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Annual Report 2015 - 2016


Contents

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS & REPORTS YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

2015-2016 at a glance

1

Report of the Chair

2

Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW ABN: 98 138 078 092 CFN: 21153 (A company limited by guarantee)

Report of the Commisioner

6

Operations

10

A safe, modern fleet

13

Our people

14

Working with our colleagues

16

Training & education

18

IT & communications

20

Our facilities

21

Fundraising & grants

22

Our partnerships

24

Saving lives

26

Report Design and Layout Nicole Brown

Investing in our fleet

29

Directors’ Report

36

© Copyright Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited without permission of the publisher.

Directors’ qualifications & experience

39

Declaration of independence by Grant Thornton

43

Independent Auditor’s Report

44

Responsible Entities’ declaration

46

Fundraising appeals declaration

47

Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income

48

Statement of financial position

49

Statement of changes in funds

50

Statement of cash flows

51

Notes to the financial statements

52

Appendix A: Submission to State Rescue Board Annual Report

67

The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 Web: mrnsw.com.au Email: admin@mrnsw.com.au


2015-2016 at a glance The crew of Crowdy 30 returns a runabout that lost battery power about 11nm south of Crowdy Head and 3nm offshore to safety on April 22. Photo: Unit Commander Keith Richardson.

Operating regions

6

Units

45

Volunteer members

3,101

Men

2,325 (75%)

Women

776 (25%)

Operational staff

17

New and refurbished vessels (over life of MRNSW)

67, worth more than $15.6m

Operational fleet

82

Vessels assisted

3,072

Life-endangering emergencies

723

Other assists

2,349

People assisted

6,714

Vessels Logged On

73,383

Radio calls

296,063

MRNSW radio towers/masts

31

MarineRescue mobile App downloads

15,951

MarineRescue mobile App Log Ons

9,788

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

1


Report of the Chair Emergency Services Minister David Elliott opened the September Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders Conference, presenting 10 units with Certificates of Appreciation for their response to the April East Coast Low storms.

Chair James Glissan ESM, QC

I

t is my pleasure to present the Marine Rescue NSW Annual Report and Financial Statements for 2015-16. This has been another year of reform, progress and service. Our remarkable volunteers have continued to provide a world-class rescue service to our community, responding to more than 3,000 vessels in trouble on the water, almost a quarter of which were caught in potentially life-endangering emergencies. Our Radio Operators responded to more than 296,000 radio transmissions - an average of 34 calls an hour around the clock over a year. The fact that this level of service is provided by volunteers, giving their time without any thought of recompense, is the reason this exemplary organisation continues to win respect and plaudits. The most tangible evidence of another year of progress has been the delivery of modern and efficient vessels for our rescue work. As this financial year closes, we near the end of the first stage of the Fleet Modernisation Program. A rapid acceleration in the program saw 16 new and refurbished primary response vessels supplied in 201415, boosted by another four this year. The concentrated investment of more than $3 million over these two years means that the focus will now shift

2 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

to upgrading the secondary response fleet. As a not-for-profit, independent emergency service, MRNSW continues to rely on the ongoing financial support of the NSW Government and the boating community. In 2015-16, this comprised a direct Government grant of $1.6 million and $6 million through the levy on boating registrations and licences. On behalf of the organisation and its members, I again place on the record our appreciation for this vital support. The direct expenditure of this Government and levy funding in our operations, services and volunteer support programs is outlined in Appendix A on Page 67, which is a copy of the 2015-16 MRNSW financial submission to the NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report. Due to timeframe requirements, this submission may vary slightly from the final audited reports outlined in this document. Any variations can be reconciled with the consolidated audited financial statements. We also continue to rely heavily on our volunteers’ fundraising efforts to help meet our mission. Our units have developed strategic fundraising plans that encompass activities such as targeted donations, sausage sizzles, community markets, support for fishing competitions, raffles and, of course, this year, the inaugural MRNSW Art Union. The Board thanks


Point Danger 20, one of 67 new and refurbished vessels delivered under the Fleet Modernisation Program.

our volunteers for devoting time beyond their direct operational and training duties to these activities. Three new Directors were elected to the Board this year: General Director Mark McKenzie, Monaro Regional Director Glenn Felkin and Hunter/Central Coast Regional Roger Evans. Northern Rivers Regional Director Bernie Gabriel and Mid North Coast Regional Director John Lynch were re-elected to their positions. On behalf of my fellow Directors and our membership, I thank former General Director Tony Drover and Hunter/ Central Coast Regional Director Anthony Long for their service and dedication to our organisation. In May, we lost one of our foundation General Directors, with the passing of Michael Stringer AM, ESM. The grandson of a Sydney Harbourmaster, Mike joined the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol in 1973, holding numerous positions over the next 43 years. Mike’s abiding commitment to volunteer marine rescue was widely known and respected not only in this organisation but in the wider emergency services community. This year, the Board has reflected on the organisation’s ongoing governance and the need to ensure our future strength and viability. The Directors’ weighty responsibilities include oversight of the company’s corporate governance; setting the high-level

direction and priorities for the allocation of funding, assets and resources; and monitoring the organisation’s performance and compliance with legislative and regulatory obligations. As I outlined at the 2015 Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders Conference, we need to put in place a mechanism that can help maintain skilled and experienced strategic leadership at the Board level. In the year ahead, members will be asked to vote on a series of reforms to the MRNSW Constitution, including a fundamental change to broaden the requirements for those standing for election to the Board to bring skill sets and experience beyond their MRNSW membership. The Board is assisted in its duties by the Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner and staff members, along with our external advisers, Commander of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings APM and NSW Roads and Maritime Services Director Corporate Services, Mr Paul Hesford, whom I thank for their collaboration and expertise. Our organisation and a number of our members have again attracted well-deserved public accolades thorughout the year for their service, skill and experience. In particular, congratulations to MR Jervis Bay

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

3


“Together, we save lives on the water. Our commitment is unwavering, our success beyond measure.” 4 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Left: The crew of Port Macquarie 30 takes part in the Mid North Coast Search and Rescue Exercise offshore from Camden Haven. Photo: Michael Davis.

Training Systems Officer and former Director Tony Drover, current Director John Lynch and MR Alpine Lakes Unit Commander Les Threlfo, who were awarded the Emergency Services Medal in the Queen’s Birthday honours. This medal is presented to recognise members of the emergency services who have made a notable contribution to their agencies and the community. The crew of Port Stephens 40 received the 2015 Australian Search and Rescue Award for rescuing two people from a yacht in the April East Coast Low storms. The NSW Government awarded MRNSW Property Officer and Broken Bay unit member David Lyall the 2015 NSW Maritime Medal and MR Port Stephens Watch Officer Eryl Thomas was named the MRNSW Volunteer of the Year in the 2015 Rotary Emergency Services Community Awards. The well-received MarineRescue mobile App took the title of Most Significant Contribution to Water Safety with a Focus On Inclusive Practices at the NSW Water Safety Awards. This technological innovation is a strong advance in boating safety, encouraging boaters to Log On and Off even more quickly and simply. The end of the financial year also coincides with our unit elections, with a number of new Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders elected. I thank all our outgoing leaders for their service and welcome those who are now taking on their new responsibilities. It is particularly pleasing to note a record number of women have been elected as Unit Commanders and

Deputy Unit Commanders this year - 14 in all. This is a reflection of the strong contribution our female members make at all levels of our service. It is also important to publicly thank those who are employed for the betterment, development and support of Marine Rescue NSW. We are fortunate to have professional and diligent staff to support our membership in meeting our core mission. Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM deserves singular praise for his boundless energy in representing the organisation and working for the members’ wellbeing and advancement. This organisation would have neither its strength nor resilience without the Commissioner’s robust leadership. The Commissioner’s appointment as the Chair of the State Rescue Board, the peak organisation responsible for ensuring the efficiency and effectiveness of rescue service delivery in NSW, is acknowledgement of his experience and skill and this organisation’s recorgnised position in the rescue sector. In closing, on behalf of the Board, I again express our gratitude to each of our 3,101 volunteers for their commitment to serving the people of this State. Their skill, resourcefulness and willingness to place the safety of others above their own are laudable. Together, we provide a recognised world-class rescue service to the boating community of New South Wales and save lives on the water. This is our mission. Our commitment is unwavering, our success beyond measure.

James L Glissan ESM, QC Chair, Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

5


Report of the Commissioner Commissioner Stacey Tannos with MR Merimbula members after the presentation of Commendations for Courage and a Unit Commander’s Citation. Photo: Merimbula News Weekly.

Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM

A

s a not-for-profit volunteer emergency service, Marine Rescue NSW is heavily dependent on the funding we receive from the State Government and boating community. In 2015-16, this core funding amounted to $7.6 million, comprising a direct Government grant of $1.6 million and $6 million raised from the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations. This was supplemented by income from our volunteers’ committed fundraising efforts, including the inaugural Art Union, a range of grants and donations. MRNSW is committed to ensuring all available funding is invested responsibly and effectively in the delivery of our life-saving services, volunteer training and support and essential capital and infrastructure. To ensure accountability and transparency, the expenditure of Government and levy funding, which is essential to our ongoing operation, is reported not only in our audited annual financial statements but also in the State Rescue Board annual report. Our sound investment of public funding has been affirmed this year in a KPMG review of MRNSW expenditure in line with the terms of our Funding Agreement with the NSW Government. Jointly commissioned by MRNSW, NSW Roads

6 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

and Maritime Services and the Office of Emergency Management (formerly the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services), the review shows the public can be assured of the astute and prudent use of this revenue. The report states: “It is evident that MRNSW has strong controls in place to monitor expenditure in line with the terms of the Agreement. On an annual basis, a detailed budget is prepared including proposed expenditure on vessels across the various Units, expected operating expenditure within headquarters and cash flow projections. The budget is reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors, providing an added level of oversight and governance. MRNSW have a clear understanding of their roles and have a strong sense of accountability to allocate State funding to initiatives so as to reduce risk to the boating community. Funding is appropriately allocated in line with a Service Delivery Model on the basis of reduction of risk to the boating community.” The overwhelmingly positive findings of the review have confirmed the success of our management approach and provide renewed confidence as we move to the next stage of the organisation’s development. We are now reaching a critical point where a large injection of capital, particularly in communications


Evans 30 keeps watch over the Evans Head Malibu Classic after a spate of shark attacks on northern NSW beaches. Photo: Ricky Forsyth.

infrastructure and unit facilities, is required for the organisation to reach its optimal efficiency and effectiveness. When it was established in 2009, the immediate priority of the new organisation was to modernise the rescue fleet. After seven years of concentrated investment, we have made tremendous strides in delivering new and refurbished vessels. By June 30, 67 vessels worth more than $15.6 million had joined the fleet, providing our volunteers and the boating public with safe, reliable and contemporary boats. We are now moving to Stage Two of the program, the broadscale enhancement of our secondary response fleet. A review of the operational communications infrastructure and services completed in 2014-15 provided a blueprint for communications investment through to 2020. While some projects and enhancements have been undertaken within existing resources and with the aid of grants and the support of the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia’s SOLAS Trusts, a comprehensive system-wide upgrade remains reliant on additional funding support. An audit of MRNSW facilities - the vast majority of which are State Government assets occupied under

lease or licence - identified a maintenance and Work Health and Safety critical backlog of $4.5 million. In addition, the audit mapped out a 10 year works and maintenance program costing $23.5 million. Again, while some of the more minor works can be carried out at unit level, larger-scale works will be dependent on obtaining extra revenue. While we are continuing to identify new means of fundraising and sources of grant funding, we also are continuing to work with the State Government to identify potential funding enhancements. Over the past seven years, we have won increasing recognition and respect as a vital member of the State’s emergency service network. This is due to the incredible commitment, skill and experience of our members and staff. Our emergency services volunteers are a tremendously valuable asset to our State; one that no government or community could afford to financially recompense. MRNSW members are tireless in their service to the community of NSW and I thank each of them for their contribution to the ongoing success of our organisation in meeting our commitments as the State’s official volunteer marine rescue service. Our boat crews answer calls for help around the clock, in wild conditions and traumatic circumstances, often placing the safety

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

7


Above: Welcome aboard... Emergency Services Minister David Elliott joins Commissioner Stacey Tannos on Sydney Harbour.

Right: A modern rescue fleet ... Trial Bay 30 and Rescue Water Craft on the Macleay River during a training weekend for RWC operators.

of others ahead of their own. They are supported by our communications operators, who maintain a watch over the airwaves and are the “voice� of MRNSW for the boating public, efficiently responding to more than 296,000 radio transmissions throughout the year. None of our work would be successful without our unit support teams, the members who carry out roles as administration and membership officers, treasurers and fundraisers, operations and IT officers, caterers, stores officers and many others. Our thanks also to a number of other emergency services, government agencies and service providers with whom we work closely, particularly Commander of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings APM and his staff, for their cooperation and confidence. Likewise to NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons AFSM and RFS staff and members

Stacey Tannos ESM Commissioner

8 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

for their support and sharing of resources. I would also like to place on the record our appreciation for the support of the Minister for Emergency Services, David Elliott and the Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight, Duncan Gay and their staff, along with Government agencies, including the Office of Emergency Management and NSW Roads and Maritime Services. Thanks also must go to our generous sponsors and donors, along with our suppliers of vessels, equipment and services. My personal thanks go to the members of the MRNSW Board for their continuing strategic leadership and support and to our staff members for their professional contribution and many long hours. Above all else, thank you again to our 3,101 volunteers for always remaining vigilant and committed to our mission of saving lives on the water.


“The have calm,aexperienced of an MRNSWto “MRNSW strong sensevoice of accountability Radio Operator you helpsoisas ontothereduce way allocate State fundingtelling to initiatives immensely reassuring.” risk tois the boating community.”

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

9


Operations The crew of Moama 20 takes part in the search for a man missing from this house boat on the Murray River in January.

M

arine Rescue NSW volunteers have again met our mission of saving lives on the water throughout 2015-16, bringing 6,714 members of our community home to their families, including almost 2,000 caught in 723 serious emergencies. The organisation’s 3,101 members contributed more than 621,000 volunteer hours to our frontline services in the past year, responding to a total of 3,072 incidents. While these varied from breakdowns and tows to Maydays and medical emergencies, the constant factor was the professionalism and focus of our volunteers. A team commitment is essential to the success of the emergency service we provide through our 24/7 marine radio monitoring and search and rescue response. The combined efforts of all make the MRNSW machine work: unit fundraisers, administrators, trainers, radio operators maintaining watch on a midnight shift and vessel crews heading to sea to save a life. Proactive engagement with the boating community is essential in maximising safety on our waterways and this ongoing focus was illustrated in 2015-16 through the active presence of MRNSW units at boat ramps, public events and community talks and on the water promoting safe practice. The effectiveness of this approach was reflected in

10 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

the higher levels of vessels Logging On with MRNSW radio bases: 73,383 in 2015-16 compared to 70,243 last year. MRNSW units also provided strong support to safety campaigns such as the State Government Old4New Lifejacket campaign and out-of-date flare mobile collection program, attending numerous local events with our partner agencies to bolster boating safety messages. Boosted unit patrols over Christmas-New Year provided a more responsive service over the busiest boating period and gave members more rescue experience and training time on the water and airwaves alike. At a state level, senior MRNSW personnel and volunteers were rostered at the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command Headquarters over summer to provide face-to-face planning and coordination support to ensure a swift response to boating emergencies. MRNSW prides itself on a culture of self-assessment and continuous improvement. In 2015-16, this commitment led to the completion of a WH&S audit of all facilities; review and reform of the annual equipment and unit inspection process (Operational Readiness Inspections); development of new and improved Standard Operating Procedures; and a strengthening of risk management processes.


Marine Rescue Port Macquarie crews out on the water early on Sunday, June 5, helping boaters in wild weather whipped up by an East Coast Low. Photo: David Targett.

THREE-YEAR MRNSW OPERATIONAL TRENDS 2015-16

2014-15

2013-14

Total

Vessels assisted

3,072

3,001

3,046

9,119

Emergencies

723

775

749

2,247

Radio calls

296,063

310,342

364,368

970,773

Vessels Logged On

73,383

70,243

79,696

223,322

2015-2016 MRNSW OPERATIONS YTD

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

March April

May

June

No. of radio calls

296,063 20,072 21,269 19,457 25,291 21,641 27,306 34,516 26,593 31,740 26,822 22,622 18,734

No. of Log Ons – local

65,911

3,820

4,697

3,577

6,371

3,893

5,719

8,879

5,308

8,535

7,082

5,406

2,624

No. of Log Ons – offshore

7,472

299

290

226

478

455

536

1,154

714

899

1,038

792

591

No. of emergency rescues

723

31

41

38

58

48

83

78

59

128

62

67

30

No. of assists – tows

1,643

55

94

81

175

84

230

226

178

219

161

90

50

No. of assists – jump starts

160

6

9

8

13

10

15

22

16

23

14

18

6

No. of assists – medical assist 60

3

1

1

17

3

7

8

4

11

3

2

0

No. of assists - transport assist 121

3

22

10

23

6

5

15

3

19

0

12

3

No. of assists - pump outs

20

0

2

1

0

2

4

2

3

1

2

2

1

No. of assists – other

345

15

23

23

41

22

39

54

21

30

20

25

32

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

11


Operations A spectacular welcome for new $850,000 Steber 38, Port Stephens 31, as it enters its home waters for the first time. Photo: Lisa Skelton, Imagine Cruises.

2015-16 MRNSW OPERATIONAL OUTCOMES Life-endangering (notifiable) emergencies

723

Persons on Board (POB)

1,965

Other vessel assists

2,349

Persons on Board (POB)

4,749

Total Persons on Board (POB)

6,714

Radio calls logged

296,063

Total vessel Log Ons

73,383

Vessels Logged On via MarineRescue mobile App

9,788

Persons on Board (POB)

261,931

Volunteer duty hours (rostered shifts, excluding call-outs) Search & Rescue Coordination Centres

245,280

Marine radio bases

33,408

Marine rescue vessels

342,432

Total volunteer duty hours

621,120

12 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


A safe, modern fleet M

arine Rescue NSW continued to invest in the modernisation of the rescue vessel fleet throughout 2015-16, delivering increased volunteer safety and operational efficiency. The Fleet Modernisation Program is delivering purpose-designed rescue boats tailor-made or substantially refurbished for their operating conditions. Stage One of the program, upgrading primary response vessels, is nearing completion, with the focus to move to secondary response vessels in 2016-17. Since the establishment of MRNSW, 67 new and refurbished vessels, worth more than $15.6 million, have entered the fleet. This includes three new boats and one refurbished vessel this year, at a cost of $1.65 million. MRNSW is committed to supporting NSW boat builders. This not only helps provide valuable skilled employment in regional centres but also ensures us ease of access during build processes and sea trials and for ongoing maintenance and servicing. Our major builders are Yamba Welding and Engineering, which produces the Naiad and Ocean Cylinder vessels in the fleet, Steber International, which this year marked its 70th anniversary and Sailfish Catamarans, builder of the new Cottage Point 30. Eight vessels’ onboard electronic navigation systems

were upgraded to new Raymarine Multi Function Displays, at a cost of about $80,000. New-model Suzuki outboards replaced engines at the end of their operational capacity on six boats, at a cost of $220,000. Digital switching also has been implemented across the fleet of new vessels and standardisation reinforced, providing additional training and operational flexibility. Rescue Water Craft (jet skis) continue to prove valuable rapid response assets, particularly on dangerous bars and shallow enclosed waters, operating at Port Macquarie, Lake Macquarie, Central Coast, Tuross, Nambucca, Trial Bay and Narooma. A professional standardised uniform, Personal Protective Equipment and training program have been developed for optimal RWC operator safety and efficiency. NEW & REFURBISHED VESSELS 2015-16 Cottage Point 30, 11.5m Sailfish

$470,000

Point Danger 20, 7.5m Naiad

$277,000

Port Stephens 31, 11.5m Steber

$850,000

Nambucca 20, 6.6m Naiad (refurbished)

$50,000

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

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Our people The MarineRescue mobile App and the Jervis Bay and Botany Port Hacking units were recognised at the 2015 NSW Water Safety Awards.

M

arine Rescue NSW has been recognised throughout 2015-16 for its members’ courage, skill and service and its technological innovation. Three members of MR Ballina, David Nockolds, Tony Handcock and Rodney Guest, have been honoured with a national Group Bravery Citation for their efforts during a 2013 rescue operation. As the crew battled dark and dangerous conditions to save two men on a stricken motor cruiser on the Ballina bar, Ballina 30 was hit by a large swell and capsized. The five men were subsequently rescued by the Ballina Jet rescue crew. In the 2016 Queen’s Birthday Honours, the Emergency Services Medal was awarded to Mid North Coast Regional Director John Lynch, from MR Forster-Tuncurry, MR Jervis Bay Training Systems Officer and former General Director Tony Drover and MR Alpine Lakes Unit Commander Les Threlfo. Eight crew members from MR Port Stephens - Michael Smith, Robert Johnson, Richard Pizzuto, Barney Pinney, Laurie Nolan, Barbara Cole, Peter Merlino and Paul Sullivan - received the 2015 Australian Search and Rescue Award for their bravery and seamanship during a rescue operation to save two people in the April 21, 2015 East Coast Low storms. Commissioner’s Commendations for Courage were

14 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

this year awarded to: t The Port Stephens crew for this operation t MR Merimbula’s Bill Blakeman, Guy Illy and the late Robert Bayliss for saving two fishermen from being smashed on to rocks at Haycock Point in 2011 t Peter Keft, Shane Gallaty and Geoff Troth, from MR Shellharbour, for rescuing two men and a 12-yearold boy in turbulent seas off Gerringong in 2014. Commissioner’s Citations were awarded to the MR Port Stephens Radio Operators who supported the April 21 operation and members of MR Trial Bay and Camden Haven, recognising their operational skill. The MarineRescue App took out the title of Most Significant Contribution to Water Safety with a Focus On Inclusive Practices at the NSW Water Safety Awards. The Jervis Bay and Botany Port Hacking units also were commended for their water safety education programs. The NSW Government awarded MRNSW Property Officer and MR Broken Bay member David Lyall the 2015 NSW Maritime Medal and MR Port Stephens Watch Officer Eryl Thomas was named the 2015 MRNSW Volunteer of the Year in the Rotary Emergency Services Community Awards. A total of 338 members received Long Service Awards and 81 were awarded the National Medal.


Commissioner Stacey Tannos addresses the organisation’s leaders at the 2015 Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders Conference in Sydney.

I

nvestment in our people is fundamental to the success of our organisation. This year, members were provided with a number of opportunities to build and enhance their leadership, management, operational and personnel skill sets, learning from and sharing their experiences with their colleagues within MRNSW and across the broader volunteer and emergency management sectors. More than 100 members of our senior leadership group assembled in Sydney in September for the biennial Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders Conference, which was opened by Emergency Services Minister David Elliott. The Minister presented official NSW Government Certificates of Appreciation to the Unit Commanders of MR Port Stephens, Lake Macquarie, Newcastle, Central Coast, Hawkesbury, Terrey Hills, Cottage Point, Middle Harbour, Port Jackson and Botany Port Hacking for their units’ response to the April 2015 East Coast Low storms. The conference spotlight was on the organisation’s operational and corporate directions, challenges and planned initiatives, with presentations from Commissioner Stacey Tannos, Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey, Commander of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Detective Superintendent Mark

Hutchings and a number of other guest speakers. Seven members from MR Point Danger, Crowdy Harrington, Tuggerah Lakes, Lake Macquarie, Cottage Point, Middle Harbour and Ulladulla represented our organisation at the 16th National Volunteering Conference in Canberra in April. Two members from the Evans Head and Lake Macquarie units took part in the Australian Emergency Management Institute’s Volunteer Leadership Progam, which aims to enhance volunteer agency capacity through developing the leadership skills of middle to senior level emergency management volunteers. In recognition of the sometimes challenging nature of emergency services operations, Critical Incident Support training was provided to Regional Controllers, Regional Training Managers, the Member Services Manager and two members from Crowdy Harrington and Port Macquarie. In 2015-16, financial support totalling $1.65 million was provided to our units, including $1.38 million for annual budget allocations, telephone and data payments, uniforms and sundry items, and the $273,000 cost of the MRNSW Great Outdoor Getaway Art Union, which supported units’ fundraising efforts. Units retained the proceeds of their direct and online ticket sales.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

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Working with our colleagues Encouraging safe behaviour on the water ... NSW Surf Life Saving Manager Andy Kent, MRNSW Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey and Commander of the NSW Police Marine Area Command Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings.

C

ommissioner Stacey Tannos was this year appointed to key positions on two key State Government rescue and water safety bodies. Deputy Premier and Police Minister Troy Grant and Emergency Services Minister David Elliott appointed the Commissioner as the Chair of the peak rescue body in NSW, the State Rescue Board. The Board, comprising the leaders or senior officers of the State’s rescue agencies, is responsible for ensuring the maintenance of efficient and effective rescue service delivery in NSW, both on land and water. In another sign of the respect in which MRNSW is held in the rescue sector, this is the first time the head of a non-government agency has been appointed as Chair. Mr Elliott also appointed the Commissioner to a working group of stakeholders, government agencies and experts charged with determining the number and location of high risk areas in which lifejackets will be made compulsory for rock fishers. This will be accompanied by a major new education campaign targeted at reducing the number of rock fishing fatalities on the State’s coastline. Commissioner Tannos continues as a member of the State Emergency Management Committee. The NSW Police Force Marine Area Command and

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MRNSW operate cooperatively to ensure the provision of an effective and robust level of marine protection for the boating community. As well as responding to emergency calls throughout the year, MRNSW crews have supported the Marine Area Command in a number of Search and Rescue operations, including searches for missing fishermen and boaters, a sailor washed overboard from his racing yacht, a houseboat passenger at Moama and a kayaker presumed missing at Lake Illawarra. Senior MRNSW personnel were again based in the MAC over the peak summer boating season to further boost the agencies’ inter-operability. MAC also continued to participate in our training program, delivering theoretical and practical training sessions at Regional Search and Rescue Exercises. As part of our commitment to advocating for increased boating safety, MRNSW has strongly supported the Old4New lifejacket campaign, a NSW Government initiative to encourage boaters to wear modern, comfortable lifejackets on the water, especially when in smaller vessels. Units also assisted NSW Roads and Maritime Services with a program for the disposal of expired flares. More than 5,000 out-of-date flares were responsibly handed in


Marine Rescue Merimbula and Pambula Surf Life Saving members search for a swimmer reported missing. Photo: Merimbula News Weekly.

at 26 mobile collection sites set up under this scheme. MRNSW also works with the yachting community to provide communications support and rescue services for events such as the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race. To ensure rescue crews were race-ready for the 2015 event, members of the Shoalhaven, Ulladulla, Sussex Inlet, Batemans Bay, Narooma and Bermagui units were put through their paces in a pre-Sydney to Hobart Search and Rescue Exercise, along with the MAC, AMSA, RMS, Westpac Rescue Helicopter and Surf Life Saving NSW. This was followed in June by a safety briefing for the yachting sector, attended by representatives of the Australian Cruising Yacht Club, Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron, Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club, Yachting Australia, Yachting NSW and SOLAS Trusts, along with NSW RMS and the MAC. As well as working to support our marine colleagues, MRNSW members also continued to demonstrate the emergency services cooperation that is the hallmark of the State’s emergency management procedures. Units conducted joint vessel-helicopter training with crews from the Westpac Rescue Helicopter and Ambulance Service of NSW; MR Port Macquarie joined a State Emergency Service tsunami exercise in February; and members of the Hawkesbury, Cottage Point, Broken

Bay and Central Coast units took part in a Rural Fire Service mass exercise on the Hawkesbury River in March. Members again gave their time to talk to thousands of people at the Boating Industry Association of NSW’s 2015 Sydney International Boat Show and 2016 Sydney Trailerboat Show about MRNSW’s boating safety net, our services and volunteer recruitment. We are proud to be good neighbours and support our community both on and off shore. MRNSW units have again provided on-water, communications and logistical support for a range of celebrations, competitions and other community events. These included the start of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, Pittwater to Coffs Yacht Race, New Year’s Eve fireworks, Australia Day activities, Anzac Day ceremonies, Fishing Classics at Evans Head and Coffs Harbour, Ulladulla Blessing of the Fleet, Mullum to Bruns Paddle, Sydney to Gold Coast yacht race, Hawkesbury Bridge to Bridge Water Ski Race and Canoe Classic and the Merchant Mariners Memorial Service. Thanks must go to our volunteers’ families and employers, without whose support they would not be able to perform their duties to assist, support and protect the people of NSW. They are also part of our wide emergency services community.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

17


Training & education Training manoeuvres ... members of Marine Rescue Kioloa and Ulladulla practice crew transfer operations. Photo: Dave Hall.

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he organisation’s abiding commitment to ensuring its volunteers have the skill and knowledge to perform their roles safely and effectively has seen a continuing investment of resources and personnel in the training program throughout 2015-16. The training curriculum, delivered by the MRNSW Registered Training Organisation, is custom-designed for MRNSW’s specific operational activities and environments and aligned with educational regulations and requirements set by the Federal Government and authorities such as the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA). The National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee, of which MRNSW is a member, has continued to work with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to ensure the requirements of the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 are appropriate and relevant to the needs and operations of the volunteer marine rescue sector, without placing an additional burden on our volunteers. The Scheme R (Rescue) training and qualification requirements for the sector were finalised and will take effect on July 1, 2016. Scheme R, now known as the new Exemption 24, sets out standards and survey requirements for new vessels;

18 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

grandfathering arrangements for existing vessels; and required qualifications and grandfathering arrangements for volunteer rescue crew members. MRNSW training programs and resources have continued to attract national interest as a benchmark for meeting the new requirements. A suite of new and refreshed education resources has been produced, funded by a 2014-15 $65,480 StateCommonweatlh Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme grant. Bound copies of the resources have been provided for unit libraries and also to unit Training Officers, with all documents available on the online OTTER system. New members starting training will be provided a folder to populate with course workbooks and manuals as they progress on the training pathway. The resources have a standard format, are easily identifiable and set out a clear course through the training process, whether from Crew to Leading Crew to Coxswain or Radio Operator to Watch Officer to Search and Rescue Support Officer. On-water training this year included coordinated multi-agency Search and Rescue Exercises (SAREX) at MRNSW Headquarters in September (the Greater Sydney and Illawarra regions), Point Danger in February (Northern Rivers) and Camden Haven in May (Mid North


Surviving at sea ... the crew of Broken Bay 20 watches over members taking part in a regional sea survival training course.

Coast). Another SAREX was staged in November to prepare Illawarra and Monaro units for the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race. More than 200 volunteers took part in these exercises, which not only test agencies’ joint response protocols and practices but also allow us to build stronger working relationships with our search and rescue partners, including the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, Surf Life Saving and rescue helicopter services from both NSW and Queensland. Mini-SAREX events also were held at Coffs Harbour, Camden Haven and Jervis Bay and MR Forster-Tuncurry took part in a police multi-agency exercise on Wallis Lake. A key part of our role as a recognised boating safety advocate is public boating education. In the 2015 calendar year, 22 units conducted 232 Safe Boating and Personal Water Craft (jet ski) courses and licence testing. A total of 1,112 adults and 176 young adults took a boat driver’s licence course and licence test, with a further 137 adults and 38 young adults undertaking a PWC course/test. Forecast changes to State boat licencing requirements indicate that boaters will no longer be required to

complete a Safe Boating course to gain a licence. MRNSW will continue to promote the safety benefits of learning from boaters with recognised expertise and experience. MRNSW members gained the following nationallyrecognised qualifications in 2015-16: TRAINING QUALIFICATIONS ISSUED IN 2015-16 Provide First Aid

507

Provide Advanced Resuscitation

556

Radio Operator

143

Crew

144

Watch Officer

63

Leading Crew

40

Coxswain

38

Rescue Water Craft Operator

15

Search & Rescue Support Officer

2

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

19


IT & communications Work site with a view ... staff from Karera Communications at work on the upgrade to the communications installation at Coopers Shoot, inland from Cape Byron.

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oncentrated investment in the MRNSW marine radio network - the “Triple Zero of the sea” - delivered significantly enhanced performance and safety this year. This public safety infrastructure facilitates units’ marine radio response, enabling them to handle more than 296,000 radio transmissions to Log On boaters, disseminate vital safety information and advice and help coordinate search and rescue operations. As well as communicating with MRNSW units via radio, boaters also have enthusiastically embraced the MarineRescue App, launched in 2015. This year, 9,788 vessels Logged On via the App, which was downloaded by 15,951 boaters on 10,151 Apple devices and 5,800 Androids. The rollout of a sector-leading Preventative Maintenance Inspection program for the marine radio system has delivered immediate improvements in network performance. Under a service agreement with leading technical provider, Karera Communications, all repeaters and remote sites are to be inspected and serviced annually and all unit radio bases and vessels biennially. In addition to providing an accurate status report on the extensive suite of radios, repeaters and remote sites, the first round of PMIs resulted in a significant number of fixes and improvements. Major projects this year included a $150,000

20 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

investment in the Cooper Shoot remote site on the North Coast; a $120,000 project to modernise the North Head remote installation overlooking Sydney Harbour; support for work on the Channel 16 installation on Mt Timbilica on the NSW/Victoria border; access to Surf Life Saving radio channels for joint-operations; 24/7 remote monitoring of the Point Perpendicular site by MR Port Kembla; and the installation of an additional remote monitoring site at Ulladulla. This investment provides improved safety not only to the boating public, but also MRNSW volunteers and partner agency personnel who risk their lives to rescue those in peril at sea. Refurbishment of radio bases at Point Danger, Cape Byron, Ulladulla and Eden strengthened local and regional capacity. Investment continued in building redundancy and resilience within the radio network, linking operationally efficient remote sites through the Radio over Internet Protocol (RoIP) system. While all Marine Radio Bases and Search and Rescue Coordination Centres are essential to long-term operations, the backbone RoIP system ensures greater remote monitoring capability if a base loses power/internet or is otherwise unable to operate. RoIP enables transmissions to units to be monitored by other key communications ‘hubs’, such as MR Terrey Hills.


Our facilities The new $1.4 million Marine Rescue Ulladulla base opened in August, 2015. Photo: Lisa Hardwick.

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onstruction began early in 2016 on the $2.28 million MR Ballina radio tower and base. The new facility replaces the unit’s ageing and leaning radio tower, which was closed by order of the Commissioner in September as an unsafe working environment. Funding for the new tower project was provided by MRNSW, Ballina Shire Council and the State and Federal governments. Work also is continuing on a new MR Port Macquarie Search and Rescue Coordination Centre. The unit relocated its radio operations to its nearby boat shed while the deteriorating Town Beach building was replaced. The unit also replaced rotting piers on its jetty and refurbished its boat shed to accommodate its new rescue vessel, due for delivery in August 2016. MR Ulladulla members celebrated the official opening of their new $1.4 million base in August 2015, almost two years after the destruction of their former building in a fire in October 2013. The Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group has generously provided space in its complex for the Newcastle unit, which was left homeless when its base was unroofed in the April 2015 East Coast Low storms. Little more than a year later, the MR Terrigal base

sustained significant damage in wild weather on the first weekend in June. Large swells battered the building, causing significant structural damage and flooding equipment. Water entry caused minor damage to a number of other units. The vast majority of MRNSW premises are State Government assets occupied under lease or licence, transferring responsibility and financial liability for building repairs, maintenance, upkeep and improvements to MRNSW as the tenant. This year, MRNSW commissioned an audit of fixed assets by AssetFuture that identified a maintenance critical backlog of $4.12 million and WH&S critical backlog of $428,000. In addition, the report identified that implementing a whole-of-life maintenance program will require expenditure of $23.5 million over 10 years. This will remove exposure to additional costs of $15.6 million in unserviceable liability in a decade’s time. In many instances, however, a cost-effective approach may be to refurbish or replace rather than repair/maintain the asset. While some of the more minor works and upgrades can be carried out using unit members’ skills and expertise, larger-scale works will be dependent on securing additional funding support for the organisation.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

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Fundraising & grants The Westport Club’s Jenny Edmunds and Anthony Westman give a $150,000 helping hand to MR Port Macquarie members in the form of a grant towards the unit’s new rescue vessel. Photo: Port Macquarie News.

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he MRNSW Great Outdoor Getaway Art Union was launched in 2015-16 as a fresh fundraising campaign to help maintain our services. The Art Union, featuring $281,500 worth of prizes, including offroad caravans, boats, vehicles, a quad bike and cash, raised more than $408,000 for our units. The Art Union was drawn by Grant Thornton Auditors partner Neville Sinclair on April 26. Another new fundraising initiative was launched in March, with the release of the MRNSW trailer plate. NSW Roads and Maritime Services and myPlates developed the trailer plate and are generously directing proceeds from sales to MRNSW. Incorporating the MRNSW logo, colours and mission statement, the new plate enables boat owners to show their support for the service’s valuable work to save lives on the water. MRNSW benefited from grants from a range of government, corporate and community organisations throughout the year. MR Ballina received an $850,000 Federal Government National Stronger Regions Fund grant for its new tower. Three units received a total of $248,000 under the 2015 State Community Building Partnerships grants program. In the largest allocation, MR Ballina received $200,000 for its tower project. The Alpine Lakes unit

22 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

received $40,000 for a boat shed on Lake Jindabyne, while Crowdy Harrington attracted $8,000 for its training room fit-out. On June 6, MR Port Macquarie gratefully received a grant of $150,000 from the Westport Club towards the cost of its new $840,000 Steber 38 rescue vessel. The State’s Registered Clubs continued to support our units with a series of grants. MR Norah Head received two grants from the Doyalson-Wyee RSL Club: $5,800 for renovations to its communications room and $4,061 for repairs to the unit’s tractor, used to launch and retrieve rescue vessel Norah Head 20. MR Bermagui received a total of $4,594 from four Bega Shire Clubs - Club Sapphire Merimbula ($2,195), Merimbula RSL ($1,000), Bermagui Country Club ($899) and Club Bega ($500) - towards a water rescue mannequin and a colour laser printer. Six units received a total of $19,000 in 2015 Department of Social Services Volunteer Grants: t MR Evans Head, $5000 for tools for its base t MR Wooli, $1000 for 12 volt power equipment t MR Coffs Harbour, $2753 for computer equipment t MR Lake Macquarie, $4850 for computer equipment t MR Forster-Tuncurry, $3588 for office equipment and t MR Hawkesbury, $1823 for volunteer training.


MR Alpine Lakes receives a $40,000 Community Building Partnership grant for a new boat shed ... Snowy Rivers Cr John Schumack, MR Alpine Lakes member Tanya Casey, Monaro Regional Controller Bob Herbert, Monaro MP John Barilaro, UC Les Threlfo and Cr Colin Stewart-Beardsley.

MR Norah Head received $7700 from the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development towards its Norah Head Remote Channel Changer project to purchase and install remote communications equipment to enhance local marine radio coverage. The unit also received a $10,000 Wyong Shire Council grant towards the radio infrastructure. Other grants and donations included: t Bendigo Bank presented MR Ulladulla with a $20,000 grant. t MR Botany Port Hacking received $11,000 under the Sutherland Shire Community Services and Art Grants Program for a Marine Radio Safety Net Extension volunteer recruitment, awareness and training program. t MR Hawkesbury received $6000 from the organisers of the annual Hawkesbury Canoe Classic for coordinating communications for the event. t NSW Department of Primary Industries’ Observation Towers Funding Program provided $3,000 for the purchase of three sets of high-powered binoculars. t RMS donated MR Tuross an air berth that was excess to its requirements. t The Woolgoolga Lions Club presented MR Woolgoolga with a $500 donation to help celebrate the unit’s 50th

anniversary in December. In order to help harness potential funding opportunities, a new position of Grants Manager was created in early 2016. Ms Emily Watson, who has strong experience in the goverment and not-for-profit sectors, was appointed to the position and joined the organisation in June. She will be working closely with our units and Headquarters personnel to develop and manage a robust and effective grants program, targeting a range of funding sources, including government and private sector bodies, trusts and foundations. Thank you to all the organisations and bodies allocating grants funding and also to our sponsors and donors, including the many local businesses and community groups that support our units’ operations through generous donations, both financial and in-kind. This support extends to members of the community, who continue to give generously to our many fundraising endeavours, whether it is our Art Union, a sausage sizzle, local unit raffles or one of the regular community markets run by our units. Each of you contributes to our mission to save lives on the water.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

23


Our partnerships Above: The MRNSW fleet is powered by Suzuki outboards under our Power of Choice preferred supplier agreement.

Right: MRNSW and Surf Life Saving crews head out in glassy conditions on the Camden Haven inlet. Photo: Michael Davis.

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artnerships with our flagship vessel outboard and electronics suppliers were renewed in 2015-16. Suzuki Marine has been the preferred supplier of outboard motors for the MRNSW fleet since 2103. The initial two-year Power of Choice agreement has now been extended to 2018, meaning MRNSW rescue vessels will continue to be powered by high-quality outboards at a competitive price, backed by threeyear unlimited hour warranties. MRNSW is pleased to continue its relationship with one of Australia’s most respected suppliers of marine engines and its Australian distributor, the Haines Group. Raymarine is the supplier of essential electronic equipment for all MRNSW vessels. A new three-year agreement will ensure the continuing high-quality fit-out of the rescue fleet. In a generous investment in our volunteers, Raymarine also has boosted training resources, donating six navigation simulators, which help crew members familiarise themselves with the operation of the latest digital technology in a classroom before putting this knowledge into practice on board a vessel. Karera Communications continues to support our communications under a four-year agreement signed in 2014. This covers the unit radio facilities and

24 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

repeater sites that form the backbone of the marine communications network. We are always looking for new and innovative ways to take our safety messages to the boating community. We have continued talking to boaters through a series of ‘infomercials’ on Reel Action TV, which attracts a weekly audience of more than 227,000 keen fishers and boaters to Network Ten’s One HD channel. Program producer and host, Michael Guest, was the entertaining guest speaker at the official dinner of the 2015 Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders Conference. Thanks must go to the organisations that advertise in our quarterly journal, Soundings, showcasing our work and their products and services, along with the suppliers for our e-shop, shopmrnsw.com.au We also have established valued relationships with businesses that support our work, including: t Sea-Doo, supplier of Rescue Water Craft (jet skis) t Navionics, which supplies its charts for our training simulators, vessels and website t Stewart Toyota, Headquarters vehicle supplier t BME, which has provided discounts for members, and t HP, which provides discounts on computer equipment for our organisation, units, volunteers and Radio Club members.


“MRNSW members continued to demonstrate the emergency services cooperation that is the hallmark of the State’s emergency management procedures.�


Saving lives Home safe ... Ron Lighton, Laurie Nolan, Mike Smith, Richard Pizzuto, Paul Sullivan, Ian Drummond and Tom Miller, who endured a triple knockdown during a rescue operation in an East Coast Low storm in January.

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anuary 6 started with a gale warning for the Hunter Coast. By the following day, five Mayday calls had been made, a sailor had drowned after being washed overboard from his racing yacht, another yacht had been beached and seven MR Port Stephens crew members had survived three knockdowns in atrocious conditions whipped up by an East Coast Low. The unit’s first job was at 9am,with Port Stephens 30 assisting a vessel that had broken its mooring. Just before noon, PS 40 (Danial Thain) was tasked to help with the search for the yachtsman knocked off his boat in huge seas north of Broughton Island as the vessel returned from the Pittwater to Coffs Harbour Yacht Race. Before it reached the search zone, PS 40 took over a tow from NSW Police of a yacht that had issued a Mayday, to allow the faster police boat to search for the missing sailor. The crew battled the seas at the port entrance to deliver the disabled yacht to a safe mooring within the bay. By 4.40pm, the crew members were tasked to join the search for the yachtsman, heading out into the combined sea and swell of 4-7 metres and winds in excess of 50 knots. Police Marine Area Command then asked PS 40 to tow or escort the missing sailor’s yacht, Amante, back to port, before tasking the crew to assist

26 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

M3, a 15.8m sailboat being blown north-west up the coastline at a rapid 7-8 knots after losing its steerage and sails in the conditions on its return journey from Coffs Harbour. A replacement crew left the dock at 8.20pm and after a long chase north, caught up to the yacht as it reached a beach just south of Seal Rocks. The crew was about to pass a tow line to the yacht when it hit the breakers and ended up on the beach, its crew abandoning ship and making it to shore. Just as that happened, an eight metre wave hit PS 40 and rolled it on its side. It was hit twice more and knocked flat. All members were secured to the vessel by lifelines and although two sustained injuries, all remained on board and safe. Both PS 40 and M3 issued Mayday calls. The five M3 crew members were retrieved from the beach by police, with PS 40 making its way back down the coastline to its base, arriving about 5.30am. The skipper of M3 and two crew members later attended a unit debrief to thank the rescue crew for their efforts. Four of these crew members also were among the PS 40 crew awarded the 2015 Australian Search and Rescue Award for rescuing two people from a yacht in similar conditions in April 2015.


Woolgoolga 30 ... deployed to assist an elderly couple who were injured when their yacht was broadsided on the Clarence River bar.

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n elderly couple who sustained injuries when their 16m cruiser was struck by large swells on the Clarence River bar were brought safely to shore in a relay rescue operation stretching into the early hours of the morning in late May. The eight-hour operation, which finished at 1.30am, involved resources and crews from three MRNSW units, the Police Marine Area Command, Ports Authority at Iluka-Yamba, NSW Ambulance and Westpac Rescue Helicopter. The cruiser was hit broadside twice, injuring the two people on board as they were tossed around in the cabin. A crew from MR Iluka-Yamba immediately prepared rescue vessel Iluka Yamba 30 to assist and the Ports Authority cutter was placed on standby. The Westpac helicopter provided aerial support, locating the cruiser and lighting up the bar. The cruiser skipper, who had suffered a head injury, decided not to try to re-enter the river and headed south to anchor at North Solitary Island, off Wooli. With the two vessels from Iluka-Yamba stood down, Woolgoolga 30 was deployed, with MRNSW and Police personnel on board, to meet the cruiser and transfer the boaters to shore for medical treatment. Mid North Coast Regional Controller John Murray

threaded WO 30 through the islands and reefs to reach the vessel on the eastern side of North Solitary Island. In difficult conditions with the prevailing strong winds and seas, Sergeant Don Stewart and Senior Constable Josh Shaw transferred to the cruiser to give immediate first aid and take control of the vessel. In the testing conditions, it was decided to continue on to Coffs Harbour. Further south again, a crew from MR Coffs Harbour was deployed on board Coffs 30 to meet the cruiser north of Split Solitary Island and provide a safety escort into Coffs. After a 60nm journey, the cruiser was assisted to a berth at the public wharf in the Coffs Marina about 1.30am, with waiting paramedics assessing the injured couple before transporting them to hospital. Vital communications support for the operation was provided by Barry Storey and Ross Minchin at MR Iluka Yamba before handing over to John Lang at Coffs Harbour. The couple later provided a generous donation in recognition of the skill and courage of the Woolgoolga and Coffs Harbour members.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

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Saving lives After a rescue operation in dangerous conditions, this 8m cruiser later slipped its anchor and washed up on Main Beach at Byron Bay. Photo: taojonesphotographer.com

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onditions on the Brunswick River bar were “horrific” when the crew of Brunswick 30 was called to assist an 8m motor cruiser that had suffered a dual engine failure off Cape Byron on January 23. The boat’s skipper issued a Pan Pan call at 10.50am to report that he and the passenger on board were stranded in large swells, with strong north-east winds blowing his vessel towards the coastline. MR Cape Byron radio operators, Bernie Allen, David Morris and Robert Asquith were assigned to control the incident response, supported by MR Brunswick operators Roy Drew and Des Wraight. A rescue crew at nearby MR Ballina was put on standby to assist if necessary. The BR 30 crew, skipper Lazlo Szabo, Christian Havet, Steven Blackhall and Atmo Kusseler, performed a safety and risk assessment for a mission to locate the stricken vessel, tow it to safe anchorage and bring its crew ashore. “The conditions were the worst I have ever seen or experienced in all my years of crossing the Bruns bar,” Mr Szabo, a 13-year marine rescue veteran, said. “We had a runout tide which was pushing BR 30 out into the oncoming waves, which were around three to four metres high and breaking heavily.” The skipper skillfully negotiated the bar in low visibility

28 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

and high winds and located the vessel, which had deployed its sea anchor. Within an hour of the Pan Pan call, BR 30 had taken the cruiser under tow. The MR Cape Byron radio operators guided the vessels through the treacherous Byron “mad mile” to a safe point in Byron Bay, where the cruiser was anchored and its passengers transferred to BR 30, with the help of a Surf Life Saving jet ski, which remained on standby as BR 30 returned across the bar at 2.10pm. “The professionalism shown by both radio bases and their total commitment to saving the stricken vessel gave me and my crew the utmost confidence in what was a very dangerous situation,” Mr Szabo said. “My crew performed over and above the call of duty with regard to their safety and that of the passengers.” The following day, the cruiser left Byron Bay in an attempt to reach Ballina but a motor again failed and on advice that it was too risky to attempt the Ballina bar with only one motor, it returned to Byron Bay. BR 30 later supplied the vessel with fuel but attempts to start the motors failed due to a complete failure of its electrical power supplies and the vessel was again anchored in the bay. It subsequently slipped its anchor and was washed up on Main Beach, before being removed by crane and taken to Ballina for repairs.


Investing in our fleet T

he Fleet Modernisation Program has resulted in 67 new and refurbished vessels joining our fleet since MRNSW was established on July 1, 2009, including four new and refurbished boats in 2015-16. All have been funded, at a cost of more than $15.6 million, with the support of the NSW Government and boating community and units’ dedicated fundraising. Cottage Point 30, above, was delivered in July 2015.

Point Danger 20 (PD 20)

Point Danger 30 (PD 30)

Brunswick 30 (BR 30)

Ballina 30 (BA 30)


Evans 30 (EH 30)

Iluka Yamba 30 (IY 30)

Wooli 30 (WI 30)

Woolgoolga 30 (WO 30)

Coffs 30 (CO 30)

Nambucca 20 (NH 20) - replacement

Nambucca 10 (NH 10) - replacement

Trial Bay 11 & Trial Bay 12 (TB 11 & TB 12) - 1 replacement

Trial Bay 30 (TB 30)

Port Macquarie 20 (PM 20)


Port Macquarie 10 (PM 10)

Camden Haven 30 (CH 30)

Crowdy 20 (CB 20)

Crowdy 30 (CB 30)

Forster 30 (FO 30)

Port Stephens 30 (PS 30)

Lemon Tree 30 (LT 30)

Newcastle 30 (NC 30)

Lake Macquarie 30 (LM 30)

Lake Macquarie 13 (LM 13)


Port Stephens 31 (PS 31)

Tuggerah Lakes 20 (TL 20)

Tuggerah Lakes 21 (TL 21)

Central Coast 21, 22 & 11 (CC 21, CC 22 & CC 11)

Broken Bay 20 (BB 20)

Hawkesbury 21 (HW 21)

Hawkesbury 22 (HW 22)


Middle Harbour 30 (MH 30)

Middle Harbour 20 (MH 20) - formerly NH 20

Port Jackson 30 (PJ 30)

Port Jackson 20 (PJ 20)

Botany 30 (BY 30)

Port Hacking 30 (PH 30)

Port Kembla 20 (PK 20)

Port Kembla 30 (PK 30)

Shellharbour 30 (SH 30)

Shoalhaven 30 (SA 30)


Jervis Bay 40 (JB 40)

Jervis Bay 20 (JB 20)

Sussex Inlet 30 (SI 30)

Ulladulla 30 (UL 30)

Kioloa 20 (KL 20)

Batemans 30 (BM 30)

Batemans 21 (BM 21)

Batemans 20 (BM 20)

Tuross 13 (TU 13)

Narooma 30 (NA 30)


Narooma 11 (NA 11)

Narooma 12 (NA 12)

Bermagui 30 (BG 30)

Merimbula 30 (MA 30)

Alpine Lakes 20 (AL 20)

Alpine Lakes 21 (AL 21)

Moama 20 (MO 20)

X Ray 21 (X 21)

X Ray 22 (X 22)

X Ray 10 (X 10)


Directors’ Report New Monaro Regional Director Glenn Felkin, Hunter/Central Coast Regional Director Roger Evans and General Director Mark McKenzie after the 2015 Board elections.

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he Directors of MRNSW submit the annual financial report of the company for the year ended 30 June 2016. The Directors consider the reference to responsible persons and entities in the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 has the same meaning as the role of Director as defined by the Corporations Act 2001. To comply with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, the Directors report as follows: DIRECTORS The Directors during the year until the date of this report and the number of meetings held and attended are: Name

Date Appointed/ Elected

Status

No of meetings while director

Meetings attended

Mr J L Glissan ESM, QC

3/7/2009

Current

8

7

Mr A Drover

11/12/2010

Term ended 28/11/15

2

1

Mrs P Fayers ESM

29/11/2014

Current

8

8

Mr M McKenzie

29/11/2015

Current

6

6

Mr B Gabriel ESM

23/11/2013

Current

8

8

Mr J Lynch ESM

3/12/2011

Current

8

8

Mr A Long BM VA

23/11/2011

Term expired 28/11/15

2

1

Mr R Evans

29/11/2015

Current

6

6

Mr D White ESM

29/11/2014

Current

8

8

Mr W Carter ESM

29/11/2014

Current

8

7

Mr G Felkin

28/11/2015

Current

6

6

36 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Between Board meetings, Directors met with unit Members in regional locations and thank them for their hospitality. COMPANY SECRETARY Mr Alan Skelley continued as Company Secretary. PRINCIPAL ACTIVITY Marine Rescue NSW provides a volunteer marine search and rescue service and radio safety service for boaters on NSW waters. The company operates in accordance with the requirements of relevant legislation and authorities, including the State Rescue Board and the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command. The company’s members also work to promote boating safety by providing a range of public boating safety education and engagement activities. FINANCIAL RESULTS The net surplus of the company for the year was $506,207 before Other Comprehensive Income (2015 $2,595,172). SHORT AND LONG-TERM OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THOSE OBJECTIVES The core roles of the organisation are to: t1SPWJEFBOFNFSHFODZNBSJOFTFBSDIBOESFTDVFTFSWJDFBOENBSJOFSBEJPTBGFUZTFSWJDF PQFSBUJOHJOBDDPSEBODF with the requirements of relevant legislation and authorities, for the boating community on NSW waters, and t1SPNPUFCPBUJOHTBGFUZ JODMVEJOHUISPVHIQVCMJDFEVDBUJPOBOEFOHBHFNFOUQSPHSBNT The strategies for meeting these core responsibilities and the company’s other short and long-term objectives are set out in the MRNSW Strategic Plan 2015-2018. During 2015-16, the company has taken steps to achieve results in key areas through: t3FTQPOEJOHUP JODJEFOUTPOUIFXBUFS JODMVEJOHTFSJPVT OPUJýBCMF FNFSHFODJFT t-PHHJOH0O JOTIPSFBOEPGGTIPSFWFTTFMT JODMVEJOH WJBUIFMarineRescue mobile App. The free Log On safety service is unique in NSW. When they Log On, skippers can be assured a responsible agency is watching out for them, knowing where they’re headed and when they’re due to return and can quickly activate a search if they do not safely return to shore as scheduled. t)BOEMJOH NBSJOFSBEJPUSBOTNJTTJPOT t.FNCFSTDPNNJUNFOUUPCPBUJOHTBGFUZFEVDBUJPO JODMVEJOHDPOEVDUJOH4BGF#PBUJOH$PVSTFTBOECPBUBOE Personal Water Craft licence tests for more than 1,400 people in the 2015 calendar year. t.FNCFSTPQFSBUJPOBM MPHJTUJDBMBOEDSPXETBGFUZDPOUSPMBTTJTUBODFBUOVNFSPVTFWFOUT JODMVEJOHUIFTUBSUPG UIF4ZEOFZUP)PCBSUZBDIUSBDF /FX:FBST&WFýSFXPSLT "VTUSBMJB%BZGFTUJWJUJFT &WBOT)FBEBOE$PGGT)BSCPVS 'JTIJOH$MBTTJDT 0DFBO#FBDI)PUFM'JTIJOH$PNQFUJUJPO .VMMVNUP#SVOT1BEEMF )BXLFTCVSZ#SJEHFUP#SJEHF 8BUFS4LJ3BDFBOE$BOPF$MBTTJD 4ZEOFZUP(PME$PBTU:BDIU3BDFBOE6MMBEVMMB#MFTTJOHPGUIF'MFFU t.FNCFSTQSPNPUJPOPGTBGFCPBUJOHQSBDUJDFBOE.3/48TBGFUZTFSWJDFBUFWFOUTJODMVEJOHUIF#PBUJOH*OEVTUSZ Association of NSW’s Sydney Trailerboat Show and Sydney International Boat Show and a range of other local boating and community events, such as Old4New lifejacket promotions and Boating Safety Days at boat ramps and other high-traffic boating locations. t3FQSFTFOUBUJPOBUWBSJPVTGPSVNTBU4UBUF OBUJPOBMBOEMPDBMMFWFMT JODMVEJOHUIF4UBUF3FTDVF#PBSE 4UBUF Emergency Management Committee, Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum, the National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee (reporting directly to the National Search and Rescue Council), the 16th National Volunteering Conference and the Australia and New Zealand Search & Rescue Conference. t3FQSFTFOUBUJWFTPQFSBUJPOBM USBJOJOHBOEPGGXBUFSDPMMBCPSBUJPOBOEDPPQFSBUJPOXJUILFZQBSUOFST TUBLFIPMEFST and third parties, including the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, NSW Roads and Maritime Services, the Office of Emergency Management, NSW Rural Fire Service, Ambulance Service of NSW, State Emergency Service, the Water Safety Advisory Council and other State Government bodies, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, Australian Communications Media Authority and other Commonwealth agencies and the Boating Industry Association of NSW and Boat Owners’ Association of NSW. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT The company achieved short-term objectives in 2015-2016: t.FNCFSTIJQPG BUZFBSFOE t Four new or substantially refurbished boats delivered. t 5IFOFX.36MMBEVMMBVOJUPQFOFE XJUIXPSLVOEFSXBZPOOFX#BMMJOBBOE1PSU.BDRVBSJFVOJUGBDJMJUJFT t USBJOJOHRVBMJýDBUJPOTJTTVFEUP.3/48NFNCFST CVJMEJOHPSHBOJTBUJPOBMDBQBCJMJUZ

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

37


MR Middle Harbour members training on board Naiad rescue vessel Middle Harbour 20, which has been operating on Sydney Harbour since Christmas Eve, and Middle Harbour 30. Photo: Brian Roberts.

LIMITED BY GUARANTEE The company does not have share capital. The Members’ liability is limited by guarantee. Each Member’s liability is limited to $2. AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE The Directors have received an independence declaration from the auditor in accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, which is included on page 43. The auditor did not provide any non-audit services during the year. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Directors made pursuant to the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012.

James L Glissan ESM, QC Director Sydney, 17 October 2016

38 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

David White Director


Directors’ qualifications & experience Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr James Glissan ESM, QC

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF#PUBOZ1PSU)BDLJOH BGUFSKPJOJOHUIF "VTUSBMJBO7PMVOUFFS$PBTU(VBSE"TTPDJBUJPO "7$(" #PUBOZ#BZ in 2008.

Appointed as Original Director 3 July 2009 – 11 December 2010 Elected General Director 11 December 2010, 3 year term 23 November 2013, 3 year term

t#BSSJTUFSTJODF 2$TJODF Extensive practice in Company and Commercial law. 1VCMJD%FGFOEFS/48 "TTPDJBUF+VEHF %JTUSJDU$PVSUPG/48  t4FSWFEPOOVNFSPVT#PBSET JODMVEJOHUIF'JSFBSNT4BGFUZ "XBSFOFTT$PVODJM/48

Mr Anothony Drover Elected General Director 11 December 2010, 2 year term /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF+FSWJT#BZ+PJOFEUIF"7$("JO  IPMEJOHSPMFTJODMVEJOH4LJQQFSBOE5FBN-FBEFS 1VSTFS 5SBJOJOH 0GýDFS $PNNBOEFSBOE4RVBESPO%FQVUZ$PNNPEPSF t$PBTU(VBSE4PVUIQPSU4LJQQFSBOE5FBN-FBEFS %FQVUZ Commander and Commander. t$BSFFSBTB3PZBM"VTUSBMJBO/BWZ0GýDFS4FBNBO0GýDFSBOE )FMJDPQUFS1JMPU  )FMJDPQUFS*OTUSVDUPS   #VJMEJOH.BOBHFS  4BMFT.BOBHFS  BOE /BWBM0GýDFS  "51-)FMJDPQUFSBOE$PNNFSDJBMýYFE XJOHQJMPUBOEþJHIUJOTUSVDUPS .BTUFSBOE$FSU5""

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

39


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mrs Patricia Fayers ESM

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF$FOUSBM$PBTU5IFýSTUXPNBOFMFDUFE UPUIF#PBSEPG.3/484FSWFENPSFUIBOZFBSTJOWPMVOUFFS NBSJOFSFTDVFTJODFKPJOJOHUIF$FOUSBM$PBTU%JWJTJPOPGUIF37$1 in 1998.

Elected General Director /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t"QQPJOUFE%JWJTJPOBM$PNNBOEFSGSPNUP'PMMPXJOHUIF USBOTJUJPOUP.3/48 TFSWFEBT8BUDI0GýDFSGSPNUP BOEXBTFMFDUFE6OJU$PNNBOEFSGSPNUP"4LJQQFS 0OF IBTQBSUJDJQBUFEJONBOZBTTJTUTBOESFTDVFTBOEIBTCFFO JOUFHSBMUPNBOBHJOHUIFEFMJWFSZPGOFXSFTDVFWFTTFMTUPUIF Central Coast unit. t0UIFSQPTJUJPOTIBWFJODMVEFE"TTJTUBOU2VBSUFSNBTUFS SBEJP JOWJHJMBUPSBOE#PBU-JDFODFUFTUFS Mr Mark McKenzie Elected General Director /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF#PUBOZ1PSU)BDLJOH BGUFSýSTUKPJOJOHUIF "VTUSBMJBO7PMVOUFFS$PBTU(VBSE"TTPDJBUJPOJO t2VBMJýFEBT$PYTXBJOJO6OJU$PNNBOEFSGSPNUP 2013. t2VBMJýDBUJPOTJODMVEFB.BTUFSPG#VTJOFTT"ENJOJTUSBUJPO $FSU *75SBJOJOHBOE"TTFTTNFOUBOE$FSU*70DDVQBUJPOBM)FBMUIBOE 4BGFUZ t&YUFOTJWFFYQFSJFODFBTB(SPVQ0QFSBUJPOT.BOBHFSGPSBNBKPS QVCMJDUSBOTQPSUPQFSBUPSBOEBQSPGFTTJPOBMDBSFFSBMTPTQBOOJOH power generation and distribution, telecommunications and construction.

Mr Bernard Gabriel ESM &MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS /PSUIFSO3JWFST

23 November 2013, 2 year term /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF1PJOU%BOHFS"DUJWFNFNCFSTJODF BOEJODFQUJPOPG7PMVOUFFS3FTDVF"TTPDJBUJPO'PSNFS6OJU Commander. t-JGF.FNCFS .BSJOF3FTDVF/48 t2VBMJýDBUJPOTBOEFYQFSJFODFJODMVEF$IJFGPG0QFSBUJPOTBOE$IJFG 4LJQQFS73" EFMFHBUFGPS7.32VFFOTMBOEBOE/48 t1SPGFTTJPOBMCBDLHSPVOEBTPXOFSPQFSBUPSPGNBSJOBBOECPBU CVJMEJOHCVTJOFTT"SFBNBOBHFSGPS/48PGMBSHF2VFFOTMBOE marine accessories distribution company.

Mr John Lynch ESM &MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS .JE/PSUI$PBTU  3 December, 2011, 2 year term 23 November 2013, 2 year term /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF'PSTUFS5VODVSSZ BGUFSCFDPNJOHBO BDUJWFWPMVOUFFSJOUIF37$1JO-JGF.FNCFS.BSJOF3FTDVF /48'PSNFSNFNCFSPGUIF3PZBM"VTUSBMJBO/BWZ t2VBMJýFEPGGTIPSFTLJQQFS 8BUDILFFQFSBOE$FSUJýDBUF*75"" t1PTJUJPOTIFMEJODMVEF"ENJOJTUSBUJPO0GýDFS 4FDSFUBSZ 5SFBTVSFS  6OJU$PNNBOEFS BMPOHXJUI4FOJPS3FHJPOBM0GýDFS/PSUI$PBTU  .FNCFS4UBUF3FTDVF#PBSE"DDSFEJUBUJPO5FBN %FMFHBUF.JE /PSUI$PBTU.BSJOF"EWJTPSZ$PNNJUUFFBOE%FMFHBUF(SFBU-BLFT &NFSHFODZ.BOBHFNFOU$PNNJUUFFGPSZFBST t1SPGFTTJPOBMCBDLHSPVOEJOBDDPVOUJOHBOECBOLJOH

40 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr Tony Long BM VA

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF$FOUSBM$PBTU"DUJWFNFNCFSPGUIF 37$1TJODF)FMEUIFQPTJUJPOPG%FQVUZ6OJU$PNNBOEFS

&MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS )VOUFS$FOUSBM$PBTU  23 November 2013, 2 year term

Mr Roger Evans &MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS )VOUFS$FOUSBM$PBTU  /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t1SPGFTTJPOBMCBDLHSPVOEBTB/481PMJDF0GýDFSTJODFBOE DVSSFOUMZB4UBGG0GýDFSUP$PNNBOEFS4QFDJBM4FSWJDFT(SPVQ  XIPIBTUIFSFTQPOTJCJMJUZGPSUIF.BSJOF"SFB$PNNBOE"UUBJOFE TJHOJýDBOU4FBSDIBOE3FTDVFFYQFSJFODFJOUIFTFýFMETPGQPMJDJOH

t+PJOFEUIF"VTUSBMJBO7PMVOUFFS$PBTU(VBSE"TTPDJBUJPOJO BOEJTBNFNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF-BLF.BDRVBSJF t4FSWFEBT%FQVUZ6OJU$PNNBOEFSGPSUISFFZFBSTVOUJMIJTFMFDUJPO UPUIF#PBSEBOEIPMET4"3BOE$SFXSBUJOHT t%JQMPNBJO.FDIBOJDBM&OHJOFFSJOH t1SPGFTTJPOBMCBDLHSPVOEJODMVEFTZFBSTXJUI#)1 XPSLJOHJO 8FTUFSO"VTUSBMJB 7JDUPSJBBOE/480QFSBUJPOT.BOBHFSJO(FFMPOH BOE&OHJOFFSJOH.BOBHFSGPSUIF8JSF1SPEVDUT(SPVQCFGPSF retirement in 2000.

Mr David White ESM

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF$PUUBHF1PJOU

&MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS (SFBUFS4ZEOFZ  /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t+PJOFEUIF"7$("JOBUUIFDPNQMFUJPOPGIJTTFSWJDFDBSFFSBT B$PNNBOEFSJOUIF3PZBM"VTUSBMJBO/BWZ t4FSWFEBTUIFVOJUT5SBJOJOH0GýDFSBOE5SBJOJOH4ZTUFNT0GýDFSGPS UXPZFBSTBOE6OJU$PNNBOEFSGPSýWFZFBST t"WFTTFM.BTUFSBOEBDUJWF$PYTXBJO IBTEFWFMPQFEBOEEFMJWFSFE DSPTTVOJUUSBJOJOHXJUIJOUIF4ZEOFZ3FHJPO BTXFMMBTTVQQPSUJOH PSHBOJTBUJPOXJEFUSBJOJOHJOJUJBUJWFTBOEKPJOJOHBXPSLJOHHSPVQUP EFWFMPQUIFOFX$POTUJUVUJPO

Mr William Carter ESM Appointed Original Director 3 July 2009 – 11 December 2010 &MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS *MMBXBSSB  11 December 2010, 2 year term /PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF4IPBMIBWFOBOEB-JGF.FNCFSPG.BSJOF 3FTDVF/48 t"OPSJHJOBMEJSFDUPSPG.3/48 IFIBTIFMEOVNFSPVTQPTJUJPOT JOUIF4UBUFTWPMVOUFFSNBSJOFSFTDVFTFDUPS JODMVEJOHUIF/48 7PMVOUFFS3FTDVF"TTPDJBUJPO.BSJOF$PNNJUUFF$IBJS 7PMVOUFFS .BSJOF3FTDVF$PVODJM$IBJS 73"7JDF1SFTJEFOU 4UBUF3FTDVF #PBSENFNCFS 4IPBMIBWFO.BSJOF3FTDVF"TTPDJBUJPO1SFTJEFOU BOE.BSJOF3FTDVF4IPBMIBWFO6OJU$PNNBOEFS t4LJQQFS /48DPNNFSDJBMDPYTXBJOBOEMJDFOTFEBVUPNPUJWF engineer.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

41


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr Glenn Felkin

t.FNCFSPG.BSJOF3FTDVF#BUFNBOT#BZ XIJDIIFKPJOFEJO

&MFDUFE3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS .POBSP

/PWFNCFS ZFBSUFSN

t".BSJOF.BTUFS IBTIFMEQPTJUJPOTJODMVEJOH"DUJOH%FQVUZ 6OJU$PNNBOEFS 5SBJOJOH0GýDFS 8BUDI0GýDFS $SFX-FBEFS  NBJOUFOBODFDPOUSPMMFSBOENFNCFSPGWFTTFMSFQMBDFNFOUUFBNT t$SFXUSBJOFSBOEBTTFTTPSGPSUIFOFXMZFTUBCMJTIFE.3.PBNBVOJU BOEBMTPBOJOUSPEVDUPSZUSBJOFSGPSUIFSPMMPVUPGUIFOFX4FBIBXL WFTTFMUSBDLJOHTZTUFNGPSVOJUTGSPN,JPMPBUP&EFO t1SPGFTTJPOBMCBDLHSPVOEJOUIFBWJBUJPOBOENPUPSJOEVTUSJFT  JODMVEJOHNPSFUIBOZFBSTXJUI2BOUBT t&MFDUFEGPSBPOFZFBSUFSNUPýMMBDBTVBMWBDBODZDSFBUFECZUIF SFTJHOBUJPOPG.POBSP3FHJPOBM%JSFDUPS)PXBSE4UBQMFT

42 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 7+61 2 8297 2400 )+61 2 9299 4445 (info.nsw@au.gt.com : www.grantthornton.com.au

Auditor’s Independence Declaration To the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW

In accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012, as lead auditor for the audit of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW for the year ended 30 June 2016, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: 1. no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and 2. no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

GRANT THORNTON AUDIT PTY LTD Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner – Audit & Assurance Sydney, 17 October 2016 Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 7+61 2 8297 2400 )+61 2 9299 4445 (info.nsw@au.gt.com : www.grantthornton.com.au

Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW

We have audited the accompanying financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (the “Company”), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2016, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information and the responsible entities’ declaration of the entity. Responsibility for the financial report

The Responsible Entities of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, and the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991. The Responsible Entities’ responsibility also includes such internal control as the Responsible Entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require us to comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error.

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Liability is limited in those States where a current scheme applies.


In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Responsible Entities, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Independence

In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. Auditor’s opinion

In our opinion: 1. the financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW is in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: a.

giving a true and fair view of the entity’s financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of its performance for the year ended on that date;

b. complying with Australian Accounting Standards- Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013; 2. the financial report agrees to the underlying records of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, that have been maintained, in all material aspects, in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and its regulations, for the year ended 30 June 2016; and 3. monies received by Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, as a result of fundraising appeals conducted during the year ended 30 June 2016, have been accounted for and applied, in all material aspects, in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and its regulations.

GRANT THORNTON AUDIT PTY LTD Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner - Audit & Assurance Sydney, 17 October 2016




Responsible Entities’ declaration Members of MR Port Kembla promoted MRNSW to a national audience when they appeared in an episode of Alive and Cooking with host James Reeson in May.

I

n the opinion of the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW: a. The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: i. Giving a true and fair view of its financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and ii. Complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Comission Regulation 2013. b. There are reasonable grounds to believe that Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Responsible Entities:

James L Glissan ESM, QC Director Sydney, 17 October 2016

46 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

David White ESM Director


Fundraising appeals declaration Grant Thornton partner Neville Sinclair draws the Marine Rescue NSW Great Outdoor Getaway Art Union with Commissioner Stacey Tannos.

D

eclaration on behalf of responsible entitites in respect of fundraising appeals:

We, James Glissan and David White, Directors of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, declare that, in our opinion: 1. The accounts show a true and fair view of the financial result of fundraising appeals for the year to which they relate; 2. The accounts and associated records have been properly kept during that year in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and Charitable Fundraising Regulations 2015; and 3. Money received as a result of fundraising appeals conducted during the year has been properly accounted for and applied in accordance with Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and Charitable Fundraising Regulations 2015.

James L Glissan ESM, QC Director Sydney, 17 October 2016

David White ESM Director

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

47


Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016 2016 $

2015 $

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

5,994,396

5,900,000

NSW Government core grant

1,627,335

1,601,780

Donations

1,137,627

927,787

Other grant income

666,882

425,712

Interest

145,864

175,691

1,621,118

1,720,180

3,365

1,427,513

86,805

53,188

554,193

504,930

11,837,585

12,736,781

Staff costs

2,544,835

2,218,575

Depreciation

2,628,237

2,427,280

143,577

207,396

2,307,576

2,283,212

Marketing

185,883

99,065

Membership

545,568

573,855

IT expenditure

440,987

260,969

Games of chance

434,642

371,791

Fundraising

106,211

119,282

Training expenses

129,710

124,651

1,864,152

1,455,533

11,331,378

10,141,609

506,207

2,595,172

-

-

506,207

2,595,172

Note Revenue and other income

Other income Proceeds from insurance claims Profit on sale of assets Activities income Total revenue and other income

4

Expenditure

Grant expenditure Maintenance & development of assets

Administration Total expenses Net surplus

4

Other comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

48 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Statement of financial position AS AT 30 JUNE 2016

Note

2016 $

2015 $

Cash and cash equivalents

12(a)

8,017,270

8,625,236

Trade and other receivables

5

1,157,044

964,628

Inventories

6

478,854

500,060

9,653,168

10,089,924

19,619,661

18,298,187

Total non-current assets

19,619,661

18,298,187

Total assets

29,272,829

28,388,111

1,023,025

952,419

837,914

861,333

1,860,939

1,813,752

2,007,475

1,676,151

Total non-current liabilities

2,007,475

3,489,903

Total liabilities

3,868,414

3,489,903

25,404,415

24,898,208

9,849,267

9,849,267

Accumulated funds

15,555,148

15,048,941

Total funds

25,404,415

24,898,208

Current assets

Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

7

Current liabilities Trade and other payables Borrowings from non-related entity

8 9(a)

Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Borrowings from non-related entity

Net assets

9(b)

Funds Transferred Assets Reserve

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

49


Statement of changes in funds AS AT 30 JUNE 2016

Balance at 1 July 2014

Transferred Assets Reserve

Accumulated funds

Total funds

9,849,267

12,453,769

22,303,036

2,595,172

2,595,172

2,595,172

2,595,172

Total comprehensive income for the year Net surplus for the year Total comprehensive income for the year Balance at 30 June 2015

9,849,267

15,048,941

24,898,208

Balance at 1 July 2015

9,849,267

15,048,941

24,898,208

506,207

506,207

506,207

506,207

15,555,148

25,404,415

Total comprehensive income for the year Net surplus for the year Total comprehensive income for the year Balance at 30 June 2016

9,489,267

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

50 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Statement of cash flows FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016 2016 $

2015 $

Cash received from levies, grants, donations & other income

11,166,731

10,612,283

Cash paid to suppliers & employees

(8,477,732)

(7,262,729)

245,769

1,498,963

2,934,768

4,848,517

Proceeds from property, plant & equipment

367,327

241,077

Interest received

145,864

175,691

Payments for purchases of property, plant & equipment

(4,230,232)

(3,746,533)

Net cash used by investing activities

(3,717,041)

(3,329,765)

Payment of interest on leases (Westpac)

(121,375)

(128,410)

Repayment of capital on leases (Westpac)

(562,258)

(462,987)

Repayment of borrowings

(350,000)

(600,000)

Proceeds of borrowing

1,207,940

1,112,920

174,307

(78,477)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

(607,966)

1,440,275

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

8,625,236

7,184,961

8,017,270

8,625,236

Note Cash flows from operating activities

Amount received from insurance claims Net cash provided by operating activities

12(b)

Cash flows from investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities

Net cash proceeds from financing activities

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

12(a)

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

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51


Notes to the financial statements Governor of NSW, General David Hurley and his wife Linda meet MR Evans Head Unit Commander Karin Brown during an impromptu visit to the unit’s radio base.

1. CORPORATE INFORMATION The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, operating as Marine Rescue NSW (MRNSW), for the year ended 30 June 2016 were authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the Directors on 17 October 2016. MRNSW is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The nature of the operations and principal activities of the company are described in the Directors’ Report (page 36) of these financial statements. 2. SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES a. Basis of Preparation General Purpose Financial Statements These General Purpose Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board and Urgent Issues Group interpretations. The company is a ‘Not for profit’ entity and registered with the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission. Historical cost convention and currency The financial statements have been prepared on the basis of historical cost, except for the revaluation of certain noncurrent assets and financial instruments. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. All amounts are presented in Australian dollars, unless otherwise noted. b. Significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions The preparation of financial statements requires the Directors to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other various factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions

52 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. Significant accounting estimates and assumptions The key estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of certain assets and liabilities within the next annual reporting period are: Make good provisions Provisions for future costs to return certain leased premises to their original condition are based on the company’s experience with previous premises and estimates of likely restoration costs determined by management. These estimates may vary from the actual costs incurred as a result of conditions existing at the date the premises are vacated. Management has estimated that the lease make good provisions will be negligible. Provisions for employee benefits Provisions for employee benefits payable after 12 months from the reporting date are based on future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service, as discussed in Note 2(m). The amount of these provisions would change should any of these factors change in the next 12 months. Useful lives of depreciable assets Management reviews its estimate of the useful lives of depreciable assets at each reporting date, based on the expected utility of the assets. Uncertainties in these estimates relate to technical obsolescence that may change the utility of certain software and IT equipment. Inventories Management estimates the net realisable values of inventories, taking into account the most reliable evidence available at each reporting date. The future realisation of these inventories may be affected by future technology or where they no longer meet the requirements of the company through changes in design or equipment redunancy. No provision for impairment has been recognised at the date of this financial report. Long Service Leave The liability for Long Service Leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account. c. Revenue recognition Revenue is recognised when the company is legally entitled to the income and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. Revenues are recognised net of the amounts of Goods and Services Tax (GST) payable to the Australian Taxation Office. Income from a contribution is recognised when the company obtains control of the contribution or right to receive the contribution, it is probable the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the entity and the amount can be measured reliably. (i) Government funding Under an agreement with the NSW Ministry for Police and Emergency Services (formerly Emergency Management NSW), the company’s services are supported by funding received from the NSW Government in the form of a core Government grant and through NSW Roads and Maritime Services as a portion of recreational boating registrations and licences. These contributions are recognised as non-reciprocal contributions and recognised as revenue on receipt since the use of the funds is at the discretion of management and applied to acquire assets in the form of vessels and for operational expenditure over varying periods. (ii) Interest revenue Interest revenue is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount. (iii) Donations and fundraising Donations collected, including cash, in kind donations, donations of vessels and equipment and goods for resale, are recognised as revenue when the company gains control, economic benefits are probable and the amount of the donation can be measured reliably. Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, in common with most organisations dependent upon such contributions, is unable to establish control over voluntary donations prior to their initial entry in the accounting records.

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53


(iv) Other grants Grants received for a specific project not yet completed are only recognised as income when the project occurs or the terms and conditions are met as these amounts are repayable if not fully utilised on the specific project. Grants received for general operational funding and which are not repayable are brought to account as income when received. Revenue from sales of goods comprises revenue earned (net of returns, discounts and allowances) from the sale of goods purchased for resale and gifts donated for resale. Sales revenue is recognised when the control of goods passes to the customer. (v) Asset sales The gain or loss on disposal of all non-current assets and available-for-sale financial investments is determined as the difference between the carrying amount of the asset at the time of the disposal and the net proceeds on disposal. Compensation from third parties for items of property, plant and equipment that were impaired, lost or given up shall be included in profit or loss when the compensation becomes receivable. The impaired or lost assets shall be written off. The cost of items of property, plant and equipment restored, purchased or constructed as replacements is capitalised as capital assets. (vi) Investment income Investment income comprises interest. Interest income is recognised as it accrues, using the effective interest method. d. Expenditure All expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all costs related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to a particular category they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with use of the resources. Fundraising costs are those incurred in seeking voluntary contributions by donation and do not include costs of disseminating information relating to the activities carried on by the company. Management and administration costs are those incurred in connection with the administration of the company and compliance with constitutional and statutory requirements. Other costs comprise investment management fees, information and education costs. e. Income Tax The company is exempted from paying income tax due to it being a charitable institution in terms of Section 50–5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended. f. Cash and cash equivalents Cash comprises cash on hand and demand deposits. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value or term deposits longer than three months in duration that may be broken without prejudice and are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value at call. g. Goods and Services Tax Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST), except: (i) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority, it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of expense; or (ii) for receivables and payables which are recognised inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables or payables. Cash flows are included in the cash flow statement on a gross basis. The GST component of the cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows. h. Financial Assets Loans and receivables Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as loans and receivables. These are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate. Impairment of financial assets Financial assets, other than those at fair value through profit or loss, are assessed for indicators of impairment at each

54 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


An attention-grabbing flare display from Shoalhaven 31 was one of the highlights of the Shoalhaven Combined Emergency Serices Open Day in November.

balance sheet date. Financial assets are impaired where there is objective evidence that as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the financial asset the estimated future cash flows of the investment have been impacted. For financial assets carried at amortised cost, the amount of the impairment is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. The carrying amount of the financial assets including uncollectible trade receivables is reduced by the impairment loss through the use of an allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against the allowance account. Changes in the carrying amount of the allowance account are recognised in profit or loss. With the exception of available-for-sale equity instruments, if, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously recognised impairment loss is reversed through profit or loss to the extent the carrying amount of the investment at the date the impairment is reversed does not exceed what the amortised cost would have been had the impairment not been recognised. i. Impairment of long-lived assets At the end of each reporting period the company assesses whether there is any indication that individual assets are impaired. Where impairment indicators exist, a recoverable amount is determined and impairment losses are recognised in profit or loss where the asset’s carrying value exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. For the purpose of assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Where it is not possible to estimate recoverable amount for an individual asset, recoverable amount is determined for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.

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j. Inventories Inventories comprise goods for distribution and goods for resale at no or nominal consideration as part of the company’s charitable activities. Inventories may be purchased or received by way of donation. Inventories are carried at the lower of cost or net realisable value. The cost is the purchase price of the items. The inventory is made up of supplies purchased for members and units, consisting of uniform items, items for the vessels, promotional and educational materials. Goods for resale No value is prescribed to goods for resale that have been donated to the company where the fair value cannot be reliably determined. The cost of bringing each item to its present location and condition is determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs necessary to make the sale. k. Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or deemed cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life, or in the case of leasehold improvements and certain leased plant and equipment, the shorter lease term, as follows: (i) Communications equipment – over 4 years (ii) Furniture and fittings – over 4 years (iii) IT and office equipment – over 3 years (iv) Motor vehicles – over 5 years (v) Rescue vessels – over 10 years The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed and adjusted, if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Gains and losses on disposals are calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the asset’s carrying amount and are included in profit or loss in the year that the item is derecognised. l. Trade and other payables Trade payables are recognised initially at their fair value, which is the amount expected to be paid, and subsequently at amortised cost. These amounts represent liabilities for services provided to the company prior to the end of financial year which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 60 days of recognition. m. Employee benefits Employee benefits comprise wages and salaries, annual, non-accumulating sick and long service leave and contributions to superannuation plans. Liabilities for wages and salaries expected to be settled within 12 months of balance date are recognised in other payables in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date. Liabilities for annual leave in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date which are expected to be settled within 12 months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related services are recognised in the provision for annual leave. Both liabilities are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Liabilities for nonaccumulating sick leave are recognised when the leave is taken and are measured at the rates paid or payable. The company pays contributions to certain defined contribution superannuation plans. Contributions are recognised in the income statement when they are due. The company has no obligation to pay further contributions to these plans if the plans do not hold sufficient assets to pay all employee benefits relating to employee service in current and prior periods. Other long-term employee benefits The company’s liabilities for annual leave and long service leave are included in other long-term benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service. They are measured at the present value of the expected future payments to be made to employees. The expected future payments incorporate anticipated future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service and are discounted at rates determined by reference to market yields at the end of the reporting period on high quality corporate bonds that have maturity dates that approximate the timing of the estimated future cash outflows. Any re-measurements arising from experience adjustments and changes in assumptions are recognised in profit or loss in the periods in which the changes occur. The company presents employee benefit obligations as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the

56 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve (12) months after the reporting period, irrespective of when the actual settlement is expected to take place. Post-employment benefits plans The company provides post-employment benefits though defined contribution plans. n. Economic dependence The company is dependent upon the ongoing receipt of Federal and State Government grants and community and corporate donations to ensure the ongoing continuance of its programs. At the date of this report, management has no reason to believe this financial support will not continue. o. Finance and operating leases i. Finance leases The economic ownership of a leased asset is transferred to the lessee if the lessee bears substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the leased asset. Where the company is a lessee in this type of arrangement, the related asset is recognised at the inception of the lease at the fair value of the leased asset or, if lower, the present value of the lease payments plus incidental payments. A corresponding amount is recognised as a finance lease liability. See Note 2 (k) for the depreciation methods and useful lives for assets held under finance lease. The corresponding finance lease liability is reduced by lease payments net of finance charges. The interest element of lease payments represents a constant proportion of the outstanding capital balance and is charged to profit or loss, as finance costs over the period of the lease. ii. Operating leases All other leases are treated as operating leases. Where the company is a lessee, payments on operating lease agreements are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Associated costs, such as maintenance and insurance, are expensed as incurred. 3. INFORMATION TO BE FURNISHED UNDER THE NSW CHARITABLE FUNDRAISING ACT 1991

2016 $

2015 $

Donations

923,930

812,034

Raffles

669,152

800,329

Other fundraising

130,151

87,667

1,723,233

1,700,030

-

-

Raffles

348,753

371,791

Other fundraising

192,100

119,282

540,853

491,073

31%

29%

1,182,380

1,208,957

69%

71%

(a) Details of Aggregate Gross Income & Total Expenditure of Fundraising Appeals Gross proceeds from Fundraising Appeals

Direct costs of Fundraising Appeals Donations

Total direct cost of fundraising as a percentage of gross income from fundraising appeals Net Surplus from Fundraising Appeals Net Surplus from Fundraising Appeals as a percentage of gross income from fundraising

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“MRNSW volunteers have again met our mission of saving lives on the water, bringing 6,714 members of our community home to their families.�


Left: Ulladulla 30 crew members Don Davidson and Allan Brook retrieve a tow line before the crew of Sussex 20 completes the operation to return a 4.5m runabout to safety. Photo: Lisa Hardwick.

4. SURPLUS FROM REVENUE, OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSES

2016 $

2015 $

554,193

504,930

1,137,627

927,787

Fundraising income

493,810

586,123

Games of chance

799,303

800,329

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

5,994,396

5,900,000

NSW Government core grant

1,627,335

1,601,780

Grants

666,882

425,712

Sales

241,564

259,022

Interest

145,864

175,691

3,365

1,427,513

Profit on sale of assets

86,805

53,188

Other

86,441

74,706

11,837,585

12,736,781

173,505

150,922

Administration

1,050,972

644,567

Staff cost

2,544,835

2,218,575

Maintenance of assets

2,307,576

2,283,212

Cost of sales

356,583

408,268

Depreciation

2,628,237

2,427,280

Training

129,710

124,651

Grant expenditure

143,577

207,396

Fundraising & games of choice

540,853

491,073

12,223

70,411

Interest expense (on finance loans)

121,375

128,410

IT expenses

440,987

260,969

Insurances

212,474

181,085

Marketing

185,883

99,065

15,480

14,665

467,108

431,060

11,331,378

10,141,609

Revenue Activities income Donations

Net insurance proceeds received

Expenses Activities

Interest expense (unwinding discount on RMS loan)

Membership Utilities

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59


5. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

2016 $

2015 $

Trade receivables

236,625

706,236

Other receivables

505,172

132,497

Goods & Services Tax recoverable

415,247

125,895

1,157,044

964,628

378,852

397,762

Stock on hand - ratings & ranks

35,915

35,037

Stock on hand - Unit items/equipment

64,087

67,261

478,854

500,060

133,282

-

At Cost

3,640,642

3,271,549

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(238,574)

(129,856)

3,402,068

3,141,693

At Cost

1,885,564

1,355,042

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(959,241)

(669,866)

926,323

685,176

471,270

427,178

(364,359)

(308,668)

106,911

118,510

At Cost

1,072,271

987,896

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(893,010)

(765,260)

179,261

222,636

735,191

698,643

(418,487)

(312,015)

316,704

386,628

6. INVENTORIES

Stock on hand - uniforms

7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Assets under construction - general

Buildings/leasehold improvements

Communications equipment

Furniture, fixtures & fittings At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

IT, office, plant & equipment

Motor vehicles At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

60 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


2016 $

2015 $

18,244,204

16,930,650

1,504,382

493,845

(6,139,698)

(4,637,590)

13,608,888

12,786,905

At Cost

1,289,485

1,235,842

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(343,261)

(279,203)

946,224

956,639

19,619,661

18,298,187

Rescue vessels At Cost Under construction Less: Accumulated depreciation

Rescue vessel equipment

Total property, plant and equipment

Reconciliations Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of the current and previous financial year are set out below: Assets under construction 133,282

-

3,141,693

1,211,260

369,093

1,984,425

Depreciation

(108,718)

(53.992)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

3,402,068

3,141,693

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

685,176

486,336

Additions at cost

533,980

444,850

(1,778)

-

(291,055)

(246,010)

926,323

685,176

118,510

154,005

Additions at cost

53,457

50,411

Disposals

(2,507)

-

Depreciation

(62,549)

(85,906)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

106,911

118,510

Additions at cost

Buildings/leasehold improvements Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost

Communications equipment

Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Furniture, fixtures & fittings Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

61


2016 $

2015 $

222,636

209,574

Additions at cost

90,975

145,408

Disposals

(1,077)

(5,147)

(133,273)

(127,199)

179,261

222,636

386,628

244,984

Additions at cost

57,898

268,408

Disposals

(4,471)

(12,869)

(123,351)

(113,895)

316,704

386,628

12,786,905

13,893,377

Additions at cost

1,478,001

745,997

Assets under construction

1,504,382

493,845

Disposals

(374,427)

(615,656)

Depreciation

(1,785,973)

(1,730,658)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

13,608,888

12,786,905

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

956,639

779,398

Additions at cost

112,904

259,281

-

(12,420)

(123,319)

(69,620)

946,224

956,639

19,619,661

18,298,187

IT, office, plant & equipment Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Motor vehicles Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Rescue vessels Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

Rescue vessel equipment

Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year Total Property, Plant and Equipment

The written down value of assets under finance lease was $2,840,805. The depreciation of leased assets was $692,507.

8. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES Trade payables

678,713

695,449

Employee liabilities

344,312

256,970

1,023,025

952,419

62 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


The crew of Cottage Point 30, delivered in 2015-16, assists boaters in strife on Sydney’s northern waterways.

9. BORROWINGS

2016 $

2015 $

Government loan

144,000

337,777

Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility)

693,914

523,556

837,914

861,333

298,400

4,600

1,708,727

1,671,551

348

-

2,007,475

1,676,151

a) Current

b) Non-current Government loan Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility) Other

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63


10. MEMBERS’ LIABILITIES AND NUMBERS The liability of the Members is limited. Every Regular and Provisional Member of the company undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Company, in the event of the same being wound up while s/he is a Member, or within one year after s/he ceases to be a Member, for payment of the debts and the liabilities of the company (contracted before s/he ceases to be a Member) and of the costs, charges and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributors among themselves, such amount as may be required not exceeding two dollars ($2.00). The numbers of Members were: Regular Members 2,470 Provisional 587 Other 44 Total 3,101 11. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL COMPENSATION No emoluments were received or due and receivable by the Directors of the company. The names and positions of those having authority for planning, directing and controlling the company’s activities, directly or indirectly (other than Directors) are: S. Tannos, Commissioner; D. Storey, Deputy Commissioner; A. Skelley, Chief Financial Officer; C. Woods, Corporate Services Director; and F. Glajcar, IT and Business Development Director.

2016 $

2015 $

901,288

784,404

2016 $

2015 $

8,017,270

8,625,236

506,207

2,595,172

24,490

(175,691)

2,628,237

2,427,280

(86,805)

(53,188)

12,223

70,411

Movement in receivables

(192,416)

(178,235)

Movement in inventories

21,206

64,962

Movement in provisions

87,342

86,454

Movement in payables

(21,226)

11,352

2,934,768

4,848,517

The compensation paid to the key management personnel noted above is:

12. CASH FLOW INFORMATION (a) Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and in banks and investments in money market instruments, net of outstanding bank overdrafts. Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to the related items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents (b) Reconciliation of surplus for the year to net cash flows from operating activities Surplus for the year Interest income received & receivable Depreciation charged Gain on sale of property, plant & equipment Present value adjustment for borrowings Changes in net assets and liabilities

Net cash from operating activities

64 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


13. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS There have been no signifcant subsequent events. 14. STATE RESCUE BOARD FINANCIAL SUBMISSION Marine Rescue NSW reports on its investment of the annual funding received from the State Government via a direct Government grant and the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations in its submission to the NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report. This submission excludes funding from other sources such as fundraising and other grants and expenditure that relates to unit operations. A copy of the 2015-16 MRNSW State Rescue Board financial submission, reconciling this expenditure, is at Appendix A (page 67). Due to timeframe requirements, this submission may vary slightly from the final audited reports, which are on an accrual basis. 15. REGISTERED OFFICE AND PRINCIPAL PLACES OF BUSINESS The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 www.marinerescuensw.com.au Web: Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au The Principal Places of Business are located at the following Marine Rescue NSW bases (from north to south): 1

Point Danger

16

Port Stephens

31

Port Kembla

2

Brunswick

17

Lemon Tree Passage

32

Shellharbour

3

Cape Byron

18

Newcastle

33

Shoalhaven

4

Ballina

19

Lake Macquarie

34

Jervis Bay

5

Evans Head

20

Norah Head

35

Sussex Inlet

6

Iluka Yamba

21

Tuggerah Lakes

36

Ulladulla

7

Wooli

22

Central Coast

37

Kioloa

8

Woolgoolga

23

Terrigal

38

Batemans Bay

9

Coffs Harbour

24

Hawkesbury

39

Tuross

10

Nambucca

25

Cottage Point

40

Narooma

11

Trial Bay

26

Broken Bay

41

Bermagui

12

Port Macquarie

27

Terrey Hills

42

Merimbula

13

Camden Haven

28

Middle Harbour

43

Eden

14

Crowdy Harrington

29

Port Jackson

44

Alpine Lakes

15

Forster-Tuncurry

30

Botany Port Hacking

45

Moama

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

65


“This year, members were provided with a number of opportunities to build and enhance their skill sets.”

66 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


APPENDIX A: MRNSW submission NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report 2015-16

$

$

7,621,731

Total funding made available: Represented by: NSW recreational boat registration & licence levy

5,994,396

NSW Government grant

1,627,335

Amount expended by Marine Rescue NSW Unit reimbursement - Radio Bases/SARCC-R&M

56,874

Direct Unit funding

776,700

Funding Advance repayment

350,000

Administration

686,978

Staff cost Activities expenses

2,440,229 72,348

Buildings

252,694

Uniforms and stores costs

285,549

Training

65,834

IT

382,792

Insurance

210,686

Marketing

160,550

Membership

6,181

Motor vehicles

227,775

Radio facilities

543,976

Rescue vessel R&M

60,343

Trailers

2,122

Utilities

339,025

Art Union & fundraising costs

274,444

Subtotal

7,195,100

New vessels

2,187,713

Other vessel capital expenditure

95,909

Other capital expenditure

352,557

Total capital expenditure

2,636,179

Unit contributions, leasing facility & other funds Total Expenditure

(2,209,548) 7,621,731

Note: This data represents the acquittal of funding provided to Marine Rescue NSW from the NSW Government through a direct grant and the proceeds of the levy on NSW recreational boat registrations and licences. Full Marine Rescue NSW financial reports are available in the MRNSW Financial Statements and Reports (Annual Report) at mrnsw.com.au

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016

67


APPENDIX A: MRNSW submission NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report 2015-16 continued

$

New vessels (note)

11.5m Sailfish Catamaran, Cottage Point Unit (part)

96,120

7.5m Naiad RHIB*, Point Danger Unit (part)

187,615

9.5m Sailfish Catamaran, Terrigal Unit (part) **

263,245

11.5m Steber 38, Port Macquarie Unit (part) **

578,823

11.5m Steber 38, Port Stephens Unit (part)

578,234

7.5m Ocean Cylinder RHIB, Batemans Bay Unit (part) **

241,837

7.5m Ocean Cylinder RHIB, Jervis Bay Unit (part) **

241,837

Subtotal Other vessel capital expenditure

2,187,713 95,909

Other capital expenditure Buildings/leasehold improvements IT equipment Communication equipment Motor vehicles Subtotal Total

108,886 5,566 185,097 53,008 352,557 2,636,179

Note: Funding allocations against new vessels represent the amount paid during the financial year and may not reflect the total cost of the vessel. * Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) ** Not delivered in 2015-16

68 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2015-2016


Marine Rescue NSW Operational Regions and Unit locations


MARINE RESCUE NSW Volunteers saving lives on the water Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales ABN 98 138 078 092 PO Box 579, Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 | Fax: 02 9544 0491 Web: www.marinerescuensw.com.au Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au

MRNSW Financial Report 2016  

MRNSW Financial Report 2016

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