than voting on separate days as was done last year. With a $645,854 increase, the town’s $10.1 million budget is almost 7 percent higher than the current $9.4 million budget. However, the BoF has cut roughly $1 million off the budget initially presented to it by the Board of Selectmen. Summary sheets of the proposed budget can be found in the public hearing legal notice on page 7 of this issue of the newspaper. Copies of the entire budget can be picked up at the Middlebury town clerk’s office. BoF Chairman Mike McCormack said his board worked to create a town budget that would result in no tax increase. The town budget increase would have been more than offset by an expected $808,862 revenue increase in property tax and supplemental auto revenue. However, Middlebury’s portion of the Region 15 School District budget is expected to increase by $681,008 to $19.8 million from $19.1 million. McCormack said he anticipates the combined

budgets totaling $29.8 million will result in a tax increase of approximately 2.5 percent for Middlebury taxpayers. McCormack said the $518,000 surplus from the 2011-2012 budget was applied to the 2013-2104 budget. “That was only right,” he said. “That was the taxpayers’ money.” When it came to reducing the proposed 2013-2014 budget, McCormack said, “We moved $160,000 right out of the budget with the thought there were reserve accounts to offset costs of roofing at Public Works and the Fire Department and general maintenance for the Historical Society building.” He said the BoF also eliminated salary increases for part-time personnel and lowered increases for fulltime personnel to 1 percent. “Most fulltime employees get longevity increases of a half to one percent,” McCormack said. First Selectman Edward B. St. John said Wednesday, “It’s always a difficult situation when you try to balance our needs against our ability to pay. There’s always a fine line there. We never get a budget we all are in love with.” He said this budget could be considered a starting point, and the town would see what happens at the public hearing next week. St. John said he didn’t like to second guess the BoF, but he was concerned the board eliminated overtime from departments like public works. He said some departments have to respond no matter when a storm occurs. “There is a certain amount of liability the town incurs if we are notified about a situation and we don’t respond,” he said.

EIDC reviews tax policy By TERRENCE S. MCAULIFFE The Middlebury Economic and Industrial Development Commission (EIDC) at its March 26 meeting reviewed its application experiences from the first two tax incentive program submissions and discussed progress on the nascent Guidebook for Commercial Development. Co-chairman Michael Kenausis asked commissioners to discuss possible areas for improvement in Middlebury’s Tax Incentive Program for business attraction, retention and expansion. An Oct. 1, 2012, town meeting approved a tax incentive for Wallingford-based Winchester Electronics to relocate to Middlebury, and an April 8 town meeting is set for voters to decide on a tax incentive for the rebuild and expansion of Shaker Family Ford-Lincoln into the Middlebury side of property that is partly in Middlebury and partly in Watertown. The previous building was almost entirely in Watertown. Co-chairman Gerry Matthews commented on several sections of the program that might be improved, including the list of factors commissioners take into account, the timetable for recommendations and the conditions necessary to begin the tax abatement first year. Commissioner Ted Manello

commented on the program being applicable to businesses simply preserving jobs, and Commissioner Frank Mirovsky commented on whether EIDC’s passing of completed applications to the board of selectmen should be considered a recommendation or simply vetting. Kenausis asked members to bring revision proposals to the next meeting for consideration in eliminating gray areas and better protecting the interests of the town. Work on the Guidebook for Commercial Development continued with a progress review of a draft document patterned after a similar guidebook from Georgetown, Mass. Members had been assigned areas to research at an Oct. 15 special meeting, with Kenausis taking on the Building Department, co-chairman Gerry Matthews doing P&Z, Commissioner Frank Mirovsky researching the Conservation Commission, Ted Manello doing the Water Pollution Control Authority, Mark Petrucci talking to the fire marshal and Joseph Salvini interviewing the town engineer. Commissioners agreed to set workshop meetings in May to continue work on the guidebook. The next regular EIDC meeting will be Tuesday, April 23, at 6:30 p.m. in the Town Hall conference room.

Family members, left to right, Elizabeth Ferreiri, Olimpia Cristaldo, David Cristaldo, Sebastian Cavada and Aref Ahmed stand in front of the deli counter at Le Bobadel in Middlebury. The family opened the New York-style deli last December.

Family runs New York-style deli By MARJORIE NEEDHAM Le Bobadel, the New Yorkstyle delicatessen that opened at 819 Straits Turnpike in Middlebury last December, is the joint venture of a mom, her husband, her daughter and her son-in-law. Chef Olimpia Cristaldo, who for many years was a chef and caterer in Larchmont, N.Y, moved to Waterbury four years ago. For four long years after the move, she drove back and forth to Westchester County to work. “I was so tired, I decided to open my store with my kids,” she said. And so she sat down with her husband, daughter and sonin-law, and they drew up plans to open their own deli and catering business close to home. The result is Middlebury’s own New York-style deli. Olimpia brings to the business more than 30 years of experience as a chef and caterer. She grew up in Portugal, and the deli name, “Le Bobadel,” comes from a place near Lisbon. Daughter Elizabeth, who usually can be found behind the cash register at the deli, said of Olimpia, “Her passion is cooking. Saturdays used to be our family day. She would cook a feast at our house.” Elizabeth formerly worked in medical records during the day, but over the years helped her mother at many catering events. Now she is working fulltime in food service, and she said she loves it. “I found a new love of food. I’m very close to my family, and I love working with them all day,” she said. Olimpia’s husband, David, brings to the deli his experience as a butcher and meat department manager at supermarkets. He supervises meat and fish purchases, handles inventory control and pitches in wherever help is needed.

Baked goods made by Chef Olimpia await purchase at Le Bobadel. (Marjorie Needham photos) Son-in-law Aref Ahmed brings years of experience as a business manager at P.C. Richard & Son to Le Bobadel. At P.C. Richard, he oversaw as many as 50 people, and he helped open four Connecticut stores for the company. Le Bobadel serves breakfast, lunch and take-out dinners and caters events like parties, weddings and Seders. It is open Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Breakfast is available all day, and the breakfast menu features pancakes, waffles, eggs with home fries and toast, egg sandwiches and assorted rolls, bagels and muffins.

Lunch and dinner dishes include Portuguese dishes like kale soup, paella, rice pudding and semi-frio along with deli hot and cold sandwiches and specialty salads. Quiches and individual and family-size chicken pot pies are prepared fresh daily. Aref said their Dec. 19 opening was much later than initially planned. “Hurricane Sandy pushed us back about two months,” he said. Despite the late opening, they delivered two big catering orders just days later, one Dec. 24 and one on Christmas Day. Recently, they catered a Passover Seder for a New York synagogue.

With the first three months on his new job behind him, Aref said, “I like it. I’m still getting used to it. The best part is dealing with people and getting to know them.” As the company’s business manager, Aref said, “When it comes to quality, we are not going to negotiate.” He said that is why all their cold cuts are Boar’s Head brand. And the deli’s bread is delivered daily from a famous Italian bakery in Port Chester, N.Y. Aref said the most popular sandwich is the Italian combo with four kinds of meat and provolone cheese. For breakfast, the bacon, egg and cheese on a roll has been a big hit. Post University is across from the deli, and students are frequent customers. Aref said 40 Post baseball players recently stocked up on breakfast sandwiches to go before getting on the bus for an away game. In addition to the eat-in or take-out food, Le Bobadel stocks specialty items such as Colombian coffee and imported jams, teas, cookies, pastas, mustards and olive oils. It also has a small section of gluten-free pasta. Brands include Piacone and Lensi from Italy and Esparguette from Portugal. The family says its focus is on providing the warm and fuzzy feeling of a home-cooked meal for all of the deli’s customers. “Right now, our main goal is to have the community get to know us and trust us with their catering needs,” Elizabeth said. Business has been booming. “We’ve surpassed our expectations,” Aref said. The location on a busy road has helped tremendously, he said, but the good cooking and good service they offer are equally important. For more information on Le Bobadel, call 203-528-4061 or visit www.bobadelmarket.com.

Inside this Issue Library Lines.................... 2 Nuggets for Life.............. 6 Obituaries....................... 5 Puzzles........................... 7 Region 15 Calendar........ 2 Senior Center News......... 3 Sports Quiz..................... 6

Editorial Office: Email: mbisubmit@gmail.com Phone: 203-577-6800 Mail: P.O. Box 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 Advertising Sales: Email: mbiadvertising@gmail.com

saturday Upcoming Events

Adoptable Pets................ 8 Classifieds....................... 7 Community Calendar....... 2 Fire Log........................... 5 In Brief............................ 4 Legal Notices.................. 7 Library Happenings.......... 2

April 6

MONday

April 8

wednesday

April 10

Middlebury Easter Egg Hunt

When: 1 p.m. What: Easter Egg Hunt for Middlebury children ages 3 to 10 Where: Shepardson Community Center Field at 1172 Whittemore Road

Town meeting to vote on tax incentive

When: 7 p.m. What: Vote on Shaker Automotive tax incentive application Where: Shepardson Community Center Auditorium at 1172 Whittemore Road

Middlebury annual budget hearing

When: 6:30 p.m. What: Middlebury Board of Finance presentation of proposed 2013-2014 town budget Where: Middlebury Firehouse at 65 Tucker Hill Road

Published weekly by The Middlebury Bee Intelligencer Society, LLC - 2030 Straits Turnpike, Middlebury, CT 06762 - Copyright 2013

Dancemakers invite public to final workshop

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The Bee-Intelligencer

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Middlebury Community Calendar

Friday, April 5, 2013

Library Happenings Middlebury

Monday, April 8 Police Commission 6 p.m...................................................Town Hall Conference Room Town Meeting 7 p.m.........................Shepardson Community Center Auditorium

Tuesday, April 9 Democratic Town Committee 7:30 p.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 27 Republican Town Committee 7:30 p.m.......................................................... Shepardson Room 26 Library Board of Directors 6:30 p.m..................................................Middlebury Public Library

Non-fiction Book Discussion Group The non-fiction book group will discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman Tuesday, April 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Copies of the book are at the circulation desk.

Mystery Book Discussion Group

The Mystery Book Discussion Group will meet Thursday, April 11, at 6 p.m. to discuss “Justice” by Kaye Kellerman. Books are available at the library. The Middlebury Public Library is temporarily at the Middlebury Timex Building at Wednesday, April 10 199 Park Road Extension, Suite D, in MiddleBoard of Finance bury. Call 203-758-2634 or visit www.middle7 p.m............................................................... Shepardson Room 26 burypubliclibrary.org for more information. Land Preservation & Open Space 6 p.m...................................................Town Hall Conference Room

Thursday, April 11 Retirement Plan Committee 1 p.m...................................................Town Hall Conference Room Parks and Recreation 7 p.m................................................................. Shepardson Room 1 Calendar dates/times are subject to change If your organization would like your event included in the community calendar, please e-mail the information to beeintelligencer@gmail.com

Naugatuck

Details from “Ivy” by artist Ron Crowcroft. His creations are on exhibit at the Woodbury Public Library this month. (Submitted photo)

Author Paul Hensler Talk Author Paul Hensler will discuss his book, “The American League in Transition, 1965 – 1975: How Competition Thrived When the Yankees Didn’t,” Tuesday, April 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the Nellie Beatty Room. Call 203-729-4591 for more information.

Book Club

Region 15 School Calendar

The Whittemore Book Club will meet Tuesday, April 16, at 7 p.m. in the Main Reading Room to discuss “The Guernsey Literary Saturday, April 6 and Potato Peel Pie Society” by Mary Ann Parent University (SMART, Inc.)...................................................PHS Shaffer and Annie Barrows. The Howard Whittemore Memorial Library Sunday, April 7 is at 243 Church St. in Naugatuck. For inforNo Events Scheduled mation, call 203-729-4591 or visit whittemorelibrary.org.

April 28, 2013. Oppel, a Woodbury artist, has experimented over time with different forms of visual expression through fine art and illustration. She now uses a variety of mediums to express herself and has completed works in watercolor, colored pencil, graphite, scratchboard, oil and photography. She applies her artistic ability to portraits of people, pets, wildlife and flowers. Her artwork has been accepted into several juried shows, and she has won awards for Best Watercolor Painting and Best Wildlife Painting in the Kent Art Association shows. Check www.southburylibrary.org for more information. The library is at 100 Poverty Road in Southbury (203-262-0626).

including a documentary film and the reenactment of a traditional Korean wedding, participants will enjoy a traditional Korean meal prepared by members of the Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project. Works of art, including paintings, objects and costumes, will be on display. Call the library at 203-263-3502 to make a reservation.

Ron Crowcroft Exhibit

The artwork of Ron Crowcroft is on display in the Gallery. Crowcroft was born in Sussex, England, and went to art school in Leeds, England, at the time the most radical art school in Europe. An art reception will be held Sunday, April 14, from 2 to 4 p.m. Works in the show all are made with acrylic and oil-based paint markers on canvas. They Monday, April 8 are biomorphic abstractions, with aboriginal and ancient glyph-like elements. Viewers may MMS National Spanish Exam Experience the associate some of the images with animals, fish, MMS and RMS Drama Field Trip to The Palace Theater Enchantment of Korea birds, heads, figures, eyes or internal organs. Board of Education Public Hearing........ PHS AP Rm. 103, 7:30 p.m. Tamara Oppel Exhibit Saturday, April 6, at 1 p.m., a multimedia For more information, call 203-263-3502 or Board of Education........... PHS AP Rm. 103 following public hearing A selection of Tamara Oppel’s artwork will presentation will bring to life Korea’s rich and visit www.woodburylibraryct.org. The library be on display in the Gloria Cachion Gallery in unique cultural heritage, from colorful art to is at 269 Main St. South in Woodbury. Tuesday, April 9 to Friday, April 12 the Southbury Public Library until Sunday, modern Korea. After viewing a presentation PES Kindergarten Registration MES Kindergarten Registration

Woodbury

Southbury

Library Lines

Tuesday, April 9

Middlebury Library has new arrivals

MMS National Spanish Exam PES PTO.....................................................................................9:30 a.m. LMES Grade 4 Chorus...................................................................7 p.m.

Wednesday, April 10

By DONNA HINE

GES Grade 5 Concert....................................................................7 p.m.

Y

es, we all know April 1 is April Fool’s Day, but were Thursday, April 11 you aware the first week in PHS PLC-Advisory Day........................................... Delayed Schedule April is Library Week? And April MES Grade 4 Chorus Concert......................................................7 p.m. 16 is National Librarian Day! RMS Tri-M Induction..................................................AP Room, 7 p.m. April is a good time to visit your Middle School End of Third Marking Term local library and check out the MMS Tri-M Induction many services we offer. Take out a Kindle, download Friday, April 12 a book to your Nook, read a magMiddle School Fourth Marking Term Begins azine, join one of our many book discussions, learn to knit with Saturday, April 13 Ann, or ask about new books or No Events Scheduled DVDs – we would love to introRegion 15 website: www.region15.org duce you to our many amenities! Turning to new arrivals, Danielle Steel has written yet another novel. “Until the End of Time” (STE) is a love story involving parallel destinies decades apart. Does love truly cross time? Middlebury Road (Opposite the Shell Station) Can you be in love forever? Do Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily we have past lives? Hmmm. Anthony Calabrese 203-758-2765 Many may find comfort in this premise, and those who do will enjoy the unfolding story of love and love again. Danielle Steel hydrangeas, lilies, min-roses, tulips, books usually are a great introhyacinths, hanging baskets duction to adult reading for Bag mulches and top soil young people, and this is no exception. Although she has written Bird Seed Headquarters many, many books, the formula Black Oil, Premium Mix, Sunflower Hearts, Niger Seed (thistle for finches) is consistent and, as a love story, quite readable for many. Deer Corn • Livestock & Poultry Feed If you enjoy the timeless writWood pellets available by the ton or by the bag ing of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple, you may enjoy a new sleuth: Local eggs. Fresh daily. $3.50 per dozen a first-grade teacher named Miss Dimple Kilpatrick. We don’t have

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her first two adventures on our shelf, but her third outing is “Miss Dimple Suspects” (BAL) written by Mignon F. Ballard. It is what is known as a “cozy” – a book you can read without worrying about horrific bloody scenes or graphic gruesome events. The setting is Georgia at the time of World War II, and the book addresses the stereotyping of Japanese-Americans; simply because she is Japanese, the companion of an elderly woman is thought to be the murderer when her charge is found dead. The writing is a little choppy, but the characters and setting depict a simpler time of necessity instead of gluttony. Rationing is still practiced, and you will discover the inventions of everyday people to just live day to day in wartime. Charlaine Harris is wellknown for her Sookie Stackhouse novels, but check out the next installment in her cozy series following librarian Aurora (Roe) Teagarden. In “Poppy Done to Death” (HAR), Aurora’s sister-inlaw Poppy is murdered, leaving behind people who each knew only one facet of her personality. An engaging novel, this thankfully leaves behind vampires and werewolves for the real human villains to be found in any small town. A perfect, early spring– storm type book to read in front of a roaring fire! Next up is J. A. Jance’s “Deadly Stakes” (JAN). Another prolific writer with a loyal following, this eighth para-mystery featuring Ali Reynolds appears with mixed reviews. Reintroduction of familiar characters is great if one is starting the series with this book, but it tends to be repetitive for those who have read them all along. Once the story evolves,

though, it is an absorbing, fastpaced read … Even better than the character Dirk Pitt is Clive Cussler’s Isaac Bell. Cussler teams up with Justin Scott to write this thrilling adventure series about a detective in the early 1900s. This one, however, has its roots at the beginning of Bell’s career with Van Dorn and toggles between portraying Bell as a fresh, new detective in 1902 and his seasoned, married self of 1912. Always a rip-roaring, good adventure tale! Let’s leave the light fiction reading behind and focus on some more meaty nonfiction for this month. If you live in Connecticut, you will have watched at least one (if not many) UCONN girls basketball games. Some of their best matchups were against the Lady Vols of Tennessee coached forever, it seems, by Pat Summit. “Sum It Up” (362.19 SUM) co-authored by Sally Jenkins, follows this legendary woman, who led the Vols from the age of 22 to a record amount of wins. Can’t you still see that glare and intense focus she maintained during a game? This is a frank and revealing look at the private life of an incredibly strong woman facing the fight of her life against early-onset Alzheimer’s. Do you have a cat? Or two? “The Cat Whisperer: Why Cats Do What They Do – and How to Get Them to do What You Want” (636.8 NAG) written by Mieshelle Nagelschneider offers many tips and hints on living with a cat – or two. Almost any problem you can imagine is offered a solution: Does your cat spray? Maybe he scratches your furniture – common-sense answers are given to inhibit unwanted behavior and encourage correct behavior. Discover the reasoning behind their

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behavior, and live happily with your cat. “Jimmy Stewart: A Wonderful Life” (791.43 COE) by Jonathan Coe is a chronicle of the life of a much-loved actor. Spanning more than 40 years and many movies, the career and personal life of Stewart are portrayed through anecdotes and many photographs. Stroll through pictures of his classic movies – you may discover one you haven’t watched, or maybe you’ll recall one you want to watch again. This legendary icon was involved in more than “It’s a Wonderful Life” or “Mister Smith Goes to Washington.” Adam Makos writes a compelling true story of a single, life-changing event during World War II: “A Higher Call” (940.54 MAK). The book is about one incredible moment when enemies stop being enemies and a tragic ending is avoided. Backed by an enormous amount of research, this book follows the very different lives of two men until they met in the sky as enemies – and meet again as friends as old men. Books about our most popular and/or well-known presidents are almost always fascinating to read. Daniel Stashhower writes “The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War” (973.7092 STA) to relate the events that unfolded as Lincoln traveled by train to his inauguration. Allan Pinkerton and the first woman private eye, Kate Warne, know the threat is very real to assassinate the president – but how to convince him? History and great writing make this and “A Higher Call” very readable for all – even those who have difficulty reading historical nonfiction! Don’t you just love a book that forces you to think about something completely outside your box? “Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts” (616.02 ANT) by Emily Anthes explores the subject of how far biotechnology should go to improve the human condition. Is our taste in pets (teacup pigs are one example) changing the focus of science? And is that change for the better? The author remains optimistic for the future of technology and that we will grow with the betterment of not just mankind in our sights, but improvements for all life. Adult Services Librarian Donna Hine is writing Library Lines for the newspaper once a month while the library is at its temporary location.


The Bee-Intelligencer

Friday, April 5, 2013

Middlebury Senior Center News Don’s Computer Classes

Beginner Computer Class

Basic Digital Photography – Tuesday, April 9, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., learn the basics of how to take, manage, print and attach your photos to emails. The fee for this one-session class is $15. Basic Computer Security – Wednesday, April 10, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., learn how to avoid computer bugs and attacks and protect your data while online. The fee for this one-session class is $15. Basic emailing – Thursday, April 11 from 1 to 2:30 p.m., learn simple email tips and tricks. Open up the power and convenience of today’s advanced email programs. Learn email protocol and etiquette. Finally make your email work for YOU. The fee for this one-session class is $15.

will share information and answer questions. The “Beginner’s Computer Basic Class” Call 203-577-4166 to reserve your seat. will meet for five weeks starting Wednesday, Donate Used Ink Cartridges April 10, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. This class Don’t throw your used ink cartridges is for fairly “new” users who want to learn away. Instead, donate them to the Middlethe beginning basics of using a computer. The class includes descriptions of parts of a bury Senior Center. They recycle. computer, practice in using a mouse and the keyboard, basic word processing, basic “paint” fundamentals, and an introduction to the Internet and email. The class fee is Stew Leonard’s $30 per person. The Middlebury Senior Center mini-bus will go to Stew Leonard’s in Danbury ThursReiki Presentation day, April 18, leaving the senior center at Thursday, April 11, at 11 a.m., Reiki Mas- 10:30 a.m. After shopping, the bus will stop ter Augusta Ozdemirer will give a free pre- at the Blue Colony Diner for lunch. The sentation. Ozdemirer has been in the spiri- transportation cost is $7 per person. Please tual healing field more than 25 years. She call 203-577-4166 to reserve your seat.

3

Special Citizens Annual Fundraiser

Trips

Start planning now for warmer weather It was a bad winter in many parts of the country. Flooding, snow, storms – we’ve had it all. But spring and summer are coming! We need to start planning now to take advantage of all the warmer weather we’ll get. Are you a gardener? Whether you plant flowers in pots outside your door, or have a full garden in the yard, or grow vegetables in the community garden, now is the time to start planning. Check your local area for gardening classes, even if your efforts are going to be on the small scale. If you have a plot in a community

garden, it often will have classes to let you know the condition of the soil this year and what additives you’ll need to apply. Those classes are where you’ll find willing volunteers to help with weeding as the season goes on, if you can’t do it all yourself.

If you’re going to want to join a walking group, investigate now. In some areas, senior centers host walking tours around town or through the woods. For daily exercise, talk with neighbors and friends to see what you can put together. Check your gear: Are your walking shoes good for another year? Do you have a hat and sunglasses? Once you get a group together, brainstorm for additional activities you can do. Once-a-week croquet in the park? Bowling? Berry picking? Painting birdhouses for the land trust? Baking

pies for the food bank? If you live in a college town, all those students will go home for the summer and leave many of their volunteer tasks undone. Where can you pitch in? Enjoy your planning! Matilda Charles regrets she cannot personally answer reader questions, but she will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send email to columnreply@gmail.com.

cards. Reservations are needed by April 8. The cost of the class is $5, and class size is limited to 10 participants.

Trained Reiki Master Shirley Core Exercises Town Council Q & A Ramponi will conduct individual Physical Therapist Jim Saturday, April 13, at 9:30 a.m., 30-minute sessions. Reserva- Jablonka and Orthopaedic Cer- Watertown Town Council memtions are needed by the day be- tified Specialist Keith Havemeyer bers will be at the center for a fore each program. from Peak Physical Therapy re- question-and-answer session. turn to the center Friday, April This program offers senior adults Larry Ayce Band 12, at 10 a.m. to teach core exer- the opportunity to speak with to Perform cises that strengthen and stabi- town leaders about issues and The Larry Ayce Band will per- lize the torso and pelvis. Reser- programs affecting them. Reserform at the center Wednesday, vations are needed by April 11. vations are needed by April 12. April 10, at 2 p.m. Admission is a dessert to share. This event is sponsored by Home Health Find the Bee-Intelligencer on Aides. Reservations are needed by April 9.

(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

Miss Westbury’s Outstanding Teen, Margaret Luddy, left, and Miss Greater Watertown, Samantha Aquavia, right, will be special guests Friday, April 12, at 6:30 p.m. at the Watertown Area Association for Special Citizens annual fundraiser at The Grand Oak Villa function hall at 550 Sylvan Lake Road in Oakville. For ticket information for the family-style dinner and raffles, call Rocco Calabrese at 860-274-9115.

Falls Avenue Senior Center Events Falls Avenue Senior Center events for area adults 55 and older follow. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 860-945-5250. Please speak with a staff member when calling as the senior center does not accept voice-mail reservations. The center is at 311 Falls Ave. in Oakville, Conn.

Nondenominational Bible Study

sions are Monday, April 1; Friday, April 19; and Friday, April 26 at 10 a.m. Reservations are needed by the day before each session.

Craft Club

Reiki Sessions

Lyn Priestman leads the center’s popular monthly Craft Club Friday, April 5, at 1:30 p.m. Meet other crafters and choose from a variety of projects.

Reiki sessions are being offered Tuesday, April 9, and Tuesday, April 16, from 1 to 4 p.m. Reiki is a safe, noninvasive, hands-on (or not, if recipient prefers not to be touched) form of alternative medicine. Reiki does not claim to heal or cure any diseases or illnesses. Its purpose is to bring on a sense of relaxation and well-being.

Card-Making Class

Join Barbara Paquin Tuesday, New Hope Anglican Church offers a nondenominational Bi- April 9, at 9:30 a.m. for a cardble study at the center three making class that produces aftimes each month. April’s ses- fordable and unique greeting

The future begins with me MICHAEL KAPLAN, MD ACTIVE ORTHOPAEDICS Meet Dr. Michael Kaplan, a nationally renowned surgeon specializing in innovative orthopaedics and sports medicine. Chief Medical Correspondent for ESPN and one of Connecticut Magazine’s “Top Docs”, Dr. Kaplan chooses Waterbury Hospital for his patients. Why? Because for more than 120 years, the skilled doctors and nurses at Waterbury Hospital have been providing quality care that is clinically excellent, community-centered, and recognized by US News and World Report as among the best in Connecticut for orthopaedics. At Waterbury Hospital, we’re not standing still. We’re moving forward, embracing the future and leading the way.

Let the future begin

waterburyhospital.org

64 ROBBINS STREET, WATERBURY, CT 06708 • 203.573.6000


The Bee-Intelligencer

4

Friday, April 5, 2013

Bee Intelligencer in•tel•li•gencer: n. One who conveys news or information The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed.

Issued every week by: The Middlebury Bee-Intelligencer Society LLC Bee-Intelligencer Staff: Editor-In-Chief/Publisher: Marjorie Needham Contributing Writers: Mary Conseur, Terrence S. McAuliffe Art & Production: Mario J. Recupido Advertising Sales: Trish Blazi - mbiadvertising@gmail.com - Submit press releases in person, by mail or email The Bee-Intelligencer welcomes news, press releases and advertising from all surrounding communities Editorial Office: 2030 Straits Turnpike, Suite 1, Middlebury, CT 06762 Direct mail to P.O. Box 10. Telephone: 203-577-6800 • Email: beeintelligencer@gmail.com Advertising Information: Telephone: 203-577-6800 • Email: mbiadvertising@gmail.com Deadlines: Display Advertising: 5 p.m. Friday preceding publication Classified Advertising: 5 p.m. Monday preceding publication

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In Brief Prepare for Street Sweeping

business. For more informa- in Naugatuck will start with a brief tion, call 203-263-2141. business meeting and then will feature speaker Marcia Melnyk The Town of Middlebury PubFrench Café presenting “Beyond the News: lic Works Department will begin The Alliance Française of Using Newspapers for Research.” its town-wide annual street Melnyk is a professional geneNorthwestern Connecticut, Inc. sweeping program Monday, April will sponsor a café and conversa- alogist, lecturer and author who 15. Work will begin on the eastern tion on French folk dancing Sat- has taught all over the U.S. and side of town near Rte. 63 and conurday, April 6, at 10:30 a.m. at The Canada for nearly 15 years. She tinue westward. The department Barn Club at 558 Main St. South is the author of “The Weekend estimates it will take seven to 10 in Woodbury. Dance master Patri- Genealogist,” “The Genealogist’s working days to complete. cia Campbell will present the Question and Answer Book,” “GeResidents are asked to sweep topic in French, and attendees nealogist’s Handbook for New sidewalks and driveways to the also will read related materials. England Research” and “Family street and rake property edges off Admission is open to the public History 101,” a beginner’s guide before April 15. They also are with $5 requested of non- to finding your ancestors. asked to refrain from on-street The public is invited, and admembers. For information, call parking until the street sweeping 203-266-5588, or email mission is free. Storm cancellais complete. For more informations will be announced on radio noelle113@charter.net. tion, call Public Works at 203-577WTIC-AM, TV WFSB and internet 4170. www.wfsb.com. For more inforCactus Show mation, visit the club website at This Weekend Tree Maintenance www.naugatuckvalleygenealogyThe 30th annual Cactus and club.org or call Dick Kreitner at (Pruning & Trimming) Succulent Show will be Saturday, 203-881-8181. The Woodbury Shade Tree and April 6, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sidewalk Committee is sponsorSunday, April 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 Parent University ing the Annual Tree Maintenance p.m. in the fifth floor cafeteria of (Pruning & Trimming) Seminar Parent University 2013, sponthe Art and Music Center at NauSaturday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to sored by Southbury and Middlegatuck Valley Community College 12 p.m. in the Shove Building bury Acting Responsibly Together, at 750 Chase Parkway in WaterConference Room at 281 Main St. Newtown Parent Connection, Inc. bury. Admission is free. For more South in Woodbury. Learn the ins and the Brookfield Substance information, see www.ctcactusand outs of tree care and proper Abuse Coalition, will be Saturday, club.com or call 860-489-8356. pruning techniques from the exApril 6, at Pomperaug High perts. The seminar is free and School. It will offer eight workGenealogy Club open to all area residents. shops, from which participants Newspapers Program may choose to attend two.  Presenter Harris “Bud” Neal of The Naugatuck Valley GenealNeal Tree Service LLC is a certiThe workshops will be prefied, licensed arborist and has a ogy Club meeting Saturday, April sented by experts who will speak long line of credentials along with 13, at 1 p.m. at the Naugatuck on topics of interest and applica47 years of experience in the tree Historical Society at 195 Water St. ble to parents of elementary-age children to grandparents parenting grandchildren! The event will include a free Kid University to care for children while their par• Permanent Makeup - Eyebrows and ents attend the workshops. eyeliner; free consults. Details and registration infor• Skin Treatments - Anti Aging, Sun mation are at www.smartinc.org. Damage, Age Spots/Discoloration, Facial Hair  Those with questions may call • Microdermabrasions/Peels 203-788-5199.

Western CT, 444 Main Street North. The next meeting is April 11. There is no charge for this open and on-going group, whose purpose is to provide emotional, educational and social support for caregivers through regularly scheduled meetings. Patty Gibbs, a volunteer with the Alzheimer’s Association, facilitates the group. For more information, call Debby Horowitz, Brownstein Jewish Family Service director, at 203267-3177.

Drug Addiction Talk “REBOUND,” an inspirational talk on drug addiction and the road to recovery by former NBA player Chris Herren, will be Thursday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in the Brookfield High School auditorium. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Herren, a former NBA player, will speak to parents and students (age 11 and older) about his struggles with addiction and his courageous road to recovery. In November, Herren spoke to more than 1,000 Ridgefield parents, children and community members and received rave reviews from all participants for his riveting presentation. The talk is sponsored by the Newtown Parent Connection,

Inc., and Steps to Recovery and presented by Brookfield CARES (formerly BSAC - Brookfield Substance Abuse Council) and the Brookfield Public Schools.

Spring Rummage Sale The Women’s Fellowship of the First Congregational Church in Watertown will hold its spring rummage sale Thursday, April 18, from noon to 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Among the quality items for sale will be clothing for men, women and children; household goods; small appliances; jewelry; toys; dishes; books and baskets. Especially fine items will be in Annie’s Treasures. Friday, April 19, from 9 to 11 a.m., there will be a $3 a bag sale. Proceeds from the sale fund various outreach programs. The church is at 40 DeForest St. in Watertown, 860-274-6737.

Easter Seals Walk in May Saturday, May 11, hundreds of supporters will participate in the Easter Seals Family Fun Walk at Quassy Amusement Park in Middlebury. Walkers will help raise money to support Easter Seals programs and services that change the lives of children and adults in the community who are

living with disabilities and other special needs. Don’t miss out on this day of music, rides and entertainment to benefit Easter Seals. Win Quassy ride passes and other great prizes. Registration is required. Call Mary Reid, events administrator at 203-754-5141, ext. 251, to sign up. Visit www. waterburyct.easterseals.com for more details.

Call for Artists The Tribury Rotary Club seeks artists for its 9th Annual Art Show, Sale & Silent Auction, which will be held from Saturday, June 15, to Saturday, June 29, at the Southbury Public Library. Funds raised from the event will be used to support philanthropic efforts including scholarships, literacy and youth leadership. Individuals interested in displaying their framed art at this event should contact Art Show Chairman William Dreska at 203510-5727 or Vice Chairman John Monteleone at 203-565-6100 to obtain an entry form. Space is limited, so interested parties should indicate their interest by April 15. Artists who have displayed their art in prior years will be contacted.

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The Bee-Intelligencer

Friday, April 5, 2013

5

Clockwork Rep show opening next week The Clockwork Repertory Theater’s fourth and last show of its 35th theater season will open Saturday, April 13, with a curtain time of 8:15 p.m. It also will be presented Friday and Saturday, April 19 and 20 and 26 and 27, May 3 and 4, and Saturday, May 11. The show, “Getting Sara Married,” is a romantic comedy by Sam Bobrick directed by Mitch Friedman. Sara is an unmarried lawyer, who is much too busy with litigation to be bothered with a romance. Her Aunt Martha, however, decides to play the matchmaker and find Sara the perfect mate. Choosing among the men she knows, Martha settles on one prospective groom she admires. So she arranges to have her compatriot in this caper, Noogie Malloy, bop him on the head and “deliver” him to Sara’s apartment. Unfortunately, Noogie’s method of delivery is a little too rambunctious, and the groom cannot remember who he is or where he is from. Sara attempts to help him regain his memory, and as he does he confuses detail after hilarious detail until he realizes he is already engaged. Sara shares a sandwich, tuna of course, and the groom finds out he is allergic to tuna the hard way and winds up stuck in the apartment again after the paramedics leave. As time wears on, the prospective groom becomes more and more familiar with Sara, and his hilarious recounting as to what he really thinks marriage is about leads Sara to believe that marriage, after all, may not be all that bad!

Obituaries Angelo Rinaldi Timex Retiree

Mr. Angelo Rinaldi, 83, passed away Saturday, March 30, 2013. He was the husband of the late Mary (Rinaldi) Rinaldi. Angelo was born in Pontelandolfo, Benevento, Italy, March 6, 1930, son of the late Pasquale and Orsola (Rinaldi) Rinaldi. He came to Waterbury in 1950 and moved to Middlebury in 1953. He worked as a gyroscope team leader for Timex/Bendix until his retirement. He was a devout Catholic and a communicant of St. John of the Cross Church. He enjoyed working in his garden, engineering things, but most of all spending time with his family. He leaves one son, Angelo P. Rinaldi and his wife, Heidi, of Novi, Mich.; three daughters: Elaine Strobel and

Noogie (Mike Sacco) prepares to dump the unconscious prospective groom (Mike Reilly) into the lap of Sara (Jolian Cook) during a rehearsal of the romantic comedy “Getting Sara Married” at the Clockwork Rep opening April 13.  (Submitted photo) Reserved tickets are $18. Call the box ofSo, will Aunt Martha’s persistence win out? Will Sara relent and finally find love? fice at 860-274-7247 for tickets or more inBest to come and see for yourself in this formation. The Clockwork Repertory Theatre charming, poignant and very funny roman- is at 133 Main St in Oakville. tic comedy.

Book Review “A Week in Winter” By Maeve Binchy (Random House, $26.95) Reviewed by Rose McAllister Croke Beloved Irish author Maeve Binchy finished the manuscript for “A Week in Winter” days before she died in July after a brief illness. Her final novel, published posthumously, shows Binchy at the top of her writing game. In a book set in a small, fictional Irish coastal town where everyone knows each other, Binchy introduces us to a plucky, resourceful middle-aged woman named Chicky Ryan, who works tirelessly

to fulfill her lifelong dream to buy the decaying Stone House mansion and build it into a holiday resort. To mark the resort’s opening, Chicky advertises a special deal – a week in winter on the west coast of Ireland. The first group of guests starts to arrive, and we learn all of them have different reasons for staying there. They include:

• An American movie star who and uneasiness that implies. misses a connecting flight and • A married couple, both doctors, decides to take a brief holiday who find themselves at a spirin Ireland. He wrongfully asitual and professional crosssumes he is incognito since his roads, having witnessed far too fellow guests don’t make a huge much sickness and death. fuss over him; Binchy writes beautifully about the importance of community • A retired schoolteacher who and of people being restored to exudes negativity with each life, especially after their dreams breath she takes, and criticizes and plans fail or when their woreverything and everyone she ries and fears consume them. “A encounters; Week in Winter” is a bittersweet • A young Swede, who must de- read for Binchy fans, many of cide whether to head the family whom will savor her final book business or follow his heart; and lament all of her untold sto• A mother and would-be daugh- ries. A literary treasure in the truter-in-law who have been est sense, Ms. Binchy will be forced into taking a vacation missed. together, with all the tension (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

her husband, George Jr., and Ursula Mobilio and her husband, John, both of Middlebury, and Mary C. Rinaldi of West River, Md.; 10 grandchildren: Paul Mobilio of Seattle, Wash.; Julie Mobilio of Boston, Mass.; Mark Mobilio of Middlebury; Dr. Nicole Mariano and her husband, Thomas, of Sacramento, Calif.; Anne Strobel of Middlebury; Lt. j.g. George Strobel III and his wife, Ashley, of San Diego, Calif.; Lance Cpl. Phillip Strobel and his wife, Tammy, of Okinawa, Japan; Jonathan Strobel of Arlington, Va.; Stephanie Rinaldi and Christopher Rinaldi, both of Novi, Mich.; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his two brothers, Carmine and Fiorino Rinaldi. The funeral was Tuesday at Chase Parkway Memorial/The Albini Family Funeral Home in Waterbury to St. John of the Cross Church for Mass. Burial followed at Middlebury Cemetery. To leave condolences, visit chaseparkwaymemorial.com.

State offers new ballot status The Middlebury town clerk’s office said Public Act 12-57 allows permanently disabled voters to apply for permanent absentee ballot status. The status enables the elector to receive an absentee ballot for each election, primary and referendum in the municipality in which they are eligible to vote without filling out additional applications. To be eligible for permanent absentee ballot status, an elector must file an absentee ballot application together with a doctor’s certificate stating they have a permanent disability and are unable to appear at the polls. The absentee ballot application can

be downloaded from the secretary of the state’s website at www. sots.ct.gov or can be obtained from the town clerk’s office. A permanently disabled person wishing to vote in a referendum with less than three weeks’ notice will have to fill out an application each time since by law ballots cannot be mailed, and a designee would have to be appointed. Please contact the Middlebury town clerk’s office at 203-7582557 with any questions. The office in town hall at 1212 Whittemore Road in Middlebury is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Middlebury Volunteer Fire Department Call Log Date Time Address/Incident 3/24/13 11:51 Middlebury Pizza. Fire alarm activation. Alarm set off by cooking.

Saturday mail delivery ends this summer To cut back on revenue losses, after weighing the pros and cons for years, the U.S. Postal Service will no longer deliver mail on Saturdays starting in August 2013. They expect to save $2 billion of the nearly $16 billion losses from last year. Here are the ways it will affect us: • No mail will be delivered to street addresses on Saturdays. • Packages, however, will continue to be delivered six days a week. This is due to an increase in package volume, likely because of online purchases. • Packages and mail will continue to be delivered to post office boxes on Saturdays. • Post offices will stay open on Saturdays, if they currently do. Consumers will need to change their habits. Birthday cards expected to arrive on Saturday won’t get there until Monday. Netflix DVDs expected to arrive for the weekend won’t arrive until Monday. Time sensitive out-of-town newspapers will be delayed. Bills mailed with the expectation that Saturday is a working day may arrive late. If you vote by mail, you’ll need to mail earlier. Over the past two years, the Postal Service has made numerous changes to try to bring down

its operating costs. Hours have been cut at smaller post offices, staff has been reduced and some post offices have closed completely. In spite of these cost reductions, the price of a stamp has been raised to 46 cents. If you haven’t used online bill payment in the past, this might be the time to investigate how it’s done and calculate your monthly savings. If you’re printing out a multipage document to mail, consider reducing the number of pages by expanding the margins slightly so more text fits on each page and reduce the font size slightly. The top and bottom margins are where you’ll get the most additional lines per page. Listen for the next increase in the cost of stamps and stock up before the change goes into effect. Invest in postcards for short messages. If you send quite a few packages, investigate Click-N-Ship and save up to 16 percent by weighing your own packages, printing your

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labels and paying with a credit card or PayPal. The U.S. won’t be alone in this change. Canada, Sweden and Australia already deliver five days a week. David Uffington regrets he cannot personally answer reader ques-

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The Bee-Intelligencer

Chase team takes league honors Chase Collegiate’s boys’ varsity basketball team finished an outstanding season with top honors. Four players were named to the All-Hudson Valley Athletic League (HVAL) team, including junior Matthew McClain of Naugatuck, who was named to the First Team and Player of the Year. Seniors Kyle Bonicki of Waterbury and William Billy Robinson of Naugatuck made Second Team, and Senior Ryan Shiel of Waterbury and Junior Charles McClain of Naugatuck made Honorable Mention. Bonicki also was named to the First Team of the All-New England - New England Prep School Athletic Conference (NEPSAC) Class D. Robinson was named to the Second Team, and McClain and Shiel were named to the Third Team. In addition to the individual honors, the team finished with a 17-8 record and won the regular season and tournament HVAL Championships and was an NEPSAC Class D finalist.

Chase Collegiate varsity basketball players, back, left to right, Charles McClain, Matthew McClain and Ryan Shiel and front, left to right, Kyle Bonicki and Billy Robinson, finished their season with top honors. (Submitted photo)

Try these three simple treasures It’s a time in human history in which new cycles are rising up, and there are two distinct, interesting ways to go. There’s also a mixture between the two. Lately this difference has struck me to the extent that I’m revisiting choices in how to offer my gifts to the world. Conversations with colleagues, friends and family have prompted interesting and cool new thought forms. So here’s where I’m at so far. There are the ways of tech living – the super-fast worldly, interconnected information world that offers everyone everything with a simple click and endless 24-hour communication. With an ever-increasing amount of social media to choose from, new forms popping up monthly it seems, and where you can position yourself to be your own expert at anything, you either go big or go home. There are the ways of natural living – of the organic connection to the land, to living from the inside out that offers everyone ev-

Nuggets for Life By CYNTHIA DE PECOL erything with a simple shift of thought, less content but more context and endless opportunity to connect with ease, flow and 24 hours of living in rhythm. Fascinating times we live in for sure. I have deep appreciation for both ways and, as you know by now, totally connect with balance and harmony. So here’s something else that came across my desk that resonated because it’s how we live. U.S. Food Administration – 1917 1. Buy it with thought. 2. Cook it with care. 3. Use less wheat and meat. 4. Buy local foods. 5. Serve just enough. 6. Use what is left.

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This week’s nuggets for life are based around choice. Three simple treasures to stay in the natural essence of balance as life picks up its pace and choices abound. 1. Stay close to the energy of the earth because nature is healing. It enhances our vitality and our connection to what we’re made of. Technology is awesome, providing tools for rapid advancement of our world so the energy of the earth balances us. 2. Try the U.S. Food Administration’s six recommendations from 1917 for a week, and see if it becomes a treasure for how you feel, sleep and handle stress. 3. With thousands of thoughts entering and exiting our minds every minute of every day, try using the following words of wisdom to help you bring all of you to your every experience. The words are: enjoy, pause, relax, simply do it, be friendly and calm with chance and change. Enough said. De Pecol is a yoga instructor, Reiki master and life coach who lives in Washington, Conn. See lifecoachingllc.com or email lifecoach3@aol.com.

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Friday, April 5, 2013

Parent University offers many choices Noel Federle of Southbury & Middlebury Acting Responsibly Together (smartinc.org) compiled lists of the top reasons for parents and caregivers (including grandparents) to choose each of the workshops at Parent University Saturday, April 6, from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at Pomperaug High School in Southbury. One reason common to all the workshops is, “You want to talk directly with an expert versus reading a book that can’t answer back!” SMART is sponsoring this event for those who wish to be proactive and learn positive parenting strategies for raising children of all ages. SMART’s goal is to strengthen families and enrich the community. Those seeking a reason to attend may find one in Federle’s lists. Top reasons to attend “Masked vs. Unmasked, Helping your Children Empower Themselves to Have Healthy Relationships.” 1. You want your teen to view themselves as important. 2. You want your teen to understand the traits of a healthy relationship. 3. You want your teen to have personal integrity. 4. You value resiliency and how it is important in human development.

to know what all the talk is about. 2. You want to know what “normal” behavior is and what might be symptoms of a bigger issue. 3. You want to know what the strengths of ADHD are because your child is driving you crazy! 4. You want all the strategies and options available to you to help your child succeed. Top reasons to choose “Self-Destructive Behaviors Teenagers Engage In: What to Look For and How to Help Your Teen!” 1. You recognize that today’s teens deal with things you never had to. 2. You are the parent of a teen who doesn’t want to be naive to the dangers of teenage life. 3. You are not sure if your teen’s behaviors are typical “teenager angst” or a bigger issue. 4. You wonder if other parents are concerned about the same things you are. Top reasons to choose “Why Do My Child and I Battle Over Homework (And Who Will Win The War.” 1. You have no idea why your child becomes so frustrated with homework. 2. You know your child is capable of better work but it isn’t happening in school, and you don’t know why. 3. Your child becomes extremely oppositional at homework time. 4. You want to minimize the conflict of “homework hell.”

Top reasons to choose “Grandparents Raising Grandchildren.” 1. You find yourself parenting or care giving ... again!! 2. You don’t understand the world in which your grandchild is living. 3. You have no idea what resources are available to you. 4. You need support from other grandparents in your position. Top reasons to choose “Parents: You Matter. Drugs/Alcohol, Your Teen and You.” 1. You know that there is a significant drug problem with our youth. 2. You feel that knowing about drug/alcohol use is better than hoping it won’t affect your family. 3. You want to be prepared to intervene, if needed. 4. You want to be the primary educator to your child about the facts of drug/alcohol abuse. Advance registration has been ongoing, but you also can register Saturday. Tuition is $10 per adult; $15 a couple for two workshops. A free kids’ program for children ages 5 to 11 will meet while parents attend the workshops. The program also includes a complimentary lunch. See www. smartinc.org or call 203-695-1226 for more information.

Top reasons to choose “Parenting for your Child’s Success.” 1. You want to learn how to build positive attributes in your child. 2. You want to validate that your parenting style is helping and not harming your child’s development. 3. You want as many tools in your tool box as possible. Top reasons to choose “Happy 4. You know your greatest influ- Parent(s) = Happy Child(ren).” ence on your child’s develop- 1. You forgot about “you” once 1. In 2012, Stephen Strasburg became the sixth mament is now! you became a parent. jor-league pitcher since 1900 2. Your identity is intimately tied to notch 200 strikeouts in Top reasons to choose “Unto your child’s social/sports fewer than 30 career games. covering You Child’s Natural calendar. Who else has done it? Gifts: A Strengths-based Ap- 3. The concept of “self care” is 2. Entering 2013, who was the proach to ADHD.” foreign to you. last major-league pitcher with 1. You think everyone is diag- 4. You are frazzled but don’t unconsecutive seasons of at least nosed with ADHD and want derstand why your child is. 20 wins? 3. Wisconsin running back Montee Ball tied an NCAA record in 2011 for most touchdowns in a season (39). Who else holds the mark? 4. In 2012, Deron Williams set a Nets team record for most points in a game (57). Who The Middlebury Seventh- and 50-37. Outstanding defensive had held the record? Eighth-grade Boys’ Travel Team pressure from guards Mike Atal- 5. Pe n g u i n s goaltender finished a strong season by losing lah, Danny McNamara and Will Marc-Andre Fleury in 2013 to Torrington 71-61 in the cham- McDonald made for poor shot became Pittsburgh’s all-time pionship game. The final game selection for Thomaston. Mileader in victories (227). Who featured the two top seeds, and chael Kowalasky did an outhad held the mark? the game lived up to expecta- standing job rebounding. 6. How many times has a detions. Nine players scored for Midfender been named MVP of The game went back and forth dlebury, including Minchella’s the Major League Soccer Cup for the first half as Middlebury 10 and Wynne’s 9 points. Other final? led 28-27 going into the inter- scorers included McDonald (3), 7. Who was the first U.S. woman mission. Andrew Minchella had McNamara (1), Emmett Lytle (2), to win an Olympic judo a strong second quarter, scoring Atallah (4), Fran Barton (2), Kowmedal? 8 of his 14 points. alasky (2) and Belden (17). The Answers Torrington came out strong in victory proved costly as Middlethe third quarter and finished bury lost one of its better shootthe period up by 10 points. In the ers when McDonald went down fourth period, Middlebury’s full- with a leg injury and was unable court pressure bothered Torring- to play the remainder of the tourton, and Middlebury was able to nament. tie the score at 50. In the semi-final game, MidIn the end, Torrington’s size, dlebury defeated third-seeded as they were bigger at every po- New Hartford 61-43. McNamara sition, overcame Middlebury’s played his best game of the seadetermination and hustle. Matt son, scoring 16 points. Belden Wynne scored 10 points, and led the way with 26 points. Chase Belden had 32 in the team’s Minchella, back from an ankle last game. injury, scored 12 points, and BarMiddlebury had to win two ton added 3 points. other games the previous weekThe team finished the season end to reach the championship with a record of 22 wins and five game. In the quarter-finals, Mid- losses. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. dlebury defeated Thomaston

Middlebury boys’ travel basketball notes

1. Hideo Nomo (23 games), Kerry Wood (23), Dwight Gooden (25), Mark Prior (27) and Herb Score (29). 2. Houston’s Roy Oswalt won 20 games in both 2004 and 2005. 3. Oklahoma State’s Barry Sanders, in 1988. 4. Mike Newlin scored 52 points in a game in 1979, and Ray Williams did the same in 1982. 5. Tom Barrasso, with 226. 6. Once – the Los Angeles Galaxy’s Omar Gonzalez, in 2012. 7. Ronda Rousey won a bronze medal in Beijing in 2008.

6

Sharon Warner Pet Psychic Sunday April 7 12 - 3 pm


The Bee-Intelligencer

Friday, April 5, 2013

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Classified Advertising Deadline: 5 p.m. Monday Classified Advertising Cost: $10 per week, up to 40 words. 25¢ each additional word. Submit ad with your name, address, telephone number and payment to: Mail: Bee-Intelligencer, P.O. Box 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 Email: mbisubmit@gmail.com Office: 2030 Straits Turnpike, Suite 1 This publication does not knowFor Rent Education ingly accept advertising which is deceptive, fraudulent, or which might otherwise violate the law or AVIATION MAINTENANCE WARM WEATHER IS YEAR accepted standards of taste. HowROUND In Aruba. The waTRAINING Financial Aid if ever, this publication does not ter is safe, and the dining qualified. Job Placement warrant or guarantee the accuracy is fantastic. Walk out to the Assistance. Call National of any advertisement, nor the qualbeach. 3-Bedroom. Weeks Aviation Academy Today! ity of the goods or services adveravailable. Sleeps 8. $3500. FAA Approved. CLASSES tised. Readers are cautioned to Email: carolaction@aol.com STARTING SOON! 1-800thoroughly investigate all claims for more information. 292-3228 or NAA.edu made in any advertisements, and to use good judgment and reason- AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Instruction - Become an Aviation Mainable care, particularly when dealtenance Tech. FAA approved ing with persons unknown to you training. Financial aid if qual- LANGUAGE TUTOR: English, who ask for money in advance of French, English as a second ified - Housing available. Job delivery of the goods or services language, SAT, PSAT, and placement assistance. Call advertised.

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7

Legal Notice TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY ANNUAL BUDGET HEARING Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 6:30 P.M.

Pursuant to the General Statutes of the State of Connecticut, The Board of Finance of the Town of Middlebury, will hold a PUBLIC HEARING on April 10, 2013 at the Middlebury Firehouse, 65 Tucker Hill Rd, for the presentation of the Proposed Operating Budget and Federal Revenue Sharing Appropriations for the FISCAL YEAR ending JUNE 30, 2014 Submitted by the Board of Finance Michael McCormack Vincent Cipriano Stephen Ruccio David Cappelletti Michael Kenausis Edward Asselin Peter Trinchero, Alternate Thomas Proulx, Alternate Ken Heidkamp, Alternate

TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY MEANS OF FINANCING - FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 REVENUES

Actual Revenues Approved Budget FY 2011-12 w/Revisions FY 12-13

Property Taxes..............................................25,449,967...........$25,453,753 ..........$25,220,394 ............ $25,453,753 ........ $26,376,555 Supplemental Auto............................................168,892..................140,000 .................153,885 ................... 140,000 ............... 160,000 Prior Years Taxes...............................................504,818..................270,000 .................166,504 ................... 270,000 ............... 230,000 Interest/Penalties...............................................234,743..................120,000 .................104,317 ................... 120,000 ............... 120,000 Tax Collector Copies................................................378.........................250 ........................194 .......................... 250 ...................... 250 TOTAL PROPERTY TAXES..................... $26,358,798.......... $25,984,003 ......... $25,645,294 ........... $25,984,003 ....... $26,886,805 State Grants......................................................282,735..................288,706 .................168,478 ................... 288,706 ............... 340,587 Investment Income..............................................28,542....................35,000 ................... 11,991 ..................... 35,000 ................. 20,000 Assessor Copier Fees..............................................817.........................450 ........................764 .......................... 450 ...................... 450 Assessor Personal Property Audits.....................72,791..................120,000 ...................13,498 ................... 120,000 ................. 25,000 Town Clerk.........................................................137,064..................148,400 ................. 116,949 ................... 148,400 ............... 148,400 Building Department..........................................143,798................. 120,550 ................ 126,773 .................. 120,550 .............. 130,050 Donations / Tower Rental Revenues.................199,090................. 197,937 ................ 149,926 .................. 197,937 .............. 197,937 Health Department..................................................................................................................................................................................... Water Commission................................................3,003..................... 4,000 .................... 3,932 ...................... 4,000 .................. 4,000 Fire Department....................................................1,007............................... ............................................................................................ Police Department...............................................16,310....................10,100 ...................10,539 ..................... 10,100 ................. 10,100 Public Works Department/Sale Of Old Assets.......5,982.................................................... 3,655 ............................................................. Transfer Station Fees..........................................47,570....................45,500 ...................20,274 ..................... 45,500 ................. 44,000 Park & Rec Self Sustaining Account.................157,725..................172,000 .................156,325 ................... 172,000 ............... 172,000 Park & Recreation...............................................52,957....................66,550 ...................10,419 ..................... 66,550 ................. 66,550 Elderly Program Revenue................................... 14,711....................20,475 ...................10,146 ..................... 20,475 ................. 20,475 Public Library.........................................................4,341..................... 5,200 .................... 2,056 ...................... 5,200 .................. 5,200 Education Cost Sharing - State.........................684,186..................719,899 ................. 357,118 ................... 719,899 ............... 740,030 Reimbursement From Region #15............................................................................................................................................................. Special Duty Fund...............................................59,973..................104,400 ...................13,461 ................... 104,400 ............... 124,000 Capital Non Recurring Fund..................................7,200......................7,200 .....................2,400 ....................... 7,200 ................... 7,200 Infrastructure Trust Fund................................... 113,423..................113,552 ...................73,710 ................... 113,552 ................. 30,000 Park & Rec Rev Fund.........................................................................10,000 .................................................... 10,000 ................. 10,000 Library Improvement Fund ................................ 41,734....................42,985 ...................32,239 ..................... 42,985 ................. 42,985 TOTAL REVENUES.................................... 28,433,757............ 28,216,907 ........... 26,929,948 ............. 28,216,907 ......... 29,025,769 Transfers From Sewer Fee & Assessment..........75,659..................283,270 .................141,635 ................... 283,270 ............... 283,270 Transfers From Unassigned Fund Balance................................................................................................................................... 518,000 TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCING................ 28,509,416 ........... 28,500,177 ........... 27,071,583 ............. 28,500,177 ......... 29,827,039

Expenditures

Town of Middlebury Appropriations Summary 2013-2014

Actual Expenses Adopted Budget Actual Expenses Estimated Expenses Proposed Budget For Fy 12-13 Fy 2013-14 Fy 2011-12 W/Revisions Fy 12-13 9 Months Fy 12-13

Board Of Selectman......................................... 133,442 ...............$136,071................$102,418.................. $136,071.............. $135,530 Finance Department......................................... 258,224 .................243,060..................190,616.................... 243,060................ 217,801 Town Treasurer..................................................... 4,490 .....................4,491......................3,401........................ 4,491.................... 4,582 Assessor........................................................... 202,802 .................180,909..................122,298.................... 180,909................ 186,779 Tax Collector....................................................... 94,520 ...................87,945....................66,952...................... 87,945.................. 94,255 Town Clerk........................................................ 112,737 .................112,749....................88,400.................... 112,749.................114,729 Registrar Of Voters............................................. 36,347 ...................58,029....................23,827...................... 58,029.................. 41,265 Board Of Finance............................................... 31,766 ...................32,529....................31,387...................... 32,529.................. 32,029 Board Of Assessment Appeals............................. 2,673 .....................1,000.........................271........................ 1,000.................... 1,550 Legal................................................................. 131,583 .................125,000..................124,756.................... 125,000................ 125,000 Probate Court....................................................... 7,769 ...................15,000.............................0...................... 15,000.................. 10,000 Town Hall............................................................ 75,631 ...................73,530....................60,586...................... 73,530.................. 73,532 Building Department......................................... 110,504 .................116,574....................84,624.................... 116,574................ 120,914 Payments To Other Jurisdictions........................ 64,263 ...................45,671....................45,163...................... 45,671.................. 48,608 Planning And Zoning.......................................... 26,098 ...................21,999....................16,666...................... 21,999.................. 22,400 Zoning Board Of Appeals..................................... 6,455 .....................6,305......................3,688........................ 6,305.................... 5,805 Conservation Commission................................. 12,622 ...................11,769......................8,343...................... 11,769...................11,871 Economic Development Committee........................ 475 ........................750.........................550........................... 750.................... 1,500 Beautification Committee..................................... 1,475 .....................1,475.............................0........................ 1,475.................... 1,475 Insurance.......................................................... 301,129 .................340,484..................329,608.................... 340,484................ 394,157 Historical Society.................................................. 4,140 .....................3,900......................3,284........................ 3,900.................... 3,900 Water Commission............................................. 82,304 ...................86,456....................82,942...................... 86,456.................. 87,976 Fire Department............................................... 217,271 .................223,284..................139,040.................... 223,284................ 217,100 Civil Preparedness............................................... 1,500 .....................1,500......................1,134........................ 1,500.................... 2,000 Fire Marshal......................................................... 9,996 ...................11,530......................7,494...................... 11,530...................11,735 Police Department......................................... 1,207,755 ..............1,243,318..................960,318................. 1,243,318............. 1,243,633 Communications Center................................... 294,788 .................212,401..................221,821.................... 212,401................ 214,000 Engineering........................................................ 27,813 ...................20,000......................9,312...................... 20,000.................. 17,000 Buildings And Grounds..................................... 248,553 .................247,819..................181,196.................... 247,819................ 275,877 Shepardson Community Center......................... 43,245 ...................43,525....................30,076...................... 43,525.................. 48,342 Public Works.................................................. 1,380,544 ..............1,417,043...............1,170,302................. 1,417,043............. 1,435,622 Waste Removal................................................ 326,753 .................315,517..................269,566.................... 315,517................ 318,977 Park & Rec Self Sustaining Account................ 172,035 .................161,000..................127,693.................... 161,000................ 161,000 Park & Recreation............................................ 240,732 .................233,106..................176,282.................... 233,106................ 244,794 Youth & Family Services..................................... 45,000 ...................45,000......................3,750...................... 45,000.................. 25,000 Social Services................................................... 43,624 ...................43,315....................33,219...................... 43,315.................. 43,770 Elderly Services.................................................. 72,668 ...................72,543....................52,541...................... 72,543.................114,622 Public Library.................................................... 400,065 .................395,271..................316,572.................... 395,271................ 407,624 Employee Benefits........................................ 2,007,287 ..............2,039,754...............1,649,266................. 2,039,754............. 2,200,804 Contingency Fund........................................................0....................50,000.............................0...................... 50,000.................. 10,000 Information Technology...................................... 52,477 ...................60,000....................63,396...................... 60,000.................. 75,908 Debt Service..................................................... 405,569 .................250,000..................235,240.................... 250,000................ 292,194 Refund Of Taxes................................................. 13,689 ...................15,000....................13,753...................... 15,000.................. 15,000 Capital Budget-Town / Facilities....................... 287,198 .................285,003..................208,490.................... 285,003................ 636,141 Capital Budget-Town / Public Safety...................45,300..................125,180....................64,847.................... 125,180................ 244,510 Extraordinary Items...............................................5,624....................38,625......................2,212...................... 38,625.................. 38,625 Capital Non-Recurring Fund................................12,619....................14,200................... 10,352 ..................... 14,200.................. 14,200 Municipal Infrastructure Fund............................127,154..................127,154................. 123,131 ................... 127,154........................... 0 Library Improvement Fund..................................44,247.............................0.............................................................. 0............................. Park & Rec Revenue Fund....................................9,125....................10,000......................9,550...................... 10,000.................... 8,500 TOTAL TOWN APPROPRIATIONS...............9,444,080...............9,406,782...............7,470,334................. 9,406,782........... 10,052,636 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.................18,677,886.............19,093,395.............14,929,023............... 19,093,395........... 19,774,403 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS.......................$28,121,966...........$28,500,177...........$22,399,357............. $28,500,177......... $29,827,039

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The Bee-Intelligencer

8

Friday, April 5, 2013

Adopt a Rescue Pet

Send in your pet photos Your pet could be featured as “Pet of the Week” in this picture frame. Send us your pet’s photo by email to mbisubmit@gmail.com or by regular mail to P.O. Box BRUISER GYPSY 10, Middlebury, CT 06762 along with your pet’s name, Bruiser was transferred here from a local pound Gypsy girl is a wonderful, sweet girl who can your last name and your and is a terrific vibrant pup! He is just five months be a tad shy at first, but loves food and will warm town. of age, loves to play ball and is a big snuggler! He up to you very quickly! Gypsy needs a home that

gets along with other dogs and has no toy or food aggression. He needs basic training, a patient owner and lots of exercise. Bruiser will be altered prior to adoption.

Coco lives with the Dyer-McCarthy family in Middlebury.

Dog scratches herself raw DEAR PAW’S CORNER: My mother’s dog “Berry” has been scratching and itching at her back legs and stomach for weeks now. I put a monthly flea treatment on her regularly, and I can’t see any fleas. Why is she itching? Some of the areas are looking very raw. – Barbara in Tampa, Fla. DEAR BARBARA: Topical flea treatments are pretty effective for pets, but double-check that Berry does not have fleas. Rather than trying to spot the fast-moving critters, look for tiny flecks of brown-black “dust” in her fur or on her skin. These are flea droppings, and seeing them means there’s still an infestation. If you spot evidence of fleas, find out what dosage of the top-

ical flea treatment is being given. These are typically sold in packages that specify the type of pet (cat or dog) and its weight range. Large dogs need a different dose than small dogs or cats. If there is no evidence of fleas, or if Berry is getting the correct dosage for her weight, take her to the veterinarian for a closer look at her skin. She may have an allergy – either to something in

her environment, to a medication she’s taking or to a food she’s eating. She could have a parasitic infection other than fleas, or she could have another skin ailment. Her vet can check for a number of possibilities and can prescribe medication to ease the itching. Treatment might include cortisone, which should be used only for a limited time, if possible. Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com, or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. For more pet care-related advice and information, visit www. pawscorner.com. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

Don’t allow dog to ‘fertilize’ lawn

Q:

My neighbor walks his dog every day and routinely allows his beloved pet to eliminate on my front lawn. He almost never picks up the dog’s droppings – it’s something I’m left to do when I get home from work. When I confronted him about it, he said that he was doing me a favor because the droppings will fertilize my lawn. How can I get him to stop? – Carlos G., Phoenix

A:

By Samantha Mazzotta

pretty unapologetic answer. For the record – and you probably know this already – dog droppings and urine are not good lawn fertilizer; they can cause dead spots or yellowed grass. It sounds like you’ve Many cities have ordinances talked to him already about picking up after dogs; about it, and gotten a some will issue tickets to pet

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owners who are caught in the act of not cleaning up. In other municipalities, enforcement varies. At any rate, don’t get confrontational or pick a fight. Ask him politely one more time to stop leaving dog droppings in your yard. If he doesn’t stop, check your options. If you belong to a homeowners association, check its rules or bylaws regarding pets. Check with your city’s animal control office or visit its webpage to learn what recourse you have in stopping the daily visits. Causing a nuisance like letting one’s dog soil a neighbor’s yard is generally frowned upon. I have a feeling the law will be on your side with this. Stay calm, do your homework and you should be able to resolve this little dispute. Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com, or write This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.

Review your homeowners’ association rules at least once a year to stay on top of any changes and to be familiar with rules that can help solve potential problems between you and your neighbors.

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Dancemakers invite public to final workshop Brass City Ballet, in partnership with the Middlebury Public Library, will present its fourth and final workshop of “Dancemakers” Thursday, April 11, from 5:45 to 7 p.m. at Shepardson Community Center at 1172 Whittemore Road in Middlebury. “Dancemakers” is a series of dance composition workshops that are free and open to the general public age 5 and up. They are facilitated by certified dance therapist and Connecticut choreographer Judith Ehrman-Shapiro. The workshop is open to all levels of abilities, and canes, walkers and wheelchairs are welcome. No previous dance experience is necessary. “Dancemakers” workshop attendees create their own dance compositions by means of dance improvisation and discussion. Assisting Ehrman-Shapiro are members of the Brass City Ballet Company, a semi-professional company that includes students enrolled in Brass City Ballet School’s

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: My son, 57, salts most every food in his diet. He told me his doctor said, “Eat all the salt you want.” I looked him in the eye, and it was hard not to believe him. I did say I found it hard to believe. My son gets regular checkups every five years. Personally, there’s no salt on my table. I eat very little processed foods. Please set my son straight. – P. ANSWER: Most doctors for most of the recent past have told their patients to go easy on salt. Official medical advisory committees composed of the most knowledgeable scientists – The American Heart Association is one example – have and still do recommend our intake of salt (sodium) should be limited to 1,500 mg a day. In some instances, an intake of 2,300 mg is permitted. This is far lower than our present salt use. Most of our dietary salt comes from processed foods like pizza, meats such as corned beef (500 mg of sodium in two ounces), hot dogs (more than 500 mg of

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Judith Ehrman-Shapiro, far left, leads a “Dancemakers” workshop at the Middlebury Public Library. Free “Dancemakers” workshops have been open to those of all abilities ages 5 and older. (Elizabeth Fisk Barriser photo) pre-professional program. Attendees are not required to participate in the workshop and are welcome to observe if they so choose. Refreshments will be served, and time for questions and an-

swers will follow the April 11 workshop. To reserve a place in the workshop or for more information, call the library at 203758-2634. For more information on Brass City Ballet, visit www. brasscityballet.org.

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inhibitors and ARBs, angiotensin-receptor blockers. The booklet on sodium and potassium discusses these two minerals and their uses. To order a copy, write: Dr. Donohue – No. 202W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: In a prior column you advocated drinking a daily amount of water that would satisfy one’s thirst, not a set amount of water as some people believe. I agree with you. However, when I travel to Colorado, I am urged to drink glass after glass of water to allay the effects of altitude. Do you think this is valid advice? – D.K. ANSWER: I do. Mountain air is dry. Altitude makes a person breathe more rapidly than normal. Fluid is lost from the lungs when a person breathes fast. You can become dehydrated if you don’t increase your fluid intake. After a few days of acclimatization, you can ease off on your water intake. Dr. Donohue regrets he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

sodium in one hot dog), commercial soups, frozen dinners, breakfast cereals, some breads and baked goods. People have to become readers of the nutrition labels put on all foods. Reducing the intake of sodium lowers blood pressure and reduces the chances for a heart attack and stroke. I have to add that a few voices have been raised recently to champion diets with no limitations on the amount of salt. These researchers say that lowsalt diets are not healthy. I am sticking with the authorities who recommend salt reduction until the majority of nutritional experts change their minds. I don’t think that’s going to happen. You sent a little item on potassium. Potassium, unlike sodium, lowers blood pressure. We’re told to get 4,700 mg of it a day. It’s found in baked potatoes with skins, sweet potatoes, bananas, orange juice, milk, kidney beans, cantaloupe, avocado and prunes. Salt substitutes are usually po(c) 2013 North America Synd., Inc. tassium. They can be used by most people if they’re not taking All Rights Reserved blood pressure drugs like ACE

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04/05/13  

Middlebury Bee 04/05/13